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Old 08-14-2012, 04:53 PM   #16
zackiedawg
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kbritton View Post
Which mirrorless???
I just sold all my Nikon d80 and I am starting over. I really like the indoor dark shots that were produced by the Sony a55. Getting clean outdoor shots are not a problem but when in Disney trying to get Picts of one of the shows or rides has always equaled blurry pictures for me the novice
I'd say, based on reading all of this thread so far, that the best advice is to slow down and read up. You don't sound as if you quite know all of the market, what's available, what suits your needs, etc. It will be worth it for you to do a little more research as to what the various DSLR, SLT, and mirrorless options are to make sure you get one that works best for you. And be very very careful when browsing camera forums, especially brand-specific ones, because you are going to get a lot of contradictory comments that can be confusing - lots of 'this brand stinks' stuff countered by tons of 'this brand is the bomb and YOU stink' stuff. Try to steer clear of any threads that try too hard to say why one brand is better or worse than all others, because it simply isn't true.

First, there's not going to be any significant differences between the DSLR/SLT products by any of the big brand names in the market: Canon, Nikon, Sony, and Pentax. Each of them may have entry level offerings, medium level offerings, and higher end or pro offerings, and pretty much each of them will be comparable in any given category. There may be specific features or advantages with each brand - larger lens selections, better backward compatibility, specialized features like stabilization in body or video specs...but for the most part, they all tend to balance out between their advantages and disadvantages. And feel is important - see which ones fit you best, because they're not all the same.

Second, the mirrorless cameras are indeed perfectly capable of matching the IQ of DSLRs - in fact, several of the mirrorless models use the exact same APS-C sensor, so there's nothing IQ-wise that makes them any different. The sensor you'll find in many Nikon, Pentax and Sony DSLR/SLT models is the very same one in several Sony's NEX models, for example. As with anything, the mirrorless cameras are a package of advantages and disadvantages that have to be weighed against your needs and likes. They are indeed much more compact, lighter, and very capable, while they also inevitably suffer from smaller grips and ergonomic differences, smaller buffers, and less battery life, and use different focus systems.

As for the low light needs, again - the brand won't be a factor here - the same lovely low light photos can be taken with any brand of DSLR, SLT, or mirrorless model. What will make the better results are the lens used, the photographer who takes the shot, and the processing technique or software they use. Brand name is just about the LEAST important factor in how good the IQ of any of these cameras is!

Take the time to research the sensors - look at the mirrorless models in both M4:3 sensor format (Olympus and Panasonic) and APS-C format (Sony, Samsung, Canon), and see the relative differences or similarities in performance compared to DSLRs and SLT models. Try out some of the Sony SLT models in person to see if you like electronic viewfinders or not - again, they have some big advantages and some disadvantages compared to shooting with an optical viewfinder, and you may love it, not like it, or be completely adaptable to either. Once you start honing in on systems you like, make sure they have the lenses you'll want to use...most of the DSLR/SLT systems have 100+ lenses available to them, between the manufacturer lineup and third party lens makers, and even the smallest of them will stretch to over 300 lenses available if you include older autofocus lenses that can be bought used and still work fine. The mirrorless systems on the other hand all have much smaller lens selection that will autofocus - still might be plenty to meet your needs, but the largest of them (M4:3) only have 30 or so lenses available and some are so new they only have 2 or 3 (Canon) - Sony and Samsung both have 10-20 lenses for their mounts that will autofocus. But a side perk of these mirrorless systems is that if you're willing to forego autofocus, they can actually mount tens of thousands of lenses from nearly any mount ever made in history.

Good luck, and hope any of that helps!
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Old 08-14-2012, 10:17 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zackiedawg View Post
I'd say, based on reading all of this thread so far, that the best advice is to slow down and read up. You don't sound as if you quite know all of the market, what's available, what suits your needs, etc. It will be worth it for you to do a little more research as to what the various DSLR, SLT, and mirrorless options are to make sure you get one that works best for you. And be very very careful when browsing camera forums, especially brand-specific ones, because you are going to get a lot of contradictory comments that can be confusing - lots of 'this brand stinks' stuff countered by tons of 'this brand is the bomb and YOU stink' stuff. Try to steer clear of any threads that try too hard to say why one brand is better or worse than all others, because it simply isn't true.

First, there's not going to be any significant differences between the DSLR/SLT products by any of the big brand names in the market: Canon, Nikon, Sony, and Pentax. Each of them may have entry level offerings, medium level offerings, and higher end or pro offerings, and pretty much each of them will be comparable in any given category. There may be specific features or advantages with each brand - larger lens selections, better backward compatibility, specialized features like stabilization in body or video specs...but for the most part, they all tend to balance out between their advantages and disadvantages. And feel is important - see which ones fit you best, because they're not all the same.

Second, the mirrorless cameras are indeed perfectly capable of matching the IQ of DSLRs - in fact, several of the mirrorless models use the exact same APS-C sensor, so there's nothing IQ-wise that makes them any different. The sensor you'll find in many Nikon, Pentax and Sony DSLR/SLT models is the very same one in several Sony's NEX models, for example. As with anything, the mirrorless cameras are a package of advantages and disadvantages that have to be weighed against your needs and likes. They are indeed much more compact, lighter, and very capable, while they also inevitably suffer from smaller grips and ergonomic differences, smaller buffers, and less battery life, and use different focus systems.

As for the low light needs, again - the brand won't be a factor here - the same lovely low light photos can be taken with any brand of DSLR, SLT, or mirrorless model. What will make the better results are the lens used, the photographer who takes the shot, and the processing technique or software they use. Brand name is just about the LEAST important factor in how good the IQ of any of these cameras is!

Take the time to research the sensors - look at the mirrorless models in both M4:3 sensor format (Olympus and Panasonic) and APS-C format (Sony, Samsung, Canon), and see the relative differences or similarities in performance compared to DSLRs and SLT models. Try out some of the Sony SLT models in person to see if you like electronic viewfinders or not - again, they have some big advantages and some disadvantages compared to shooting with an optical viewfinder, and you may love it, not like it, or be completely adaptable to either. Once you start honing in on systems you like, make sure they have the lenses you'll want to use...most of the DSLR/SLT systems have 100+ lenses available to them, between the manufacturer lineup and third party lens makers, and even the smallest of them will stretch to over 300 lenses available if you include older autofocus lenses that can be bought used and still work fine. The mirrorless systems on the other hand all have much smaller lens selection that will autofocus - still might be plenty to meet your needs, but the largest of them (M4:3) only have 30 or so lenses available and some are so new they only have 2 or 3 (Canon) - Sony and Samsung both have 10-20 lenses for their mounts that will autofocus. But a side perk of these mirrorless systems is that if you're willing to forego autofocus, they can actually mount tens of thousands of lenses from nearly any mount ever made in history.

Good luck, and hope any of that helps!

Thanks so much for taking your time to give me such an informative answer. I looked at some of your photography and Im rally jealous of your disney pictures they are fantastic.
I thought about it and Im going to go with the Canon T4I. My sister is giving me a 50mm 1.4 lens which im really happy about. That should be good for the low light shots. Now I need to decide what to pair up with the 50mm lens. Do I go with
1. Canon 18-135mm EF-S IS STM Lens

or

2. Canon 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS + 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III Telephoto Zoom Lens

I could really use some help with the lens?????
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Old 08-14-2012, 11:03 PM   #18
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If you're talking about the Canon 75-300 f/4-5.6 run far, far away. It's the only Canon lens I would tell someone not to buy. Ever. It was an adequate lens for film but it's purple fringe, lack of contrast and overall softness really show with digital. The only reason I have mine still (I've had mine since the 90's) is because it really isn't worth selling and every once in a while I do use it for that little bit of extra reach. If low cost is your aim the Canon 55-250 is a solid entry level lens or you can go even cheaper used with a 70-210 f/4 (check KEH.com), which is an outstanding older lens with near L quality optics. There are also tele-zoom offerings in the same price range from Sigma and Tamron that I'd go for before getting the Canon 75-300.
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Old 08-15-2012, 01:24 AM   #19
MolonLabe
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kbritton View Post
Thanks so much for taking your time to give me such an informative answer. I looked at some of your photography and Im rally jealous of your disney pictures they are fantastic.
I thought about it and Im going to go with the Canon T4I. My sister is giving me a 50mm 1.4 lens which im really happy about. That should be good for the low light shots. Now I need to decide what to pair up with the 50mm lens. Do I go with
1. Canon 18-135mm EF-S IS STM Lens

or

2. Canon 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS + 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III Telephoto Zoom Lens

I could really use some help with the lens?????
I'm a n00b but I wish I would have waited for the 18-135 STM lens. I still probably would have bought the 18-55 separately but right now you can't get the 18-135 any way but in the kit.

If you decide on the 18-55, I will trade you mine (It's like new, completely pristine) for the 18-135stm and compensate you for the troubles and cost difference.

I've got my 18-55 range covered with another lens and the STM is something I'm lacking for what I want to do with it.
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Old 08-15-2012, 12:54 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kbritton View Post
I thought about it and Im going to go with the Canon T4I. My sister is giving me a 50mm 1.4 lens which im really happy about. That should be good for the low light shots. Now I need to decide what to pair up with the 50mm lens. Do I go with
1. Canon 18-135mm EF-S IS STM Lens

or

2. Canon 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS + 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III Telephoto Zoom Lens

I could really use some help with the lens?????
I agree with Photochick, do not get the 75-300 !
The 55-250IS is often on sale for $150, it's a much better telephoto and sometimes paired with the 18-55IS as a kit which is a good inexpensive combination for starting out. But I've heard the newer 18-135 is better for video (and better than the older version )
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