Disney Information Station Logo

Go Back   The DIS Discussion Forums - DISboards.com > Just for Fun > Community Board
Find Hotel Specials & DIScounts
 
facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS UpdatesDIS email updates
Register Chat FAQ Tickers Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read





Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 12-05-2012, 11:52 PM   #16
tink_lover
POLKA PRINCESS
 
tink_lover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 1,511

If you haven't already, please check out the documentary The Big Picture:Rethinking Dyslexia by Robert Redford's son. Redford's grandson is dyslexic and this is a very powerful movie. Unless you live with this (like we do), it is hard for people on the outside to understand the daily school challenges.
__________________
tink_lover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2012, 08:00 AM   #17
zurgswife
WDW is my Shangrala...and I'm going...life is better!!!
 
zurgswife's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Posts: 15,392

Quote:
Originally Posted by ebtbmom View Post
I understand the cheat sheet may not be the answer, I was frustrated because he had not even tried it. It is a pretty obvious one, such as capitalize beginning of sentences, proper nouns, put punctuation at the end. Plus he failed a paper about a state fair field trip because he didn't answer all of the questions and only turned in 5 sentences! It's a perfect storm of him having a legitimate learning disability but also not trying his hardest. Oh the teen years!
Ok the bold part. (Still wondering how old your son is)

1) OBVIOUS for YOU. This is not how the dyslexic brain works. Just because you think it is easy and obvious it is NOT for a dyslexic brain. Capitalization, and punctuation at the end of sentences were on going issues for my son as he continued through HS.

2) My son was not able for many years to put what was in his brain on paper in any way shape or form like a regular student. This is called dysgraphia.

You are looking at this like he is a normal student and just not doing what he is supposed to. This may not be the case. He may truely have a dyslexcia, decoding and dysgraphia issue that the testing didn't properly test for.
__________________
[IMG]

In Honor of Robin Costello I will miss you my dear friend.
zurgswife is offline   Reply With Quote
|
The DIS
Register to remove

Join Date: 1997
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 1,000,000
Old 12-06-2012, 09:43 AM   #18
Wishing on a star
DIS Veteran
Another proud Southerner!
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 14,059

Yes, again, as a parent to a young teen with similar disability issues, I have to say that I totally agree with Zurgswife.

It is time to back way up, accept the reality, and to try to understand what the disability really entails, and approach this from a very basic level. Not just suggest counter-productive measures such as cheat-sheets, and add the pressure to 'try harder'.

Sure, he has known since he was in early elementary that the first letter of sentences are capitalized, and that a sentence should end with a period or question mark.
Telling him these things for the umpteen millionth time will do absolutely no good.
The disability is the issue.

What he knows, and what comes out onto a sheet of paper, will be two very different things.
Wishing on a star is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2012, 10:24 AM   #19
crashbb
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 7,479

Quote:
Originally Posted by zurgswife View Post
Ok the bold part. (Still wondering how old your son is)

1) OBVIOUS for YOU. This is not how the dyslexic brain works. Just because you think it is easy and obvious it is NOT for a dyslexic brain. Capitalization, and punctuation at the end of sentences were on going issues for my son as he continued through HS.

2) My son was not able for many years to put what was in his brain on paper in any way shape or form like a regular student. This is called dysgraphia.
Yup - I have dysgraphia. I can say "23" and write "32" and not realise it - even when someone tells me I've written it wrong, unless they tell me what I did wrong, I'll still often not see it. My brother still teases me about the time I made a t-shirt with my name on it and spelled by own name wrong. I knew it was wrong because it had an even number of letters (and my name doesn't), but could not figure out what was wrong with it.

I did spend many years with tape across my desk, on which was written all the letters of the alphabet and the numbers 1 - 9, so that I could copy them and have my letters/numbers facing the right way.

For the most part, I've developed my own coping strategies (I have a "mild" case) - I type as much as possible (and, if writing by hand, I print and it looks like an 8-year-old did it), use spell check (or resort to using different words, because I know that the word I want is likely to be spelled incorrectly), and avoided courses that would involve a lot of (or any) timed writing.

On a positive note, dysgraphia (or dyslexia) does not need to define your life or limit your education - I have my PhD (just not in something requiring timed writing). Most people who know me, don't even know that I am dysgraphic.
crashbb is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS Updates
GET OUR DIS UPDATES DELIVERED BY EMAIL



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:37 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Copyright © 1997-2014, Werner Technologies, LLC. All Rights Reserved.