Disney Information Station Logo

Go Back   The DIS Discussion Forums - DISboards.com > Just for Fun > Community Board
Find Hotel Specials & DIScounts
 
facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS UpdatesDIS email updates
Register Chat FAQ Tickers Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read





Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 09-29-2008, 09:36 PM   #1
disneyhopeful
Mouseketeer
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: atlanta, ga
Posts: 192

2nd grade projects(dioramas)

Hello everybody. My dd7 brought home her 1st project for the year . I believe its for social studies. She has to make a neighborhood diorama out of a shoebox. It has to be turned in no later than October 17th. This is the 1st big project she's ever had since Kindergarten. I suck at projects so I wanted to get an early start on this as possible. Has anyone had to do this with their child? I'm looking on google to try to find websites for ideas. Any help is very much appreciated. I just need a good starting place. Thanks
__________________
me, dh, dd10 dd6 dd5
Finally scored a Wii on Jan 15, 2007 @ TRU.
Add Mii: 1715 1829 8939 0837
disneyhopeful is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2008, 09:40 PM   #2
Cool-Beans
Flippin' PINK
Finally admitted itís her flippin' cat
I always had a thing for Agent Almeida
Queen of the Crow
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 16,601

After 1st grade I just had the kid do something - anything. It didn't have to be good. They didn't need to put in much effort.

If it was coloring or art crap, just do a little something and turn it in.

If they were into it and wanted help, I'd help them. If not, I just didn't care.

That was that.
__________________
I have nothing to put here.
Cool-Beans is offline   Reply With Quote
|
The DIS
Register to remove

Join Date: 1997
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 1,000,000
Old 09-29-2008, 09:57 PM   #3
clh2
I am the Pixie Stick NARC at my house
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 8,821

Did this assignment come with a rubric (grading guide)?

If it did, it should be pretty self explanatory exactly what needs to be done. The only help I would be offering your DD is to make sure she "hit" all the points on the rubric.

At that age it is really easy to figure out which projects were done by kids, and which projects had an adult influence.

Somethings I found really nice when DD had to do stupid projects like this...happy meal toys sometimes are worth something And...once glued into a project, once the project was thrown out...the happy meal toy was gone!!! And my other advice...if you are doing a neighborhood...hot wheels is a nice sized car.

Oh - my other advice...don't ever through out another shoebox! You'll regret it.
__________________
signing off - clh

"WONDER" ful trip 10/2003
followed by a couple of days at the Swan

I want a real countdown timer again!
clh2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2008, 10:00 PM   #4
disneyhopeful
Mouseketeer
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: atlanta, ga
Posts: 192

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cool-Beans View Post
After 1st grade I just had the kid do something - anything. It didn't have to be good. They didn't need to put in much effort.

If it was coloring or art crap, just do a little something and turn it in.

If they were into it and wanted help, I'd help them. If not, I just didn't care.

That was that.
This is exactly how I feel. I couldn't have said it better.
__________________
me, dh, dd10 dd6 dd5
Finally scored a Wii on Jan 15, 2007 @ TRU.
Add Mii: 1715 1829 8939 0837
disneyhopeful is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2008, 10:06 PM   #5
disneyhopeful
Mouseketeer
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: atlanta, ga
Posts: 192

Quote:
Originally Posted by clh2 View Post
Did this assignment come with a rubric (grading guide)?

If it did, it should be pretty self explanatory exactly what needs to be done. The only help I would be offering your DD is to make sure she "hit" all the points on the rubric.

At that age it is really easy to figure out which projects were done by kids, and which projects had an adult influence.

Somethings I found really nice when DD had to do stupid projects like this...happy meal toys sometimes are worth something And...once glued into a project, once the project was thrown out...the happy meal toy was gone!!! And my other advice...if you are doing a neighborhood...hot wheels is a nice sized car.

Oh - my other advice...don't ever through out another shoebox! You'll regret it.
Yes, it does include a rubric. She also has a list of things she can include. I'll help her decide what she wants to put in it and get her started but she will do the rest. Thanks for the shoebox tip.
__________________
me, dh, dd10 dd6 dd5
Finally scored a Wii on Jan 15, 2007 @ TRU.
Add Mii: 1715 1829 8939 0837
disneyhopeful is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2008, 10:21 PM   #6
Bella the Ball 360
Keyboarding is not my thing excuse typos.
I am going to have to sew "whoopie pie" pockets on the hips of my jeans
 
Bella the Ball 360's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 9,092

I hate when teachers do this. You are of course a good parent and want to help but few things happen that make the project worthless. First,many parents view it as a competition. They do not let the child do it for himself. Then there are the kids whose parents could not give a darn. They come in and feel embarrassed by the fact that their's looks like a child did it and the rest look like someone hired a designer. I think that this type of project should be done in school. That way the playing field is level and it is a true example of what the child can do. In addition, this should be a choice project. If the teacher is using differentiated instruction with respect to the child's strengths then there should be a choice of projects from which the child can choose and a rubric to go along with it.
__________________
Bella the Ball 360 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2008, 10:35 PM   #7
clh2
I am the Pixie Stick NARC at my house
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 8,821

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bella the Ball 360 View Post
I hate when teachers do this. You are of course a good parent and want to help but few things happen that make the project worthless. First,many parents view it as a competition. They do not let the child do it for himself. Then there are the kids whose parents could not give a darn. They come in and feel embarrassed by the fact that their's looks like a child did it and the rest look like someone hired a designer. I think that this type of project should be done in school. That way the playing field is level and it is a true example of what the child can do. In addition, this should be a choice project. If the teacher is using differentiated instruction with respect to the child's strengths then there should be a choice of projects from which the child can choose and a rubric to go along with it.
I started off my response just like this, and then I started over. But...since someone else brought it up - I think projects like this would be perfect for the main teacher to "hand over " to the art teacher. That way all the students will have age-appropriate art instruction, and have it evaluated relative to what a 2nd grade is capable of doing. And...I could go on and on and on.
__________________
signing off - clh

"WONDER" ful trip 10/2003
followed by a couple of days at the Swan

I want a real countdown timer again!
clh2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2008, 10:46 PM   #8
CajunDixie
"Carpe diem, quam minimum credula postero."
Just don't touch my hair
 
CajunDixie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 1999
Location: Lala Land
Posts: 3,286

I saw the perfect shoebox for a diorama a few weeks ago!!! DS was shoe shopping and I think it was at Dick's Sporting Goods and the shoe was Under Armour brand. It had a clear plastic hinged lid! You can use Google Images and type in under armour shoe box to see it. Not that that helps you but my first thought when I saw it was diorama!
__________________
There's more to the DIS than boards. http://www.wdwinfo.com/
CajunDixie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-29-2008, 11:23 PM   #9
M&N
DIS Veteran
 
M&N's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: PA
Posts: 8,408

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bella the Ball 360 View Post
I hate when teachers do this. You are of course a good parent and want to help but few things happen that make the project worthless. First,many parents view it as a competition. They do not let the child do it for himself. Then there are the kids whose parents could not give a darn. They come in and feel embarrassed by the fact that their's looks like a child did it and the rest look like someone hired a designer. I think that this type of project should be done in school. That way the playing field is level and it is a true example of what the child can do. In addition, this should be a choice project. If the teacher is using differentiated instruction with respect to the child's strengths then there should be a choice of projects from which the child can choose and a rubric to go along with it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by clh2 View Post
I started off my response just like this, and then I started over. But...since someone else brought it up - I think projects like this would be perfect for the main teacher to "hand over " to the art teacher. That way all the students will have age-appropriate art instruction, and have it evaluated relative to what a 2nd grade is capable of doing. And...I could go on and on and on.

I hate to say this but, just like classroom teachers, art teachers have a curriculum to follow. The classroom teacher apparently gave suggestions. It is the student's job to decide how to carry it out. I'm sure the teacher can judge whether the student or parents have completed the project. I'm sure when the project is graded, the student's ability will be taken into account. Unfortunately, with the emphasis on state testing and schools having to show annual yearly progress, there is no time to do projects like this in school. I remember doing dioramas and 3D maps at home with the supervision of my parents. Maybe some parents are too busy to do this now.
The response of Cool Beans seems to sum up the attitude of some parents these days. -- "After 1st grade I just had the kid do something - anything. It didn't have to be good. They didn't need to put in much effort. If it was coloring or art crap, just do a little something and turn it in. If they were into it and wanted help, I'd help them. If not, I just didn't care. That was that." When does the caring start? If you don't care about that one assignment, what message are you sending your child for the other assignments along the way?
__________________
Give me Liberty!















Give me Liberty! -----


















Give me Liberty!



Give me Liberty!



















-------















































------














-----



Give me Liberty!
M&N is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2008, 12:14 AM   #10
Cool-Beans
Flippin' PINK
Finally admitted itís her flippin' cat
I always had a thing for Agent Almeida
Queen of the Crow
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 16,601

Quote:
Originally Posted by M&N View Post
I hate to say this but, just like classroom teachers, art teachers have a curriculum to follow. The classroom teacher apparently gave suggestions. It is the student's job to decide how to carry it out. I'm sure the teacher can judge whether the student or parents have completed the project. I'm sure when the project is graded, the student's ability will be taken into account. Unfortunately, with the emphasis on state testing and schools having to show annual yearly progress, there is no time to do projects like this in school. I remember doing dioramas and 3D maps at home with the supervision of my parents. Maybe some parents are too busy to do this now.
The response of Cool Beans seems to sum up the attitude of some parents these days. -- "After 1st grade I just had the kid do something - anything. It didn't have to be good. They didn't need to put in much effort. If it was coloring or art crap, just do a little something and turn it in. If they were into it and wanted help, I'd help them. If not, I just didn't care. That was that." When does the caring start? If you don't care about that one assignment, what message are you sending your child for the other assignments along the way?
The message I sent was that I cared about knowledge and not about coloring or art.

My oldest is at Princeton. Didn't have to color to get in there. Hasn't had to color since he got there. Second kid is at a decent college, but not Ivy League. Coloring not required there, either.

I do not and never did care about the fluff stuff. My kids know it now and they knew it then. My focus - and theirs, by extension - was on the important stuff.
__________________
I have nothing to put here.
Cool-Beans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2008, 06:57 AM   #11
paintnolish
You'd think a sniff in the general vicinity would be sufficient
I mean, how much more can a dead guy do?!?
I'm meh about "meh."
 
paintnolish's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: IL
Posts: 5,808

DD (2nd gr) had her first big project- she got assigned a sate and had to do 3 "mini" projects on it, each valued differently. Of course we chose the 3 with the highest point value- a travel brochure, a mobile, and a float (P.I.T.A.). The rubric evensaid- we hope this will be a project your whole family will enjoy. Oh yeah. It was a blast! I made dd do tons of work, but I still spent lots of time gluing and assembling!
__________________
The Latest and Greatest TR: The Family Truckster Heads to Wally World, 6/19-7/1/13
http://www.disboards.com/showthread.php?t=3129993
Quality over quantity: Unfished TR: Pop, Abraham Lincoln, and Talking to Strangers
http://www.disboards.com/showthread....7#post34722197
DH Me DS (13) DD (12) Baby DS (1)
paintnolish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2008, 07:14 AM   #12
Tinijocaro
DIS Veteran
 
Tinijocaro's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 4,288

Quote:
Originally Posted by disneyhopeful View Post
Hello everybody. My dd7 brought home her 1st project for the year . I believe its for social studies. She has to make a neighborhood diorama out of a shoebox. It has to be turned in no later than October 17th. This is the 1st big project she's ever had since Kindergarten. I suck at projects so I wanted to get an early start on this as possible. Has anyone had to do this with their child? I'm looking on google to try to find websites for ideas. Any help is very much appreciated. I just need a good starting place. Thanks
Just be sure it ends up looking like a 1st grader did it. Help her brainstorm ideas, materials-guide her but don't give her the ideas. The actual work should be hers.

It's always easy to tell which projects were done mostly by the parent, and which were done by the child.
Tinijocaro is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2008, 07:16 AM   #13
Bella the Ball 360
Keyboarding is not my thing excuse typos.
I am going to have to sew "whoopie pie" pockets on the hips of my jeans
 
Bella the Ball 360's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 9,092

Quote:
Originally Posted by M&N View Post
I hate to say this but, just like classroom teachers, art teachers have a curriculum to follow. The classroom teacher apparently gave suggestions. It is the student's job to decide how to carry it out. I'm sure the teacher can judge whether the student or parents have completed the project. I'm sure when the project is graded, the student's ability will be taken into account. Unfortunately, with the emphasis on state testing and schools having to show annual yearly progress, there is no time to do projects like this in school. I remember doing dioramas and 3D maps at home with the supervision of my parents. Maybe some parents are too busy to do this now.
The response of Cool Beans seems to sum up the attitude of some parents these days. -- "After 1st grade I just had the kid do something - anything. It didn't have to be good. They didn't need to put in much effort. If it was coloring or art crap, just do a little something and turn it in. If they were into it and wanted help, I'd help them. If not, I just didn't care. That was that." When does the caring start? If you don't care about that one assignment, what message are you sending your child for the other assignments along the way?

Sorry the art teacher should be working WITH the classroom teacher in this respect. I am a certified art teacher as well as a classroom teacher. There is no topic that cannot go across the curriculum and be interpreted in the art room. Working with the classroom teacher lets the student know that a particular topic is not limited to the narrow confines of the homeroom.
I do not care if the teacher can adjust for the student whose parent does the project for him. It is still not his/her project.

There are times when we have assigned projects and called them FAMILY projects just so kids can work with parnents at home and have the experience but they were not graded and optional . Anyone who does the project for their child is stifling the child's creativity. It is like giving a child crayons and a coloring book instead of giving him/her crayons and paper and saying, or create. The message you give is you CANNOT draw so I had someone else do it for you.
Obviously a grade 2 student cannot create what an adult could and therefore this does not foster independnence in the child. The playing field needs to be on the student's level. Think about this, I have a degree in ART as well as education would you really want a project created my me to go up against a grade 2 student?
While I would guide my own kids by teaching them various techniques to use on a project THEY needed to execute the project themselves. Sure they knew how to make faux wood and age a page so it looked like it came from the 1600's but they did it themselves. I even forced my son to learn how to knit as part of a collage he was doing for Tale of Two Cities. My kids would come to me with an idea for a project and ask if there were a technique to accomplish whatever they wanted to present.

I am well aware of NCLB BUT again if an art teacher has a curriculum to follow then show that he/she can truly be an ART teacher and incorporate academics into the art. IMHO.
__________________

Last edited by Bella the Ball 360; 09-30-2008 at 07:23 AM.
Bella the Ball 360 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2008, 07:21 AM   #14
The Mystery Machine
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: Missouri
Posts: 45,359

Oh yea...

My dd had to do an animal habitat of the wild hamster.

It ended up pretty cool. We got styrofoam blocks and we drilled holes to do "underground" cross section.

A neighborhood will be a breeze. Just go to Hobby Lobby and get miniature things. Or if you can't spend the money for that, you can just cut out paper things and give them a backing.
The Mystery Machine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2008, 07:38 AM   #15
kristilew
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Coastal NC
Posts: 1,896

Ok, I have to speak up in favor of diorama projects. My dd11 gets at least one a year. They are always included on a a list from which she can choose - other options might be write a story or poem, or create a power point show. Each kid gets to do what appeals to him or her.

The diorama forces dd to think through how to best represent her research visually and to think through the main points she wants to be sure to emphasize. She has really grown creatively each year, and I've been very impressed.

I do not help at all, other than to save all shoe boxes so she has a variety available. The first year she did one, it was pretty lame, and she was embarassed when she saw the ones the parents had helped with. (didn't affect her grade - she was in 1st that year, just had to do it) That motivated her to really put thought and effort into the next one, and each one has benefitted from learning from her mistakes.

Now she sketches a plan, makes a material list, and starts early. The most recent one was pretty cool: she had studied Canadian Lynxes and she turned the shoebox vertical and created a forest scene with the Lynx hiding in the tree branches at the top, ready to jump on an unsuspecting snowshoe hare. I think the combination of creative problem solving and long term planning and time management are excellent benefits of doing projects like this.
kristilew is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS Updates
GET OUR DIS UPDATES DELIVERED BY EMAIL



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:11 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Copyright © 1997-2014, Werner Technologies, LLC. All Rights Reserved.