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Old 01-25-2013, 08:26 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by zurgswife View Post
When you say you have lots of people with diabetes in the family are you talking type 1 or type 2 or a mixture of both? And what relationship siblings and parents or second cousins.
I am not really sure. I think type 2. They were all insulin dependent. And by lots I mean grandmothers on both sides, mother, father is borderline, plenty of aunts and uncles, and at least one first cousin that I know of. My mother was my age when she was first diagnosed which I think has a lot to do with my paranoia about it. She also did not take care of it and let it kill her before she was even 50 years old. I am trying my best to not walk in their footsteps. My uncle recently lost a toe to diabetes. I have seen the worst that it can do and I don't wish for it to happen to me. I am trying to be as proactive as I can be.

Should I not be concerned about numbers? What is normal after a meal? I was at 150 after dinner tonight. I guess I just tend to think that your numbers should always be between 80-110 and anything over 120 is bad. Is that wrong?
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Old 01-25-2013, 08:42 PM   #17
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I respectfully disagree. You can have a great a1c and have wild fluctuations in blood sugars. Especially for someone who already has hypoglycemia, their a1c will skew low every time, since they've got a lot of lows being thrown into the mix which will always mask any highs. And it's the yoyo of blood sugars which cause the damage.
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Very interesting posts. Yes, a doctor is the best point person on this, but it sure seems that your individial body reactions can vary wildly.

I have been on "watch" with my doctor for about a year after 2 blood sugars of 108.....so he did A1C...most recent 6.8.... sent me to specialist. Losing weight, exercising and restricting carbs and sugar has sent all my blood chemistry crazy. Will continue the weight loss and reevaluate, but the "healthier" I live, the worse it gets. And I have never had any signs of diabetes, at the start of this process or current. All based on lab work.

Like I said, your individual body has to be considered, there is a lady at the Board and Care my mom lives in that is at risk of going into coma if her blood sugar goes below 200, and she is not the first diabetic I am aware of with that situaiton.
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Old 01-25-2013, 09:13 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by worm761 View Post
I am not really sure. I think type 2. They were all insulin dependent. And by lots I mean grandmothers on both sides, mother, father is borderline, plenty of aunts and uncles, and at least one first cousin that I know of. My mother was my age when she was first diagnosed which I think has a lot to do with my paranoia about it. She also did not take care of it and let it kill her before she was even 50 years old. I am trying my best to not walk in their footsteps. My uncle recently lost a toe to diabetes. I have seen the worst that it can do and I don't wish for it to happen to me. I am trying to be as proactive as I can be.

Should I not be concerned about numbers? What is normal after a meal? I was at 150 after dinner tonight. I guess I just tend to think that your numbers should always be between 80-110 and anything over 120 is bad. Is that wrong?
I asked because if it is Type 2 there are a number of things you can do to try to avoid it. I say try because sometimes Type 2's body just don't follow the normal rules.

1. You say 150 after dinner how much time are you talking? 2 hours or more?
2. Yes normal BS is 80-110. Usually Doctors tend to go with a number of 126 being considered prediabetic.
3. Look at the entire picture. Like I state prior commit to doing a weeks worth of testing. First thing in the am, before meals and 2 hrs after meals. That will give you a large snap shot of your BS numbers.
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Old 01-26-2013, 10:46 AM   #19
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1. You say 150 after dinner how much time are you talking? 2 hours or more?
Yes. Two hours after I start eating. I set an alarm so I know when to test.

I downloaded the glucose buddy app and started tracking first thing this morning.
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Old 01-26-2013, 10:59 AM   #20
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Yes. Two hours after I start eating. I set an alarm so I know when to test.

I downloaded the glucose buddy app and started tracking first thing this morning.
Good. What you need to look at is what your morning number is probably the most important number. This is a fasting number. If your morning number is 100 and over the course of the day eating you may increase 30-40 pts but return to a lower number that would be better then if they keep increasing over the course of the day and don't return anywhere near the fasting numbers.

Then you need to compare your number prior to eating to the two hour after. Example if your number prior to eating is 120 and two hours later it's 150 the change is not that great. If your starting at 70 and ending at 150 then that's more important.

Do this for a few days and get a picture of your BS without any huge changes. I would then review where you feel your weight is in comparison to what a healthy weight is. If it's normal then no need to look at making a change there. What about exercise? Do you need to increase your exercise? Watching your diet would be the final item that might need help. A few small changes to your life style might fix your slightly elevated numbers; if it is type 2 diabetes. You might be able to make your own fixes and the next physical you have you will be fine.

If it is a adult onset Type 1 any changes in life style won't make a bit of difference in the long run and your numbers will continue to rise over time. If that is the case you will have to involve an endo and insulin shots are back for good.
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Old 01-26-2013, 10:59 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by worm761 View Post
Thanks for the tip about alternating sides and fingers. Would never have occurred to me. LOL

And thank you for the advice about testing before and after eating. I will have to get in the habit.

My machine says I can test on the forearm. Is that as accurate? How painful is that?

The spike that bothered me, I had eaten a Jimmy Dean sausage, egg, and cheese croissant thing. No idea why they are in the house since I don't usually buy processed crap. Anyway, that was the 140 3 hours later. Chicken soup (homemade) was 88 2 hours after. Today I had a grilled chicken wrap (ceasar dressing, iceburg lettuce, 2 slices of a small tomato, some red onion, and a home grilled chicken breast pieces on a burrito size tortilla) and 2 hours later my sugar was at 209. It just seems really really high to me.
Ok, on the first, that was a fat spike. It's totally normal. The fat slows down the digestion of carbs and even a perfectly healthy person will have a fluctuation like that.
The 209 is high, but make sure you're washing and drying your fingers completely before testing. Any residue left on your fingers will alter your results.

Quote:
Originally Posted by worm761 View Post
I am not really sure. I think type 2. They were all insulin dependent. And by lots I mean grandmothers on both sides, mother, father is borderline, plenty of aunts and uncles, and at least one first cousin that I know of. My mother was my age when she was first diagnosed which I think has a lot to do with my paranoia about it. She also did not take care of it and let it kill her before she was even 50 years old. I am trying my best to not walk in their footsteps. My uncle recently lost a toe to diabetes. I have seen the worst that it can do and I don't wish for it to happen to me. I am trying to be as proactive as I can be.

Should I not be concerned about numbers? What is normal after a meal? I was at 150 after dinner tonight. I guess I just tend to think that your numbers should always be between 80-110 and anything over 120 is bad. Is that wrong?
If you have had all these people who are younger, and all who are insulin dependent at an early age, you might want to investigate the possibly that your family has something called LADA. It's an autoimmune form of diabetes (like type1) which manifests itself like type 2. There are also many different genetic types of diabetes that mimic type 2 as well. But I"d look at LADA first.

Here is one study that shows how variable "normal" blood sugar can be http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2892065/
(you can convert the blood sugars from mmol/l to mg/dl here http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/converter.htm

and this is a very interesting presentation:
http://www.diabetes-symposium.org/in...nu=view&id=322

So that's not to say that you don't have a problem brewing, but it might not be as drastic as you think.
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Old 01-26-2013, 11:09 AM   #22
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OP is your Primary Care Physician also an endocrinologist? I know many doctors that have no clue about treating diabetes and do a terrible job at managing this disease. I would make an appt with an endocrinologist. Many are also PCP's.
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Old 01-26-2013, 12:23 PM   #23
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Okay, I am not a doctor. My dad has type 2 diabetes which he controls with metformin, diet and exercise. I agree with those who say that everyone is different, but I personally have never heard of a post-meal 150 being problematic at all.

For my dad, his doctor wants to see an A1c under 7. Dad's has been running around 6.6-6.8 for the past couple of years, and the doc is happy. He has it tested every three months.

As far as daily spikes and lows, Dad was told that morning (fasting) blood sugar should be under 120--normal (no diabetes) people usually run 80-110, but up to 120 or so is fine. Pre-meal should be around the same, but if he's really hungry, he'll eat something low-carb even if his sugar is up to 140ish.

Dad was told to expect a post-meal spike, that it's a normal part of the digestion process. So he tests three hours after meals. The spike, for Dad, (not necessarily true for everyone) should be somewhere around 170. That's because his sugar drops around 15 points per hour and he's supposed to eat every five hours. If it didn't go up that much, there wouldn't be room for it to drop properly before eating. His numbers also go haywire, generally high, when he's sick.

So fluctuations are normal and expected. Dad was told that as long as he doesn't go above 200 he's not doing damage to his body, and that even the occasional "just over 200" mark isn't bad as long as his A1c's don't go high. Again, the precise numbers will vary by individual, and not all doctor recommendations are the same. I agree with tracking for a week or so, and then approaching your doctor with the results. Good luck!
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Old 01-26-2013, 01:24 PM   #24
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As far as daily spikes and lows, Dad was told that morning (fasting) blood sugar should be under 120--normal (no diabetes) people usually run 80-110, but up to 120 or so is fine. Pre-meal should be around the same, but if he's really hungry, he'll eat something low-carb even if his sugar is up to 140ish.
That fasting blood sugar level is what confused me. Mine was 108, which is at which point my Doctor said I was pre-diabetic. I went to the American Diabetes Association website, and they list 120 as the threshhold. I asked my Doctor and he said each lab has it's own threshhold, and the lab he uses says 100 is the pre-diabetic threshold for fasting blood sugar.
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Old 01-26-2013, 01:51 PM   #25
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That fasting blood sugar level is what confused me. Mine was 108, which is at which point my Doctor said I was pre-diabetic. I went to the American Diabetes Association website, and they list 120 as the threshhold. I asked my Doctor and he said each lab has it's own threshhold, and the lab he uses says 100 is the pre-diabetic threshold for fasting blood sugar.
I've always used the 120. But with a home meter that number could actually be somewhere between 108 and 132 as there is a 20% error factor. So, if the blood was from a lab I do get they have their own thresholds but 100 sounds kinda low to me to say someone is pre-diabetic.
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Old 01-26-2013, 02:07 PM   #26
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Thanks for the tip about alternating sides and fingers. Would never have occurred to me. LOL

And thank you for the advice about testing before and after eating. I will have to get in the habit.

My machine says I can test on the forearm. Is that as accurate? How painful is that?

The spike that bothered me, I had eaten a Jimmy Dean sausage, egg, and cheese croissant thing. No idea why they are in the house since I don't usually buy processed crap. Anyway, that was the 140 3 hours later. Chicken soup (homemade) was 88 2 hours after. Today I had a grilled chicken wrap (ceasar dressing, iceburg lettuce, 2 slices of a small tomato, some red onion, and a home grilled chicken breast pieces on a burrito size tortilla) and 2 hours later my sugar was at 209. It just seems really really high to me.
That would definitely concern me. I would guess that to be about 40 carbs (not knowing what kind of tortilla). I think you should be testing more often to see where the trend is, i.e., was that a 209 going up or a 209 coming down. If you had numbers at 1, 2 and 3 hours we could probably get a better picture of what's going on.

I think the forearm testing is just as accurate and less painful, but you do need to draw more blood, in my experience. Use the clear cap, prick the forearm and push down to force more blood out before moving the lancet device.
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Old 01-26-2013, 04:10 PM   #27
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For my dad, his doctor wants to see an A1c under 7. Dad's has been running around 6.6-6.8 for the past couple of years, and the doc is happy. He has it tested every three months.

As far as daily spikes and lows, Dad was told that morning (fasting) blood sugar should be under 120--normal (no diabetes) people usually run 80-110, but up to 120 or so is fine. Pre-meal should be around the same, but if he's really hungry, he'll eat something low-carb even if his sugar is up to 140ish.

!
A1C over 7 can lead to organ damage.
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Old 01-26-2013, 05:07 PM   #28
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Thank you everyone for all of the advice. I have been tracking all day today and will continue to do so.
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Old 01-26-2013, 05:21 PM   #29
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A1C over 7 can lead to organ damage.
As a parent of a Type 1 who battles and battles to keep numbers good that is comment is a not totally true. There are Type 1's who's BS numbers during the 1940's, 50's, 60's, 70's and into the 80's who don't have organ damage and I guarantee their A1Cs averaged in the 9s or higher....They didn't have the ability to test and correct like we do today. So to say a mear 7 can causes organ damage is wrong.
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Old 01-27-2013, 10:45 AM   #30
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oh and forearm testing, I find it incredibly painful for me. I bruise every time I try it there. The last time I was showing my son, "look sweetie, we can do this on your arm. Watch mommy try it." (doing my best mommy voice for a 12 year old hahah) and as soon as the lancet hit my skin a started seeing a bruise form right under the cap. My son was like "yeah, no way I'm doing that mom."
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