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lkohawaii
02-04-2005, 10:37 PM
I was reading on one of the threads that renewing a passport is cheaper than getting a whole new one. It gave directions on renewing an adults passport but not on kids. Can I renew a kids passport and not pay that additional fee?

scrapperjill
02-05-2005, 01:35 AM
yes you can renew a childs passport...I belive it's done within 5 years of obtaining the first one. Meaning...the childs passport expire alot sooner than adults...only makes sence seeing kids can change so much from year to year. You should be able to look at the orininal passport and see what the dates are....(when it expires)

lisamacd
02-05-2005, 05:41 AM
Renewing or obtaining a passport for a child (under the age of 14) is the sames process and it is actually a royal pain. The total fee is $70. Both parents as well as the minor MUST appear at the passport office or one parent must have a NOTARIZED authorization signed by the non-appearing parent. On the other hand, I think it is much easier to travel with a passport than a birth certificate so I have obtained them for all my children. See this link for more info.

http://travel.state.gov/passport/get/minors/minors_834.html

Hope this helps.

rjh8115
02-05-2005, 08:09 AM
We just got new passports for our kids. While it is a pain (both parents need to be present, etc.), I feel that it is well worth it (IMHO). These are the second set for the kids. With them, they have been able to travel to Europe with me when I've gone for work. It makes travel to Canada much easier. It also helps while cruising.

They are good for five years for children under 15 (as opposed to 10 years for 16 and older). Once they are on "adult" passports, then they can be renewed.

I would go ahead and get it done. At some point, more and more island nations may jump on the bandwagon and require them.

Rick

tbck1993
02-05-2005, 08:49 AM
You cannot renew a child's passport. They need to get a new one every 5 years until the age of 16.

tvguy
02-05-2005, 08:53 AM
The passports make life so much easier it is worth it. DS, 18, has had a passport since age 2.

ivanova
02-05-2005, 10:10 AM
I believe renewing involves using the existing picture - because a child can change dramatically in 5 years a new picture would be needed, and I think that means a new passport instead of a simple renewal.

cjsmith
02-05-2005, 11:38 AM
Renewing or obtaining a passport for a child (under the age of 14) is the sames process and it is actually a royal pain. The total fee is $70. Both parents as well as the minor MUST appear at the passport office or one parent must have a NOTARIZED authorization signed by the non-appearing parent. On the other hand, I think it is much easier to travel with a passport than a birth certificate so I have obtained them for all my children. See this link for more info.

http://travel.state.gov/passport/get/minors/minors_834.html

Hope this helps.

Even though it hasn't been updated on the government pages,(go figure!) both parents must now be present to obtain the passports for those under the age of 14. A notarized letter will no longer do unless the one parent lives out of state. This changed as of November 2004. I went to our local passport agency here in Naples along with a notarized letter from my husband and they wouldn't accept it. We just did this right after Christmas. They had the official rules there and sure enough, it showed that both parents now have to be present. Only one of us had to be there for my 14 year old son, but they wouldn't process my 12 year old son's passport. Believe it or not, my 16 year old daughter didn't need either of us! Her passport is good for 10 years, their's is good for 5.

Stinasmom
02-05-2005, 12:33 PM
ok, I am a bit confused between "renewing" an existing passport (kid or otherwise) and getting a new one. When I renewed my passport, I had to submit a new picture and the old passport, they charged me less (forgot amount...years ago), punched two holes in the old one, stamped it "cancelled" then mailed both new and old back to me...
Wouldn't this process be same for kids, just after 5 years instead of 10? Meaning they would charge a "renewal" fee rather than the whole $70? Seems like the process is quicker and easier as they don't have to verify all the info on the application, verify the birth certificate, ss# etc...

rjh8115
02-05-2005, 01:33 PM
ok, I am a bit confused between "renewing" an existing passport (kid or otherwise) and getting a new one. When I renewed my passport, I had to submit a new picture and the old passport, they charged me less (forgot amount...years ago), punched two holes in the old one, stamped it "cancelled" then mailed both new and old back to me...
Wouldn't this process be same for kids, just after 5 years instead of 10? Meaning they would charge a "renewal" fee rather than the whole $70? Seems like the process is quicker and easier as they don't have to verify all the info on the application, verify the birth certificate, ss# etc...

We just "renewed" the passports for our kids. Here is the process:

For kids it is different than adults. You cannot "renew" a child's passport. You need to provide the old passport, new pictures, their birth certificate, and BOTH parents must be present (with photo ID). There is no cost difference between a new application or a "renewal" for children.

Adults can use the renewal process (haven't done this yet as my passport has not expired) with a lower fee.

Check with your town/city hall. Many local governments can now take passport applications in addition to US post offices.

Hope this helps . . .

Rick

Stinasmom
02-05-2005, 02:53 PM
Thanks Rick...you answered our question! Too bad I will have to shell out another $140 in 5 years, but knowing now will keep it from being a sobering surprise then!
These boards are so great...there is always someone who has "been there, done that!"

scrapperjill
02-05-2005, 03:08 PM
Oh....I guess you can't "renew" a childs passport. I did't really think getting our for the girls were that much of a hassle anyway....but from the looks of it getting a new one in five years will be a little less work than the first time....with the old passport and all being sent in for proof....but it's just too bad that all the same fees apply when getting a "new" childs passport.

dcandmc
02-05-2005, 05:09 PM
I believe renewing involves using the existing picture -

This is not true. A "renewal" passport is a brand new passport that requires new photos to be submitted, even though the DoS is now digitizing the submitted photos for placement on the passport (and thus presumably has the photo stored digitally in a database).

lkohawaii
02-05-2005, 06:17 PM
Thanks everybody. Stinamom and I were trying to figure this one out on our own. I finally got the great idea to ask and you've answered our main qustion. We wanted to know if we would pay the full price when renewing. Well, not good news but at least we know. For me I needed reasurance that getting passports for my kids wouldn't be a waste of money since I don't plan on going out of the country in another 5 years. Somebody posted that it's easier to get in and out of Canada so maybe I'll try going there before my kids passports are expired.

DOCTORRICK
02-05-2005, 08:11 PM
Info from the US gov, as well as printible versions of all the forms you need are available here:

http://travel.state.gov/passport/passport_1738.html

The info previous posts have given is correct with one addition that surprised me.

You will need to submit the birth certificates for the children again. In other words, the passport alone is not sufficent. For me the post office even got it wrong and didn't ask for it. I got a letter from the us gov. saying that the application couldn't be processed without the stamped birth certificate.

So with a child, there is absolutely no difference from the first time you got the passport. You need all the paperwork you needed in the first place.
One new thing in the past few years, as noted above, is both parents and the child must go to the post office.

rjh8115
02-05-2005, 09:51 PM
I believe the birth certificate is required to prove parental-child relationship . . .

jrabbit
02-07-2005, 12:47 PM
Too bad I will have to shell out another $140 in 5 years, but knowing now will keep it from being a sobering surprise then! You think it will still be "only" $140 in 5yrs. :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl2: