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Old 08-14-2013, 07:01 AM   #16
GadgetTheInventor
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I do think kids are exposed to a lot of unnecessary violence in realistic movies and media coverage that causes kids to be overly fearful, but they are always going to have to cope with the violence they are bound to encounter in their personal lives...molestation, rape, physical abuse, bullying, online predators, etc.

Back in the fourth grade, a bunch of us knew that one of our friends lived in a very abusive home. Things got really bad one day and luckily one of us who shared the same bus stop got her onto the bus and was able to articulate to the bus driver and then police and social services what had happened while the girl was receiving medical care. More of us were interviewed too and were able to get her father removed from the home. Thank goodness we were raised to think clearly in that situation or our friend would probably have died. A few years later another student disappeared, presumed murdered, and was never seen again. Statistically, 1 in 10 girls will be sexually assaulted before turning 18...

I think kids are a lot more intelligent and resilient than we give them credit for. Violence and death has always been a part of childhood historically and talking about it openly these days actually allows adults to be able to react and help stop the violence before it continues and does further damage.
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Old 08-14-2013, 07:01 AM   #17
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DS's elementary school has gone on lockdown twice (last year)--not because of things happening at the school, but things that are happening in the neighborhood.

The school is on a main road, so it is pretty busy. There was a police chase that ended up on that road, so they locked the school down during it.

The other time, there was a robbery at a store up that road, in a strip mall. They locked the school down.

Over winter break last year, his school put up 6ft chain link fences. The classroom doors on the portables, and all outside doors on the main buildings are to remain locked (can exit, but can't enter)...except for the main office door. His old school went one up on that, with all doors being locked and you would need to buzz and speak to the secretary to gain entrance. The doors there had only that small rectangular window in them, so it wouldn't do any good to try to enter that way.


DD2's school had a lot of lockdowns her senior year (more than during her other years). Fights in the hallways would cause a lockdown scenario, after the first fight that year, where a kid set off a can of pepper spray on the guy attacking him. Several kids (including my DD) ended up getting medical treatment (washing out eyes, got oxygen, etc) as they were in the classroom where the spray was set off. One kid had a gun, a couple of kids had knives, and the ever popular non-custodial parent attempting to take the kids without proper authorization scenario (6 times, 3 were by the same parent) also happened.


My kids and I have talked about safety. DS knows to follow his teachers instructions, to be quiet, etc. But I've also told him that if the worst is happening, and he can get away, where to go and how to get there. There are some wooded properties bordering the school, so it would be a short dash to those trees and houses.

We've talked about what to do if you're in public, and shooting starts. DD1 was working at the mall in Omaha, when that shooting happened in 2007. She was not near the shooter, but still...Scary stuff.
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Old 08-14-2013, 07:04 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by rwdavis2 View Post
Are any of you old enough to have done an air raid drill in school in the 60's?
I was thinking about this. It's just a bit before my school days but my oldest brother went through them. Kids are resilient and are more frightened by the unknown than being told the grim truth.

Op, I remember having to explain 9-11 to my dd when she found out about it in 1st grade. She was 2 when it actually happened. The day I told her I felt her innocence fade. It's hard as a parent dealing with the harsh realities of our world as it relates to our children.
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Old 08-14-2013, 07:18 AM   #19
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Today in St. Charles Missouri, they had a lockdown situation. Kicker was the guy is a firefighter. Yep. He came to the HS distraught to see his ex-wife, who was a teacher and child who went to the school. The school resource officer met him in the parking lot because I think the ex-wife alerted the school to the situation.

http://stlouis.cbslocal.com/2013/08/...into-lockdown/
DW is front office at our school. Custody fights are the #1 reason the cops are called at our school. On several occasions, it's appeared the mom moved with the kids and didn't tell the dad where. When the dad finally figures it out, he shows up at school demanding to take his kids.
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Old 08-14-2013, 07:56 AM   #20
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It is definitely heartbreaking! It's a different world from what I grew up in. My youngest has lockdown drills now. A code is given over the intercom and each room has a particular place or wall in which the students are to sit--silently. I was in the school during one and it was unnerving. I had to sit where the kids sat, the leaders turned off the lights, windows were covered, door was locked. Then the principal walked the halls checked doors to verify they were locked--THAT in itself was scary! You're sitting in the dark and then that door is rattled!! Then, like a fire drill, the all clear is given and the kids go back to what they were doing. As much as it saddened me, the children weren't bothered by it at all--it's part of their normal routine now.

I wish you luck next week! It's a big step for both of you!
My generation had to do bomb drills. It was no big deal to us. We would either get under our desks or line up in the hallway.
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Old 08-14-2013, 08:15 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by daemom View Post

It is definitely heartbreaking! It's a different world from what I grew up in. My youngest has lockdown drills now. A code is given over the intercom and each room has a particular place or wall in which the students are to sit--silently. I was in the school during one and it was unnerving. I had to sit where the kids sat, the leaders turned off the lights, windows were covered, door was locked. Then the principal walked the halls checked doors to verify they were locked--THAT in itself was scary! You're sitting in the dark and then that door is rattled!! Then, like a fire drill, the all clear is given and the kids go back to what they were doing. As much as it saddened me, the children weren't bothered by it at all--it's part of their normal routine now.

I wish you luck next week! It's a big step for both of you!
That 'lockdown' procedure is all well and good IF the threat is outside the building. However, that would be the wrong thing to do if the threat was IN the building.

There is a new school of thought (no pun intended) that the safest thing to do in the event of an active shooter is to first, GET OUT if you can. Hide/barricade if you can't get out and Lastly, fight back as a last resort. In short... Don't be a sitting duck and wait your turn to be shot.

Most of these tragic events are over in minutes. Usually when the police arrive the bad guy takes himself out. Teachers need to be trained in evacuation, and what to do if you can't. Things like creating time between you and the bad guy... By slowing the bad guy down, you lower the casualties. The sad truth though it that they are there to do damage. And they will. Teachers and administration need to know how to cut down the casualties. Even if it means... <gasp> taking the bad guy out!!!!

Oddly enough, at this moment, they are talking about this very thing on TV.....
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Old 08-14-2013, 08:40 AM   #22
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We've had lockdown drills for at least 5 years. It's just something routine to practice in case there is an emergency situation. In my room, we go in the classroom bathroom. I have a lockdown bag I made that has a tap light, a list of the kids, and marshmallows. The marshmallows are in case it is a real lockdown. It would give us something fun to eat while we sit there. My assistant is to take the kids in the bathroom and I close the blinds and make sure the door is closed(it is always locked), plus put out a signal that all is well in the classroom.

We tell our kids that the school is safe. All doors are locked and the teachers know what to do in the case of an emergency. It seems to be enough for them. Now, it isn't enough for ME. Our doors are wooden with glass windows. All it would take is one gunshot to get a gunman in the classroom. I don't know what I would do in a real shooting situation. I could get the kids to the cafeteria across our courtyard in less than a minute. The cafeteria has steel doors with really high windows. The problem is---only the custodian has a key to LOCK the cafeteria doors. I have been trying to get that problem corrected, but the district is not cooperating. It stays on my mind A LOT.
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Old 08-14-2013, 08:49 AM   #23
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Yeah, I don't really see how lockdown drills are any more traumatizing than fire drills, or the bane of my childhood schooling, tornado drills. God, I hate tornados.

I don't believe our kids are any less safe these days then they used to be. When my DD goes to school I will be considerably more afraid of tornados (still!) than random shooters (and I don't even live in tornado alley!). I also believe our kids become worried about things that we are worried about via osmosis. Hopefully, if I'm not worried about needing lockdown procedures, neither will she.


Somewhat funny story, the OP mentioned that her DS was worried about typical things like how he would find his teacher and such. I was one of those kids who couldn't care less about such things. On my first day of kindergarten my mom set me on the bus and waved goodbye. My then best friend got driven to school for her first day and I ran into her and her mom when I got there. I followed them in. It never occurred to my 5 year old mind that there would be more than one class or that, heaven forbid, I would be placed in a different class than my best friend. I was playing happily in her classroom for a good 30 minutes while the teachers frantically tried to locate where the missing girl from the other class was. They found me. I was disappointed. Her classroom had a small jungle gym inside it. Mine didn't.
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Old 08-14-2013, 09:07 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DVCJones View Post
That 'lockdown' procedure is all well and good IF the threat is outside the building. However, that would be the wrong thing to do if the threat was IN the building.

There is a new school of thought (no pun intended) that the safest thing to do in the event of an active shooter is to first, GET OUT if you can. Hide/barricade if you can't get out and Lastly, fight back as a last resort. In short... Don't be a sitting duck and wait your turn to be shot.

Most of these tragic events are over in minutes. Usually when the police arrive the bad guy takes himself out. Teachers need to be trained in evacuation, and what to do if you can't. Things like creating time between you and the bad guy... By slowing the bad guy down, you lower the casualties. The sad truth though it that they are there to do damage. And they will. Teachers and administration need to know how to cut down the casualties. Even if it means... <gasp> taking the bad guy out!!!!

Oddly enough, at this moment, they are talking about this very thing on TV.....

This is what the kids at my sons school (k-5) are being taught and I admit that while it unnerves me to think about, I think it's the right approach.

1. Get out (most of hte classrooms have emergency exits)
2. If they can't get out, then lock the door, turn off the lights, and sit quietly by the wall.
3. If the shooter (or whoever) gets in the room anyway, then they are to pick up whatever they can find and throw it at the persons head.
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Old 08-14-2013, 09:16 AM   #25
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Teachers and administration need to know how to cut down the casualties. Even if it means... <gasp> taking the bad guy out!!!!
All of the administrators in our district received firearms training over the Summer. It's somewhat odd though as they have not been given approval to carry weapons, not does it appear they will be ever. So, I'm really not sure what the training was all about (and from the sounds of it, they are all equally confused).
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Old 08-14-2013, 09:19 AM   #26
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All of the administrators in our district received firearms training over the Summer. It's somewhat odd though as they have not been given approval to carry weapons, not does it appear they will be ever. So, I'm really not sure what the training was all about (and from the sounds of it, they are all equally confused).
Yikes.
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Old 08-14-2013, 11:03 AM   #27
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I remember when my youngest niece started Kindergarten. 9/11 was on Tuesday and she started school that Thursday. I remember her asking her Mom if she would be able to come and get her "if another airplane came." As I recall, my sister had to pick her up early that day because she was so afraid.

I feel her terror was sort of my fault. We had the TV on watching the coverage of the attack nonstop (I was babysitting her while my sister worked), and she was sitting there, but playing with her toys. We thought that it was all going over her head because she seemed to not be paying the slightest bit of attention to the TV. I was so angry later that she was terrorized and so sad for my part in facilitating it.
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Old 08-14-2013, 11:20 AM   #28
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I would never be comfortable with a gun in the classroom, but I would like a taser, locked up where the kids could not reach it of course.
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Old 08-14-2013, 11:34 AM   #29
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I would never be comfortable with a gun in the classroom, but I would like a taser, locked up where the kids could not reach it of course.
Teachers do not need a gun to keep children safer. Proper training and tools like bullet proof doors/ locks and exits would do a lot. Also training to use what is already in the classroom to protect yourself. Imagine what 20+ chairs, books, desks etc. flying in the direction of a shooter could do. You may get lucky and knock the gun out of their hand. Even better maybe knock them out or at the very least get some kids out of the room. It is all about creating opportunity and time to cut down casualties.
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Old 08-14-2013, 11:43 AM   #30
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We've had lockdown drills for at least 5 years. It's just something routine to practice in case there is an emergency situation. In my room, we go in the classroom bathroom. I have a lockdown bag I made that has a tap light, a list of the kids, and marshmallows. The marshmallows are in case it is a real lockdown. It would give us something fun to eat while we sit there. My assistant is to take the kids in the bathroom and I close the blinds and make sure the door is closed(it is always locked), plus put out a signal that all is well in the classroom.

A friend whose child goes to the same school DS will be staring described their lockdown drills to me. I sounds like they have a coordinated plan.


We tell our kids that the school is safe. All doors are locked and the teachers know what to do in the case of an emergency. It seems to be enough for them. Now, it isn't enough for ME. Our doors are wooden with glass windows. All it would take is one gunshot to get a gunman in the classroom. I don't know what I would do in a real shooting situation. I could get the kids to the cafeteria across our courtyard in less than a minute. The cafeteria has steel doors with really high windows. The problem is---only the custodian has a key to LOCK the cafeteria doors. I have been trying to get that problem corrected, but the district is not cooperating. It stays on my mind A LOT.
I would imagine a lot of teachers feel this way. I really don't think there are enough precautions in the world that can stop bad people from doing bad things.

I will be doing a lot of praying.
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