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Old 02-27-2013, 07:58 PM   #16
luv2sleep
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wbeem

Here's what I mean. The quality of your image has more to do with the quality of your lens than the quality of your camera. Most cameras can record great images, but the lens is what transforms the scene onto your sensor.

When you spend money on camera bodies, the more expensive models typically enhance features, but really doesn't enhance the image quality - except for things like lower noise on high ISO photos, etc. You end up paying for things like a faster frame rate, more controls or menu options - things that make it more convenient to take a better picture. The lens will actually make a difference on the quality of your photo.

Buy based upon your needs, though. Photography isn't magic. It just requires knowledge and experience. We're all learning at every level.
Thank you for explaining that. I'm kind of lost. I'd like a DSLR and I'm reading such confusing info. Don't know whether to get a Canon T3, save $$ on that and then buy specific lenses (then I don't know which lenses to buy) or buy the T3, T3i, or T4i with the lens it comes with and add on later.
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Old 02-27-2013, 08:09 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by luv2sleep View Post
Thank you for explaining that. I'm kind of lost. I'd like a DSLR and I'm reading such confusing info. Don't know whether to get a Canon T3, save $$ on that and then buy specific lenses (then I don't know which lenses to buy) or buy the T3, T3i, or T4i with the lens it comes with and add on later.
Take your time. Determine your needs based upon the kind of photography you want to do and your budget. Sports/action photography is the most demanding on gear, which is why sports photographers spend a BUNDLE on their cameras and lenses. Most everything else you can achieve with very simple gear.

Also, don't forget about post-processing software. The photos you see and love with vibrant colors and details don't just come magically out of a given model of camera. They require some tweaking in post-processing.
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Old 02-27-2013, 08:09 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by luv2sleep View Post
Thank you for explaining that. I'm kind of lost. I'd like a DSLR and I'm reading such confusing info. Don't know whether to get a Canon T3, save $$ on that and then buy specific lenses (then I don't know which lenses to buy) or buy the T3, T3i, or T4i with the lens it comes with and add on later.
The "kit" lens is perfectly acceptable for most people. It's not as if you will immediately notice the difference between pictures taken with a $100 lens versus a $2500 lens.
The cheaper kit lenses are made to be decent all around, so they are perfectly acceptable for a beginner.
Future lenses are need specific. Want to take very low light pictures, get a prime. Sweeping landscapes, a wide angle. Close ups of flowers, time for a macro lens. Distant nature shots, birding, etc, time for a telephoto. Indoor sports.. Then you may want a telephoto with fixed aperture.

You usually don't save a ton of money by buying "body only"-- and the kit lens is usually well worth the $100-$200 price.
To cheaply start improving your photography... A nifty fifty lens is usually helpful. 50mm/f1.8. Usually sharper than the kits, great for portraits, great for low light. But won't replace the kit lens in all situations.
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Old 02-27-2013, 08:13 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by havoc315

The "kit" lens is perfectly acceptable for most people. It's not as if you will immediately notice the difference between pictures taken with a $100 lens versus a $2500 lens.
The cheaper kit lenses are made to be decent all around, so they are perfectly acceptable for a beginner.
Future lenses are need specific. Want to take very low light pictures, get a prime. Sweeping landscapes, a wide angle. Close ups of flowers, time for a macro lens. Distant nature shots, birding, etc, time for a telephoto. Indoor sports.. Then you may want a telephoto with fixed aperture.

You usually don't save a ton of money by buying "body only"-- and the kit lens is usually well worth the $100-$200 price.
To cheaply start improving your photography... A nifty fifty lens is usually helpful. 50mm/f1.8. Usually sharper than the kits, great for portraits, great for low light. But won't replace the kit lens in all situations.
Thanks! The kit lens is the 18-55 mm lens on the T3 and T3i. An 18-135 can be purchased with the T4i. I'm thinking starting out with an 18-55 will be enough. Then I can add on later.
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Old 02-27-2013, 08:14 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wbeem

Take your time. Determine your needs based upon the kind of photography you want to do and your budget. Sports/action photography is the most demanding on gear, which is why sports photographers spend a BUNDLE on their cameras and lenses. Most everything else you can achieve with very simple gear.

Also, don't forget about post-processing software. The photos you see and love with vibrant colors and details don't just come magically out of a given model of camera. They require some tweaking in post-processing.
What software is good for beginners?
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Old 02-27-2013, 08:22 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by luv2sleep View Post
Thank you for explaining that. I'm kind of lost. I'd like a DSLR and I'm reading such confusing info. Don't know whether to get a Canon T3, save $$ on that and then buy specific lenses (then I don't know which lenses to buy) or buy the T3, T3i, or T4i with the lens it comes with and add on later.
My advice is usually to get the kit lens with the camera. It comes at a discount and you can always sell it later if you find it doesn't fit with what you need down the road.

Different lenses serve different purposes and some are better to have in certain situations than others. The kit lenses are normally solid, entry level general purpose zoom lenses that work for everyday shooting. Its really easy to run out and blow a lot of money on lenses then end up with a bunch of lenses that aren't right for you. Get the kit. Learn to use it. If it comes up short in areas for you that will tell you what your next lens purchase should be.


Just a note on the 18-135 STM that is sold with the T4i.... That lens has features for auto focusing when shooting video. While that lens will work on other bodies you will only see the STM benefits on the T4i. The T4i is also sold with the 18-55 for a much lower price.
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Old 02-27-2013, 08:24 PM   #22
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What software is good for beginners?
PHotoshop Elements. A lot of people say Lightroom but Elements is cheaper and Camera RAW in Elements has the same engine as Lightroom. You don't get Lightroom's image management but you get a lot more editing tools.
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Old 02-27-2013, 08:30 PM   #23
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PHotoshop Elements. A lot of people say Lightroom but Elements is cheaper and Camera RAW in Elements has the same engine as Lightroom. You don't get Lightroom's image management but you get a lot more editing tools.
Thanks!
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Old 02-27-2013, 08:31 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by photo_chick

My advice is usually to get the kit lens with the camera. It comes at a discount and you can always sell it later if you find it doesn't fit with what you need down the road.

Different lenses serve different purposes and some are better to have in certain situations than others. The kit lenses are normally solid, entry level general purpose zoom lenses that work for everyday shooting. Its really easy to run out and blow a lot of money on lenses then end up with a bunch of lenses that aren't right for you. Get the kit. Learn to use it. If it comes up short in areas for you that will tell you what your next lens purchase should be.

Just a note on the 18-135 STM that is sold with the T4i.... That lens has features for auto focusing when shooting video. While that lens will work on other bodies you will only see the STM benefits on the T4i. The T4i is also sold with the 18-55 for a much lower price.
Ok thanks!
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Old 02-27-2013, 11:57 PM   #25
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I decided to just get one of those three with the kit lens to start off with. When I look up prices the bundles are enticing. However, I didn't know much about all of the lenses and what my needs will be to buy an additional lens. I'll just wait on that, learn more and get used to the camera first.
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Old 02-27-2013, 11:58 PM   #26
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Thanks for everyone's help!
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Old 07-12-2013, 09:50 AM   #27
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I just bought the canon rebel T3 with the kit lens. Will it take good photos for things such as fireworks or low light situations? What lens would be the best to buy for that?
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Old 07-12-2013, 10:48 AM   #28
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I just bought the canon rebel T3 with the kit lens. Will it take good photos for things such as fireworks or low light situations? What lens would be the best to buy for that?
I am assuming the lens is the 18-55. To obtain the flowery fireworks look, you will need additional equipment. You will need a tripod and a remote control. As far as lowlight, what do you want to shoot. Stationary object requirements are different than lowlight movement. I do not want to make this complicated, however your question leads me to believe you are a beginner. If so I would highly recommend you gain some more photographic knowledge before going to purchase other lenses. A highly recommended book is Bryan Peterson's "Understanding Exposure". I think it goes for about $16.00 on Amazon. It will be the cheapest thing you do in photography. When you talk about lenses, they are designed for specific situations. An example, I shoot a lot of lowlight action therefore my main zoom lenses are what we refer to as f2.8 lens. That means throughout the zoom range I have the ability to maintain a constant f2.8 aperture (lens opening). Your kit lens will have an aperture range from 3.5 to 5.6. This means that at 18mm the largest aperture (lens opening) will be 3.5 and at 55mm the largest aperture available will be 5.6. That lens will not work as well in lowlight with all the other conditions being equal. Its all about the photographic triangle of aperture, shutter speed and ISO.
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Old 07-13-2013, 11:47 PM   #29
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I am assuming the lens is the 18-55. To obtain the flowery fireworks look, you will need additional equipment. You will need a tripod and a remote control. As far as lowlight, what do you want to shoot. Stationary object requirements are different than lowlight movement. I do not want to make this complicated, however your question leads me to believe you are a beginner. If so I would highly recommend you gain some more photographic knowledge before going to purchase other lenses. A highly recommended book is Bryan Peterson's "Understanding Exposure". I think it goes for about $16.00 on Amazon. It will be the cheapest thing you do in photography. When you talk about lenses, they are designed for specific situations. An example, I shoot a lot of lowlight action therefore my main zoom lenses are what we refer to as f2.8 lens. That means throughout the zoom range I have the ability to maintain a constant f2.8 aperture (lens opening). Your kit lens will have an aperture range from 3.5 to 5.6. This means that at 18mm the largest aperture (lens opening) will be 3.5 and at 55mm the largest aperture available will be 5.6. That lens will not work as well in lowlight with all the other conditions being equal. Its all about the photographic triangle of aperture, shutter speed and ISO.
Thank you for the reply! I am definitely a DSLR beginner and its seeming like its going to be an expensive journey! I don't know if I'm ready to be carrying around all this stuff either haha. Thanks again
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