Disney Information Station Logo

Go Back   The DIS Discussion Forums - DISboards.com > Just for Fun > Photography Board
Find Hotel Specials & DIScounts
 
facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS UpdatesDIS email updates
Register Chat FAQ Tickers Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read





Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
Old 12-04-2012, 07:14 PM   #31
dkhillerud
Mouseketeer
 
dkhillerud's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Minnesota
Posts: 113

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gianna'sPapa View Post
You can get that look almost anytime you have some light. Obviously not in total darkness.
So the reason that I needed such a high ISO and a wide open aperture to get a fast shutter speed was because the lighting in the gym was so bad?
__________________
Kathy
dkhillerud is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2012, 07:39 PM   #32
NLD
DIS Veteran
 
NLD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 1,516

Here's the problem with aperture priority when shooting moving objects in low light:

Let's say (just as an example) "correct" exposure is 1/250, f/4, ISO 1600.

If you're in shutter-priority, you can select 1/250 and ISO 1600 and the camera will select f/4.

If you're in aperture priority, and you select f/4 and ISO 1600, the camera will select shutter speed 1/250.

BUT... what happens if the light changes? If you're in aperture priority and you've selected f/4, ISO 1600, and the light dims (or the composition changes to include a lot more dark in it)... your camera is going to select a shutter speed longer than 1/250 (to maintain that correct exposure).

Maybe that's okay with you, but maybe it's not. What if the shutter speed it now selects is 1/100? 1/60? What if you now have motion blur? Or heck, camera shake from trying to hand-hold a zoom lens at 200mm with a shutter speed of, say, 1/60?

If you set the shutter speed to what you want (shutter priority), you don't have to worry about this. If the camera needs a wide aperture, it will select one. If the widest aperture STILL won't give you enough light, your photo will be underexposed (too dark), yes--but at least it won't have motion blur. Too dark is a heck of a lot easier to correct in post processing than motion blur.

At the end of the day, it doesn't matter what "mode" you use (shutter priority, aperture priority, program, manual). It's what the f/ stop, ISO, and shutter speed are that matters. The end. The thing is that with aperture priority, you have to pay attention to what the camera is selecting for shutter speeds--making sure they don't get too long. To me, that takes attention away from watching the event in the gym, composing your shot, etc etc.
__________________
Nicole

Trip reports

Driving through the Desert: Our Utah and Arizona Trip

Breaking All the Rules! Pirates, Pixie Dust, and Pictures... a January 2012 WDW Trip Report


First family trip: September 2009 POR
Sisters trip: September 2010 AKL
MNSSHP only: October 27, 2011
Birthday trip for daughter: January 2012 WL

The Disboards Photography Forum
NLD is offline   Reply With Quote
|
The DIS
Register to remove

Join Date: 1997
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 1,000,000
Old 12-04-2012, 09:06 PM   #33
Gianna'sPapa
DIS Veteran
 
Gianna'sPapa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Elgin, Il.
Posts: 3,573

Quote:
Originally Posted by NLD View Post
Here's the problem with aperture priority when shooting moving objects in low light:

Let's say (just as an example) "correct" exposure is 1/250, f/4, ISO 1600.

If you're in shutter-priority, you can select 1/250 and ISO 1600 and the camera will select f/4.

If you're in aperture priority, and you select f/4 and ISO 1600, the camera will select shutter speed 1/250.

BUT... what happens if the light changes? If you're in aperture priority and you've selected f/4, ISO 1600, and the light dims (or the composition changes to include a lot more dark in it)... your camera is going to select a shutter speed longer than 1/250 (to maintain that correct exposure).

Maybe that's okay with you, but maybe it's not. What if the shutter speed it now selects is 1/100? 1/60? What if you now have motion blur? Or heck, camera shake from trying to hand-hold a zoom lens at 200mm with a shutter speed of, say, 1/60?

If you set the shutter speed to what you want (shutter priority), you don't have to worry about this. If the camera needs a wide aperture, it will select one. If the widest aperture STILL won't give you enough light, your photo will be underexposed (too dark), yes--but at least it won't have motion blur. Too dark is a heck of a lot easier to correct in post processing than motion blur.

At the end of the day, it doesn't matter what "mode" you use (shutter priority, aperture priority, program, manual). It's what the f/ stop, ISO, and shutter speed are that matters. The end. The thing is that with aperture priority, you have to pay attention to what the camera is selecting for shutter speeds--making sure they don't get too long. To me, that takes attention away from watching the event in the gym, composing your shot, etc etc.
Good explanation!!
Gianna'sPapa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2012, 09:42 PM   #34
DSLRuser
Age is a state of mind
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: midwest
Posts: 1,005

Which s finally why full manual is the ultimate goal.

Subtle changes in the way the camera reads light won't cause your settings to change. For he most part, when you get dialed in, you can shoot forever or till conditions change.
__________________
*****30+ trips since 1993*****
Wilderness Lodge x 5
Beach Club x 4
Port Orleans FQ x3
Coranado Springs
Caribbean Beach Club
Contemporary Resort
Animal Kingdom Lodge
Yacht Club
Polynesian Resort
<<Disney Wonder>>
Marriot Sable Palms x 4
Marriot Royal Palms x 4
Bonnet Creek x 3
Marriot Cypress Harbor x 2
Marriot Grande Vista
DSLRuser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2012, 09:49 PM   #35
photo_chick
Knows a little about a lot of things, a lot about nothing.
 
photo_chick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: in the middle of Dallas/Fort Worth
Posts: 4,657

Quote:
Originally Posted by DSLRuser View Post
finally, when you fully understand how shutter speed, ISO, and aperture work together....then you are ready to graduate to full manual. which opens a hole nother bunch of options.
I don't see where manual mode opens up a lot of other options. The only advantage manual mode really offers is to allow you to keep the exact same settings if you want. You can get to the same end result settings wise with shutter priority or aperture priority. Most people look at those modes as controlling one variable but you really have a lot more control than that. ISO changes will shift the third variable for you while keeping the same exposure value and exposure compensation can shift the exposure value if needed.

And subtle changes in light can easily change the exposure value. In some situations being off by even a stop can make a huge difference.

I'm not saying one way is better than another, but there seems to be this idea many photographers have that manual mode is the pinnacle of photographic skill. In reality you can have just as much command over your camera in other modes if you truly understand how your camera works. It's all about what way is easiest for the photographer to get there with the way they work.

As far as what I personally use... shutter priority or aperture priority most of the time when I'm not in the studio. I've done my time using all manual film cameras and still go back to that on occasion. Especially when shooting with the view camera in the studio. But I paid good money for the fancy electronics in my DSLR and I'm going to use them.
__________________
Danielle

If we all agreed all the time the world would be an awfully boring place. I'm here to make it interesting!


Last edited by photo_chick; 12-04-2012 at 09:58 PM.
photo_chick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2012, 09:26 AM   #36
boBQuincy
I am not carrying three pods
There's something about the smell of the chemicals that just shouts "Photography!"
 
boBQuincy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: NC
Posts: 4,502

Quote:
Originally Posted by photo_chick View Post
But I paid good money for the fancy electronics in my DSLR and I'm going to use them.
Amen! There is no valid combination of shutter. aperture, and ISO available in Manual that Aperture or Shutter modes can't provide (fireworks are one of the rare exceptions). The big difference is that the semi-auto modes can almost instantly change to adapt to changing light levels where Manual is much slower.

To continue with what PhotoChick wrote regarding exposure compensation I would like to consider that as a fourth control, one which modifies or shifts the exposure triangle. Many photographers still adhere to what the light meter shows, the settings are considered to be correct when the meter lines up with "0" even if we are in Manual mode. Although this may be the "correct" exposure it is not always the best or the one we want. Sure, in Manual we can change this but by dialing in compensation we can set this change while still keeping the semi-auto features.

In short, we get the best of both methods. Give it a try, it may be just what you are looking for.
__________________
"Well, then, I confess. It's my intention to commandeer one of these ships, pick up a crew in Tortuga, raid, pillage, plunder, and otherwise pilfer my weasly black guts out."

Walt Disney World photos? Yeah, we have "a few" at: suzieandbob.com

Our model monorail site: http://monorail.suzieandbob.com/

boBQuincy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2012, 09:48 AM   #37
havoc315
DIS Veteran
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,707

The only time I use manual is when shooting something like fireworks, where I'm shooting in anticipation of a changing exposure over the course of an extended shutter.
havoc315 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2012, 10:43 AM   #38
DSLRuser
Age is a state of mind
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: midwest
Posts: 1,005

Quote:
Originally Posted by havoc315 View Post
The only time I use manual is when shooting something like fireworks, where I'm shooting in anticipation of a changing exposure over the course of an extended shutter.
Same for me for the most part. i will use A or S to get me dialed in, then put those settings in manual. makes for much easier batch processing as well.
__________________
*****30+ trips since 1993*****
Wilderness Lodge x 5
Beach Club x 4
Port Orleans FQ x3
Coranado Springs
Caribbean Beach Club
Contemporary Resort
Animal Kingdom Lodge
Yacht Club
Polynesian Resort
<<Disney Wonder>>
Marriot Sable Palms x 4
Marriot Royal Palms x 4
Bonnet Creek x 3
Marriot Cypress Harbor x 2
Marriot Grande Vista
DSLRuser is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

facebooktwitterpinterestgoogle plusyoutubeDIS Updates
GET OUR DIS UPDATES DELIVERED BY EMAIL



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:56 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Copyright © 1997-2014, Werner Technologies, LLC. All Rights Reserved.