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Old 09-06-2010, 11:56 PM   #31
pookersmom
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Oh, I dunno -- I heard and saw some pretty evil stuff that I didn't usually see at home from my son the first time we took him, at the age of 5. It was over 100 degrees out, he wasn't used to so much walking, etc. etc. So he had some truly crabby moments and he wasn't afraid to express them. Not any knock down drag out tantrums, but he was awfully rude and snippy and whiny -- three things I cannot stand. So I had to reign him in quite a few times. And I distinctly recall being complimented on my mad parenting skillz by an older gentleman in the popcorn line one afternoon. He was impressed that I was actually disciplining the child.
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Old 09-06-2010, 11:58 PM   #32
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My child is an angel in the parks, I am the one who meltsdown

Ok I said it LOL

Seriously, if your normally angelic child just out of the blue starts to misbehave and injure the person in front of them by climbing up the rail in TSM. Apologize and don't let the little darling do it again. And don't encourage them to climb up again so you can take a pic. When they fall the second time they are going to hit cement and not the woman in front of them.


I guess you could say I did cause another melt down. I will admit I was in the wrong I was pushing my child in stroller in a straight line toward the entrance. A "lady" quickly tried to change direction and walked into my stroller and hit my child. The "lady" proceeded to call me every name in the book (in front of my young child). I wished her a "magical" day.
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Old 09-07-2010, 12:01 AM   #33
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Little ones are going to melt down. It happens, and I think most parents try to do their best to diffuse the situation.

Heck, I've seen quite a few adult meltdowns at WDW...my favorite was the redneck couple swearing and swinging at each other in front of IASW.

When did we all get so sensitive? In the past few days, I've seen threads about how people are traumatized by bubbles. Or traumatized by drinkers at Epcot. Really? Are people that sheltered at home that some kid blowing bubbles or having a tantrum is going to send them into full blown panic attack? Seeing someone who's tipsy is going to send you or your kids down the path of vice and ruin?

There are things that annoy me, sure. But if they bothered me that much, I'd just stay home. I look at some of the more colorful things that happen as prime people watching opportunity.
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Old 09-07-2010, 12:05 AM   #34
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Originally Posted by luvthemouse71 View Post
Little ones are going to melt down. It happens, and I think most parents try to do their best to diffuse the situation.

Heck, I've seen quite a few adult meltdowns at WDW...my favorite was the redneck couple swearing and swinging at each other in front of IASW.

When did we all get so sensitive? In the past few days, I've seen threads about how people are traumatized by bubbles. Or traumatized by drinkers at Epcot. Really? Are people that sheltered at home that some kid blowing bubbles or having a tantrum is going to send them into full blown panic attack? Seeing someone who's tipsy is going to send you or your kids down the path of vice and ruin?

There are things that annoy me, sure. But if they bothered me that much, I'd just stay home. I look at some of the more colorful things that happen as prime people watching opportunity.
But thanks to the DIS, I learned that Children with bubbles is bad, but children sitting at/in the Bar is acceptable. (Who knew? LOL)
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Old 09-07-2010, 12:08 AM   #35
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but children sitting at/in the Bar is acceptable. (Who knew? LOL)
I missed this somehow!
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Old 09-07-2010, 12:24 AM   #36
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... children sitting at/in the Bar is acceptable.
not. bad form. old school values.

okay. that was my last post to this thread. i'm going to resist temptation and not respond any more.
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Old 09-07-2010, 03:54 AM   #37
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As someone who does not have children, I still understand that they get hot and tired and cranky just like I do . I can usually tell if a child is getting upset because they are tired, or they aren't feeling well, and I just look the other way. I can also usually tell if they're throwing a tantrum to get attention. In those cases, I look to see how the parent is handling the situation. If it looks like they are at least attempting to contain the tantrum, then I have no problems. To be honest, the ones I really hate are the parents who get right up in their kids faces and yell at them about how they spent x amount of money to come to WDW so they better just shut up and have fun ! I can't tell you how many times I've seen that happen .

My parents raised us with the fact that if we misbehaved for no reason, we would leave whereever we were - a store, a park, or even WDW. We knew they meant it, because they followed through. I don't recall them ever having to correct our behavior at WDW, although I can remember Mom leaving a full cart of groceries at the store and taking us home one day (I don't remember what we did though . . . .). While I agree that "kids will be kids" it's how the adults handle it that matters.

It's like my first flight to the UK. There was a little girl, maybe 18 months, who was fine on the ground, but about halfway through take off she let out a scream and then cried at the top of her lungs for a good hour or more. You could tell the child was in agony over something, I'm assuming her ears, and the mom was trying to soothe her. A lot of people would have come to a forum like this and posted a scathing report about the child who wouldn't stop screaming. But in this case, you could tell there was something major going on, and you really felt sorry for both the child and the mother. Sure, it was annoying - but the point is, it wasn't deliberate.

On the other hand, there was the toddler, maybe 4 years old, at the Concourse Steakhouse who got under the table and was head-butting the table and screaming at the top of his lungs. The parents sat there saying in a sing-song kind of voice "stop that right now Johnny", "if you don't stop that, we'll have to go back to the room", "don't do that Johnny", and they just kept saying those things over and over for the entire duration of their meal. At no point did they actually do anything about the fact that their child was creating a major disturbance in the restaurant. They didn't leave the restaurant even for a small "time out" to show they meant business. In that case, there were a lot of us, including other families with children, who were more than a little annoyed.
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Old 09-07-2010, 04:02 AM   #38
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I guess I have been lucky my kids are almost 17 and 14 and going since they were 2 & 5 but they never once acted up! I don't know why but I never ever had any problems with either of them in public. Even when I know they were over tired, as I type this I realize how fortunate I have been
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Old 09-07-2010, 05:22 AM   #39
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My son is an amazing child with Autism. His 'differences' are not always obvious if we are just passing by and although we have been very lucky because he so LOVES DW we are very much aware of his sensory, emotional and social issues and have tried very hard to accommodate them on vacation. It has taken years to have a thick enough skin and be able to advocate well enough for my son - I DO apologize for any 'akward' moments another may face but I am usually concentrating on my child and his immediate needs. I have had to remove him from certain areas or hold him as best I can until he can be helped to calm down. It happens so quickly sometimes and comes from almost 'out of the blue' that it can be mind-boggling to anyone who has never experienced this. I promise we are doing all we can with Applied Behavioral Therapy, Occupational Therapy, IEP, supplements and in my son's case anti-seizure medication as well as daily planning and extreme vacation planning. Please remember there are many children who have invisible disabilities and although we have positive reinforcement and consequences for his actions it is a busy road indeed. We are there to enjoy our vacation and will certainly 'parent' our children, I promise - if something offends you that my children do, please make me aware of it and I WILL make sure to take care of it as it is my responsibility as the parent of my child - we've had the 'he needs an a-whuppin' moments and I know that will not CURE his Autism, believe me it HURTS when people point us out and make snide comments and I am the first to pass on any info I can about Autism. Thank you for being a friend to someone with Autism.
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Old 09-07-2010, 05:43 AM   #40
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We just got back from a hot, humid WDW vacation - and the kids were much better behaved than the adults we saw there! Had to cover my niece's ears at World Showcase, as some ignorant man was ranting a blue streak at the top of his lungs to his friends. Wish I could have thrown him in the lagoon to cool off his temper, but he was bigger than me...

My DD16 spent a lot of her vacation time handing out silly bands to kids who needed a little distraction to get out of an escalating situation. She got at least a dozen kids to stop crying, many thank yous from the parents, and even asked one little princess for her autograph! My heart just swelled up and nearly burst with pride as I watched her spread some magic. She has her heart set on working for Disney now. She's looking into the college program, and I think she'd make a great CM!

The key to a more carefree vacation is to go at the child's pace, no matter the age. I know the desire to do it all, but that just makes for overtired, overstimulated kids, and then "disaster strikes"! We've always done WDW from the kids' viewpoint - if they are having fun, so are we!
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Old 09-07-2010, 06:00 AM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mousireid View Post
My son is an amazing child with Autism. His 'differences' are not always obvious if we are just passing by and although we have been very lucky because he so LOVES DW we are very much aware of his sensory, emotional and social issues and have tried very hard to accommodate them on vacation. It has taken years to have a thick enough skin and be able to advocate well enough for my son - I DO apologize for any 'akward' moments another may face but I am usually concentrating on my child and his immediate needs. I have had to remove him from certain areas or hold him as best I can until he can be helped to calm down. It happens so quickly sometimes and comes from almost 'out of the blue' that it can be mind-boggling to anyone who has never experienced this. I promise we are doing all we can with Applied Behavioral Therapy, Occupational Therapy, IEP, supplements and in my son's case anti-seizure medication as well as daily planning and extreme vacation planning. Please remember there are many children who have invisible disabilities and although we have positive reinforcement and consequences for his actions it is a busy road indeed. We are there to enjoy our vacation and will certainly 'parent' our children, I promise - if something offends you that my children do, please make me aware of it and I WILL make sure to take care of it as it is my responsibility as the parent of my child - we've had the 'he needs an a-whuppin' moments and I know that will not CURE his Autism, believe me it HURTS when people point us out and make snide comments and I am the first to pass on any info I can about Autism. Thank you for being a friend to someone with Autism.

Thank you for posting this, mousireid. I have a fourteen-year-old with Asperger's (an autistic spectrum disorder) and he still has meltdowns. You would not know he's on the spectrum just by looking at him or even in casual conversation. There have been times when I have just wanted to melt into the ground because of the looks we get sometimes. Please be aware that roughly 1 in 100 children are affected by autism, many of whom are on the end of the spectrum which allows them to function to a degree that their disability is not readily apparent to the casual observer. To put that in perspective, in 2009 there were 17.2 million visitors to Magic Kingdom. If half of those were children Magic Kingdom may have seen around 86,000 children on the spectrum last year.

All this to say, please try to remember that you really have no clue as to what challenges the family your judging deals with irl. I try my best to look out for the signals that my son is struggling to maintain and diffuse situations as best I can when I've missed the earlier signals. I have also spent many a meal outside in the car with my son so he would not disrupt the rest of the restaurant, gone home early from an event (or a park) when he's reached the tipping point, apologized for my son when he's been disruptive and make sure I'm staying on top of his tendency to fidget and want to find something to do with his hands. I'm human though and sometimes I miss something. And as mousireid said so well, no amount of 'whuppin' in his earlier years would have made him less autistic.
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Old 09-07-2010, 06:38 AM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mousireid View Post
My son is an amazing child with Autism. His 'differences' are not always obvious if we are just passing by and although we have been very lucky because he so LOVES DW we are very much aware of his sensory, emotional and social issues and have tried very hard to accommodate them on vacation. It has taken years to have a thick enough skin and be able to advocate well enough for my son - I DO apologize for any 'akward' moments another may face but I am usually concentrating on my child and his immediate needs. I have had to remove him from certain areas or hold him as best I can until he can be helped to calm down. It happens so quickly sometimes and comes from almost 'out of the blue' that it can be mind-boggling to anyone who has never experienced this. I promise we are doing all we can with Applied Behavioral Therapy, Occupational Therapy, IEP, supplements and in my son's case anti-seizure medication as well as daily planning and extreme vacation planning. Please remember there are many children who have invisible disabilities and although we have positive reinforcement and consequences for his actions it is a busy road indeed. We are there to enjoy our vacation and will certainly 'parent' our children, I promise - if something offends you that my children do, please make me aware of it and I WILL make sure to take care of it as it is my responsibility as the parent of my child - we've had the 'he needs an a-whuppin' moments and I know that will not CURE his Autism, believe me it HURTS when people point us out and make snide comments and I am the first to pass on any info I can about Autism. Thank you for being a friend to someone with Autism.
I'm very pleased that you posted this. Many people think that just because a child has special needs they can't learn. You, on the other hand have shown how you try to cope and teach your child better behaviour skills. These skills can be taught anywhere-home, WDW, etc. And that's what a good parent does. They don't ignore bad behavior, but they teach, distract, dicipline, and reward good behavior. Parenting is a 24/7 job, and I applaud all you parents who are working at raising your child to rise up to the best he or she can be. Sorry, I didn't mean to take this thread off topic.
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Old 09-07-2010, 06:46 AM   #43
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I agree with the last the posters. My oldest has ADHD, Tourettes, anxiety disorder, speech aprexia (plus a few more). You would never know by looking at him that he is not "normal". You would see a boy who is snappy and does some things that may seem funny to you. My 2nd oldest has ADHD also, as do I. We are just a family out to have a good time at the House of Mouse. My oldest sons ticks are mostly verbal, but he does have some ticks that are not. I understand that it can annoy other people (and have had people make passive agressive comments about it) but there is nothing he can do. And hearing the muttered comments from those around us only makes his anxiety worse. Add in raging puberty from him and the starts of it for my 2nd and you have some kids that others may see as badly behaved, at times.

I lack a filter for noise. For example, at a sit down resturant I can hear the conversations of at least the next 4 tables around me. I can hear the music piped in with clarity. I can hear the clock ticking. It can be overwhelming. Its like being a toddler.

What do I think of kids whose parents are in the middle of a melt down? I think that they are doing the best they can, in the situation they are presented. Am I right 100% of the time? Maybe not, but I'm more then willing to give them the benefit of the doubt. I would hope that everyone would remember that a little kindness and joy will spread better then a sour comment
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Old 09-07-2010, 06:59 AM   #44
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We don't have kids yet, but I can't say at any time on our WDW trips have any kids being upset/naughty really bothered us.

A few times children would start crying in shows etc, but in all cases the parents went outside with them, or watched from over at the side and rocked them a little etc.

One day we were getting back to AKL and there was a Dad sat on the bench outside Zawadi on the way back from the bus stop, and he had a tiny cinderella (maybe 3 and 4) who was absolutely screaming her lungs out, stomping her feet, just generally seeing red.

He was keeping an eye on her that she wasn't getting in anyone's way, but wasn't talking to her and just letting her get it out her system. People were walking by and glaring like he was stood there provoking here. I just smiled at him and said "we all feel like that at the end the day sometimes", and he seemed so grateful.

I'd bet good money she was back in her stroller and fast asleep within 5 minutes or so, but kudos to him for just taking her outside and letting her get over it.

I mean we can all get overwhelmed in WDW with all the sights and sounds and heat, and when you're little I think it can be a bit too much to handle!
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Old 09-07-2010, 06:59 AM   #45
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I raised two great kids who knew what behavior was acceptable and what behavior would not be tolerated. What bugs me at WDW or anywhere else, is when bad behavior is ignored by the parents. Mom and/or Dad are having a conversation or talking or texting on their phone and the kids are running wild. How many times have you been some place and a kid is trying to the attention of their parent. "Mom, Mom, Mom, Mom" on and on. I can hear them, how come Mom can't? How long would Mom tolerate being ignored before she blows her top.

I saw this at a McDonald's last week. Dad is sitting at a booth next to a toddler in a highchair at the end of the table. A boy around 5 or 6 is standing waiting. Mom arrives with the food. Boy wants to sit at the end, Mom wants him to move in on the seat. She must have told the kid 10 times to sit down. She finally gives up and slides in. There was really no good reason for Mom not to give the seat he wanted at the beginning. What she teaches him by finally giving in is that he can get anything he wants if he argues long enough.

My theory is : Don't sweat the small stuff. The kids will be more cooperative on the important stuff.

BTW, I have never made any comment to a parent whose kid is being 'bad'. (Or to the kid.) I do not need an apology from a parent, unless the kid has actually bumped into me.

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