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DisneyDetective 01-07-2013 09:43 AM

Strange Photos
 
I have a Canon 400D with Tamron 18-200mm lens and was in Florida in July 2012. i've just had a look at my photos and discovered wierd ones like these. never happened before and not all like these, very random. :confused3
http://i210.photobucket.com/albums/b...ps1c72617e.jpg
http://i210.photobucket.com/albums/b...psf9cf2503.jpg
http://i210.photobucket.com/albums/b...ps45c6d084.jpg

photo_chick 01-07-2013 09:56 AM

What is it that you think is strange about them? I see a little lens flare, white balance that looks off, and some flat contrast. But they seem pretty run of the mill to me.

havoc315 01-07-2013 10:06 AM

Looks like you just need some white balance correction.

DisneyDetective 01-07-2013 10:19 AM

it just looks really bright/whitish (if thats a term). in regard to the white balance, i'm still a DSLR novice, is that easily changed. what i don't get is that some photos are fine and others aren't, when you talk about white balance is it to do with the amount of light coming into the lens/camera?

havoc315 01-07-2013 10:28 AM

It's the camera's processor trying to figure out the right temperature and tint to apply.
If you shoot in RAW, it's very easy to fix in lightroom.
When shooting in jpeg, you can still correct in lightroom, but not as dramatically.

Download the free trial of lightroom. Try sliding the temperature slider slightly towards gold. Slide the highlight slider to the left.
Those steps should make quite a difference.

DisneyDetective 01-08-2013 05:58 AM

You can't download lightroom anymore. is it fairly easy to change the white balance plus what effect does it have ie does it change the settings of the camera because unsure what to change as some photos came out ok and a minute later it would change (see below). so if i took photos this summer would the white balance interfere with the camera settings that produced the first photo? :confused3
Sorry about all this!!
http://i210.photobucket.com/albums/b...ps31d5fe56.jpg
http://i210.photobucket.com/albums/b...psb3dfcaab.jpg

BirdsOfPreyDave 01-08-2013 09:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DisneyDetective (Post 47119409)
You can't download lightroom anymore.

You can download a free 30-day trail of Lightroom from Adobe's web page. The link is https://www.adobe.com/cfusion/tdrc/i...&promoid=DTEML

Quote:

Originally Posted by DisneyDetective (Post 47119409)
is it fairly easy to change the white balance plus what effect does it have ie does it change the settings of the camera because unsure what to change as some photos came out ok and a minute later it would change (see below). so if i took photos this summer would the white balance interfere with the camera settings that produced the first photo?

Lightroom is a tool you can use to change or correct the look of a photo after you've loaded it into your computer. Changes you make in Lightroom wouldn't have any effect on your camera's settings.

The edits are fairly easy to make. It's just a matter of moving a few sliders until the photo looks like you want it to.

havoc315 01-08-2013 09:28 AM

You can still get a free trial of Lightroom, unless you've already done the free trial.
https://www.adobe.com/cfusion/tdrc/i...shop_lightroom

It has no impact on the camera. It is post-processing --- You download the image to your computer, and change the image on the computer. Has no impact on the camera.

cpbjgc 01-08-2013 09:40 AM

If you have your white balance set to automatic (that shows as AWB in your display), it is assessed for each shot. The only time it is constant is when you set it to a specific colour temperature (e.g sunny, cloudy, tungsten, fluorescent, etc) or if you set a custom white balance. For info on white balance check pages 86-89 of your manual.

It is actually amazing how often the colour of light in a scene changes, even from second to second. Typhoon Lagoon is a good example where you have mixed sun and clouds, plus a huge reflective light source in the water. In such conditions, where you have many different light sources and quickly changing conditions that can effect the light, I go with automatic and correct it after the fact. This is less of a problem indoors where there is a single light source, in which case I will use on of the set settings, or sometimes a custom setting. This is one of the reasons I shoot in RAW as it is easy to correct white balance, expecially where one (that is, me) usually just uses the automatic white balance.

zackiedawg 01-08-2013 10:00 AM

Two observations - first: those shots are badly blown out - overexposed. Second: the white balance got thrown off on those shots - poorly chosen Auto WB by the camera, but that also could have been influenced by the heavy flare from the sun and enhanced by the bad overexposure.

Now, this could have happened because of the metering mode you chose - how 'auto' were you? If you were in an Auto mode, or P mode with a wide or matrix metering mode chosen, then the camera meters based on the whole frame and can sometimes be led off track by a swath of dark or light area in the shot right where the metering system picked up the brightness of the scene - in your examples above of the good and bad shot, maybe the fact that the overexposed photo is framed more to the right, which included more of the dark red rock in the frame, caused the metering to set the exposure off that darker rock area and cause the second shot to be overexposed - the first was just a bit more to the right, with just a bit less of that rock in the frame, and that little amount could have made a difference.

The location of the sun in the shots can cause severe flare - in the first example you showed in the thread, there is clearly heavy flare from bright sky and what looks to be shooting into the sun. Bad flare can throw off the white balance pretty severely. Combine that with a metering system that tried to meter for the darker colored buildings in the scene rather than the sky above, and you get a severe overexposure.

There is one other possibility too - you may have a defective or failing lens. Aperture blades can sometimes get 'sticky' - where they don't fully close down before the shot is taken like they are supposed to. If your aperture blades are getting a bit sticky, this could be a cause for some shots every once in a while being overexposed. DSLR cameras meter a scene, and focus it, with the lens' aperture set wide open - even if you have an aperture of F8 set, the camera is initially viewing the scene with the aperture at the maximum value, say F3.5. So when you go to take the photo, the aperture quickly shuts down to F8 just before the shutter fires. If the aperture blades are occasionally sticking, what can happen is the camera has metered the scene for an aperture of F8, and set the shutter speed accordingly (say, 1/200). Then when you took the photo, the aperture didn't close down because it got stuck, and you ended up taking a photo at F3.5 and 1/200, which would be severely overexposed. Just to offer one other possibility - you can usually tell if your aperture blades are starting to stick by setting the aperture to a very small setting like F22 - then looking into the front of the lens, you should see the aperture blades opened fully before you shoot, and as you press the shutter, those aperture blades should immediately and quickly narrow down to a tiny hole in the middle of the blades. If you notice that they didn't seem to move smoothly, or after a few shots you noticed they didn't close down at all, you may have sticking blades.

The first scenario is still quite probable - that the metering system just overexposed a few shots because you were set to Auto or a wide metering mode and the composition of the scene changed, and along with shooting into the sun or with a bright sky, the overexposure caused bad flaring and threw off the white balance too.

photo_chick 01-08-2013 10:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DisneyDetective (Post 47119409)
You can't download lightroom anymore. is it fairly easy to change the white balance plus what effect does it have ie does it change the settings of the camera because unsure what to change as some photos came out ok and a minute later it would change (see below). so if i took photos this summer would the white balance interfere with the camera settings that produced the first photo? :confused3
Sorry about all this!!

Unless you set things manually the camera can, and often will, change settings every shot. It's reassessing each time you push that shutter button unless you tell it to do otherwise. If you look at where the sun is in relation to the subjects, everything you're shooting is in shadow but the sky. That makes it tougher for the camera to know what to do as well.

I don't see a big difference in the exposure between the two shots at typhoon lagoon. If you correct the white balance, and in turn that brings the blacks to where they should be, the images will look nearly identical.

White balance is applied when the image is processed. It looks at the data and says "this value should be white". And it affects the whole range of colors in an image. It's one reason many of us shoot RAW. It's much easier to change the white balance after the fact with RAW files since you're processing them at the computer. If you have a jpeg you need to color correct, rather than just change the WB, which is a little bit different approach.

And as others have said you can still download Lightroom. But any photo editing software that can color correct can get this job done.

boBQuincy 01-08-2013 10:26 AM

On a Canon XTi the white balance select is the lower button on the 4-way switch. As on my Panasonic G3 (where this button is in a similar place) it is easy to accidentally press this button while carrying the camera. My WB occasionally gets reset but since I shoot in RAW it doesn't matter much to me. My Canon XSi has the picture effects button in that spot and same thing, it sometimes got changed without my knowing about it.

The WB setting may be displayed in the viewfinder so that is one way to check it before taking the photo, otherwise use RAW and you won't have to worry about it. It seems some of the camera designers do not actually use the cameras or they might not put these buttons in places where they are prone to being accidentally pressed.

DisneyDetective 01-13-2013 02:54 PM

do you think i shoud buy a polariser lens?

photo_chick 01-13-2013 04:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DisneyDetective (Post 47176676)
do you think i shoud buy a polariser lens?

Polarizers will cut reflected light rays and are a great tool to have in your bag. They make skies more blue and water more clear. They will not correct white balance or overexposure.

wiigirl 01-13-2013 04:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by havoc315 (Post 47109837)
Looks like you just need some white balance correction.

Thats what I was thinking.


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