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Old 08-24-2010, 12:30 PM   #16
rogerlover
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the movie is purposely not being released in north america at all and Disney has stated several times that they have no plans to change their stance.

It has been released throughout Europe on VHS and i think laserdisc, although not on DVD, pretty much all pirate copies are taken from European VHS copies
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Old 08-24-2010, 05:45 PM   #17
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I do not recall seeing the "whole" movie as a child, but I do remember watching filmstrips of it in school. The kids and I just watched the movie on youtube, and I thought it was a beautiful movie. It just feels like a classic Disney movie. I really do not understand why this will not be re-released. If Gone with the Wind can be on DVD, why not this one?
As an African American, I gotta tell you I find both of them offensive. so I'm definitely in the don't release category.

The problem is with the perpetuation of the "happy Darkie" theme in both movies. Yes slavery occured but these movies tend to have the "we were sooo happy to be slaves or friend with XXX and our lifes were just filled with us dancing and singing". uuugh. I absolutely hate that. I've read people who say "well some blacks were treated good" excuse me?

I always think in the back of my mind would they make a movie portray holocaust prisoners "happy" to be in the "work camps".

Just another perspective.
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Old 08-26-2010, 04:46 PM   #18
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yes they were offensive movies, if they are treated as correct, the same way that most comics/cartoon released during the second world war are now considered offensive yet they are reproduced and released.

Does not allowing people to watch the movie stop slavery from happening? should we also ban Tom Sawyer because that's no longer consistant with current morals?
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Old 08-26-2010, 05:32 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by rogerlover View Post
yes they were offensive movies, if they are treated as correct, the same way that most comics/cartoon released during the second world war are now considered offensive yet they are reproduced and released.

Does not allowing people to watch the movie stop slavery from happening? should we also ban Tom Sawyer because that's no longer consistant with current morals?
No, but remember Disney is a "for profit" corporation. I would expect them to make sure their image is as "all inclusive" as possible. Would you risk a boycott from 15% of the buying population on some thing that probably would not bring in substantial gains? Especially since releasing it would be portrayed as the equivalent of saying "yes, we know you guys hate the movie but we don't give a crap".

Most minorities are extremely sensitive to how the are portrayed in the media. That's why Hispanics are going through such great lengths to make sure they are not always portrayed as "illegal immigrants".

It's why many, many africans americans did not go to see the Blind side. We are really tired of the "Benevolent white person swooping down to save the poor black child" and it probably was a great movie but when that's all you see, it gets tiresome. My parents were a lawyer and police officer, awarded bronze medal during Korea and Vietnam. raised 3 successful kids (one annapolis graduate, one chemist and a dentist) Where are those stories?

That's why Disney went through so many focus groups to make sure Tiana was marketedly correctly. Pisses off a large segment of your customers generally is not a good way to conduct business.
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Old 09-15-2010, 08:34 AM   #20
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It is still movie history. I minored in film studies and majored in history. I watched Birth of a Nation in my film studies class in college. Like a previous poster said, Gone With the Wind had insensative moments. And I know that I, as an educated and mature white individual, am not watching these movies and taking them seriously. I watch them for their entertainment value and historical value. I am also a Christian who follows the teachings of Jesus. I know full and well that there are shows like South Park that make fun of Christianity. If I don't like it, I just don't watch it. There are a lot of people out there who love South Park but do not condone religious intolerance. They watch it because they find it funny. Shows that make fun of Christianity are not my cup of tea, so I don't watch. Now a movie like Song of the South, I would very much like to see due to its historical relevence and I firmly believe Disney should release it and I see no way whatsoever that such an action would be culturally insensative. I do not believe anyone watching it would feel that is still Disney's way of potraying African Americans. Just my two cents.
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Old 09-19-2010, 10:09 PM   #21
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wow lots of posts
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Old 09-19-2010, 10:14 PM   #22
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Have you seen this movie since you were an adult? I have not. However the ride at Disney is a family favorite. I agree that the movie may be offensive. In fact, one of the reasons I wanted to find the movie was to analyze with a mature eye. Your comment about the holocaust seemed ironic as I would argue your solution of ignoring "Song of the South" (as well as Huckleberry Finn, Gone With The Wind to name a few) trying to keep it hidden and unreleased is akin to the horrors of those who would pretend the holocaust did not happen.
Quote:
Originally Posted by eliza61 View Post
As an African American, I gotta tell you I find both of them offensive. so I'm definitely in the don't release category.

The problem is with the perpetuation of the "happy Darkie" theme in both movies. Yes slavery occured but these movies tend to have the "we were sooo happy to be slaves or friend with XXX and our lifes were just filled with us dancing and singing". uuugh. I absolutely hate that. I've read people who say "well some blacks were treated good" excuse me?

I always think in the back of my mind would they make a movie portray holocaust prisoners "happy" to be in the "work camps".

Just another perspective.

Last edited by Melnalala; 09-19-2010 at 10:22 PM.
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Old 09-21-2010, 12:32 AM   #23
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I heard that it will never be released in the USA, however, I actually looked, and found it on Ebay. It was in an overseas country but I don't remember which one. Doesn't matter. That was months ago. I'm sure if you look now, they'll be a seller in Europe with it for you.
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Old 09-21-2010, 12:43 AM   #24
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Have you seen this movie since you were an adult? I have not. However the ride at Disney is a family favorite. I agree that the movie may be offensive. In fact, one of the reasons I wanted to find the movie was to analyze with a mature eye. Your comment about the holocaust seemed ironic as I would argue your solution of ignoring "Song of the South" (as well as Huckleberry Finn, Gone With The Wind to name a few) trying to keep it hidden and unreleased is akin to the horrors of those who would pretend the holocaust did not happen.
As a Jewish person. I'm gonna have to agree with you. It is instructive to look at these films with a modern eye and learn from them. One time, back in the 80's when my oldest daughter was a pre-schooler, I purchased a combo pack of VHS tapes of really really old cartoons. Some were in black and white... they included Lil' Audrey and Raggedy Ann among others. I was sitting there one day watching an old Lil Audrey cartoon with my daughter when I almost fell out of my chair and my mouth dropped to the floor as I was shocked at the way black people were portrayed. Not only were they drawn in a racist way, their accents were exaggerated and their roles were so stereotyped. I just couldn't believe it!! This old cartoon HAD to be from the 1930's based on the way the men were dressed and what the automobiles looked like. This however, was a teachable moment. as I explained to my daughter the problem with this old cartoon and how things have changed. We talked about just how wrong this whole cartoon was. The cartoons however, had plots that dealt with what a brat Lil' Audrey was! Everything else was ancillary. It was the backdrop to a long ago world that we can't believe actually existed.

I remember seeing Song of the South as a child. I loved Uncle Remus because he seemed so nice. You just wanted to sit in his lap and have him tell you a story. He was like the best grandpa ever! I'd love to have the opportunity to see this old movie through adult and modern eyes.
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Old 09-22-2010, 02:20 PM   #25
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I had to watch it after all the discussion. It's a shame because my kids loved it. There are 10 parts. Here's the first:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JrAKhHcZM-Y
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Old 09-27-2010, 08:44 PM   #26
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Originally Posted by Mindy5767 View Post
As a Jewish person. I'm gonna have to agree with you. It is instructive to look at these films with a modern eye and learn from them. One time, back in the 80's when my oldest daughter was a pre-schooler, I purchased a combo pack of VHS tapes of really really old cartoons. Some were in black and white... they included Lil' Audrey and Raggedy Ann among others. I was sitting there one day watching an old Lil Audrey cartoon with my daughter when I almost fell out of my chair and my mouth dropped to the floor as I was shocked at the way black people were portrayed. Not only were they drawn in a racist way, their accents were exaggerated and their roles were so stereotyped. I just couldn't believe it!! This old cartoon HAD to be from the 1930's based on the way the men were dressed and what the automobiles looked like. This however, was a teachable moment. as I explained to my daughter the problem with this old cartoon and how things have changed. We talked about just how wrong this whole cartoon was. The cartoons however, had plots that dealt with what a brat Lil' Audrey was! Everything else was ancillary. It was the backdrop to a long ago world that we can't believe actually existed.

I remember seeing Song of the South as a child. I loved Uncle Remus because he seemed so nice. You just wanted to sit in his lap and have him tell you a story. He was like the best grandpa ever! I'd love to have the opportunity to see this old movie through adult and modern eyes.
Thank you -
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Old 02-22-2011, 11:31 AM   #27
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I found the Little Audrey and Lulu videos on Youtube and I think it was Lulu that was the one that was so racist... but really.... most cartoons of the period were. Those were just so glaring. Its hard for us now, to look back, and believe that people actually thought this was ok! That's why it is so important to watch and critique and discuss... not hide. History that is not learned from, gets repeated. We all know that. Song of the South can certainly be appreciated for the technology it brought to film making and the songs themselves. Who doesn't want to have a Zippedy Doo Dah day?
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Old 02-22-2011, 06:22 PM   #28
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I wondered if Song of the South was an offensive movie. I hadn't seen it since I was a child. I was able to find it on youtube. I personally didn't find it offensive. Uncle Remus is a sweetheart who likes to tell stories that teach important moral lessons. There wasn't any reason to believe he was a slave or anything more or less than a kindly neighbour to the family the little boy were staying with. I think anyone who thinks this film is offensive should watch it again.
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Old 02-23-2011, 11:58 AM   #29
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I think it is a great idea to watch so people can learn. It happened, that makes it history. The point of studying history is to learn from mistakes, like so many people have said. Circulating copies of Birth of a Nation doesn't mean that the company believes in the movie, but maybe the purpose that the movie has in today's society. I personally want my kids to be able to see how media has changed the last 100 years.
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Old 02-23-2011, 12:06 PM   #30
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I personally want my kids to be able to see how media has changed the last 100 years.
You are so right. We forget about how things have changed. Remember when Jeannie's costume from I Dream of Jeannie was considered racy!!
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