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Belle0101
12-16-2005, 09:33 PM
My grandma (and dad) were born in England. Grandma is 80 this year and I have an awful feeling that this is her last Christmas. I've had talks with my aunt and dad (2 of her 6 children) and they seem to think that she has given up. I've talked to her myself and as much as I don't want to admit it, I agree with them. She lost my grandpa several years back. He was actually our step-grandpa but he was an amazing man, so loving and caring and really devoted to her. She was also a passenger in car in that was rear ended a few summers back. She was hurt pretty bad, suffered a stroke and we didn't think she'd pull through. Amazingly she did but it took its toll on her.

Anyhow, I think she's just tired now and ready to go. Not that I'm ready to let her go, it breaks my heart to even think of her not being around anymore.

I want to make this Christmas special and make treats for her from "back home". So far I found two scone recipes and a lemon curd recipe. Nothing fancy, my dad told me all she will eat now is toast, every meal is toast. I thought if I could find some biscuits or cookies or something then it might be special and hopefully stimulate her appetite. I thought about some soups too, I could put that in individual bowls and freeze them for her.

Sorry to write such a tear jerker just before the holidays. Whatever you can suggest would be very much appreciated.

Thanks!

bclydia
12-16-2005, 11:42 PM
How wonderful of you to want to make this Christmas special for your Grandmother. I hope you have many Christmas's to come with her.
My father was from England and although he wasn't big on sweets we did incorporate a few ideas into our traditions. Dessert at Christmas is traditionally a steamed pudding which we always served with a brandy hard sauce and whipped cream.
I love my aunt's shortbread which is quite traditional too. It's dense and not too sweet unlike most of the whipped shortbreads that are common here.
Queenie, are you around today? She would be your ultimate expert. I hope you have some luck finding something special to make for her!

MazdaUK
12-17-2005, 04:00 AM
I would make shortbread (make it quite thin - roll it rather than press it into a mould so its easier to eat). If she only eatsd oast, what about getting her a jar of Marmite (if she likes it - not everyone does ;) ) or some proper marmalade? You won't be able to get Seville oranges, but you could make a grapefruit marmalade, or a 3-fruit (orange, grapefruit and lemon). Proper mince pies (mincemeat and shortcrust pastry) would be nice if she can manage them.

Let me know if you need any recipes

Queenie
12-17-2005, 05:30 AM
I've got family due over soon so I can't look now but I'll pull out some of my more traditional recipe books later and have a look for some things for you. I'll try and stick with smallish things (like biscuits etc) if she's not eating much. I hope this isn't her last Christmas with you but I understand that feeling completely and it's not pleasant.

ERICS MUM
12-17-2005, 07:17 PM
What about a nice bread and butter pudding? It is soft to eat, nutritious, and typically english and TASTY!. Basically is is an egg custard poured over bread and butter, flavoured with dried fruit (raisins, sultanas), but some people add marmalade (i.e. spread it on the bread and butter) and sprinkled with nutmeg to add a bit of spice. It is then baked until the custard sets.

Or, an english trifle, which basically is layers of sponge cake flavoured with jelly (jello), custard, whipped cream and a topping such as chopped walnuts, sprinkles etc. Some people add chopped fresh ruit to the sponge and jello layer. You can also add a bit of a zing by sprinkling the sponge cake with sherry, port, brandy etc. Again, a soft, tasty reminder of England.

On the savoury side, perhaps your dad can remember some regional favourites - most regions of England have their speciality dishes.

Linda

Belle0101
12-17-2005, 08:56 PM
Thanks everybody. :grouphug:

I think she might like the bread and butter pudding. And the shortbread too.

I'll double check with my dad but I think he is going to look for some marmalades.

My dad came over when he was 2 so he has no memory of England.

I love the story of how my dad got here though. Grandma, a nurse, married an american G.I., became pregnant, had my dad and then around the time my dad was two, grandpa sent for her. She brought my dad over on a ship using the bottom dresser drawer for a crib. She says it was quite common back then, late 1940's, to put the baby in the dresser like that. It's just quite funny to imagine my dad using a dresser drawer for a crib. :goodvibes

To hear my dad talk you'd think he was from one of the southern states and to hear me talk, at times, you'd think I may have come over recently. Now the funny / odd thing is we've lived all our lives in northern Indiana. :confused3 I think I just pick it up from being around my grandma - she never lost her accent.

Anyhow, sorry to ramble, she means a lot to me.

Thanks for the help, looking forward to some recipes and I know if my grandma could, she'd thank you all too for helping me. :grouphug:

wils
12-19-2005, 04:44 AM
How thoughtful of you. I've nothing different to add just wanted to wish you and your family a Happy Christmas :)

Queenie
12-19-2005, 06:50 AM
Ok had a quick look and found these. I'm on holiday until Thursday now but I'm sure you'll be able to find the recipes:

Steak & Kidney Pie
Toad in the Hole
Fish & Chips
Apple or Rhubarb Crumble with Custard
Rice Pudding
Bakewell Tart
Scones with Strawberry Jam and Clotted Cream
Jam/Lemon Curd Tarts
Spotted Dick
Treacle Tart
Yorkshire Puddings

Glynis
12-21-2005, 05:26 PM
Ok had a quick look and found these. I'm on holiday until Thursday now but I'm sure you'll be able to find the recipes:

Steak & Kidney Pie
Toad in the Hole
Fish & Chips
Apple or Rhubarb Crumble with Custard
Rice Pudding
Bakewell Tart
Scones with Strawberry Jam and Clotted Cream
Jam/Lemon Curd Tarts
Spotted Dick
Treacle Tart
Yorkshire Puddings

Could you please post your recipes for Yorkshire Puddings, Toad in the Hole and Scones? I used to live with an English family and these were staples in their house. Of course, being a teenager, I didn't think to ask for recipes, and I don't have contact info. for them any longer. I would really appreciate it!

kittychatalot
12-22-2005, 02:21 PM
A wonderful British woman that I once knew gave me this recipe.

Corn Pudding

1 can corn
1 can cream corn
1 container sour cream
1 stick butter melted
1 box corn muffin mix (like the jiffy ones)

Mix all and bake anywhere between 350- 450 degrees untill golden brown and set. You can cook it at whatever temp your other items are cooking at- can't go wrong. My family salivates over this!

Queenie
12-22-2005, 04:16 PM
Will post up tomorrow afternoon. Very tired right now as just back off holiday (sadly not to Disney :( )

Belle0101
12-22-2005, 05:38 PM
kittychatalot I might have to make that for my DH! We had a dish quite like that years ago at a church dinner but I wasn't able to find out who made it. DH loved it!


Sorry I haven't checked in more recently, I came down sick on Tuesday. I thought I was better today but now that I'm up and moving around ... not feeling so good again. Crummy time of the year to take ill.

MazdaUK
12-23-2005, 02:22 AM
A wonderful British woman that I once knew gave me this recipe

Ummmmm..... don't know how to break it to you but this is not a traditional British recipe. We don't grow much corn here (except a very little in the south, mostly for animal feed) - until recently it was too cold but global warming :sunny: and selective breeding have made it possible to grow it in the warmest counties. You also can't buy corn muffin mix in the UK - you couldn't buy any muffin mix here until about 1990. I don't dispute she was British though - I wonder where she got the recipe?

Glynis
12-26-2005, 03:54 PM
Will post up tomorrow afternoon. Very tired right now as just back off holiday (sadly not to Disney :( )


I'd still love a copy of those recipes if you get a chance to post them. Now that Christmas is over, perhaps you'll have more time? Thanks.

MazdaUK
12-28-2005, 03:39 AM
go to bbc.co.uk/food and you can get a range of British recipes - Delia Smith's are generally very straightforward and reliable - you can search by recipe or chef name!

striker3636
12-28-2005, 10:16 AM
Hi...I know this is late, but perhaps you can make this for her anyways....

This recipe has been handed down for 4 generations and I have been assured that it is authentic. It came from my great-grandmother who emigrated from England to Canada. I must admit I make it in a whipped version as I prefer the lighter texture, but my Mom makes it the original way and my sister rolls out and uses cookie cutters. We all use the same recipe (I just soften the butter and really whip it first, add the rest, roll into 1" balls and use a cookie press to press down and leave impression.)

Shortbread

1 lb butter
3/4 cup cornstarch
3/4 cup icing sugar
3 cups flour
-cream butter, sugar and cornstarch.
-add flour and blend
-put on floured board and knead until cracks appear
-roll out and cut, or shape into circle and score triangles
-bake in a slow oven (translation: 250 for 20 min)

Glynis
12-28-2005, 02:10 PM
go to bbc.co.uk/food and you can get a range of British recipes - Delia Smith's are generally very straightforward and reliable - you can search by recipe or chef name!

I couldn't get the address to work. Is there any way you can post a link? Thanks. I can't wait to get my hands on these recipes.

MazdaUK
12-29-2005, 02:45 AM
This should get you in : http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/

Glynis
12-30-2005, 07:22 PM
This should get you in : http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/


Thanks so much for this! I have printed up a ton of recipes and can't wait to try them out. I think I'll try the Yorkshire pudding this weekend. I haven't dared tell my DH yet, as I know he'll be skeptical as to my success. I'll let you know how it goes.

MazdaUK
12-31-2005, 04:45 AM
I always use Delia's toad in the hole recipe very successfully.