Disney Information Station Logo

Go Back   The DIS Discussion Forums - DISboards.com > Just for Fun > Community Board
Find Hotel Specials & DIScounts
 
facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS UpdatesDIS email updates
Register Chat FAQ Tickers Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read





Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 04-03-2013, 01:06 PM   #61
nmmom95
I'm a pregnant lesbian in an interracial relationship
Or am I?
 
nmmom95's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Southern New Jersey
Posts: 2,775

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorelei Lee View Post
It was? OMG, the symbolism...especially since I'm not a christian and therefore destined, not for heaven, but for that other place....
The emergency holy water is on its way!
__________________
nmmom95 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 01:06 PM   #62
Gumbo4x4
Note to the ladies who forgot to check - we don't mind. Signed, "The guys"
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Missouri, USA
Posts: 12,466

Quote:
Originally Posted by mimmi View Post
Ok, I'm really sorry that I wrote without thinking, I didn't think that I would have to explain a personal feeling. I don't care if you think it's odd as feelings are usually subjective, right?
Sure, I mean my finding it odd is subjective
__________________
Gumbo4x4 is offline   Reply With Quote
|
The DIS
Register to remove

Join Date: 1997
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 1,000,000
Old 04-03-2013, 01:07 PM   #63
Lorelei Lee
DIS Veteran
 
Lorelei Lee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 3,637

Quote:
Originally Posted by nmmom95 View Post
The emergency holy water is on its way!
I suppose I should say thank you for that...
Lorelei Lee is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 01:10 PM   #64
NHdisneylover
Lanyards are taking all my poor organizatioanl skills
mice and such creatures tend to like to travel aorund
 
NHdisneylover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Heidelberg, Germany (formally from New Hampshire)
Posts: 13,726

Quote:
Originally Posted by mimmi View Post
Thank you, I'm trying to explain it properly but it's really hard to convey feelings and beliefs in a foreign language.
I think you express yourself really well--and come across sounding pretty much like a native speaker. I am always surprised when I look and realize who is posting an know you are working in a second language, because you are so fluent
__________________
Hadley

My blog about my wanderings and ramblings in Europe, Disney and where ever else life takes me:

http://hadleyswanderingsandramblings.blogspot.de/
NHdisneylover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 01:14 PM   #65
Gumbo4x4
Note to the ladies who forgot to check - we don't mind. Signed, "The guys"
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Missouri, USA
Posts: 12,466

Quote:
Originally Posted by NHdisneylover View Post
FWIW -- I don't think it is at all odd that you would host an Easter meal and not have it be religious--plenty of people, even in the US, think of Easter as just a secular holiday.
I didn't find it odd PP would treat it as a secular holiday. In fact, that's how it is at my house. The only part I found odd was that PP would object to someone else seeing it differently given that it IS traditionally a religious holiday.

If you're celebrating a holiday that ties into a religion (any religion), you kind of have to be prepared for the chance someone will want to view it as a religious holiday - even someone who's shown no prior interest in doing so

Now, if that someone makes a jerk of themselves in the process (which appears to be the case here) that's a whole different issue there
__________________
Gumbo4x4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 01:15 PM   #66
StephMK
DIS Veteran
 
StephMK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: TBD
Posts: 4,815

Quote:
Originally Posted by NHdisneylover View Post
I just want to add that in general, I feel that my kids being exposed to others who have differing beliefs than our own is a very GOOD thing.

It gives us the chance to discuss (often after the fact) the varying beliefs and what WE believe and how we feel about the others things they saw or experienced.

It is a great conversation opener and a fabulous way for us to examine our beliefs more deeply--and to help our children form their own beliefs (and demonstrate to them that we still love people who feel differently than we do--so hopefully one day if they as adults or even teens do not share my religion or politics or whatnot they are not afraid to tell me or think I might not want them around, etc).
ITA. Whether it is religion, beliefs, or customs, my kids have been raised to accept others and respect different choices. This came up recently as DS10found out the girl he likes is atheist. For him, it wasn't a big deal, just a "huh" moment.

We talked about how at this point, most kids believe what they have been raised in- ie. if we were Jewish, he'd have a different view of Jesus, etc. Kids may grow up to believe the same or change their views. It was good for him to see different beliefs. DH was raised in a different religion but changed as an adult.

DD has a family member on my ex's side with a same sex partner and she is just exposed to another kind of loving relationship.

As far as visiting others, we just respect the house rules and they know to ask one of us if they are unsure of anything.
__________________
DD DD DS
StephMK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 01:18 PM   #67
FlightlessDuck
Pluto's personal nose scratcher
Dumb people spoiling my fun makes me a sad Panda
 
FlightlessDuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bethlehem, PA
Posts: 11,355

Quote:
Originally Posted by NHdisneylover View Post
FWIW -- I don't think it is at all odd that you would host an Easter meal and not have it be religious--plenty of people, even in the US, think of Easter as just a secular holiday.
If it weren't for the rules, I would love to have a discussion sometime about secular vs. religious holidays, and whether us Christians would like it better if our holidays were treated more like Muslim or Jewish holidays in the US. I guess Pagans would feel the same way as well, since Christmas falls during old Roman holiday and Easter may be named for a Pagan god, along with the conflict between Sanheim and All Hallow's Eve.

Alas, that will not happen...
__________________
FlightlessDuck
DH of MouseEarsJenny

'87: Off Site, '94: GF, '02: FWC, '06: POP, '09: CSR, '10: POP, '12: CSR
FlightlessDuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 01:19 PM   #68
nmmom95
I'm a pregnant lesbian in an interracial relationship
Or am I?
 
nmmom95's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Southern New Jersey
Posts: 2,775

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lorelei Lee View Post
I suppose I should say thank you for that...
I watch too many movies.
__________________
nmmom95 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 01:21 PM   #69
ford family
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Brighton UK /Bradenton FLA
Posts: 2,598

Quote:
Originally Posted by NHdisneylover View Post
FWIW -- I don't think it is at all odd that you would host an Easter meal and not have it be religious--plenty of people, even in the US, think of Easter as just a secular holiday.
MTE.
In the UK, Easter is a four day weekend with Good Friday and Easter Monday being public holidays. That makes it a great opportunity for families to get together, especially those who have to come some distance.
We had ten family members here at some point over the long weekend and had a fantastic time.
None of it had any religious content or significance whatsoever.

ford family
ford family is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 01:24 PM   #70
Gumbo4x4
Note to the ladies who forgot to check - we don't mind. Signed, "The guys"
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Missouri, USA
Posts: 12,466

Quote:
Originally Posted by soccerdad72 View Post
The OP never even mentioned religion in their question.

Somehow, it was assumed by many that "lifestyle" and "values" meant religious issues.
I actually assumed it had something to do with gay people. OP definitely did a hit and run on this
__________________
Gumbo4x4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 01:27 PM   #71
NHdisneylover
Lanyards are taking all my poor organizatioanl skills
mice and such creatures tend to like to travel aorund
 
NHdisneylover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Heidelberg, Germany (formally from New Hampshire)
Posts: 13,726

Quote:
Originally Posted by FlightlessDuck View Post
If it weren't for the rules, I would love to have a discussion sometime about secular vs. religious holidays, and whether us Christians would like it better if our holidays were treated more like Muslim or Jewish holidays in the US. I guess Pagans would feel the same way as well, since Christmas falls during old Roman holiday and Easter may be named for a Pagan god, along with the conflict between Sanheim and All Hallow's Eve.

Alas, that will not happen...
I confess that I am curious about what you mean about having your holidays treated like Jewish or Muslim holidays.

I can tell you that my own family celebrates the following, traditionally religious holidays in a secular sort of way (and always including learning or discussing the history of the religious celebration and what the day means to those who are a part of the particular religion--I think it is a lovely way to teach my children about a variety of religious beliefs):

Easter
Christmas
Passover
First night of Chanukah
First night of Ramadan
Eid Al-fitr (last night of Ramadan)
All Saints Day
St Nicholas Day

We also celebrate a variety of cultural types of holidays which do not have a much of a religious history overall, like Fat Tuesday (but yes we talk about how it related to Ash Wednesday and Lent), Chinese New Year, etc.
__________________
Hadley

My blog about my wanderings and ramblings in Europe, Disney and where ever else life takes me:

http://hadleyswanderingsandramblings.blogspot.de/
NHdisneylover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 01:30 PM   #72
NHdisneylover
Lanyards are taking all my poor organizatioanl skills
mice and such creatures tend to like to travel aorund
 
NHdisneylover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Heidelberg, Germany (formally from New Hampshire)
Posts: 13,726

Quote:
Originally Posted by ford family View Post
MTE.
In the UK, Easter is a four day weekend with Good Friday and Easter Monday being public holidays. That makes it a great opportunity for families to get together, especially those who have to come some distance.
We had ten family members here at some point over the long weekend and had a fantastic time.
None of it had any religious content or significance whatsoever.

ford family
It is a four day weekend here in Germany too We went up to Belgium and Holland and spent one day at an awesome amusement park (bundled up like skiers ), had an egg hunt in our rental house and swam at an indoor water park on Easter.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gumbo4x4 View Post
I actually assumed it had something to do with gay people. OP definitely did a hit and run on this
I thought that was the most likely issue too, based on the OP. But we weren't given much information were we?
__________________
Hadley

My blog about my wanderings and ramblings in Europe, Disney and where ever else life takes me:

http://hadleyswanderingsandramblings.blogspot.de/
NHdisneylover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 01:34 PM   #73
FlightlessDuck
Pluto's personal nose scratcher
Dumb people spoiling my fun makes me a sad Panda
 
FlightlessDuck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Bethlehem, PA
Posts: 11,355

Quote:
Originally Posted by NHdisneylover View Post
I confess that I am curious about what you mean about having your holidays treated like Jewish or Muslim holidays.

I can tell you that my own family celebrates the following, traditionally religious holidays in a secular sort of way
OK, well I never heard any anyone having a secular celebration for Yom Kippur, Rosh Hashanah, Ramadan, Chinese New Year, so that's new to me.

But you certainly don't see a Ramadan Sale at Wal-Mart.
__________________
FlightlessDuck
DH of MouseEarsJenny

'87: Off Site, '94: GF, '02: FWC, '06: POP, '09: CSR, '10: POP, '12: CSR
FlightlessDuck is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 01:37 PM   #74
NYEmomma
DIS Veteran
 
NYEmomma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: NE Ohio
Posts: 1,643

Quote:
Originally Posted by NHdisneylover View Post
I confess that I am curious about what you mean about having your holidays treated like Jewish or Muslim holidays.

I can tell you that my own family celebrates the following, traditionally religious holidays in a secular sort of way (and always including learning or discussing the history of the religious celebration and what the day means to those who are a part of the particular religion--I think it is a lovely way to teach my children about a variety of religious beliefs):

Easter
Christmas
Passover
First night of Chanukah
First night of Ramadan
Eid Al-fitr (last night of Ramadan)
All Saints Day
St Nicholas Day

We also celebrate a variety of cultural types of holidays which do not have a much of a religious history overall, like Fat Tuesday (but yes we talk about how it related to Ash Wednesday and Lent), Chinese New Year, etc.
Treading lightly & hoping to have this discussion before this thread gets closed!

Why do you choose to celebrate those specific holidays in your family? Is it because you have family members who are adherents to those particular religions?? I only ask because I think it's an interesting mix of faiths & I personally strive to incorporate more world faiths into our family & traditions as a way of exposing our kids to the various belief systems out there in the hopes that they can make an educated choice (even if that choice is to not choose, like DH & I have decided) once they're of an age and maturity level to do so.
__________________
Me , DH , DD 4 , DD 1 , DD 1

8/82 off-site :: 12/88 off-site :: 2/93 POFQ :: 12/98 off-site :: 10/02 POFQ :: 10/11 POFQ :: waiting for 3/15 to get here!
NYEmomma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-03-2013, 01:38 PM   #75
IvyandLace
Certified pixie dust user
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: North Carolina (Pirate Country)
Posts: 838

Wow! That's what I get for posting a thread topic and then being away from the boards for over 24 hours, huh?

The whole "religion" topic is what caused me to spend a few days phrasing my question before I even bothered to post. I REALLY did not want to veer off into where the thread derailed which is one reason I did not leave any specific examples with my original post.

That being said, I totally get that everyone has differing values and that it is healthy for kids to be exposed to differences in order to open dialogue as to what their beliefs/values are or should be. Totally get it. However, I wasn't really referring to that as much as this: Do you have certain things that you DO not compromise on when your kids are at family member's homes? What are the "no way, no how" areas? (I understand that this will be different for everyone.) If you do have these areas, HOW do you handle them? Do you reference the "rules" prior to the family get-together or do you find that addressing them as they come up works better? I can see problems with both-I do not want my daughter to offend the host(s) by stating something that might appear to be "judging" them nor do I want her to be exposed to things that we do not believe in.

Do you believe that consistency in your "family rules" outweighs the fact that you are together with family you do not see very often?

For example...My husbands' side of the family is very volatile and tends to be politically minded with every single one of the members of his family having a totally different political lean. This is ALWAYS discussed very heatedly at every get-together, and it is not pretty or constructive. Add to that fact that there is often heavy drinking and horribly offensive language being batted around in general...well, it makes me concerned about putting my daughter in that kind of environment...even for a short amount of time.

A totally different example from my side of the family: both of my sisters (one older, one younger) have preschool age kids. This past Christmas my older sister expressed concern about coming for Christmas dinner at my younger sister's house because my younger sister's daughter is not expected to sit at the table like her own children are. My niece has never been a good eater and so is often allowed to get down to play while we are eating. This was concerning to my older sister who said that this was a bad example to her own kids as they would rather be playing with their cousin instead of having to follow "the family rules" at the dinner.

As you can see, neither of these examples deals with religion so I hope we can steer the topic back on course.

Thanks! IVY
__________________
July 1986 (Disney Inn) April 1991 (CBR) Oct. 2000 (ASMo)-Matt's 12th BD! Sept. 2001 (ASMu) Oct./Nov. 2002 (POFQ/ASMu) -Moriah's 12th BD, 1st MNSSHP! May 2003 (CBR)-Mother's Day! Oct./Nov. 2003 (ASMu) Jan. 2004 (Pop Century) May 2004 (POFQ) August 2004 (POP)-Rode out Hurricane Charlie! Nov./Dec. 2004-First DCL 7-day Eastern cruise & Micah's 12th BD! Dec. 2004 (offsite)-First Christmas trip! August 2005 (OKW studio, offsite) Nov. 2007 (POP)-Thanksgiving! June 2010 (offsite)-1st Amtrak ride, Disney Y.E.S. Program! January 2012 (1 bedroom at BLT with rented points)-Niece's 1st trip; Molly's 1st trip (in utero)
IvyandLace is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS Updates
GET OUR DIS UPDATES DELIVERED BY EMAIL



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:49 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Copyright © 1997-2014, Werner Technologies, LLC. All Rights Reserved.

You Rated this Thread: