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Old 02-28-2013, 07:53 AM   #31
dismom301930
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trentmom
They are doing everyday math, so when he brings home his homework, I go on that website and can look at lessons associated with homework, thus learning myself.

I am sure as he gets older, I will need to freshen up my math skills and I will.

I was a straight A student in regular math, alegbra I and II, but that was back in the 90s, so my mind is a little fuzzy
oh hell, you're screwed.
Wait till you get to the messed up way they try to teach multiplication/division. BTDT. Have you had the joy of the Fact Triangles yet? - See more at: http://www.disboards.com/showthread.....ymmcXUtd.dpuf
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I am also NOT a fan of Everyday Math. Our school also switches back to "regular" math in middle school. It is a nightmare!!! I hope someone somewhere is laughing all the way to the bank about Everyday Math & all these kids that don't know how to do math! For us, "regular math" is translated as"calculator welcome and needed". I can't imagine that this works with an IEP, because it doesn't work for kids without one. Good luck, OP! - See more at: http://www.disboards.com/newreply.ph....p4GjtukB.dpuf
Agreed! I tried to keep an open mind when the program was first introduced, but now having had 3 children go through the program (currently 7th, 5th and 3rd grades) I can say that I strongly dislike this approach to math. I do not know one parent who thinks it is a good program for their children.
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Old 02-28-2013, 07:55 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by Wall-E1 View Post


You're still here? It's over. Go Home.
Oh, I'm sorry. I wasn't aware that, since you were finished with this topic, we all were finished as well. My mistake.
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Old 02-28-2013, 08:19 PM   #33
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Math is math - Everyday Math makes the kids use math foundations to think. My kids sailed through it, but I spent a lot of time with them before they were school age doing number sense, adding, subtracting, ordering, and other math foundations. We also spent a lot of time on reading skills.

The birth-age 5 brain is such a developing sensation that this time is crucial for learning. When I worked in a kindergarten class I was amazed that many kids didn't know a single letter of the alphabet, never mind how to spell their own name. What had their parents done for 5 years?

I'm not saying that all kids that don't know this stuff are doomed, but boy it does make it hard for them to learn it all later. They could tell me all the names of the pokemon characters, power rangers, etc, but they struggled with academics. (And no, these were not children with special needs, as they are now in the high school I work at, and are not in my program there.)

Students struggling with the Everyday Math may need some supplementation at home. Core standards for math should be available online through state education departments. That's where I'd start.
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Old 02-28-2013, 09:13 PM   #34
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Not that any of you asked what I think, but I will share anyway.

This paper looks like something a parent could sit down and help their child with. IEP or not. I don't mean give them the answers, but talk it through together, bounce ideas off of each other, etc.

I have some very good memories of my dad and I trying to figure out a puzzle paper like the one in the OP. He did not give me the answers but we sat together and he guided me, and we laughed, and we got frustrated with the silly thing AND I still remember it to this day.

Totally different if the OP just showed us a list of long division problems and asked for answers.
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Old 02-28-2013, 11:16 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by Wall-E1 View Post


You're still here? It's over. Go Home.
Good one

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Originally Posted by dismom301930 View Post
Agreed! I tried to keep an open mind when the program was first introduced, but now having had 3 children go through the program (currently 7th, 5th and 3rd grades) I can say that I strongly dislike this approach to math. I do not know one parent who thinks it is a good program for their children.
Agreed. I didn't go in with a negative attitude, but after looking at it day after day for 2 years, I am definitely not a fan. I have yet to find anyone who is

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Not that any of you asked what I think, but I will share anyway.

This paper looks like something a parent could sit down and help their child with. IEP or not. I don't mean give them the answers, but talk it through together, bounce ideas off of each other, etc.

I have some very good memories of my dad and I trying to figure out a puzzle paper like the one in the OP. He did not give me the answers but we sat together and he guided me, and we laughed, and we got frustrated with the silly thing AND I still remember it to this day.

Totally different if the OP just showed us a list of long division problems and asked for answers.
Thank You.

I completely agree.



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Originally Posted by Schmeck View Post
Math is math - Everyday Math makes the kids use math foundations to think. My kids sailed through it, but I spent a lot of time with them before they were school age doing number sense, adding, subtracting, ordering, and other math foundations. We also spent a lot of time on reading skills.

The birth-age 5 brain is such a developing sensation that this time is crucial for learning. When I worked in a kindergarten class I was amazed that many kids didn't know a single letter of the alphabet, never mind how to spell their own name. What had their parents done for 5 years?

I'm not saying that all kids that don't know this stuff are doomed, but boy it does make it hard for them to learn it all later. They could tell me all the names of the pokemon characters, power rangers, etc, but they struggled with academics. (And no, these were not children with special needs, as they are now in the high school I work at, and are not in my program there.)

Students struggling with the Everyday Math may need some supplementation at home. Core standards for math should be available online through state education departments. That's where I'd start.
I worked with my son before he started school as well. He knew his alphabet well before Pre-K and was one of 3 kids who could spell their name and write it in Pre-K. He knew his shapes and colors. He could count to 20.

Reading was really a struggle for him, Thus affecting his ability to learn other subjects, but last year it finally has clicked, so now he has to play catch up. But he is getting there.

He has gone from hating reading to loving it. It is such a nice sight to see him sitting in his chair reading a chapter book, which is huge for him and enjoying it. Plus, doing it on his own and not having to force him to read.
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Old 03-01-2013, 08:54 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Schmeck View Post
Math is math - Everyday Math makes the kids use math foundations to think. My kids sailed through it, but I spent a lot of time with them before they were school age doing number sense, adding, subtracting, ordering, and other math foundations. We also spent a lot of time on reading skills.

The birth-age 5 brain is such a developing sensation that this time is crucial for learning. When I worked in a kindergarten class I was amazed that many kids didn't know a single letter of the alphabet, never mind how to spell their own name. What had their parents done for 5 years?

I'm not saying that all kids that don't know this stuff are doomed, but boy it does make it hard for them to learn it all later. They could tell me all the names of the pokemon characters, power rangers, etc, but they struggled with academics. (And no, these were not children with special needs, as they are now in the high school I work at, and are not in my program there.)

Students struggling with the Everyday Math may need some supplementation at home. Core standards for math should be available online through state education departments. That's where I'd start.
No, I disagree. Personally, I found the whole program far below grade level, so kids who sail through it, doesn't seem to be much of a bragging point to me. My child was working far above grade level in math and had to sit and relearn the stupid version of 'math' that the school wanted him to 'learn'. Instead of focusing on learning new concepts he had to sit and relearn how to do lattice multiplication, when he could already do complex multiplication problems in his head.

So yes, he struggled with the everyday math program and often got plenty of things wrong on his papers but he wasn't getting the answers wrong, he was getting their technique wrong. And it wasn't because he needed supplementation at home (which he actually got by doing harder work on khan academy)

There are plenty of other kids who will NEVER understand the way they lay out everyday math.
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Old 03-01-2013, 09:35 AM   #37
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First off I want to say I commend you for helping your child with his homework. If your child can do it on his own then great but if he requires assistance then do not feel bad for guiding him. Yes I agree you should not do it for him but helping and guiding him in the right direction is absolutely ok. Do not let others tell you otherwise. I will tell you it is disheartening to see so many kids in my childs class who do not even turn in their homework and they do not have parents working with them or even checking their childs homework.

I have a child in advanced classes and he does all of his homework on his own and then we go over the ones he is stumped on. I then give him a lesson on how to complete the problem. Sometimes that does require me to do the problem with him to show him each step but I do not do this for all problems just the first and he has to complete the rest on his own. I also grade all of his homework before he turns it in to make sure he is understanding the problems/subject and he is required to correct his problems if they are wrong. Sometimes this catches simple mistakes or misunderstandings he has on a subject before he continues it and makes it a habit of doing it wrong. His teachers have said on many occasions that it is nice to have a parent work with their children like we do. So do not feel bad about it.

Also, do not feel bad about asking for help. I was very strong in math in HS and college but sometimes they are teaching things differently and sometimes it is just a matter if you do not use the info you forget. We all have to brush up our skills so do not let others make you feel bad about that. Also, others commented that it is extra credit so just do not do it. We feel very differently about that. We tell our child he needs to do all extra credit and he is usually a straight A student with a few B's on occasion. We explain to him that you never know when you may need it because you may have a bad test and it could be the difference between a B+ and an A-. We do have high standards when it comes to school and we try to instill in him to do his best at all times

Hang in there. You are doing what is best by being present for your child and guiding him along the way.
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Old 03-01-2013, 09:51 AM   #38
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Originally Posted by Trentmom View Post
Thanks

Oh yes, Fact triangles are delightful




My son and others in class our grouped together and aide works with them separately at least.

You are right, it is too disorganized and there are way too many steps being taken to find the answers. Math needs to be simple, least amount of steps to arrive at the answer, the better.

I have never heard of CMP. I am going to google that now as i am curious

I did hear that in 7th grade, they switch back to regular math like we did when growing up.

I really don't understand what the point of having them doing Everday Math is, if they are not going stick with it all through their school years
My 8th grader is taking geometry. Our district teaches every day math in elementary school. I have to say that IMO it was a good way to teach problem solving skills that will be used in higher level math. I think my DD does well in math because of the foundation she had in the early grades.

I don't agree that math needs to be simple. Basic facts can easily be obtained these days with a calculator. Kids need to be taught the steps necessary for complex problem solving.

I would definitely consider getting your son a tutor to help him outside of school if math isn't your thing.
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