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-   -   Odd landlord situation - Opinions? (http://www.disboards.com/showthread.php?t=3032490)

dakcp2001 12-12-2012 04:31 PM

Odd landlord situation - Opinions?
 
My landlord is a little odd. We rarely see him, he never calls us back usually has his assistant speak with us. We love the home we rent and the location. The rent is a bit high, so we will probably look around next lease since there are many homes empty on this street. I debated whether or not to post this, because I do not want to violate the no politics and religion rule. This topic is about the landlord and his rights to put up signs, not what the signs refer to.

Here is what he has been doing. During the election, he came over and put political signs on our lawn. Offensive ones. Really offensive ones. Not just run of the mill with someone's name. I took them down, called and left several messages and never heard back from him. Now he has put some more signs on the lawn. These are also somewhat offensive, depending on what holiday you celebrate. I took them down, new ones reappeared. These ones are worse. Again he is not returning my calls. Again, I took the signs down.

Does the landlord have the right to put these signs on the lawn of our rental? He owns the home, but the signs are causing people to yell out their window and throw trash at the house. I have also gotten several comments at work from people who pass by our home on the way by.

HippieChickadee 12-12-2012 04:37 PM

I wouldn't want to be in your position, but he can put them up. It's his property. I have had similar issues in the past (not with signs). Landlord wants something there, it's their property.

Ponygirl 12-12-2012 04:48 PM

It sounds to me like he is creating an unsafe living environment. I would be taking lots of photos and my attorney would be in touch. Do you know it is definitely the landlord responsible for the signs?

I wonder if he puts up the same signs at his personal residence. Ugh!

dakcp2001 12-12-2012 04:51 PM

He does puts them up at his home. He has his own billboard that he made himself. (yikes)

Lynne M 12-12-2012 05:37 PM

I'd check with a lawyer to see what your rights are in this situation. At the very least, I'd be asking the lawyer if there were a way to get out of the lease early. I'd be afraid someone would throw worse things than trash.

He's hurting himself more than anyone, because he's going to have a heck of a time renting that place out with those signs on the lawn.

mrsv98 12-12-2012 05:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dakcp2001 (Post 46912254)
My landlord is a little odd. We rarely see him, he never calls us back usually has his assistant speak with us. We love the home we rent and the location. The rent is a bit high, so we will probably look around next lease since there are many homes empty on this street. I debated whether or not to post this, because I do not want to violate the no politics and religion rule. This topic is about the landlord and his rights to put up signs, not what the signs refer to.

Here is what he has been doing. During the election, he came over and put political signs on our lawn. Offensive ones. Really offensive ones. Not just run of the mill with someone's name. I took them down, called and left several messages and never heard back from him. Now he has put some more signs on the lawn. These are also somewhat offensive, depending on what holiday you celebrate. I took them down, new ones reappeared. These ones are worse. Again he is not returning my calls. Again, I took the signs down.

Does the landlord have the right to put these signs on the lawn of our rental? He owns the home, but the signs are causing people to yell out their window and throw trash at the house. I have also gotten several comments at work from people who pass by our home on the way by.

Is it a single family home? Renters have rights, though they vary by state so you should check. If I were you, I would look into the covenant of "Quiet Enjoyment"

Quote:

A Covenant that promises that the grantee or tenant of an estate in real property will be able to possess the premises in peace, without disturbance by hostile claimants.

Quiet enjoyment is a right to the undisturbed use and enjoyment of real property by a tenant or landowner. The right to quiet enjoyment is contained in covenants concerning real estate. Generally a covenant is an agreement between two parties to do or refrain from doing something.

Courts read a covenant of quiet enjoyment between the Landlord and Tenant into every rental agreement, or tenancy. Thus a renter, or tenant, has the right to quiet enjoyment of the leased premises regardless of whether the rental agreement contains such a covenant.

In the covenant of quiet enjoyment, the landlord promises that during the term of the tenancy no one will disturb the tenant in the tenant's use and enjoyment of the premises. Quiet enjoyment includes the right to exclude others from the premises, the right to peace and quiet, the right to clean premises, and the right to basic services such as heat and hot water and, for high-rise buildings, elevator service. In many respects the implied covenant of quiet enjoyment is similar to an Implied Warranty of habitability, which warrants that the landlord will keep the leased premises in good repair. For example, the failure to provide heat would be a breach of the implied covenant of quiet enjoyment because the lack of heat would interfere with the tenant's use of the premises and would also make the premises uninhabitable, especially in a cold climate.

Other rights related to quiet enjoyment may be tailored to specific situations. For example, at least one court has found that the ringing of smoke alarms for more than a day is an interference with a tenant's quiet enjoyment of leased premises (Manzaro v. McCann, 401 Mass. 880, 519 N.E.2d 1337 [1988]).
Really, the best idea might be to look around, especially of the rent is high. If you want to stay, you will probably want to have a lawyer look at your lease and draft a letter that references your rights and tell him to knock it off.

Good luck, situations like this can be very touchy.

ebtbmom 12-12-2012 05:46 PM

Can you post a sign saying that's the landlords sign, not the occupants and draw an arrow to it?

People willing to post highly opinionated signs always seem to be a little off.

mnrose 12-12-2012 05:52 PM

It's his house...however, you lease it. And, that gives YOU the right to control the signage in the front yard. Ownership of the house DOES NOT give you the right to post anything other than a "for rent" or a "for sale" sign. Anything other than that interferes with your right to quiet enjoyment of the property....one of the things you are entitled to in your lease.

As a practical matter, I'm not sure what you can do about it. I'd probably find another place to rent.

FYI...I am a landlord, and I would never presume to plant a political sign in my tenant's property. Very offensive.

scrapquitler 12-12-2012 07:09 PM

I have no idea if that is legal for him to do or not, but regardless of that, it is a bad situation for him to put you in. It sounds like you are not happy there for other reasons as well, so if I were in your position, I'd probably just start looking for somewhere else to move.

Pooh Girl 71 12-12-2012 07:45 PM

I don't know the various rental laws in different states. We rented a place many years ago. We had gone through a leasing office, after we signed the lease, the owner pops up. In fact, he kept stopping by and calling. It got so bad, we called the police to ask what to do. They said he is technically the owner but since we had a lease it was our property and he couldn't show up whenever he wanted.


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