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Old 09-29-2011, 01:42 PM   #1
Dreamer2012
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Smile Princess 1/2 walkers?

Hi everyone! I am a real "newbie", but have talked my BFF into walking this marathon in 2012. We are registered, made our flights and hotel reservations and have begun "training". I would love to hear from anyone who has walked this before or who like us will be attempting this for the first time. We are terriffied of being "swept" - I wanted to start this because I have read a lot about the runners and thier super times (wish we could do that...) but have not found a place for the walkers to talk about thier training strategies or get advice from other walkers....I hope some of you will help us newbies!
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Old 10-02-2011, 12:29 PM   #2
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I feel your pain--I have nightmares about being swepted! If you do your training, you will be fine! I follow the Galloway method, doing 1 minute walking and then 1 minute of running. I have been so happy with it and it really helped my time. Google the Galloway plan, there is lots of info out there. I am new too, started running over the winter. I did a local 10 miler about a month ago and came in with about 14 minutes per mile. Try doing some local races to get the feel of it and improve your time. I have a blog about training for the Disney Princess. There is a link below. See you at the race! You will do great.
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Old 10-03-2011, 09:35 AM   #3
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Thanks for the encouragement! We have just begun the Galloway program - but am finding the running very difficult. My friend ha a bit easier time of it - I think because she ran when she younger or sports teams and I did not. I was a swimmer/Diver - NO RUNNING NEEDED! Therefore I just can not get the form etc down - but I keep trying. I hold out very little hope that I will be able to run any of it - so I need to make sure that my walking pace is less than the 16 min per mile required. I have you done this race before? Would love to hear your experience if so....
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Old 10-03-2011, 10:28 AM   #4
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Hi Dreamer, I'm not a walker but I am a runner...and a running coach and I very likely tell you why the running is so tough for you: You are running too fast. This is the single most common rookie mistake.

Here is the thing... when you train for endurance events, speed comes as a function of fitness. You increase your overall fitness by walking (or running) further and longer. The only way to accomplish this is by slowing down so that you can keep going. If during your run interval, if I ran up beside you and asked how your day is going...and you were too out of breath to respond, you are going too fast. It only takes a 70-80% effort to train, anything more than that is only exhausting you and actually slowing you down.

So for now, don't worry about speed at. all. Focus your efforts on time and distance. The speed will come. I promise.
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Old 10-03-2011, 02:22 PM   #5
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Dreamer2012, I AM a walker and also not able to run but have improved my walking style to the point where I pass many runners.

Funny thing is that we walked before running but so many adults seem to feel they are not accomplishing anything unless they are running or at least attempting to do so. Running can cause great pain and injury and unless you take things slowly you can very well be joining the masses who do injure themselves.

Build up your base by following training schedules that can be found on the net or in books and if you really want to run you might have to join a running club for expert advice.

I just finished my tempo 13.12 miles this morning in 2:18:18 walking and feel great right now. Please don't feel that you have to run to prove something, just get out and enjoy your training and things will jell. Trust me.

BTW, I am 61yo and just started walking 1 1/2 years ago so age does not have to limit your accomplishments. Come on over to Events/Competition and join in there.
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Old 10-03-2011, 03:11 PM   #6
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Quote:
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I just finished my tempo 13.12 miles this morning in 2:18:18 walking and feel great right now. Please don't feel that you have to run to prove something, just get out and enjoy your training and things will jell. Trust me.
Amazing! I'm aiming for a 2:36 or better finish doing a 5 run/ 1 walk combo for the Princess and that is awesome. I might have to rethink my strategy. .

OP to answer your question, I just ran/walked the Disney Wine and Dine 1/2 Marathon. There are runners and walkers of all shapes and sizes at all different paces. I passed a woman walking with a CANE covered in glow sticks. I have no idea if she finished, but God bless her, she was doing it.

I just checked the Wine and Dine results and the last walkers finished the half in 3 hours 59 minutes and 21 seconds. That's a 18 minute mile plus pace. Disney threatens to sweep people up but it looks like they don't do it. In fact there were close to 1,000 runners over the 3 hour and 30 minute finish requirement time.

So don't worry about time and pace right now. Just make sure you are following a program and getting in a few shorter walks during the week and a long walk on the weekend!
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Old 10-03-2011, 03:29 PM   #7
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Well said John.
Running has an almost 100% injury rate and the vast majority of those are people trying to do too much too soon.

That is an amazing walk speed! I bet you do pass quite a few runners.
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Old 10-23-2011, 07:36 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John VN View Post

I just finished my tempo 13.12 miles this morning in 2:18:18 walking and feel great right now. Please don't feel that you have to run to prove something, just get out and enjoy your training and things will jell. Trust me.

BTW, I am 61yo and just started walking 1 1/2 years ago so age does not have to limit your accomplishments. Come on over to Events/Competition and join in there.
Um...I did my first half marathon last week, and with a run-walk combo, came nowhere near 2:18.

That is awesome. Thanks for sharing and inspiring!
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Old 10-03-2011, 05:58 PM   #9
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I'm totally new too. Until now my idea of exercising has been going to the grocery store. I hope we can cross the finish line together!

I do have a question for the "vets" though. Right now I am jog/walking 1 min / 2 mins for 20 mins total, but even that I can't complete. When I finish I get lightheaded, migraines, my head feels like it's full of pressure (my ears even pop!). I also shake for several hours. Today I started crying for no real reason. Is this normal or am I doing something wrong? I am healthy, just not fit, and I'm young, so I didn't think I needed medical clearance?

I'm still determined to do this somehow, but I want to make sure I don't do it "wrong" and hurt myself, and I get discouraged easily when it comes to physical activities (lots of being yelled at in gym).
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Old 10-03-2011, 10:00 PM   #10
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I do have a question for the "vets" though. Right now I am jog/walking 1 min / 2 mins for 20 mins total, but even that I can't complete. When I finish I get lightheaded, migraines, my head feels like it's full of pressure (my ears even pop!). I also shake for several hours. Today I started crying for no real reason. Is this normal or am I doing something wrong? I am healthy, just not fit, and I'm young, so I didn't think I needed medical clearance?
That is not normal. If you can't walk/jog at a 2 minute/1 minute ratio for 20 minutes then its too much for you right now. For someone doing a 16 mm, Jeff Galloway recommends a 30 sec run and a 60 sec walk. Do that for a few weeks and gradually increase (go to a 30 sec run and a 45 sec walk). I personally downloaded an app to my smartphone called RunKeeper (its free) it ques my intervals so I know when to run/walk. Do not obsesses about pace, you will improve if you work on laying the foundation by a few short training session and 1 long training session a week. I didn't believe it myself - I could barely run a mile when I started in May!

Make sure you hydrate and fuel your body properly! You can't run on empty. The only time I struggled with my running was in the extreme heat of the summer, I just ended up getting up earlier. I always feel good after my runs, challenged, but not sore or feeling sick or crying. If you continue to feel this way even after slowing down your pace, please see your doctor. Good luck.
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Old 10-04-2011, 09:41 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gules View Post
I do have a question for the "vets" though. Right now I am jog/walking 1 min / 2 mins for 20 mins total, but even that I can't complete. When I finish I get lightheaded, migraines, my head feels like it's full of pressure (my ears even pop!). I also shake for several hours. Today I started crying for no real reason. Is this normal or am I doing something wrong? I am healthy, just not fit, and I'm young, so I didn't think I needed medical clearance?
I'll echo what jenjacobs said: Hydration and fuel are key. Shaking is usually symptomatic of critically low blood sugar and the rest sounds a lot like a blood pressure spike which is often a hydration issue.

I don't know what your diet is like but endurance sports require some attention to keeping a decent level of hydration and adequate carbohydrates in the diet to fuel.

The other way this can happen is if you are pushing yourself too hard. We are surrounded by this "no pain/no gain" BS, images of trainers screaming at people to do more and we come up with this notion that if you aren't going past the edge of your ability, you aren't doing enough...this is patently false.

You will see your best progress in running or walking at a 70-80% effort. This is often measured as a percentage of theoretical maximum heart rate but the easy way to tell is...could you carry on a conversation? If the answer is "no" slow down until you could. People always give me this incredulous look when I tell them that going faster and longer means slowing down but this is how even elite athletes train.

All endurance sports are aerobic in nature, the only way to train your aerobic energy systems is by gradually increasing the length of time it can feed you energy. It really doesn't care about the intensity level, it just cares about time.

This is why starting with a walking program, even if you are healthy and young is a good idea. It gets your energy systems used to working for a longer duration and it makes your body strong enough to avoid injury when you do begin running. Once you can walk at a brisk pace for half an hour without pain and without being seriously out of breath (or lightheaded, etc.) THEN it's time to start throwing some short run intervals in there...if you want.
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Old 10-04-2011, 10:32 AM   #12
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People, please, please, please stop beating up on yourselves.

CSGeorge has it right! I do not know your ages but take it from this 61yo geezer, better or perfect takes much more practice, "training" as one gets older.

Take things slower and focus on all aspects of your training. Feel your body as you are moving and listen to your body. Personally, I think listening to music is great for accomplished athletes but should not be done by newbies because they are not yet tuned into their body and how it is working or not working. Even now I walk with open ears, no music because I focus intently on myself. My bad knees do talk to me and I correct things to make them happy otherwise my pace could not be maintained.

Even the slightest run interval can cause injury, so be careful. The Galloway Method might get one to the finish line a little faster but if the run segments causes an injury, my feeling is I rather be slower and not in pain. The time and money not spent at a Dr. is better spent rewarding myself.

Hope that made sense.
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Old 10-04-2011, 10:57 AM   #13
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Personally, I think listening to music is great for accomplished athletes but should not be done by newbies because they are not yet tuned into their body and how it is working or not working.
EXCELLENT point.
I'm a fairly seasoned runner and even now, I pull out the earbuds before I do something risky...it happened just this Saturday during a half-marathon. I started at a very conservative pace due to a recent injury, though I'm not sure a Spartan Race counts as a running injury. Once it became clear that it was healed and I decided to RACE, I wanted to be very focused, present, and aware so that if anything wasn't 100%, I could slow it back down before I did more damage.

FWIW John, I'm a "masters runner" too (44).
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Old 10-04-2011, 11:10 AM   #14
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Thanks guys! I think I will back off more for now, and try the shorter intervals to see where that gets me. I do have a temp. high blood pressure problem due to a medication I'm taking right now, but it should be fixed soon. I'll see how that affects things when I get it patched up.

The thing is that I don't feel that muscle ache I used to get when I exercised. The good "I can tell I did work" feeling, you know? So I thought I must be doing it wrong. It's a rather pleasant feeling, since you can tell you did work the day before (but not too much!). Should I be feeling that still when I back off the pace?

I'll try to hydrate more and start bringing a snack of some kind. Fruit or candy or something. That way I can get something in my system if I start shaking. Thanks so much again! I'm feeling more confident for my next session tomorrow!

Oh, and John VN, you're one of those 60-somethings I see jogging in the morning on my way to grad classes with a better figure than me, aren't you? I'm so jealous!
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Old 10-04-2011, 11:52 AM   #15
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Glad to help.
If you are achy the next day after running, you over did it.

Here is the thing about running and walking that people forget. It's not like weight lifting in that there is mostly one body system being impacted. You are making HUGE changes in your body and unless you want to be injured, you go as fast as the slowest system. Your long muscles will be among the first things to adapt. Within a few weeks they will easily be able to keep up with what you ask of them as long as you follow a reasonable training schedule. The enzymes that make the complex set of processes that bolster your aerobic fitness and your circulatory system will come along a bit more slowly and your connective tissue takes months to years depending on your body.

I'm not saying that Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness isn't part of a runner's life, it just shouldn't be part of a NEW runner's life. There are too many changes that need to happen to be able to approach that without a high risk of injury.

Good idea with the snack. It's worth mentioning that there are are products specifically made for endurance athletes. The most common of them are gels or gummies. It's not really something to be too concerned with right now but worth knowing.
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