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Old 01-12-2013, 12:16 PM   #31
joyjanet
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Originally Posted by mom2aredhead View Post
I had progressive lenses - essentially bi-focals without the lines.

I brought them back. They were absolutely horrible. I couldn't see a damn thing. I want to be able to put my glasses on and go "ahhhh - I can see".
Same for me. My DH said I did not give them enough time but I did not like them. Walmart took them back and put a reading lenses in the frame I picked. I can see a lot better with them when I read and I don't need to wear glasses all day long.
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Old 01-12-2013, 12:52 PM   #32
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I had extreme motion sickness with progressives and hated only being able to clearly read five words at a time - too much moving my head back and forth. I could only see the top half of my computer monitor clearly if I kept my chin lifted, which aggravated my neck problem. I now have glasses for reading, computer and distance and am much happier. My DH didn't have trouble with progressives, but his prescription is very weak, and I wonder if that might have something to do with it.
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Old 01-12-2013, 01:24 PM   #33
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I have chronic problems with vertigo, but got talked into progressives. I might as well throw them away. I can't see a thing with them and trying to wear them long enough to adjust to them activates my vertigo and pretty much incapacitates me.

Lesson learned. I'd rather swap out glasses constantly than go through that.
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Old 01-12-2013, 02:17 PM   #34
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I tried progressive for a year and never got use to them. Tried bi-focals for a year and hated them. Tried the one contact which I liked, but was hard with my arthritis, so I have been back to wearing 2 different glasses for the last few years and it works much better for me. I admit I may look silly changing glasses, but I see much better so its worth it for me.
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Old 01-12-2013, 03:26 PM   #35
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I've been in Progressives for about 15 years, took a week or so to get used to them, especially on stairs. My eye Doctor at the time said since I've been wearing glasses at that point for 30 years, that would be the best option so I never even considered bi-focals.

To me, anyway moving my head a bit to hit the right correction is easier than having to put on and take off reading glasses and keep track of them. I feel sorry for the folks who had RK or Laser correction, especially the ones that went with monovision that helps, but does not overcome the need for reading glasses after a certain point.
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Old 01-12-2013, 03:47 PM   #36
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I've been wearing glasses since I was 14, bifocals/progressives since I was about mid-thirties. Every pair of glasses I've owned has required something of a "learning curve". I have never put on a pair and said, "Wonderful!" Back when I wore plain glasses, that learning curve was short: Say, a couple days. My first pair of progressives, however, took me the better part of a year to learn to love -- but learn I did.

Hints:

When I got my first pair, the opthomatrist said, "With these glasses, you can see whatever your nose points towards." I didn't really understand at that point, but I do now. With progressives, you must turn your head to see what you want to look at. You don't get any real "side vision" with progressives. This was very difficult for me, but now it's second nature.

Working at the computer is difficult with progressives. The "reading portion" of the lenses is at the bottom, and you have to tilt your head up at an unnatural angle to read the words on the screen. The answer is to keep a pair of cheap readers at the computer. Do you know what your lens prescription is? Mine's +2. You can get that very same +2 in a reader. I also keep a pair next to my bed because I prefer reading with a pair of readers instead of my prescription glasses (because the prescription glasses have only a little slice of reading-glass at the bottom of the lens). The progressive lenses are best for walking-around all day, but for these circumstances, they're not best.

Oddly enough, stairs have never bothered me, whereas I've heard other people say that was the worst for them.

I have prescription sunglasses that're "distance only" for driving, and I love those things, but when I get another pair I'll add in the progressive lens. I hate not having the ability to read something while wearing them.


In closing, I think everyone has some trouble adjusting to these glasses. When I got my last pair, a man was in the office CHEWING OUT the girl who had sold him a pair of glasses a few weeks before. I know what he was going through, but he didn't have to be nasty to her about it. What he really wanted was to have his young, adjustable eyes that could be "fixed" with a simple prescription. I'd like to have that too, but since it's not going to happen, progressive lenses are the best I'm going to get.
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Old 01-12-2013, 03:56 PM   #37
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Love my progressive lens....been wearing them for at least 10 years, maybe longer. I actually have 3 different prescriptions in the lens. It is imperative that you have them made by someone who really knows what they are doing. The last pair I had made, the lenses were "too short" to accommodate the 3 prescriptions and so they had to be remade (at their cost).

It does take some people a few days to get used to knowing where the line is, and what part of the lens to use for what purpose (close up - the bottom part of the lens, distance - the upper part of the lens).

As Mrs. Pete said, going down stairs were bad for me. Now that I have that third prescription, no problem.
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Old 01-12-2013, 04:09 PM   #38
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Count me in as another who HATED PROGRESSIVE LENSES!! I have no deisre to wear the bifocals with lines. When I got new glasses last summer I got regular glasses to see far away with an take glasses off to read. When I can no longer read without my glasses I will go buy readers.

Funny after wearing my glasses unless sleeping for 40 yrs I rarely ever put them on till I'm ready to go out. When cooking working around the house etc I can see close up well enough not to need my glasses. Usually don't ever wear glasses at home unless I'm watching TV which is very rarely.
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Old 01-12-2013, 06:25 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goofycampers View Post
How long will it take to get used to these things? I went from using non prescription readers to these and I just don't think this is gonna work. I was expecting to see better not worse!
As soon as I put mine on I hated them. But, the doc told my point my nose to where I want my toes and his really helped. It was not long until second nature to put them on. Don't aim your eyes downward, move your head down. If you look out the reader part while walking it throws off your perception.
Good luck,
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Old 01-12-2013, 06:35 PM   #40
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I have heard some people taking a couple weeks or so to adjust to the progressives. I was lucky, no problem at all. I do always have trouble looking down like when stepping off a curb or stairs. It happens when my rx gets replaced.

The progressives are actually shaped like an hourglass. There is a channel down the middle where the corrective glass is located so when you look out the side of the lens, like when merging onto the freeway, you will see differently. Your brain will eventually adjust.

I always request "wide channel" lenses. I think they might all be that way but back in the early 90's when I got my first pair they had two types.

Do you wear them high enough or low enough on your nose? They are ground with distance at the top and reading at the bottom but the central area is progressing toward these. It is meant for work like computers and mid distance viewing. Try moving them up or down and see if you need to have them reset for you.
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Old 01-12-2013, 06:55 PM   #41
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My DH didn't have trouble with progressives, but his prescription is very weak, and I wonder if that might have something to do with it.
It will. Stronger prescriptions are harder to adjust to, especially if there is a strong amount of astigmatism.
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Old 01-12-2013, 07:12 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by RNMOM View Post
I have heard some people taking a couple weeks or so to adjust to the progressives. I was lucky, no problem at all. I do always have trouble looking down like when stepping off a curb or stairs. It happens when my rx gets replaced.

The progressives are actually shaped like an hourglass. There is a channel down the middle where the corrective glass is located so when you look out the side of the lens, like when merging onto the freeway, you will see differently. Your brain will eventually adjust.

I always request "wide channel" lenses. I think they might all be that way but back in the early 90's when I got my first pair they had two types.

Do you wear them high enough or low enough on your nose? They are ground with distance at the top and reading at the bottom but the central area is progressing toward these. It is meant for work like computers and mid distance viewing. Try moving them up or down and see if you need to have them reset for you.
Bears repeating.

It took no time for me to adjust to my first pair of progressives, and I have never had the depth perception issues such as you describe. I do get the best high-index lenses insurance and my money can buy, since I only get one pair of glasses at a time.

My optician always discusses with me the size of each viewing area and the fact that I spend all day working at a computer. I know I've been told that for some, possibly less-expensive lenses, an area may be much smaller in relation to the others. That may be a factor in adjusting to them.

Some people get different glasses for each type of vision. If someone can afford that and wants the hassle, that's great. I'm very happy with my progressives.
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Old 01-12-2013, 07:41 PM   #43
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Originally Posted by Goofycampers View Post
Yep, that's what I got...progressives. $400 worth of glasses and contacts and I could see better with readers.
Oh yea, hate those. Tried them for 2 yrs and could not get used to them. Did it again, oh heck no, I went back and got them changed to single vision.

HOWEVER now I have reached a point where it has become essential for me to get bi focals. ACK. I am going to go somewhere else. I feel your pain.
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Old 01-12-2013, 08:55 PM   #44
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kathi OD View Post
Love my progressive lens....been wearing them for at least 10 years, maybe longer. I actually have 3 different prescriptions in the lens. It is imperative that you have them made by someone who really knows what they are doing. The last pair I had made, the lenses were "too short" to accommodate the 3 prescriptions and so they had to be remade (at their cost).

It does take some people a few days to get used to knowing where the line is, and what part of the lens to use for what purpose (close up - the bottom part of the lens, distance - the upper part of the lens).

As Mrs. Pete said, going down stairs were bad for me. Now that I have that third prescription, no problem.
1,000 percent correct. You c an't just get them done zippo. Needs to be someone that knows your needs. I actually had the higher end lifte d so I coul straight ahead instead of down to to see the monitor better. I do find if I am on the comute r a lot to use my readers. If watching TV and looking at I pad, the I use the progressive.

Driving, I actually bought the Joy Magano bifocals to save $$$, they can be funkiy for full time wear si I am so happy I did not order the bi-focal glasses.
If not happy with them explain what is going on and have the eye doc offer to help correct the right wearing, and how the LANs sits. I know dd is near sighted and has to have her glasses sit even and high on the bridge of her nose.
I did spend $500 on my glasses so they better be perfect!
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Old 01-17-2013, 11:34 AM   #45
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Just a coda to unscare some folks who might be reading this and decide against progressives. I got my first progressives yesterday. It took me about a half hour to adjust. I love them! No more reading glasses or taking my glasses off to see things!
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