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jewellmmc
12-23-2004, 11:30 AM
On my trip last year I was talking to a CM at the Canadian pavilion. This American ma walked up to me and asked where I got my shirt if I was Canadian. I told him I got it at a store and he replied" You have stores in Canada?" I stared at him for a moment and slowly nodded my head "yes" I answered. He looked at me and asked" Do you live in and igloo?"....I looked at the CM stunned and told him politely that in Canada we have houses,clothes, pets,and all the regular things. He looked at me and asked "Do you have a pet beaver?" After that I just walked away. I really hope he was joking.

striker3636
12-23-2004, 12:06 PM
Isn't it funny how *some* people can have such misconceptions about other countries? I have heard about a TV show a few years ago where Americans were interviewed about Canada and its people and some of the things that were said were unbelievable. Isn't it funny that in our schools we learn so much about the US but is seems that the reverse isn't true? (Please correct me if I am wrong, I don't mean this in a negative way....this is a generalization) I have been asked before what it like to always be living in the snow!

Tabetha
12-23-2004, 12:58 PM
You're probably referring to Rick Mercer's "Talking to Americans". It was pretty funny, but I think if someone stuck a camera and a microphone in my face and asked me to sign a petition to help make staplers legal in Canada, I'd think it was weird, but hey -they've got the camera and microphone, so they must know something!
I thought it was a pretty interesting commentary on how people will believe anything if told it with enough "authority".

I don't think Canadians are educated all that much in school about America and Americans.

I think we learn because we watch their TV.

soupy11
12-23-2004, 01:01 PM
I remember learning a lot of American history and politics in school. We learned the presidents, the US States and capitals, etc. I also remember a class on the Boston tea party. Somehow I don't think the Americans are learning provincial capitals.

Tabetha
12-23-2004, 01:04 PM
Ok, Canadians get a passing knowledge about America for part of a term.

I still think it's mostly TV.

jewellmmc
12-23-2004, 01:56 PM
I learn a lot off T.V but at school we get taught about America as well.....Anyone have any funny stories about that kind of situation?

Sandyincanada
12-23-2004, 02:00 PM
I also learned alot about American history and geography. I can recall a test where we had to place every state in the right area of the map and also list all their capital cities. I belong to a game site with a chat and I can't believe how many Americans have never heard of Manitoba. I can maybe understand not knowing too much about it but these people have never even heard of it, have no idea its a province....it floors me. If I say MB, they all think I'm from Myrtle Beach, lol. I guess that understandable but sorta funny. Its not all Americans (I apologize to my knowledgable American friends) but a surprising number of them that are pretty ignorant about Canada. I never hear the "igloo" comment anymore but many do not know we have a Prime Minister and not a president, for example.

I think the Rick Mercer show where they asked Americans if Canada should switch to a 24 hour day speaks for itself, lol

totalia
12-23-2004, 02:40 PM
On my trip last year I was talking to a CM at the Canadian pavilion. This American ma walked up to me and asked where I got my shirt if I was Canadian. I told him I got it at a store and he replied" You have stores in Canada?" I stared at him for a moment and slowly nodded my head "yes" I answered. He looked at me and asked" Do you live in and igloo?"....I looked at the CM stunned and told him politely that in Canada we have houses,clothes, pets,and all the regular things. He looked at me and asked "Do you have a pet beaver?" After that I just walked away. I really hope he was joking.

roflmao. That gave me a giggle.

I was working in the mall at the information booth a few years ago. These bunch of teenagers walked up to me which was nothing out of the ordinary. Suddenly one of the guys pops out with "Do you guys barter?" I asked him what he meant and he looked at me funny and asked again. I laughed and told him that we aren't Mexico. We are just like the States. We don't live in Igloos, drive dogsleds, or live in the arctic.

Another time I was asked if I wear a seal skin coat.

Another time abunch of young people walked up to me in the mall again when I was working and asked where all the snow was because they wanted to go skiing. It was July. That made me laugh and I told him that the only place that has snow in July was the arctic because its summer in Canada and warm.

My god. How can people actually be this misinformed?

roflmao

DisFan2
12-23-2004, 03:42 PM
I laughed and told him that we aren't Mexico. We are just like the States.


I wonder how people in Mexico would feel about that. As part of the NAFT Agreement, I'm pretty sure they use cash too. What system of government does Mexico have? Who's the president? Do they have states, provinces, neither, both? I'm betting a Mexican version of Rick Mercer would have a pretty good time at our expense too. :scratchin

jewellmmc
12-23-2004, 05:27 PM
Another time I was asked if I wear a seal skin coat.

Another time abunch of young people walked up to me in the mall again when I was working and asked where all the snow was because they wanted to go skiing. It was July. That made me laugh and I told him that the only place that has snow in July was the arctic because its summer in Canada and warm.

My god. How can people actually be this misinformed?

roflmao

Ditto for me. I've had this happen multiple times. I think one of the funniest things I have actually been asked was " How did you get to Florida?" The person didn't know we had airports and cars which I think is really stupid. The funniest part was I replied "My pet beaver towed me on my sled through the snow! How else?" I know I'm adding to the people who are misinformed about Canadians but he was stunned! And he actually believed me! :earboy2: :teleport:

c&m
12-23-2004, 05:51 PM
I was watching a Jay Leno segment called "Jaywalking" one night. Jay walks out to the streets around L.A. and asks people questions. This particular day, he brings a picture of Madeline Albright (former U.S. Secretary of State under Clinton administration) and asks who is she. Guess what, all the U.S. citizens said "I dunno". He comes across a Canadian tourist, who promptly answers "Madeline Albright". Hmmm... :cheer2:

hockey mom
12-23-2004, 05:58 PM
While toasting to a "Happy thanksgiving" a woman leaned over to ask why. I explained our Thanksgiving is in October. She then leaned over to ask
"so when is your Christmas"

I also do believe we are educated more about the states then they are about Canada because my kids can name quite a few of the states and yet when I tried to explain to a cm we are not from a state but a province she was totally confused.

jewellmmc
12-23-2004, 06:15 PM
While toasting to a "Happy thanksgiving" a woman leaned over to ask why. I explained our Thanksgiving is in October. She then leaned over to ask
"so when is your Christmas"

I also do believe we are educated more about the states then they are about Canada because my kids can name quite a few of the states and yet when I tried to explain to a cm we are not from a state but a province she was totally confused.


Yes, same here. I can name about 20 states.



Since I was the one who started this post I must add: This thread is not about all Americans only the ones who say funny things. Seriously though, this thread is not meant to offend anyone.

Sandyincanada
12-23-2004, 07:06 PM
I wonder how people in Mexico would feel about that. As part of the NAFT Agreement, I'm pretty sure they use cash too. What system of government does Mexico have? Who's the president? Do they have states, provinces, neither, both? I'm betting a Mexican version of Rick Mercer would have a pretty good time at our expense too. :scratchin

Right off the top of my head...they use cash but will barter in alot of areas, the president is Fox, they have regions, states and cities. Not sure about the system of government BUT I do know that they have 24 hours in thier day, LOL.

Feliz Navidad :)

DisFan2
12-23-2004, 08:26 PM
Right off the top of my head...they use cash but will barter in alot of areas, the president is Fox, they have regions, states and cities. Not sure about the system of government BUT I do know that they have 24 hours in thier day, LOL.

Feliz Navidad :)

Impressive!

Quickly... How many fingers am I holding up right now? :D :D

Sandyincanada
12-23-2004, 10:12 PM
hmmmmm, the middle one? LOL

I love Mexico... I couldn't resist. But I really do think the American schools could do abit better job in teaching about other parts of the world. We're only a few hours away from Grand Forks but the things I've heard when we've gone down there, sheeesh lol.

totalia
12-24-2004, 12:53 AM
I wonder how people in Mexico would feel about that. As part of the NAFT Agreement, I'm pretty sure they use cash too. What system of government does Mexico have? Who's the president? Do they have states, provinces, neither, both? I'm betting a Mexican version of Rick Mercer would have a pretty good time at our expense too. :scratchin

lol. Yeah I know. The problem is that one of his friends mentioned something about how they barter in Mexico so why not Canada. Thats why I said it. Sorry I didn't explain the rest. I guess I was in too much of a hurry.

ChisJo
12-24-2004, 01:39 AM
I remember learning all about the American Revolution, when they signed the Declaration of Independence, all states, and the presidents - all learned in High School. 4 years ago, I signed up for a class in History in College, and was surprised that about 25% of it was American - thought it would focus more on Canaidan than American, but it didn't.
Just a little story for you....The first time I was in Florida in 1999, I met a Southern American (I will refrain from naming what state) and they were oblivious to what life in Canada was really like, and within 10 minutes of our converasation, I had them convinced that we had "fuzzy snow snakes" that lived in the snow and we had to be careful because we never knew when they would emerge and bite us. They completely believed me. There was another couple there from Mexico City that was dying with laughter, because they knew we were full of crap, but the Americans actually thought we were telling the truth.
I shouldn't add to the fire, but at the time, it was priceless.
Jo

DisFan2
12-24-2004, 04:18 AM
hmmmmm, the middle one? LOL


I was hoping it wouldn't be taken that way! I knew I should have written "What number am I thinking of"? (In my defense, I did ask "How many"!) :earboy2: :earboy2:

jewellmmc
12-24-2004, 09:44 AM
I shouldn't add to the fire, but at the time, it was priceless.
Jo

Smae here. It's funny to lead them on.....but other times t can be really annoying when people ask you about the snow all year around. Oh well, such as life.

NicoleMD
12-24-2004, 09:53 AM
I work in a Call Center in Nova Scotia and all my customers are Americans. Once they get past the whole "oursourcing" issue (a totally different topic....) some of the comments make me laugh. One customer asked me if I spoke Canadian? I replyed "Yes, and so do you" They didn't quite know what to say to that becasue they said they only spoke English.

During the 2000 elections, I was having an online discussion about the voting system in the Staes and comments on how difficult it was. The response I received was that we had it hard too when counting votes becasue we had to count them in tweo official languages!!!!! My responce was that "an X is an X is an X.....in English or in French"


Nicole

Limmer
12-24-2004, 11:10 AM
My uncle did have an experience like this. They were in a time share in florida in the late 80's, he was a teenager and started to hang out with some teens around the pool. They started asking him if he enjoyed having electricity while on vacation and was he scared the first time he got in a car, did he find restaurants exciting etc. He could not believe it. I did not actually believe him when he told me this, I thought he was teasing me. It was not until my grandfather verified the story and it just stunned me. Do they really think we live like that? Or do they put it on to tease us?

Seaera
12-24-2004, 11:14 AM
Okay, here's mine...
My boyfriend (at the time) and I were on vacation in Hawaii and were relaxing on the beach. We were chatting with these two girls there for awhile and they asked us where we were from. We told them that we were from Vancouver, BC, Canada. One of the girls responds excitedly, "oh I met a guy from Canada! His name was Steve...do you know him?"
Seriously...she wasn't kidding! :rolleyes:

Amberle3
12-24-2004, 11:21 AM
I haven't come across too many Americans like that lately, but I do remember some interesting comments in the 70's when we (gasp) DROVE to WDW. I mean my gosh, we have CARS up in Canada?!

I also remember quite a few questions about the cord at the front - was it an electric car? Did we have to plug it in every night? What happened if it ran out of power?

Most of the comments I get these days are about the cold weather and the snow. Of course living in Winnipeg all I can do really is say "yep"

ETA: I think one of the reasons we learn about the US in school is, well let's face it, they're a major super-power and they're located right next door. It would be a little silly if we didn't learn about them.

totalia
12-24-2004, 01:34 PM
Oh I forgot the one where an american asked if I had to wear snow shoes to get to work in the summer.

Sometimes it seems that Americans know more about Mexico than they know about Canada. I don't know why that is. They may be a super power but we are right next door to them and Canadians can't be all that odd to meet.

jewellmmc
12-24-2004, 02:01 PM
Haha...These stories are funny. I'm glad I started this thread.

PanamaMike
12-24-2004, 02:56 PM
Some years ago an American tourist I was dealing with complained that it was "so hard to tell your money apart because it's all different colours".

I wondered if she had the same problem with traffic lights.

jewellmmc
12-24-2004, 03:22 PM
Some years ago an American tourist I was dealing with complained that it was "so hard to tell your money apart because it's all different colours".

I wondered if she had the same problem with traffic lights.

OMG! I'm ROTFL! :Pinkbounc

Limmer
12-24-2004, 03:51 PM
I remember one. When we were staying at a Marriott in Buffalo my Dad tipped the concierge lady $2 CDN the first night. She thought it was the funniest thing that she had ever seen. At first she thought my Dad was joking and the 2 $ bill was fake. When he assured her it was real money she said she was going to give it to her little brother to play with because "it was so cute".

chasbos
12-24-2004, 04:03 PM
I really wonder if any of these people making these brilliant comments has ever looked at a map of North America? If they have they could easily see that a lot of Ontario (which is in Canada) is further south than some of there states! Even parts of California are further north than southern Ontario!

My kids learn a lot of Canadian History in school - more than I ever did and they know very little about the US (despite going there numerous times).

All this being said - you are all giving me a good chuckle today!

tigercat
12-24-2004, 04:16 PM
I have a friend who is a police officer. He was patrolling along the 401 near London when he came across a car along side the road. When he asked the people in the car what was the trouble they told him that they were having a hard time finding the ski hills could he direct them. He told them to keep going north and eventually they would find it. It was in July. Also, when I was in Orlando I had gone into a store that specialized in clothes for short women. I really liked something and wanted to get some more later. I asked her where the nearest one was and I told her I lived in Ontario Canada. She couldn't find it in her directory of the U.S. I couldn't convince her that Ontario was in another Country not part of the U.S. To be fair though I finally told her to look up New York and particularly Buffalo and she told me that now I was being funny that there was no such place. I have no idea where another one of those stores is as I left. She was the manager.
tigercat

chasbos
12-24-2004, 04:21 PM
You really have to wonder how some people get by in life don't you! I guess they are so wrapped up in their own lives they do not like to broaden their horizons!

wee-haggis
12-24-2004, 06:17 PM
I don't think Canadians are educated all that much in school about America and Americans.

I think we learn because we watch their TV.
LOL...I think it quite the opposite.
The American school kids only learn about USA....with a smidge of Europe,Asia ,Africa and S America thrown in.

damo
12-26-2004, 06:41 PM
Here are two of many:

This summer, some teens from Kentucky asked my son if he really kills baby seals.

My mom, who winters in Florida, was amazed by another senior citizen lady, who told her that it was impossible for Canadians to have baby boomers since we didn't participate in WW2.

ChisJo
12-27-2004, 12:33 AM
My mom, who winters in Florida, was amazed by another senior citizen lady, who told her that it was impossible for Canadians to have baby boomers since we didn't participate in WW2.

OMG!! :earseek: :earseek: :earseek:

Maybe it's because I find War history interesting, but really, do they think they actually won the war on their own?

Lollipop's Mom
12-27-2004, 01:36 AM
I once sold something on ebay to a lady that lived in Norway. She emailed me asking all kinds of questions about Canada because she once knew a 'John Anderson' (I think that was the name....if not, it was a similar very generic name) who lived in the 'city' of Nova Scotia. She wondered if I knew him. She asked if we had cars here and if we had lots of snow all year round. It seemed very innocent. I replied that I live in Western Canada, above WA state, and very far from Nova Scotia. I told her where to find a map of Canada. I also told her that were I live we rarely get snow, and it rarely goes below 10 degrees, and people golf all year round! She could barely believe that!

SyracuseWolvrine
12-27-2004, 10:20 AM
Maybe it's because I find War history interesting, but really, do they think they actually won the war on their own?

I'm sure some of us Americans believe that, I on the other hand, know better.

(I also know that Canadians have both cars and electricity, there's more to do than just watch hockey, most people do not have pet beavers (nor moose), and that the 401 is the most boring highway I've ever driven on.) (That being said, after driving the 401, I now know that Speed, Tailgating, Drunk Driving, and Fatigue can kill me, and that I'll get "1 demerit point" if I get caught going 120 in a 100 zone)

I also find it pleasant that most places that I've stopped in Canada will accept American currency, and wish that more places in America would accept Canadian currency. (I believe I still have $3 or 4 CDN in my car's change box, leftover from the last time I was in Canada)

tigercat
12-27-2004, 10:28 AM
I just remember something else My dd's friends cousin (I think it was a cousin) was coming over from England. The family was going to take her to some tourist area's so they wanted to know what she wanted to see. She was going to be here a short time but thought she would like to see Niagara Falls (doable), Ottawa, the east coast and Vancouver. Oh and Edmonton. No problem right. It seems that Europe doesn't understand how big Canada is.
tigercat

Sandyincanada
12-27-2004, 11:38 AM
It seems that Europe doesn't understand how big Canada is.

I would say thats probably true but not as much from ignorance but more from not being able to picture it from a map. DH is from England and his relatives visit every few years. They are completely amazed at how big Canada is and how much empty space we have. His Aunt and Uncle arrive in different areas of Canada, rent a vehicle and eventually make their way to MB. Most of the Countries are so close there, they are used to grabbing a car/train or ferry and arriving in a different Country the same or next day, lol.

jewellmmc
12-27-2004, 11:39 AM
I'm sure some of us Americans believe that, I on the other hand, know better.

(I also know that Canadians have both cars and electricity, there's more to do than just watch hockey, most people do not have pet beavers (nor moose), and that the 401 is the most boring highway I've ever driven on.) (That being said, after driving the 401, I now know that Speed, Tailgating, Drunk Driving, and Fatigue can kill me, and that I'll get "1 demerit point" if I get caught going 120 in a 100 zone)

I also find it pleasant that most places that I've stopped in Canada will accept American currency, and wish that more places in America would accept Canadian currency. (I believe I still have $3 or 4 CDN in my car's change box, leftover from the last time I was in Canada)

That's good. I was waiting for an American to come. LOL. BTW I'll take that CDN money off your hands! lol....just kidding.

ChisJo
12-27-2004, 01:26 PM
Syracuse Wolvrine, I didn't mean to offend you, and if I did, I'm sorry.
Jo

totalia
12-27-2004, 02:39 PM
I'm sure some of us Americans believe that, I on the other hand, know better.

(I also know that Canadians have both cars and electricity, there's more to do than just watch hockey, most people do not have pet beavers (nor moose), and that the 401 is the most boring highway I've ever driven on.) (That being said, after driving the 401, I now know that Speed, Tailgating, Drunk Driving, and Fatigue can kill me, and that I'll get "1 demerit point" if I get caught going 120 in a 100 zone)

I also find it pleasant that most places that I've stopped in Canada will accept American currency, and wish that more places in America would accept Canadian currency. (I believe I still have $3 or 4 CDN in my car's change box, leftover from the last time I was in Canada)

How refreshing. It's rare to find an American who knows ANYTHING about Canada.

Oh this was funny. My fiance (who's from Louisiana and lives in New Orleans) came to Canada for a week when I had my accident so he could spend time with me.

He was staying at a hotel in the city and there were fast food joints nearby. He went in one night to get some dinner and gave the guy at the counter a tip since they often do in the States. The guy gave him this really funny look like he had just grown wings and was flying.

My darling asked me why the guy had looked at him so funny. I had to tell him that we don't customarily tip someone at a fast food joint and that tips are generally reserved only for extrordinary service. Even then they are rarely as large a tip as he gave (he gave the guy $4 when that was as much as his dinner). It made me laugh really hard.

lol. It wasn't the first time I had explained how tips work in Canada so it was very amusing.

jewellmmc
12-27-2004, 03:08 PM
Haha that's funny totalia. I didn't really think tips were complex....hmmmm...lol just kidding.

crazee4mickey
12-27-2004, 04:55 PM
I remember when we were kids at Disneyland in the 1980's, there had been a much publicized taking of hostages(Americans)that was in the news for quite some time before we got there.
Canada played a huge part in the hostages release--My sister and I (aged maybe 12 and 15) were in an elevator in the Disneyland Hotel when a group entered the elevator--they asked where we were from when they heard us talking. We told them Canada--I am not kidding, they were hugging us, shaking our hands and thanking us for helping to release their hostages---kind of freaked us out a little! When we got off the elevator we were laughing so hard-it was like we had gone and released them personally--made us proud to be Canadian though!
When I was in elementary school we had to learn all of the states, their capitals, etc. and in high school we also used to have to take a mandatory year of American history.
My brother-in-law is married to an American-she was raised only 30 minutes from the Canadian border and has very little knowledge about Canada---we tease her as much as she teases us! :D

DisFan2
12-27-2004, 05:34 PM
When we got off the elevator we were laughing so hard-it was like we had gone and released them personally--made us proud to be Canadian though!

This falls under the rubric of "Funny things Canadians might not know about themselves" - http://www.cia.gov/csi/studies/winter99-00/art1.html
:D

SyracuseWolvrine
12-27-2004, 09:26 PM
Syracuse Wolvrine, I didn't mean to offend you, and if I did, I'm sorry.
Jo

No offense taken. I'm enjoying this thread almost as much of some of the Canadians. (I knew a lot of my fellow Americans were clueless, I didn't realize they were THIS clueless)

I grew up close to the Windsor-Detroit border. Close enough that I was able to watch hockey on CBC rather than on US networks. (CBC provides much better coverage.) Close enough that some friends say I have a "Canadian accent" ... (I don't really, except on "ou" words ... out, about, etc). My cell phone ringtone alternates between O Canada and the Hockey Night in Canada theme song.

(I joke that I'm from one of, if not the only place in the US where you can drive due south and end up in Canada)

jewellmmc
12-28-2004, 09:34 AM
Very cool Syracuse, but I am sorry to break then news that your some of your fellow Americans are that clueless. Maybe you should educate them lol.

pumpkinboy
12-28-2004, 04:11 PM
...My god. How can people actually be this misinformed?...Hey, more than 50% of them voted for George Bush didn't they? :rolleyes: And after seeing these election results and you're really surprised at the ignorance of many of my countrymen??!! :umbrella: Really, some of these people make Stockwell Day sound well-informed and thoughtful (the Flintstones is not a documentary!).

But seriously, you are all correct about Canadian school children being able to name and identify US states but US school children not being able to do the same. To be fair, I am a product of US public school and I am not completely ignorant; then again, I came from Maine, where something in the vicinity of a third of the population can trace their families back to Canada (usually Québec, but quite a few Maritimers as well); so we actually had some connection or reason for knowing. Maine also has some of the top performing schools in the States on major standardised tests (pats self on back...).
Interestingly, even some of my fellow American students at McGill had not bothered to figure out Canadian geography, after four years.

People learn things that have relevance to their lives, and my countrymen have been focusing on their navels for some time now. Think of all the Easterners who have no idea how big the West really is, or the Europeans and North Americans who somehow come to believe that Africa is one smallish country. Ignorance is everywhere folks, and my countrymen do not have a monopoly on it by any stretch of the imagination.

Funny thread tho.

totalia
12-28-2004, 04:52 PM
Hey, more than 50% of them voted for George Bush didn't they? :rolleyes: And after seeing these election results and you're really surprised at the ignorance of many of my countrymen??!! :umbrella: Really, some of these people make Stockwell Day sound well-informed and thoughtful (the Flintstones is not a documentary!).

Funny thread tho.

Lol. Very good point.

DisFan2
12-28-2004, 05:02 PM
Hey, more than 50% of them voted for George Bush didn't they? :rolleyes: And after seeing these election results and you're really surprised at the ignorance of many of my countrymen??!!

Let's see.... my parents, university educated, living in Canada as landed immigrants, voted for Bush. Which I guess makes them "ignorant" Americans. Yet living here, as they have for more than 30 years, they know more about Canada than most Americans. Which makes them less ignorant Americans, yet still ign.... never mind. Ironically, I believe it was a Canadian - Premier Brian Peckford, who when asked about election results stated "there was WISDOM in the masses". Small consolation when your man doesn't win, I guess. :D

Ignorance is everywhere folks, and my countrymen do not have a monopoly on it by any stretch of the imagination.


With this point I can agree. While the thread was well intentioned, I think that pumpkinboy has detected the decided note of hubris that has more than crept in here.

merfsko
12-28-2004, 05:19 PM
I once went to a Wendy's in Florida, and when our server guy foudn out we were Canadian. He completely didn't understand that our first language was English- he thought Canadian's were all French-speaking! Sure, we learn French, but it's not like I speak fluent French or anything. He just didn't get the concept that we spoke English AND French.

Let's just say I was glad when we got out meal!

**I agree with jewllmmc, the message below mine. We know that not all Americans are like this- I also acknowledge that some Canadian are like that too.**

jewellmmc
12-28-2004, 05:38 PM
Another Note: This thread is not meant to insult Americans. We are just talking about funny reactions. Obviously they are about Americans but the posts aren't poking fun at the entire population of the United States.

Thank you,
Jewel

jersey shark
12-30-2004, 08:49 AM
As am American frequent business traveler to Canada, I can't disagree with the ignorance of many Americans re: all things Canadian; but it does work both ways, though (especially at the level of the fast food employee...of course...this should not be surprising!!!).

I find Canadians (generally speaking) don't know too much about US geography (can you name the 3 largest cities in New Mexico) history (Who were the "Minutemen"?), or even cultural items that aren't necessarily truly American (Cinqo de Mayo, for example...what is this??).

My theory is as follows (articulated somewhat in an earlier post)...we know/care about the things, people, places that matter to us,,,so what's going on may not be a reflection of things related to Canada so much as the degree to which there is an interest or concern about Canada. Example: Here in the New York/New Jersey metropolitan area...many of us here have pretty much concluded that we're the center of the universe and have everything here etc..., therefore, we don't have much of an appetite to learn of things going on in Kansas City, Billings Montana, or
yes, Canada. My experience in Canada is somewhat similiar INSIDE Canada...for example, Toronto people are generally pretty out-of-touch with people in fishing villages in Newfoundland or on the farms of Saskatchewan because like New Yorkers to the rest of the US, "it's not their scene".

P.S. I can always identify when I've reached a Canadian call center when calling for hotel reservations....he's the guy apologizing for no reason with a funny accent (SOAR-ee!) and often starting each sentence with an apology!!! (Oddest thing!!) Also, the
Cdn pronunciation of pasta (PAST-a, not PAW-sta) should be illegal...enough to make my Italian grandma turn over in her grave!!!

Happy New Year!

JS

Happy New Year!

blusk
12-30-2004, 10:22 AM
I did not have any experiences like this on our first trip to WDW, but on our last.....oh boy. One night at Illuminations I got talking to this guy from PA somewhere and he asked if the Canadian Pavillion was what Canada really looked like, I said no not really, then he asked if we spoke french because he heard somewhere that everyone is Canada is french. That one is not so bad, I just explained to him about his misconceptions and he was pretty cool about it. He just kind of laughed after that. They were pretty nice.

We met a couple at MGM during a parade, they were from Washington. When they found out we were from Canada, they asked if we had ever been in heat like this before. It was like 22 degrees out. hahahahahahaha....she had no idea we had a summer at all.......she really did think that the whole country was like a frozen tundra.

Sandyincanada
12-30-2004, 11:02 AM
[QUOTE=jersey shark] (especially at the level of the fast food employee...of course...this should not be surprising!!!).

I find Canadians (generally speaking) don't know too much about US geography (can you name the 3 largest cities in New Mexico) history (Who were the "Minutemen"?), or even cultural items that aren't necessarily truly American (Cinqo de Mayo, for example...what is this??). QUOTE]

As to your first comment - OUCH! Glad I don't work for one.

You are talking about very specific things. I know Cinqo de Mayo is a holiday in Mexico, its to do with wnning a war victory - but I know that from being in Mexico. Minutemen? again heard of it, again a war question - it was a group of soldiers. Do I really need to know more about them? I don't think so.

We are not surprise that someone hasn't hear of, for example, The Royal Winnipeg Ballet (which is renowned world wide) but the fact that they have never heard of the PROVINCE of Manitoba! Some people don't even realize we have provinces and not states. Simple things like the Provinces (we learn all the States here), that our Christmas lands on Dec 25, that our clock has 24 hours (lol, sorry but I love that one), the fact that Canada does have a summer season ( a very hot one in some provinces), that we have a Prime minister and not a president. That we DO NOT live in igloos, lol. We are not talking about specific cities or historical events just perceptions in regards to Canada period.

Alot of this is in fun only but think about it, if everytime (ok, many times not everytime) you spoke to a Canadian, they asked you what New Jersey is and what province is it in and was surprised that you weren't all farmers with Jersey cows, would it not get to you? lol, you may be rolling your eyes but those are the type of questions we hear all the time.

So I'll make you a deal, we'll stop saying pasta, if you stop saying "ya'll", ;)

TnTsParty
12-30-2004, 11:47 AM
I had to post to this thread because I have found some of the same ignorance you have been talking about but its not about Canada. My DH is from New Mexico and like Jersey Shark mentioned alot of people don't even realize this IS a state in the US - I was born and raised in South Florida so I have come across alot of people from different states and countries so I feel I am pretty knowledgable about things (though I won't say I know everything about Canada or Mexico or other countries but I do know enough not to ask stupid questions) the comments I have heard about my DH have been "wasn't he scared to live outside of the US" "does he have a passport" and another funny one he has heard is "you don't look like a Mexican" well duh that's because he's not - he's a 1/2 Irish - 1/2 German American. I guess he was so used to people being ignorant about New Mexico that when I first met him he said "I'm from New Mexico and no I am not Mexican" he didn't realize I had paid attention in my Geography classes!! Also on Christmas I was talking with my cousin who was visiting from Alaska and he has had the same ignorant comments asked to him - like does he need a passport to come to the US or why the galcier is dirty and not clean, or do they live in igloo's - guess ignorance is not only aimed at the Canadians!!

Also I do not appreciate Pumpkinboy implying that if you voted for George W Bush you are ignorant - sorry but it makes you the ignorant person for making that comment.

Mickey&JoshNut
12-30-2004, 12:47 PM
I think the funniest thing I heard was on our last trip to WDW at the beginning of December. When we visit EPCOT I always wear my Roots Canada t-shirt. This time I had on my Roots Canada T-shirt (with the Canada flag), my socks had small Canada flags and I had a Roots Canada backpack and a CM asked if I was from Canada or just advertising for them!!!

Also, when we were talking to a family from a Southern State (not mentioning where) and when they found out we had driven from Canada she couldn't believe it and asked how long it took to drive. When I replied that we took a leisurely drive and were here in 3 days the mom was dumb founded. I guess she thought Canada was further away!!!!

merfsko
12-30-2004, 08:57 PM
So I'll make you a deal, we'll stop saying pasta, if you stop saying "ya'll"

Hey! I'm Canadian and "y'all" is part of my everyday vocabulary! :D
but really, about the 'past-a' thing, people pronounce things differently, sometimes a whole nation sometimes just a single person (I always pronounced 'plain,' play-in , and my family/friends makes fun of me :guilty: )
So the 'past-a' is just another of saying it.

crazee4mickey
12-30-2004, 10:29 PM
When we were in Animal Kingdom a couple of weeks ago, my husband went to buy some smoothies for us. The cast member asked where he was from--when he said "Canada" her reply was "Yeah I thought so, have you seen the movie "Brother Bear" because you sound just like the two moose in the movie, all Canadians do!"
My husband kind of stood there with his mouth open :eek: -really not knowing what to say-he came back over to us and said "she thinks all Canadians sound just like Bob and Doug MacKenzie!" He was so insulted and even asked us what we thought-"do I say eh all the time? You guys never do, do I?"-we never do--"do I say take off?" --he was insulted but paranoid at the same time that we spoke like that! I think he wouldn't have taken it so badly if she had even indicated that she was teasing a bit but she was so serious!
I laughed so hard :laughing:--he was so "ticked off"--I'm still LMAO, EH!

Sandyincanada
12-30-2004, 11:06 PM
Hey! I'm Canadian and "y'all" is part of my everyday vocabulary! :D
but really, about the 'past-a' thing, people pronounce things differently, sometimes a whole nation sometimes just a single person (I always pronounced 'plain' play-in , and my family/friends makes fun of me :guilty: )
So the 'past-a' is just another of saying it.

LOL...I've never heard a Canadian say "Y'all" before, thought it was a good example .... my Aunt who moved to the States quite a few years ago says it alot and I always tease her about it.

But I agree with you, I never understood the "aboot" thing. I've never heard anyone say aboot for about. Hmmm, my DD just moved to NS and they have pretty strong accents there, maybe its from there?? lol, will have to listen to her SO better.

To crazee, ok, I'll admit that I do use "eh" once in awhile but I can't recall the last time I said "Take off, you hoser" lol. Those moose in Brother Bear were pretty funny, they were my favorite part of the movie :)

chasbos
12-31-2004, 08:55 AM
I totally agree with SandyinCanada - I had a cousin move to NS almost 6 years ago and we she comes home and we start a conversation we sometimes look at her as if she has grown another head! We cannot understand half the things she is saying!

So it happens in our own country too!

Taryn
12-31-2004, 10:30 AM
Hi,

I have a couple of favorites and most are from people I have spoken with at WDW. I was chatting with a lovely older couple from Kentucky while waiting for the Friendship at MGM one afternoon. The lady after a bit asked me what part of England I was from. She knew a lot about the U.K. but couldn’t place my accent. *I still can’t hear an accent no matter how hard I try). I told her I was from Toronto Canada. Her husband thought that was very interesting and asked if Toronto was a big town. I said that it was pretty big… fifth largest city in North America. The gentleman laughed and said that was nice but I was mistaken. He then informed me that the United States was part of North America so it was not possible for the fifth largest city to be in Canada. I must have my continents confused.

A little later on in the week I was chatting with a young couple and I believe they were from Florida because they said they were close enough to come down every month or so. Anyway, we got to chatting about our dogs and the husband asked what kind mine was. I said that Chessa was a Siberian Husky. The wife hit her husband playfully and laughed, “Dear, of course it’s a Husky, those are the only dogs they have up there because it is so cold… really dear.”

I also got a little giggle one other time when I mentioned, while down at WDW again, that I had had the opportunity to meet the Queen… well, just see her up close really when she came for a tour of my workplace the month previous. It was pretty exciting I thought. We chatted about other things for a while and as I was leaving he added… “Well, I hope you guys get your independence soon…”

Last one! I am in broadcasting and often get calls from the States, mostly NPR stations requesting facilities or the services of technicians up here for interviews etc. I got a call from NPR in Sacramento wanting me to send someone to Banff. I explained that he was calling Toronto and that I was looking for a station in Alberta who could assist him. He stopped me and said he preferred to deal with Toronto… didn’t mind paying a bit of mileage but we had to have somewhat out there by 2pm. It was 11:30 am and I couldn’t resist telling him that he would have a much better chance of getting there himself by 2pm! I’m bad… I talked him into letting me send a reporter from Calgary.

AND just to make things fair I am going to admit that I only found out this year that they do not have boxing day in the States…

minkydog
12-31-2004, 12:17 PM
Ya'll have to know this goes both ways, right? I'm from Atlanta, Georgia, which is in the southern U.S. my hubby and i love Canada, particularly Montreal. Once when we were there are a business trip I had several hours to "play" at the mall. I guess I look Canadian, because every sales person spoke French to me,then quickly switched to English(In my part of the country, Spanish is much more useful than French; therfore I do not speak French.) The questions they would ask me (I'm not making these up!):

"Do you live on a plantation?" (I admit, we get this from people in the U.S. too. Too much Gone With The Wind)

"Do you know any of the Braves?" (No, do you?)

"Does it ever get cold in Georgia?" (Well, it was 15 degrees last week.)

"Don't you get hot in Georgia?" (Only when the air conditioning breaks down.)

"Do you own a gun?" (Yes. a big one.)

"Do you keep hunting dogs?" (Only my poodle. We shot our Boston Terrier just kidding...)

"You have such a strange/weird/pleasant/funny accent. Say something!"(Thank you. You're obnoxious.)

We in the South really are pleasant people, but the media sometimes paints us all as though we were The BEverly Hillbillies or Dukes of Hazzard. I promise not to ask if you drive a dogsled, if you will not treat me like I'm an idiot just because I stumbled across the border (which way is it again?...)

Cathy--got some Canadian dollars burning a hole in my pocket

wee-haggis
12-31-2004, 01:19 PM
Ya'll have to know this goes both ways, right? I'm from Atlanta, Georgia, which is in the southern U.S. my hubby and i love Canada, particularly Montreal. Once when we were there are a business trip I had several hours to "play" at the mall. I guess I look Canadian, because every sales person spoke French to me,then quickly switched to English(In my part of the country, Spanish is much more useful than French; therfore I do not speak French.) The questions they would ask me (I'm not making these up!):

"Do you live on a plantation?" (I admit, we get this from people in the U.S. too. Too much Gone With The Wind)

"Do you know any of the Braves?" (No, do you?)

"Does it ever get cold in Georgia?" (Well, it was 15 degrees last week.)

"Don't you get hot in Georgia?" (Only when the air conditioning breaks down.)

"Do you own a gun?" (Yes. a big one.)

"Do you keep hunting dogs?" (Only my poodle. We shot our Boston Terrier just kidding...)

"You have such a strange/weird/pleasant/funny accent. Say something!"(Thank you. You're obnoxious.)

We in the South really are pleasant people, but the media sometimes paints us all as though we were The BEverly Hillbillies or Dukes of Hazzard. I promise not to ask if you drive a dogsled, if you will not treat me like I'm an idiot just because I stumbled across the border (which way is it again?...)

Cathy--got some Canadian dollars burning a hole in my pocket
You are absolutely correct Cathy..it does work both ways.
Although,to be honest its is a bit more one way than the other.
As for your first example....Most folk in Quebec will speak to you in French first ,then in English (if they are in a good mood! :D
I think it is suffice to say that when a visitor from another country has little or no knowledge about you home country,it can a bit frustarting and annoying to the extent where you perhaps reply with a sarcastic remark.

Sandyincanada
12-31-2004, 05:04 PM
I promise not to ask if you drive a dogsled, if you will not treat me like I'm an idiot just because I stumbled across the border (which way is it again?...)



Bah, thats just Quebec, ignore them, we do, LOL

totalia
12-31-2004, 05:23 PM
lol. These are so funny.

jersey shark
01-01-2005, 10:20 AM
I had to laugh when I read someone say "still can't hear (my) Cdn accent, no matter how hard I try"...of course you can't, because you're used to it!

The "oots and aboots" you are NOT hearing are being heard by Americans as very definite "oots and aboots"! Trust me on this, it's very strong. (As a well-travelled business guy across Canada and US I can nail down US accents to their individual states, if not cities!)

Other dead giveaways in the Cdn accent are the words "sorry" and "pasta" (explained on an earlier post), and of course, "eh". Plus, there's some strange (to Americans) word plays...the phrase "at all" I hear in Canada pronounced "a tall"...Also, certain vocabulary notes are worth mentioning..."supper" in Canada becomes "dinner" in the US; washroom/bathroom in Canada, restroom in the US - restroom seems so much more civilized; "highways" in Canada, "routes" in the US - this one has always amused me...the highway is meant to refer to the physical road (the asphalt etc...)...the route is what should be numbered and what should be discussed to take you somewhere (i.e. Follow Rt 401 from Toronto to Windsor ...not Highway 401!!)

I have the general sense that you mix in about one-third of a British accent with a generic midwestern American accent...poof you get a Cdn accent! Make that two-thirds British when you're in Nova Scotia and other eastern provinces.

Happy New Year

wenabre
01-01-2005, 11:35 AM
washroom/bathroom in Canada, restroom in the US - restroom seems so much more civilized;

jersey shark, I don't know about you...but I would prefer NOT to sleep in the bathroom, unless of course thats what you guys do in Jersey :earseek:
For someone who states he does a lot of business in Canada you seem to always 'knock it'. How about joining in the fun, in fun, if you catch my drift!!
Now for my pick on fun words heard in New Jersey:
CAAW-FEE for coffee and BUDDAH for butter

Have a Happy New Year to All of you, you all!! :laughing:

Sandyincanada
01-01-2005, 12:10 PM
The "oots and aboots" you are NOT hearing are being heard by Americans as very definite "oots and aboots"! Trust me on this, it's very strong. (As a well-travelled business guy across Canada and US I can nail down US accents to their individual states, if not cities!)


Ok, this aboot thing drives me nuts, lol....exactly what provinces do you hear this in cause its certainly not MB, SK, AB, BC or Ont. (These are the provinces I frequent). We pronounce it about (abowt, I guess). Maybe its a french pronounciation?

I use both supper or dinner, supper informally, dinner formally as in making dinner reservations.

Never heard of a-tall either, only at all.

We were in England once and I used the term restroom, bathroom, washroom and all I received was a blank stare until I finally said, I have to pee, lol...she laughed and said ohhhhh, "The Toilet"...duh, never even thought of that one, lol.

When I watch American movies I don't pick up any accent because they sound identical to how I sound (other than the extremes like southern accents) if they pronounced words differently, my ears would pick that up so I guess I'm still confused about this so called generic "Canadian accent".

I have the general sense that you mix in about one-third of a British accent with a generic midwestern American accent...poof you get a Cdn accent! Make that two-thirds British when you're in Nova Scotia and other eastern provinces.

I had to show DH that one since he is from England...he laughed and said more like Scottish mixed in with a twang, lol. DD's SO and family (from NS)sound like cowboys to me, lol...when he first called here I thought he was an American, honestly lol.

I'm taking this thread all in fun, hopefully everyone else is too. :)

damo
01-01-2005, 12:34 PM
We were recently in California. Everyone assumed we were Californian. We sounded the same as the majority of folks there. Hey, we were even told that we didn't look Canadian!

jersey shark
01-01-2005, 06:23 PM
...but I merely wanted to point out that it works both ways (with Canada, with the South, and now allow me to share some my favorite comments I've heard about New Jersey in Canada)

a) "Do you have a gun?" (Answer: No)

b) "On The Sopranos, some neighborhoods really look poor" (Good source of info!!!...meanwhile, NJ just passed CT to become the wealthiest state based on per capita income)

c) I don't like New Jersey...I've seen the Sopranos, and it looks ugly (a common misperception...even for the rest of the US...mostly due to the routing of the NJ Tpke which happens to pass by some chemical plants and oil storage tanks)...meanwhile the rolling hills of western NJ, the pinelands in the south, the shore, all are fondly thought of when "trapped" on the 401 - especially between Windsor & London!)

d) (upon hearing that I often take the family on summer weekends to the "shore", Jersey-speak for "ocean" or "beach",)...you have beaches in New Jersey???
(meanwhile, almost all of coastal New Jersey is pristine, fine white sand beach...each town with its own flavor...there are family beach towns, there are college beach towns (wild) and there are boardwalk-laden amusement park type beach towns...in fact many Canadians apparently come down to Wildwood, NJ and take over the town every summer I'm told.

e) What's your big city in New Jersey? (Uhh, that would be New York City - a 45 minute drive from most of us in North Jersey!!!)


BUT, this is all fine and amusing more than anything....I don't seriously mind these misunderstandings...here's my "big picture synopsis" of this thread...(same concept from an earlier post stated another way)

Canada is simply not on the radar screen of most Americans the way that America is on the average Canadians' radar screen. This is not optimal, agreed, but it's just the way it is (and there are very good reasons for this...America's leadership position in the free world partly explains it, but I think I'd have to move to another board to go further.)

Happy New Year!

Sandyincanada
01-01-2005, 07:56 PM
...
Canada is simply not on the radar screen of most Americans the way that America is on the average Canadians' radar screen. This is not optimal, agreed, but it's just the way it is (and there are very good reasons for this...America's leadership position in the free world partly explains it, but I think I'd have to move to another board to go further.)

Happy New Year!

Oh puh-lease, :rolleyes: or its the fact that we are educated in grade school about America AND other Countries.

And I won't even comment on Americas perceived leadership position. You've just changed the whole lightheartedness of this thread but I think you already know that. Your obviously trying to start something here and I, for one, am not playing.

Yzma and Kronk
01-01-2005, 08:45 PM
[QUOTE=SyracuseWolvrine]

and that the 401 is the most boring highway I've ever driven on.) (That being said, after driving the 401, I now know that Speed, Tailgating, Drunk Driving, and Fatigue can kill me, and that I'll get "1 demerit point" if I get caught going 120 in a 100 zone)

LOL!

We just went up and down the 401 a couple of times during Xmas holidays!
The things you learn on the 401 :rolleyes: :D

Yzma and Kronk
01-01-2005, 08:54 PM
[QUOTE=
So I'll make you a deal, we'll stop saying pasta, if you stop saying "ya'll", ;)[/QUOTE]

You should have said, "If ya'll stop saying ya'll" LOL!

Problem is you can't stop saying ya'll. It creeps into your vocabulary like a nasty virus.
You should hear me now - "Let's all go "ooot and abooot" (out and about), y'all"! :D :D

Yzma and Kronk
01-01-2005, 08:59 PM
QUOTE"But I agree with you, I never understood the "aboot" thing. I've never heard anyone say aboot for about. Hmmm, my DD just moved to NS and they have pretty strong accents there, maybe its from there?? lol, will have to listen to her SO better." UNQUOTE


I didn't understand the "aboot" thing either until I moved here. I actually pronounce it that way :eek:
I just about fell over when I heard the word come out of my mouth!
I guess you really can't hear our Canadian accents until you are away!

Katdb
01-01-2005, 09:06 PM
This is not optimal, agreed, but it's just the way it is (and there are very good reasons for this...America's leadership position in the free world partly explains it, but I think I'd have to move to another board to go further.)

All I can say is: all the kids on the playground know the bully, but not every bully knows all the kids.

Sandyincanada is right, you always seem to want to pick a fight on these boards. If you can't play nice with other kids, than maybe you shouldn't play at all!

Thank you to everyone for this great, fun thread and for recognizing that it is just that, a fun thread. Let's keep it that way and keep the fun rolling :Pinkbounc

Yzma and Kronk
01-01-2005, 09:18 PM
Sorry about all the posts, but I was reading through the thread and answering as I went along.....(ooops how Canadian of me to apologise LOL!)

My comments:

The US is a very insular country - which is OK. They do however teach some world geography in school here in Georgia. DD has been here since the first grade (grade one :D ) They study CANADA in grade one. Let's just say that I helped out the teacher some during that unit, and all the neighbours call on us for info on Canada when their kids hit the first grade.

The best was in DD's class the kids had to write a information fact on Canada. The teacher really didn't want to have to look up the information herself to see if it was correct so she ask me to check them. One child wrote, "London is a city in Canada and it rains a lot"
I told her they were half right - London is in Canada (she didn't know) and I said it doesn't really rain a lot (the child was referring to London, England)

This term DS will study Canada, and I've already stocked up on Canadian things and will make Butter Tarts for the class too!

BTW - DD also learned about England, Japan and Australia in 2nd grade.
She is now in 4th grade, and boy does she know a lot about Georgia history, and the original colonies in the US!

I hope y'all had a great new year (it was sunny and 70F here today!)
Y&K - oot and aboot in Jawjah! :D

pampam
01-02-2005, 08:20 AM
I think some people say foolish things, no matter where they are from. I, a Canadian, was in a store in Canada, and I asked the sales clerk if they accepted American Express. Her reply? You guessed it. "No, we only take Canadian Express." I'm still laughing over that one.

Sandyincanada
01-02-2005, 12:09 PM
I'm still on a fact finding mission on which province says "aboot" instead of "about (abowt), lol......soooo, which province were you living in, Y & K?

I'm sure we all have our own ways of saying certain words and in Canada, to my ear, I hear French accents, Maritime accents and then everyone else sounds the same, lol. But I have never heard anyone say "aboot", well unless they are discussing boots as in shoes. I even asked DH who has a british accent and he said he hears "abowwt".

So, c'mon people., fess up.....who says aboot? lol

wee-haggis
01-02-2005, 12:41 PM
I'm still on a fact finding mission on which province says "aboot" instead of "about (abowt), lol......soooo, which province were you living in, Y & K?

I'm sure we all have our own ways of saying certain words and in Canada, to my ear, I hear French accents, Maritime accents and then everyone else sounds the same, lol. But I have never heard anyone say "aboot", well unless they are discussing boots as in shoes. I even asked DH who has a british accent and he said he hears "abowwt".

So, c'mon people., fess up.....who says aboot? lol
I agree...I've never heard anyone say aboot !!
I would guess that if it is said anywhere.....it would be in the Maritimes (what with the Scottish and Irish influence).
I know myself (being originally from Scotland),that in the "non-city" parts of the country you may find the word pronounced that way.
As for Vancouver,Calgary,Toronto,Montreal (English speaking group)....I can't hear much of a difference.

twinz
01-02-2005, 12:55 PM
Let me just start by saying that neither of us say ABOOT...LOL
I have a few comments.
We were in Ohio at a concert, and I was talking to this other girl sitting beside me. Sha asked where I was from and I told her Toronto Canada, and she looked at me and goes "oh you speak english?" Her friend said "you dummy what do you think she s speaking to you right now!",
Another time we were visiting friends in Boston and we were talking to their neightbour, and we were telling him about Toronto. He was shocked and amazed when we told him our temperatures are VERY close to Bostons. He couldn't believe that we didn;t have snow all the time.

I always LOVE to watch the Talking to American's and always get the biggest laugh when I am watching it!

pkitty
01-02-2005, 01:52 PM
Two Newfies talk'n bout fish.

Although I am not from Newfoundland. I did date a beautiful gal from there who told me this one. I must say they are sometimes their own worst enemy. I also have to admit they have a great sence of humor and know how to laugh at ones self.

PS. Hope this does not offend anyone.

pkitty
01-02-2005, 02:30 PM
While reading these stories I have to share a good one with you. I am a Police Officer in Ontario and was posted to Northern Ontario for a duration posting. In the five years I spent there I have to say they only Iglo I saw was the one my DD had me build for her in the winter so she could play. Anyway I recieved a call to attend a small community about 1 1/2 hours from my office this was in regards to a fail to remain motor vehicle collision. It was moose or bear hunting season and alot of tourists were up hoping to get a head to mount on their wall (the only wildlife I like to shoot is with a camara but thats a whole other story). Knowing it was going to take so long to get there I went home and packed my lunch, and grabbed a Tim Hortons coffee for the long trip out. Once I got there I met with the complainant who's vehicle was hit in a parking lot
they had seen the suspect vehicle and cought a glimpse of the driver. The damage was quite extensive and appearant the person who hit them would have known what they did. I then took the complainants information and found them to be from Michigan and when I got to the description of the suspect and their vehicle and plate number. The plate was from Colorado. It took me about 2 minutes to find out who the owner was and what street he lived on and another 30 seconds to get his telephone number. I then spoke to the owner of the local General store/Liquor/Bait and Tackle shop and found out the culprit was staying at a hunting lodge about 5 miles out of town. Anyways the long arm of the law was speaking to the suspect approx 3 hours after he hit the victims car. In all my years of working up there I think that was the only Fail to Remain that community had in about 10 years. I just thought it was funny the two involved happened to be Amarican.

pkitty
01-02-2005, 02:31 PM
sorry for the typo. American

Eskie_Lover
01-02-2005, 03:36 PM
The funniest thing I had happen, was I was posting to an internet board, about how hot it was (35-40 degrees without the humidex), and that my dog was spending all day sitting on the air conditioner vent. Someone from California posted back that that was nothing - they were in the 90s.... I had to explain that I was talking about Celcius, and that 37 degress Celcius is equivalent to 100 degress Fahrenheit.

I would just love to have seen her reaction to my original post - 35 degrees Fahrenheit would just be over freezing, but to a Canadian it was so hot I had to turn on the air conditioning, and my dog had to stay on the air conditioning vent???? LOL

MikeJ
01-03-2005, 12:51 PM
One child wrote, "London is a city in Canada and it rains a lot"
I told her they were half right - London is in Canada (she didn't know) and I said it doesn't really rain a lot (the child was referring to London, England)


Trust me, it does rain a lot here, and I have the new pond in my backyard to prove it... :umbrella:

- Mike

DisneySpence
01-04-2005, 11:00 AM
My best recalection of a funny question from somone from the states was at a hockey tournament when I was younger. I was hit with a stick and cut and went to the dressingroom to get stitches and came back to play. After the game I was asked if I even felt the pain or if living in Canada and being cold all the time made me numb so I didn't feel anything LOL that was a funny one.
Another one was in Ohio while at Cedar Point and I was asked if we needed the money different colours so that we didn't get confused with American money. This was a bad one in university on our way to FLA for spring break we paid our lunch bill with CDN Tire money and they put some of it on the wall as their first CDN money ever recieved in the place we had a good chuckle over that one but looking back now we see just how wrong that was.

Yzma and Kronk
01-04-2005, 05:48 PM
I'm still on a fact finding mission on which province says "aboot" instead of "about (abowt), lol......soooo, which province were you living in, Y & K?


Sandy: I'm from Ontario, grew up quiet close to the Michigan boarder. I had NEVER heard "aboot" before. I thought it was a bunch of sillyness too. I never heard it or said it, and I spoke to Canadians from all over in my job.
Now, that being said about 6 months after we moved down here and I found myself listening to the cashier at the local Publix say, "Hey, how y'all dooin. Jaunt sum extre caash with thaaat" I also had to switch from garbage to trash, evestroughs to gutters, pop to coke, etc, my Canadian ear must have gone a little flat! :eek:
I was outside talking to a neighbour and I used the word "about" and distinctly heard "aboot" coming out of my mouth. It wasn't as pronounced as consciously saying "aboot", it was more subtle than that, but I DID SAY IT!
I HEARD ME :scared1:

I was horrified! I felt like some sort of northern Yankee hick! ;)

I'm sure we Canadians don't really hear it in Canada, as the Sutherner's don't necessarily hear the y'all's etc. (they still think I'm the happiest Canadian they've met, because I still think the Southern accent can be pretty funny at times, and when I hear it I smile when I'm rolling with laughter inside)

I don't think it is necessarily from one part of Canada or another, it's just a Canadian thing (or should I say thang......LOL!) I was told once however, that I have a very strong Canadian accent - whatever that means! :)

melindaandrob
01-04-2005, 07:58 PM
At the Canadian pavilion dh (Rob of melindaandrob) was making a purchase and the CM asked "Are you making fun of me?"
He was a little taken back and said "No! why?"
"You said eh"
He laughed, he didn't realize he even said it.
She said "I wondered because you used it right"
Imagine what the Canadians in the pavillion put up with in regards to stereotypes.
We were suddenly very conscious of the word 'eh', I never realized just how much we said it. (When I'm oot and aboot)

We were getting on a bus one morning and the driver immediately asked if we were from Canada. Rob asked how he knew.
"The kids are in shorts and t-shirts"
(Hey! we had jackets and touques in our pockets--just kidding none of us have ever worn touques)

ChisJo
01-04-2005, 09:08 PM
This was a bad one in university on our way to FLA for spring break we paid our lunch bill with CDN Tire money and they put some of it on the wall as their first CDN money ever recieved in the place we had a good chuckle over that one but looking back now we see just how wrong that was.

This is so bad....But at the same time, so funny!!!
Jo

Amberle3
01-04-2005, 10:02 PM
I'm still on a fact finding mission on which province says "aboot" instead of "about (abowt), lol......soooo, which province were you living in, Y & K?

According to DFi's best friend (an American) - I do. He's from NY, lived in GA for a number of years and is now in CA. Every time I talk to him on the phone and accidently say "about" he cracks up and makes me say it again. He SWEARS I say "aboot". No one else I know hears it though.

sapdaddy
01-04-2005, 10:26 PM
When I go on vacation I try to get a tee shirt from the places that I find most interesting. I picked up a shirt that has the Peggy's cove light house and under it was "Peggy's Cove, NS. At least once every time I wore that shirt someone would ask me, "Which state is NS?" I would just say it's not in the US. I think most couldn't figure it out.

Sandyincanada
01-05-2005, 03:53 PM
According to DFi's best friend (an American) - I do. He's from NY, lived in GA for a number of years and is now in CA. Every time I talk to him on the phone and accidently say "about" he cracks up and makes me say it again. He SWEARS I say "aboot". No one else I know hears it though.

hmmmm, my DH from Britian doesn't hear "aboot", it seems only some Americans hear it so I wonder if these same people who hear "aboot" actually pronounce boots (as in shoes) "bowts"...then it would all make sense, lol

works for me ;)

Mickey Fanatic
01-05-2005, 04:08 PM
We had a funny one on our last trip to WDW.

We purposely arrived the weekend AFTER their Thanksgiving to avoid the crowds. When we were talking to our airport shuttle driver and telling them that it is strange to us to have Thanksgiving on a week day and comparing the days off we both get fot the holiday he said,"You have Thanksgiving up there?"

I think that it was more funny because he just finished telling us that he spends a week every summer visiting friends in Mississauga!

PanamaMike
01-06-2005, 04:34 PM
We had a funny one on our last trip to WDW.

We purposely arrived the weekend AFTER their Thanksgiving to avoid the crowds. When we were talking to our airport shuttle driver and telling them that it is strange to us to have Thanksgiving on a week day

American Thanksgiving is Thursday
Canadian Thanksgiving is Monday.

Both Monday and Thursday are weekdays.

Sandy22
01-06-2005, 08:04 PM
Ok, this aboot thing drives me nuts, lol....exactly what provinces do you hear this in cause its certainly not MB, SK, AB, BC or Ont. (These are the provinces I frequent). We pronounce it about (abowt, I guess). Maybe its a french pronounciation?

LOL - no way - not a french pronounciation. I live in Quebec and have never heard it pronouced "aboot". We pronounce it like "abowt". I don't hear an accent when watching American movies or while I'm traveling in most of the States. I can hear an accent in the "southern states" and in NY/NJ.

In Florida, when I tell people I live in the province of Quebec, they have no idea where this is and are always surprised I can speak French. To help them visualize where I live I'll say I'm 15 minutes from Ottawa - then I get a blank stare. But by far, the most common thing I get is people assuming I'm experiencing summer-like weather for the very first time. I think they know I'm not living in an igloo but they don't realize that I do live in an area where it's +30 C many summer days. When I took my summer trip to Orlando, it was hotter back home!

pkitty
01-06-2005, 09:57 PM
I lived in the Maritimes (Nova Scotia) for 6 years and have heard numerous Maritimers pronounce the word about "aboot" and hello "A buy" or where are you going "where ya too buy" and a few others. I find it hard to believe we from Ontario say aboot due in part that we know out is pronounced out and not oot. So folks from Ontario am I right or oot right wrong ?

all in fun pkitty.

Sandyincanada
01-06-2005, 10:39 PM
Hah!! So it is the Maritimes, lol thanks, pkitty. That was my first thought, with all the Scottish there but my DD (who moved there a few months ago)said (in a rather uppity voice, I might add) no, Mom, we do not pronounce about like aboot here in NS and proceded to brag about her nice weather while asking me about our blizzard...the brat!!

Sandy22, I found that out for myself this week. I'm in Ottawa on business and popped into the Casino in PQ (hull?)...I actually found myself listening for it, sooooo sad lol.

twinz
01-08-2005, 01:07 PM
Onthe flip side of this I notice that most American's pronounce PINK as PEENK, or BOX as BAX. It drives me nuts! LOL

jersey shark
01-08-2005, 09:39 PM
Okay, just had to claim the 100th posting on this marathon thread.

The "oot & aboot" phenomena is really interesting...I've maintained previously that it is certainly there very prominently to the US ear (I personally hear it on virtually every Canadian I speak with), but from what many of you report, you don't detect it at all (UNLESS you've left Canada for awhile and then it becomes VERY apparent, as I believe Y & K reported). Maybe that's just the nature of accents...difficult to detect unless one is out of their native "zone".

Here's some more great Canadian accent notes (not being critical; point being makes for some charm on my visits to Canada)

* the word "again"....in the US this never rhymes with "pain"
* (of course) "eh"....this truly is everywhere!
* the word "sorry"...previously described in this thread....the Cdn "soar-y" pronounciation just cracks me up...the US way is more "Saw-ry"...also, the frequency of needless apologies in Canada makes for tremendous use of this word...I remember being in a hurry once and turning a corner in Toronto Airport only to nearly bowl someone over (my fault) and my "victim" apologized to me profusely!!!!
* not an accent thing, but the word "buggy" for cart in the grocery store is pretty amusing, as is use of word "dinner" for the noon time meal (dinner means the evening meal in the US and word "supper" is rarely used).
* there is a very unusual speech thing in Nova Scotia, many folks there, when agreeing with someone, will say "Yeah, yeah, yeah" (rhymes with heh...the way "heather" starts out), and the same time they're saying this, they seem to breathe in in short spurts (not to the point of hyperventilating but...) ...aw, I may lose you on this because it's hard to describe in words, but it's very apparent to me....but then again, people from Maine have a very odd speech pattern to many non-Maine ears.

But isn't it just grand that we all have our local accents and it makes the world more interesting....it's nice that we're not all clones of one another, isn't it??

By the way, the "bax" (for "box") described above as a US accent is very regional ...it's the upstate NY-Cleveland-Detroit-Chicago nasal accent that calls a dollar a "dallar".

I have a few honies that I'm ALWAYS called on when in Canada (and in many other parts of the US)...mostly the "awe" sound in words like "costs", "office" and "coffee"...which Cdns hear as "cuh-wa-fee" as opposed to your "caw-fee"! I also have a great deal of difficulty with those French derived words that come seemingly natural to many Cdns...I love croissants for example, but can never pronounce them correctly (even as English Cdns can)...same for foyer (of a hotel for example)...I'm amazed that Cdns use the fo-yeah versus foy-er, but it shouldn't be that surprising...just sounds so odd to me when you first hear it.

Happy Weekend All!

Heavy rain in NJ today...hopin' for sun tomorrow!

totalia
01-08-2005, 10:12 PM
lol. My fiance (who's American) swears I say aboot too. But I know I don't and no one else seems to hear it. I think he's just teasing.

Anyone ever notice that in New Orleans people say "err-ran-g" for orange, "pern-cil" for pencil, and "err-l" for oil? I think its absolutely adorable and it makes me want to squeeze peoples cheeks lol.

ChisJo
01-09-2005, 01:19 AM
A little off topic, but Totalia, now you can get that kiss from Brad Pitt since him and his beautiful wife are now splitsville!

Sandyincanada
01-09-2005, 02:03 AM
"not an accent thing, but the word "buggy" for cart in the grocery store is pretty amusing"

Buggy? Thats a new one for me, we use cart here.

Did you see Brad Pitt in Troy...omg..(looked for a drooling smilie but can't see one, lol) :love:

ChisJo
01-09-2005, 12:01 PM
Did you see Brad Pitt in Troy...omg..(looked for a drooling smilie but can't see one, lol)

I was also looking at Orlando Bloom and Eric Bana....This movie was meant for the ladies!
Jo

Yzma and Kronk
01-09-2005, 12:41 PM
* there is a very unusual speech thing in Nova Scotia, many folks there, when agreeing with someone, will say "Yeah, yeah, yeah" (rhymes with heh...the way "heather" starts out), and the same time they're saying this, they seem to breathe in in short spurts (not to the point of hyperventilating but...) ...aw, I may lose you on this because it's hard to describe in words, but it's very apparent to me....but then again, people from Maine have a very odd speech pattern to many non-Maine ears.


LOL! I know exactly what you are saying JS!

I used to do a lot of work in Atlantic Canada, and my friend and I used to crack up over this.........no offence mean't to the Maritimers, you are all wonderful people and NS is one of my favourite places. But it was a Maritime thing.

I used to love the way "Michiganders" said the word "POP" It was more like, "paaapp".

They use both "buggy" and "cart" down here. Buggy sounds weird to me.

My other favourite was for the word "route" Canadians pronounce it "root". Americans (including Californians) pronouce it "rah-out". Hee-hee

Sandyincanada
01-09-2005, 03:18 PM
Y & K and Jersey Shark,

I find it interesting that when you speak of a word used in Canada, you generalize it and say "Canadians say" but when you speak of pronouncing words in America, you regionalize them.

Pop into Winnipeg one day, you will find we say "abowt" (DH and family are from England and he hears abowt and not aboot but I keep saying this)
We do not use buggy??, we use both pronounciations for route, pasta, use supper and dinner, I've heard "again" pronounced both ways, but mostly like "agen". I'm just pointing out that alot of this in Canada is regional as well. You have some very strong accents in certain areas of the States but we are not taking some of those words and saying "Americans say". I mean what if we use the movie Fargo, for example and assume you all sound like that? lol.

Yep, we tend to say soar-y alot but then again, we are a very polite bunch in general and I certainly won't apologize for that, lol.

totalia
01-09-2005, 04:23 PM
A little off topic, but Totalia, now you can get that kiss from Brad Pitt since him and his beautiful wife are now splitsville!

:) Ahh dreams.

Heh. If I ever meet him I'll see if he will give me a kiss lol.

totalia
01-09-2005, 04:27 PM
I was also looking at Orlando Bloom and Eric Bana....This movie was meant for the ladies!
Jo
We use cart here too.

I think the blanket statement of "Canadians do so-and-so" is just a sign of American perception.

And oh yeah. That movie was just eye candy for the ladies. The first time I watched it, I didn't even notice whether the movie was good or not. I was more concerned about Brad Pitt in a gladiator outfit lol.

twinz
01-09-2005, 06:59 PM
I have used the term BUGGY, for shopping cart, or even BUNDLE BUGGY (for those personal ones--you know the ones you bring to the store with you and wheel home, with all your grogeries in). :rolleyes:

Yzma and Kronk
01-09-2005, 07:34 PM
Y & K and Jersey Shark,

I find it interesting that when you speak of a word used in Canada, you generalize it and say "Canadians say" but when you speak of pronouncing words in America, you regionalize them.


You just brought up one of the biggest differences between Canadians and Americans. National vs. regional. Canadians are very national in their thinking, while "generally" Americans are very regional.

Also, I think that the accents in Canada just aren't that pronounced as they are in regional area's of the US. I don't think I've ever met a Canadian speaking English that I didn't understand (immigrants and first generation Canadians excepted). But here in the US, I could hardly understand the cashier at Publix! LOL!
Generally we kind of all sound the same, and tend to use the same expressions - maybe that's why they use the "Canadian" accent on TV here
;)

Interesting thread - thanks Jewellmmc :D

SyracuseWolvrine
01-09-2005, 08:04 PM
I've been told I have a "canadian accent" ... I'm not from Canada, and, truth be told, have never spent more than 14 hours at a time in Canada. The only thing I've heard myself say that could possibly come across as a Cdn accent is the "OU" words ... about, out ... however, I don't say "aboot" or "oot", if I had to describe it, I say it more as "a-boat" with a slight W sound in there. That and the fact that I pronounce the word "Detroit" as 3 syllables - Dee-troy-it.

When listening to hockey players (yes, I know, not representative of all Canada, but most of the best hockey players are Canadian) being interviewed, the phrase I hear the most is "y'know" ... "Well, y'know, we gave up some early goals, and y'know, that hurts you, but our goaltender played a good second period, and, y'know, we're still in this game. We've got one more period left to play, and I think we'll uh, y'know, make it a good period."

(I freely admit that I have the "Michigan/upstate NY accent", and that I pronounce "dallar" instead of "dollar" ... my "blend" of accents (being in FL) makes me stand out a bit)

ChisJo
01-09-2005, 09:49 PM
When listening to hockey players (yes, I know, not representative of all Canada, but most of the best hockey players are Canadian) being interviewed, the phrase I hear the most is "y'know" ... "Well, y'know, we gave up some early goals, and y'know, that hurts you, but our goaltender played a good second period, and, y'know, we're still in this game. We've got one more period left to play, and I think we'll uh, y'know, make it a good period."

Good point...I say y'know all the time...and yes, I do say the word eh. I had to be told this by someone in Hawaii. I never even noticed I did it! They laughed hysterically and were so happy to have heard a Canadian say it!
Jo

Sandyincanada
01-09-2005, 11:45 PM
lol, yep, you nailed me on the y'know too....although I say, "you know what I mean?" or "you think?"

totalia
01-10-2005, 12:55 AM
I think almost all Canadians say "eh". It has blanket meaning and is close to the American "huh". It can be a question or a statement or even punctuation. Though we don't say it as prolifically as TV would have people believe.

bavaria
01-10-2005, 03:08 PM
Actually, I don't know anyone on the west coast who says 'eh' - except maybe a few transplants from the east!

bavaria
01-10-2005, 08:38 PM
was listening to CBC AM today and they were discussing paper ROWTS. But whenever there was no word 'paper' they talked about the ROOT. ie I had a paper rowt as a child, and the root was pretty simple. Here on the west coast I swear we all had paper roots.

No wonder I listen to NPR except when I can't get the signal!

pkitty
01-11-2005, 10:43 PM
You know what it is people? I just figured it out. American's pronounce "boot" "bowt" or "bout".

Now that I thinks of it. I now thinks they do fer sure. LOL.

bavaria
01-12-2005, 02:32 PM
If they comment on how we say ROOT vs ROWT, I ask them how they pronounce 'Route 66'

:rolleyes:

totalia
01-12-2005, 02:36 PM
I've been accused of saying "hosier". I have never heard that said and I have definately never said it. Though I noticed the states have a state where that word is part of the state (you know.. kind of like "The garden state"). I can't remember the exact wording though.

Its amazing how wrong they can get things because of some stupid tv show.

Yzma and Kronk
01-12-2005, 06:58 PM
You know what it is people? I just figured it out. American's pronounce "boot" "bowt" or "bout".

Now that I thinks of it. I now thinks they do fer sure. LOL.

OK - now I'm going to be listening for the "bowt" "bout" or whatever. I'll have to take in account the southern twang. Down here it just might be "abaat"
:D

RobTheGob
01-13-2005, 11:25 AM
Whenever I'm talking to an American, I seem to always take the proactive attack towards their misconceptions.

Normally, I mention to them how impressed I am with their grasp of ENGLISH. If they start talking about us as hicks, I usually point out some of the better known Canadian inventions (Here (http://www3.sympatico.ca/taniah/Canada/things/#v) and here (http://inventors.about.com/library/weekly/aa090100a.htm)). They're usually surprised about the common items that they thought were American. I was working with a diabetic American in LA a while back that had a hard time believing that insulin was a Canadian discovery.

When they start talking about "eh", I usually mention the "y'all" and "uh-huh".

Uh-huh seems to be universally used in the US instead of "you're welcome". It used to really bother me when a waitress says uh-huh (because my mother would have swatted me in the head if I said that instead of your welcome), but then I realized that they don't say it to be flippant or rude. It just sounds that way to the overly polite Canadian...

mom_rules
01-13-2005, 01:42 PM
Welcome RobtheGob-1st post?

I agree with you, my mom would have whapped me upside the head too
for saying uh-huh instead of you're welcome. I also know what you mean about the polite Canadian thing-One thing I do notice everytime I'm in the US, Americans tend to excuse themselves (bump into you "excuse me") but
Canadians are constantly apologizing (bump into you "I'm so sorry"), almost like we have a complex or something LOL.

merfsko
12-04-2005, 01:42 PM
My cousin went to the US to visit her brother, and went to pick up some Goldfish Pretzels for me. She asked one of the workers where she could find them, and was told they weren't getting them until the following week. My cousin says,
"Oh, I'm from Canada and I'll be back home my next week, so I was going to stock up.." The store person, shocked replies
"You don't have pretzels in canada?!?!"

:rotfl:

sean-1966
12-04-2005, 02:32 PM
I just had to register to post on here. I live in Niagara, about as south as you can be while still being in Canada. I've seen Americans driving around in July with snow-skis on their car. Most Americans don't believe me when I say I live further south than them "But you live in Canada". I had relatives coming from England to visit for a few days. They wanted to drive to Vancouver for the weekend. When I told them it would take about a week to get to there they couldn't believe it.

Islandergal
12-05-2005, 12:00 AM
I really can't get over how everyone thinks Eastern Canadians have such accents. Yes it's true that some do, but mostly people from smaller towns or more isolated areas. The majority of people who grew up in a city sound the same as or at least almost the same as someone from Ontario. I grew up on PEI and went to McGill in Montreal for university and I never had someone comment on my accent. Also, whoever mentioned the Scottish/Irish origins are probably the root of the "aboot" thing would be correct. I am not mad, but I am just shocked that people are making comments that they can barely understand us. By the way my funny story happened while I was living in Edmonton back in the late 80's. Another young person asked me If we had any electricity back East! and he was not joking either. Like someone said earlier, these kinds of comments happen everywhere. By the way I got a good laugh reading these stories. :rotfl:

almacdonald
12-05-2005, 05:16 PM
True story, not mine but a friend's....

Cashier -American (slow drawl): "Did ya'll find everything ya were lookin for?"

Friend -Canadian: "Yup, sure did! Found everything we were looking for!"

Cashier (slow drawl): "Ya'll must be from CA-NA-DA.'

Friend: "We are, why do you say that?"

Cashier (slow drawl): "Ya'll talk REEAAALLLL fast!"


:rotfl2:

Susan--Ontario
12-06-2005, 10:30 AM
Cashier (slow drawl): "Ya'll talk REEAAALLLL fast!"


:rotfl2:
I had a friend from Newfoundland that would come to Ontario to visit. No one could understand him because he talked too fast.

In our new Venture van (which is built somewhere in the US) we have a temperature gage on it. You can choose E for fahrenheit or C for celsius. Know what the "E" stands for??


It stands for English. Last time I checked Britain was metric. Made me laugh though.

the gage is always set to E so that we can relate to how much colder it is here than Disney World. Today it's a whole lot colder.

sunkissed212
12-06-2005, 04:56 PM
I tell you what, these are really funny.

I'm from the US (Michigan) and my boyfriend is from Belle River, Ontario. I've lived just minutes from the border all my life and have spent a lot of time on the Canadian side throughout my life but I'm amazed at all I've learned since I started dating my boyfriend back in April.

It's interesting to see all of the differences when we're so close. We only live 30 miles from each other...but in different countries. I know I've asked some pretty silly questions already and I'm sure there's more on the way.

ducklite
12-06-2005, 05:06 PM
Well I never!

HAHAHA! I have traveled pretty extensively through Canada, and am appalled at the lack of basic knowledge that many of my friends (especially those from the South) have about our neighbors to the North.

I grew up in Upstate New York where we thought of Ontario as "the next state over" (YES I KNOW IT'S A PROVINCE!) and Californaia as some very foreign country. LOL!

Anne

Torontogal
12-08-2005, 09:53 AM
"You are from Canada? What PROVIDENCE would that be?"
"My best friend's mother is from Canada - maybe you know them - Sarah Smith?"

CharlesTD
12-08-2005, 11:49 AM
One of my favourites is why does your money look like it came from a monopoly game with all teh different colours.

ducklite
12-08-2005, 12:12 PM
One of my favourites is why does your money look like it came from a monopoly game with all teh different colours.

Guilty. :rolleyes1

But I can name the highest peak in Canada, does that absolve me from my sin? LOL!

Anne

DutchsMommy
12-08-2005, 12:51 PM
"You are from Canada? What PROVIDENCE would that be?"
"My best friend's mother is from Canada - maybe you know them - Sarah Smith?"

I had to reply to that one because that is my name - but DS is only 3 so I doubt I was the person in question!

One from my past - we used to drive all over the Eastern Seaboard to go to Bike Rallys. Often it was alot of camping and drinking. At least once during our trip someone would try and pay for the breakfast bill with Canadian Tire money and convince the waitress it was legit Canadian currency. It worked at least once that I am aware of. :teeth:

diz karen
12-08-2005, 03:04 PM
My Father In Law was able to run a tab (years ago) all night at a bar as they had taken an imprint of his credit card. It was actually his Quebec Health Card.

RoyalCanadian
12-08-2005, 08:23 PM
Guilty. :rolleyes1

But I can name the highest peak in Canada, does that absolve me from my sin? LOL!

Anne

Hold off on the absolution. The Government of Canada is changing the name of Mt. Logan. If you can tell us the new name, then perhaps your sins will be forgiven.

RoyalCanadian
12-08-2005, 08:26 PM
Hold off on the absolution. The Government of Canada is changing the name of Mt. Logan. If you can tell us the new name, then perhaps your sins will be forgiven.

Never mind -- the National Post story last week was wrong. Mt. Logan will remain Mt. Logan. Here's the story. (http://www.canada.com/vancouver/vancouversun/news/westcoastnews/story.html?id=b704f46c-c16f-49b2-8b1c-f5231e6cd681)

ducklite
12-08-2005, 09:21 PM
Hold off on the absolution. The Government of Canada is changing the name of Mt. Logan. If you can tell us the new name, then perhaps your sins will be forgiven.

Well that's easy! For about four years now there's been a movement to rename it after former PM Trudeau. I signed a petition against it and used my friends address in Calgary hehehe!

Anne

maryliz
12-09-2005, 08:52 AM
Well that's easy! For about four years now there's been a movement to rename it after former PM Trudeau. I signed a petition against it and used my friends address in Calgary hehehe!

Anne

:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:


MaryLiz

declansdad
12-09-2005, 09:15 AM
Ya'll have to know this goes both ways, right? I'm from Atlanta, Georgia, which is in the southern U.S. my hubby and i love Canada, particularly Montreal. Once when we were there are a business trip I had several hours to "play" at the mall. I guess I look Canadian, because every sales person spoke French to me,then quickly switched to English(In my part of the country, Spanish is much more useful than French; therfore I do not speak French.) The questions they would ask me (I'm not making these up!):

"Do you live on a plantation?" (I admit, we get this from people in the U.S. too. Too much Gone With The Wind)

"Do you know any of the Braves?" (No, do you?)

"Does it ever get cold in Georgia?" (Well, it was 15 degrees last week.)

"Don't you get hot in Georgia?" (Only when the air conditioning breaks down.)

"Do you own a gun?" (Yes. a big one.)

"Do you keep hunting dogs?" (Only my poodle. We shot our Boston Terrier just kidding...)

"You have such a strange/weird/pleasant/funny accent. Say something!"(Thank you. You're obnoxious.)

We in the South really are pleasant people, but the media sometimes paints us all as though we were The BEverly Hillbillies or Dukes of Hazzard. I promise not to ask if you drive a dogsled, if you will not treat me like I'm an idiot just because I stumbled across the border (which way is it again?...)

Cathy--got some Canadian dollars burning a hole in my pocket


So true, you will hear it both ways.

I found it interesting that as I was reading your post, I was reading with a southern accent. :teeth:

declansdad
12-09-2005, 09:46 AM
Hello all, just finished reading though all the post and thought I should defend the maritimes a bit. :)

I have never heard anyone in the maritmes used "aboot" so don't go blaming that one on us. As for accents, every area has different accents, some just stronger than others.

I was on the etrain in Boston one night and struck up a conversation with a fellow passenger (I think it was because of the many cases of bear our group was carrying ;) ). He had to say things two or three times before I could understand him.

I think the maine accent is a combination of the southern drawl and the new england nasal tone.

As for the maritimes, you will find different accents in all three provinces. New brunswickers, nova scotian and islanders all do sound a bit different. People from cape breton sound a lot like newfoundlanders.

Now back to the original topic of the thread:

While in high school my brother went to Portland Maine for a basketball tournament. Over the course of the weekend they had some social interactions withe the US players. One of the questions they were asked is "do you live close to Russia?" Now Portland is maybe 3 hours from the border so it seemed like an odd question. One of the players with my brother answered that it was just acrossed the river and we went shopping there every weekend.:rotfl2: