The DIS Discussion Forums - DISboards.com

The DIS Discussion Forums - DISboards.com (http://www.disboards.com/index.php)
-   Disney Resorts (http://www.disboards.com/forumdisplay.php?f=12)
-   -   Dog in the park (http://www.disboards.com/showthread.php?t=3117506)

MacClemsons 05-26-2013 09:43 PM

Dog in the park
 
Saw a dog in HS today - NOT a guide dog from what I could tell because those wear a harness. This was a yorkie. How'd that get through bag check? Are animals allowed in the park? Several SWW event staff saw it and didn't bat an eye.

disneyaddict101 05-26-2013 09:47 PM

They could have said it was a therapy dog to help with stress. I recently began talking to a lady who trains guide dogs to see what id have to do to have a career in that. She said that dogs you see, like Yorkies, could be "used" as dogs to help with stress. While there are dogs that do that, there are also people who just say that to be able to take their dog places. I'm not saying that's why but it could be. It's ridiculous that someone wouldn't just leave their dog at home or board it. But people do it all the time.

Oathkeeper13 05-26-2013 09:51 PM

Similar to therapy dogs for stress, there are also dogs that can sense seizures before they happen. They don't wear the harnesses, but they can be literally be a lifesaver.

MacClemsons 05-26-2013 09:54 PM

Saw this addressed on SWW thread after I posted. Just thought it was strange. She even had a poddy pad for it to use sitting in front of stage.

Bean786 05-26-2013 09:55 PM

Any dog can be a therapy or service dog. We have a pitbull service dog, but we wouldn't bring her to disney because we don't want people to freak out. But I guess technically she can go.

CandleontheWater 05-26-2013 09:58 PM

We just got back from a trip two weeks ago and dogs in general are on the rise in the theme parks. Most of them wore some sort of identification as guide/therapy/medical assistance dogs, but there were some that didn't.

I really wish that WDW would make working dogs wear some sort of identification, be it harness, tag, leash with medical symbols, or something like that. I've been working at teaching my 3 year old never to bother working dogs and never ask to pet or interact with any sort of medical guide dog because they have important jobs to do. Its tough when the dogs don't wear anything distinguishing, because then they just look like the pets at the park and its confusing for kids.

As a side note, in the airport I saw a medical dog of some sort that was wearing a harness, but then the harness had a patch that said "ask to pet me, I'm friendly". I thought that was crazy, talk about sending mixed messages! :mad:

disneyaddict101 05-26-2013 09:59 PM

Service dogs are trained to go where ever and when ever they are told. While I'm not sure that stress dogs have that same training im sure they would not use a potty pad since they would be in public a bit. That, in my opinion does not sound like a service dog. I know that all sorts of dogs can help with certain things. But there is a fine line between needing it, and just saying that so they can go in places. I could be wrong but that's what it seems like to me.

LockShockBarrel 05-26-2013 11:27 PM

popcorn::popcorn::popcorn:: How long til we have to pull out that jump to conclusions mat picture..

Planogirl 05-26-2013 11:31 PM

I just wonder how anxious people handled life before dogs became welcome everywhere. I don't doubt that some need them but many seem to self-diagnose or just want their pup with them. It's annoying but I don't see what can be done.

Bean786 05-27-2013 12:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CandleontheWater (Post 48509544)

As a side note, in the airport I saw a medical dog of some sort that was wearing a harness, but then the harness had a patch that said "ask to pet me, I'm friendly". I thought that was crazy, talk about sending mixed messages! :mad:

Agree. One of our options was ask to pet me but we didn't go with that because SOME services dogs shouldn't be petted. This way we try and keep the idea of 'working' dog and 'pet' separate.

Bean786 05-27-2013 12:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Planogirl (Post 48510283)
I just wonder how anxious people handled life before dogs became welcome everywhere. I don't doubt that some need them but many seem to self-diagnose or just want their pup with them. It's annoying but I don't see what can be done.

Agree. Is your hot dog dog really calming your down? If CoP doesn't relax you then idk what will! Joking totally. But I do feel what you are saying,

SueM in MN 05-27-2013 12:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by disneyaddict101 (Post 48509448)
They could have said it was a therapy dog to help with stress. I recently began talking to a lady who trains guide dogs to see what id have to do to have a career in that. She said that dogs you see, like Yorkies, could be "used" as dogs to help with stress. While there are dogs that do that, there are also people who just say that to be able to take their dog places. I'm not saying that's why but it could be. It's ridiculous that someone wouldn't just leave their dog at home or board it. But people do it all the time.

I don't know nothing about that particular dog and it may have been a service dog.

I just wanted to point out that therapy dogs and anxiety dogs don't meet the definition of Service Animal in the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act). Therapy and Anxiety dogs may be trained, but they are not individually trained to do something to assist a person with something they need related to a disability.
Being individually trained to do something to assist a person with a need related to their disability is the major part of the definition.
Many of the anxiety dogs are just there so the person can pet them. That is specifically listed in the ADA as NOT being a task or service because dogs don't need any individual traing to be petted.
Quote:

Originally Posted by CandleontheWater (Post 48509544)
We just got back from a trip two weeks ago and dogs in general are on the rise in the theme parks. Most of them wore some sort of identification as guide/therapy/medical assistance dogs, but there were some that didn't.

I really wish that WDW would make working dogs wear some sort of identification, be it harness, tag, leash with medical symbols, or something like that. I've been working at teaching my 3 year old never to bother working dogs and never ask to pet or interact with any sort of medical guide dog because they have important jobs to do. Its tough when the dogs don't wear anything distinguishing, because then they just look like the pets at the park and its confusing for kids.

As a side note, in the airport I saw a medical dog of some sort that was wearing a harness, but then the harness had a patch that said "ask to pet me, I'm friendly". I thought that was crazy, talk about sending mixed messages! :mad:

Diney World can't make working dogs wear any identification because the ADA says it is not required.
Most people with service dogs do have them wear a vest or something for 2 reasons:
1) it shows other people that the dog is working.
2) it is the dog's 'uniform' and lets the dog know that it is time for work.

My youngest DD has a service dog. He is normally a well behaved dog, but when he is wearing his vest, he knows that there are certain expectations - he's not free to do 'dog thing' like sniffing and his job is to be as invisible as possible and do whatever he is asked to do.

Most of the vests include a message that says 'Working Dog. Do not pet' or something similar. The message you saw was a bit strange - kind of inviting petting, as long as you ask. But, the owner may have thought the usual message was unfriendly or something.

spidet1964 05-27-2013 12:09 AM

If itwas a yorkie itbwas probbly a seisure dog.

wilkeliza 05-27-2013 12:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CandleontheWater (Post 48509544)
We just got back from a trip two weeks ago and dogs in general are on the rise in the theme parks. Most of them wore some sort of identification as guide/therapy/medical assistance dogs, but there were some that didn't.

I really wish that WDW would make working dogs wear some sort of identification, be it harness, tag, leash with medical symbols, or something like that. I've been working at teaching my 3 year old never to bother working dogs and never ask to pet or interact with any sort of medical guide dog because they have important jobs to do. Its tough when the dogs don't wear anything distinguishing, because then they just look like the pets at the park and its confusing for kids.

As a side note, in the airport I saw a medical dog of some sort that was wearing a harness, but then the harness had a patch that said "ask to pet me, I'm friendly". I thought that was crazy, talk about sending mixed messages! :mad:

Legally you can not require proof of the animal being a service dog. Harnesses and tags are not what make the dog a service animal it is the task it performs.
You can only ask is the Dog a service dog? And if they say yes you can ask what task/dog do they perform. That is to ensure that the person isn't lying or is aware of the change in laws.
Now technically a therapy dog is not a service dog as of 2011. The ADA laws were changed to say that only dogs that perform a task or service are protected by law. Therapy dogs are specifically mentioned as not fitting this bill. The dog must be trained to guide, retrieve, protect, etc not simply provide comfort. The issue is many big companies are too afraid of getting sued to question and frankly many don't know the law changed in 2011.

SueM in MN 05-27-2013 12:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wilkeliza (Post 48510520)
Legally you can not require proof of the animal being a service dog. Harnesses and tags are not what make the dog a service animal it is the task it performs.
You can only ask is the Dog a service dog? And if they say yes you can ask what task/dog do they perform. That is to ensure that the person isn't lying or is aware of the change in laws.
Now technically a therapy dog is not a service dog as of 2011. The ADA laws were changed to say that only dogs that perform a task or service are protected by law. Therapy dogs are specifically mentioned as not fitting this bill. The dog must be trained to guide, retrieve, protect, etc not simply provide comfort. The issue is many big companies are too afraid of getting sued to question and frankly many don't know the law changed in 2011.

The law was clarified and tightened up in 2011, but therapy dogs were technically not considered Service Dogs even prior to 2011.

I agree with you though that many companies are not aware of the law and are afraid of being sued.

A DIS poster who was a waitress posted one one of these kinds of threads a few years ago about someone who frequently brought a 'service dog' into the restaurant where she worked. I don't remember the specifics, but the dog was unruly, loud and stealing food off the table. The poster wondered what if there was anything they could do about it since they thought they could do nothing without getting into trouble with the ADA.
I don't know what actually happened, but a number of people posted links that showed even someone using a service dog could be asked to remove the dog if it is not under control of the person.

She was not aware if that and my guess is a lot of businesses are not. Just businesses enforcing that would do a lot to stop people bringing their family pet with them and claiming it is a service dog.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:50 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Copyright 1997-2014, Werner Technologies, LLC. All Rights Reserved.