PDA

View Full Version : Canadian Folk!


Nutsy
04-21-2004, 07:40 PM
My DS 14 has a home economics assignment to do on an International Cultural Cuisine & he has tentativley decided on Canada. With Canada having a French Province as well as British, we feel he would need to cover both aspects as they both make up the country of Canada.

He needs to know....

How people select, prepare, cook & consume food
Clothing
Shelter
Special events......eg. births, marriages, deaths, birthdays, anniversaries, special ceremonies


Availability of food & other resources
Cultural beliefs, ideas & traditions
Financial restraints (economy)
Technological infulences
Religion
Any other aspect relevant to the country or culture


He also need to choose two dishes to prepare that is suitable for buffet service. One is to be a main course & the other a dessert.

I thought perhaps a main from the British side a dessert from the French.

Any help anyone can give us would be much appreciated.

Also, if anyone knows of a good site where we could print out a flag from, it would be much apreciated.

Thanks heaps in advance.

Any info, no matter how little or big all helps.


__________________

DSNY FN
04-21-2004, 08:01 PM
Well as for clothes we wear just about the same things as people in the US you now jeans t shirts suits and ties etc same basic name brands like Polo and Tommy Calvin stuff like that. Houses we have your standard single family homes semi detached homes townhouses/condos apartments farms etc. We usually just have a b day party out at a play area like Adventures on Wonderland it is a big play area fort he kids with a ball pit and jungle jim type stuff. Or at Mc Donalds and then we have the family party with parents grandparents etc at the house and order pizza or bbq depending on what child and what season we are in. I don't think religion plays as big a role in Canada as it does in the US I know for a fact that just about everyone I know has gone to church but does not go often only sometimes at Christmas etc and do not practice their relgion. Traditions I would have to say that Canada is hockey crazy we love the game and our country in general embraces it. No not all of us do but the vast majority love hockey and I guess you could say speaking from my vbiew it is almost like a religion to us it is after all as they say Canada's game. Our official second language is french not that I really know much of it my daughter is going to french immesion public school as a parent I can find many reasons on doing this one is the employment benefits you gain by being fully biligual and fluent in both english and french. Not to sure what else to tell you I am sure there will be alot of others here that can help you out a great deal more than I have.

Darren

Debbie
04-21-2004, 08:31 PM
For your food, you might want to consider the reverse. Main dish-French-tortière (http://www.recipesource.com/main-dishes/meat/01/rec0107.html) --a traditional dish after Christmas Eve mass (Quebec is largely Roman Catholic). For your desser, I'd pick Nanaimo Bars (http://www.recipesource.com/baked-goods/desserts/cookies/bars/06/rec0684.html) from BC.

Add barbecue cooking in the summer, although many diehards will BBQ all year round. ;)

Good luck!

CdnDisneyNut
04-21-2004, 09:39 PM
Here is a link for Canadian Flag Clip Art (http://canflag.ptbcanadian.com/)

faithinkarma
04-21-2004, 09:46 PM
Nanaimo bars is a brilliant idea !

madge62
04-21-2004, 09:49 PM
Yup, they taste even better in their hometown!!!!

faithinkarma
04-21-2004, 09:53 PM
Yup, they taste even better in their hometown!!!!

And I am embarrassed to admit I have never been west of Ontario. Embarassed because I have been to all of Eastern Canada and US, western US, and Europe, and yet I have never been to western Canada. I always thought there would be plenty of time to finish seeing Canada when I retired. Who knew I would move away?????

Cruisin
04-21-2004, 09:56 PM
Wow, Nutsy, your kids sure get a lot of interesting projects to do for school don't they?

Most Canadians buy their food from supermarkets/grocery stores. These stores have a large variety of different foods. It is a one stop shopping experience for most Canadians I think. There are of course small specialty stores, such as bakeries, meat stores, vegetable markets etc that can be found but I think the average person uses the grocery store.

Canada is such a multi-cultural country that it is hard to answer questions such as how the food is prepared and cooked. Every culture has it's own methods. For a lot of people, it is whatever can be prepared quickly and easily, with a minimum of preparation.

Of course a big part of food consumption in Canada, as in the US is fast food that is purchased and eaten on the run. I think the ideal of families sitting down together to eat a meal just doesn't happen all that often anymore in Canada.

Special events such as deaths, weddings, birthdays are usually celebrated with food being a focal point of the celebration. Again it revolves around the ethnic background and traditions of each family. Some celebrations can be very elaborate with meals of many, many courses in length.

Good luck in finding the answers to the rest of your questions:wave2:

pumpkinboy
04-21-2004, 09:59 PM
I am with Debbie on Tourtière! Wasn't it originally made with rabbit tho? And another important feature of la Cuisine Québecoise would be Poutine (and that final "e" is so important to avoid offense) which is a dish composed of a bowl of freshly cooked french fries topped with cheddar cheese curds and then a greasy slightly spicy barbecue sauce (or is that officially "BBQ"?). There are a number of variations on this, including one called a Michigan for some reason which features a bolognese sauce. None are quite a delicious as Poutine.

Oh yes, and then there are all the Maple based dishes, the simplest being "Tir" or maple taffy, made with fresh made and hot maple syrup dripped on fine fresh snow (both in great abundance in Quéebec) then rolled up on a popsicle stick. Yum,

The thing about Canadian culture is that there is no single overriding culture (well, other than Ice Hockey, perhaps), but rather many depending on region and ethnicity, something of a mosaic. Heck it varies within Québec or even Prince Edward Island.

When I lived in Montréal I lived with a distant cousin of German descent, who was married to a Chilean in a Portuguese neighbourhood: so the 4 yr old at that point spoke German and Spanish with his parents, Portuguese with the neighbourhood kids and French and English when he got to preschool. I married into an Acadian family (French-speaking from the Maritime provinces) and in the process learned yet another dialect of French (a bizarre one too).

Now even tho I am a Yank (different from a Jerk, ya know) I am Canadian educated and I have been in 9 of the 10 provinces (all except Newfoundland). Unlike many of my countrymen, I actually know that many Canadians don't live in igloos, or dress entirely in beaverskin. Most are Mounties tho, at least according to the EPCOT exhibits ;).

Good luck!

wdwmo
04-21-2004, 10:05 PM
Hi!

I have lived in the province of Quebec all my life. One side of the family is French and the other is English (British); i've always thought I had the best of both worlds - especially foodwise.

For the dessert part, we love sugar or maple syrup pies. We also have "Pouding Chomeur" which is made like an apple pouding but instead of the apples, you find ... sugar or maple syrup! Depending on what region of Quebec you are in - who find an abondance of berries and apples - so Bleuberry cobblers and apple desserts are very popular.

Anyway, you have a few ideas - if you need recipes - let me know!

Mo
:earsgirl: :earsboy: :earsboy: :earsgirl:

ChisJo
04-21-2004, 10:10 PM
Although we are all die-hard hockey fans, Lacross is still our national sport.
As for food, I believe anything with Saskatoon berries is pretty delicious as well. We grew up eating Tortiere and Saskatoon berry pie (oh, the memories..).
Anyways, good luck to your son with his project.
J

pumpkinboy
04-21-2004, 10:15 PM
Originally posted by wdwmo
...For the dessert part, we love sugar or maple syrup pies. We also have "Pouding Chomeur" which is made like an apple pouding but instead of the apples, you find ... sugar or maple syrup! Depending on what region of Quebec you are in - who find an abondance of berries and apples - so Bleuberry cobblers and apple desserts are very popular... Pouding Chomeur would translate to Unemployed Pudding:rotfl: That's hilarious! I always loved the little Québecois nicknames for things and people.

Alors wdwmo, a tu une recette pour Cretons?

Nutsy
04-21-2004, 11:39 PM
Wow what interesting info.........thanks you guys. I like the sound of that apple pudding tho........may have to look into that a bit further & see just what it entails.

He has to make the stuff twice. First is a trail run & from there the teacher decides if it's suitable for the project or not.

Then a few weeks later it's done at school for the parents of each child to come & sample. We get to have dinner at school & taste food from different countries in the process.

Oh & we have to pay $5 each to eat it:D

eleanor
04-22-2004, 06:19 AM
One of the big desserts around right now is dessert pizza. Easy aand very very good.Simple recipe if you want it.

Baboo
04-22-2004, 07:06 AM
Hi Nutsy! Do you still have any of the recipes or the maple syrup I sent you for the recipe exchange? I think I sent the recipe for butter tarts, or maple butter tarts. This is a Canadian recipe and you can make them in a small tart pan or a regular one depending on how big you want the serving to be.

DutchsMommy
04-22-2004, 07:56 AM
The above suggestions are great - hopefully you can find the ingredients!! I have included a link to a Canadian Gov't website for some of the other details you might need - ie. population, weather etc. From my travels I have found that Aussies are the closest people I can think of to Candians!! In general temperment, way of life, behaviour, humour etc. This is just my opinion, but when travelling Aussies and Canucks seem to get along the best. If your son needs to actually participate in an exchange program, he is welcome at my house and I'll just ship myself over there!!! LOL

I wonder if they have the recipe for "beaver tails" that they sell at Epcot on a Disney (or DisneyFan) website - because you could make those too!

Peameal bacon (or Canadian Bacon as it is know to the Americans) would also probably be considered "authentic Canadiana - not sure if you can get it in Australia though?



http://canada.gc.ca/acanada/acPubHome.jsp?font=0&lang=eng

buzzlady
04-22-2004, 10:22 AM
This is great. My DS11 just told me this morning that he has a project that will in the end be a travel brochure. He is doing it on Canada. I will pass everyone's info. along to him.

Susan--Ontario
04-22-2004, 11:05 AM
You've had lots of input in the food end so I'll try and answer some of your other questions.

Religion-- we have many religions here as all our ancestors (except the native Canadians) came here from other countries. We were first settled by French and English. We are a British Commonwealth country and therefore do have the Church of England here (Anglican). As someone else mentioned Quebec is predominantly Roman Catholic. So many of our special events include religious traditions such as baptism, marriage, funerals, etc.

Financial Restraints-- we pay very high taxes here. We are sort of a socialist country in that we have medicare, employment insurance, government pension plan, child tax credits, subsidized education. However, we don't pay quite high enough taxes so a lot of these items end up being co-pay. The rules sometimes change when the governments change. A more conservative government may spend less money and a more socialist party may spend more by borrowing. I say may because that can change depending on the will of the people.

Technologically we are very close to the Americans. The exchange of information across the border goes both ways.

If you have any specific questions once you've filtered out all the responses here, I'd suggest posting the question on a new post so that it is less confusing.

Hope this helps.

tinkerbeth
04-22-2004, 12:41 PM
Don't forget DONUTS!! Tell your son to check out www.timhortons.com Poutine is another good one. Also, there's a neat salad from Quebec called "SAlade Niscoise" which is good.

Good luck!

Beth ;)

faithinkarma
04-22-2004, 12:54 PM
Financial Restraints-- we pay very high taxes here.

Amen to that !!! I am sitting here at my desk doing my taxes LOL


tinkerbeth

I forget how many years ago it was, more than ten at least. But when Dunkin Donuts came to the town in Quebec where I was living at the time, they set a WORLD record for the most donuts sold in a week.


Of course, seeeing that, Timmie's was not far behind LOL

pumpkinboy
04-22-2004, 02:13 PM
Originally posted by tinkerbeth
Don't forget DONUTS!! Tell your son to check out www.timhortons.com Poutine is another good one. Also, there's a neat salad from Quebec called "SAlade Niscoise" which is good.
Good luck!
Beth ;) Actually, a Salade Niçoise is from Nice in France. But it is awefully good! My kids call it "salad with everything in it" from roasted potatoes to good tuna to olives... Yum!

I had thought that other than Potato salad, salads were not part of traditional Cuisine Québecois. Mainly pork and potatoes with the occasional rabbit or other game meat thrown in. Then again, I used to think the same thing about Canadian wine until I was delighted to find not just good but Great wines being produced on the Niagara peninsula.

faithinkarma
04-22-2004, 02:23 PM
Actually, a Salade Niçoise is from Nice in France.

That is the problem trying to define Canadian food. Virtually most of the dishes we associate with "home" can be claimed to have originated elsewhere.

And yet most of the French Canadian dishes seem to be quite authentically local. I wonder why that is?

Am I the only one who remembers going out and roughing it like "the settlers" when in Girl Guides...and what did they serve? bannock, hung on a twig, and roasted over a fire.

mbb
04-22-2004, 04:37 PM
...and strawberry shortcake for dessert!!

yummm...nothing says "July Church Suppers" more than Strawberry Shortcake!!

Good luck on the projects!!
:sunny:

Nutsy
04-22-2004, 04:53 PM
Originally posted by Baboo
Hi Nutsy! Do you still have any of the recipes or the maple syrup I sent you for the recipe exchange? I think I sent the recipe for butter tarts, or maple butter tarts. This is a Canadian recipe and you can make them in a small tart pan or a regular one depending on how big you want the serving to be.



Maple Syrup is all gone:D We started having pancakes for breakfast after that arrived..How could we resisit.........that stuff is sooooooooo yummy......:)

I do have the recipes tho.....must look them out.......thanks for reminding me. I'll make that my mission for today. I do remember something to do with maple syrup amongst them.........


All this info is great...........all recipes are welcome.........as it will take a bit of time to work out just what he is going to cook. The easier the better as far as he is concerned:teeth:

Cruisin
04-22-2004, 05:20 PM
When does his project have to be done, Nutsy?

If you are having trouble finding anything you need, just let me know and I will see if I can send some to you.

Nutsy
04-22-2004, 05:23 PM
He has quite a while yet Robin. He doesn't even have the sheet yet, but my other son did this last year, so we know what is coming up this year & are getting a head start:D


Thanks for the offer.............once we work out what he wants to make I'll let you know.::yes::

melindaandrob
04-22-2004, 05:26 PM
My sister in law in Las Vegas has a number of stereo-types that I have been trying to beat out of her!!

1. We do not say oot and aboot. Some Canadians may but the majority do not. We do say 'eh.' and no matter how much I try I can't stop myself :teeth: Hubby said 'eh' to a CM in the Canadian pavillion and she asked if he was making fun of her. This surprised him, he admitted to her he was from Canada and she said 'I wondered because you used it right' LOL.

2. As a previous poster said, we do not live in igloos.

3. You can't just drive to Canada to go skiing.

4. It isn't the ocean it's Lake Erie. (Or Superior, Huron, Ontario, Michigan)

5. It's a touque but that's OK you can call it a hat.

6. Yes, skin will freeze.

Any other stereotypes?

faithinkarma
04-22-2004, 06:26 PM
I was once asked, by someone in NY, if we had a change of season in Canada.

Another stereotype is that we are nice and kind and very laid back. While I personally am of course, I know many Canadians who are not. :smooth:

Nutsy
04-22-2004, 10:37 PM
I have a question..........what is Grahams Wafer Crumbs?

Nutsy
04-22-2004, 10:41 PM
Originally posted by DutchsMommy
The above suggestions are great - hopefully you can find the ingredients!! I have included a link to a Canadian Gov't website for some of the other details you might need - ie. population, weather etc. From my travels I have found that Aussies are the closest people I can think of to Candians!! In general temperment, way of life, behaviour, humour etc. This is just my opinion, but when travelling Aussies and Canucks seem to get along the best. If your son needs to actually participate in an exchange program, he is welcome at my house and I'll just ship myself over there!!! LOL

I wonder if they have the recipe for "beaver tails" that they sell at Epcot on a Disney (or DisneyFan) website - because you could make those too!

Peameal bacon (or Canadian Bacon as it is know to the Americans) would also probably be considered "authentic Canadiana - not sure if you can get it in Australia though?



http://canada.gc.ca/acanada/acPubHome.jsp?font=0&lang=eng


How sweet of you...........he would dearly love to be part of an exchange program. Ship yourself over here?? Why not? LOL

Debbie
04-23-2004, 05:51 AM
HOLD IT! :idea: Did I hear that we are shipping teenagers to Australia??? :teleport:

Oh, and graham wafer crumbs are graham wafers (crackers) all smushed up! :duck:

Graham crackers are made of graham and whole wheat flour. They are pretty bland, but are often used-as crumbs packed together- as a pastry bottom for cream pies, or kind of like the cookie centres in some chocolate bars. :scratchin Now that's clear as mud, isn't it??

Canadave
04-23-2004, 06:45 AM
On the topic of Canadian food...Mike Weir, our beloved Canadian golfer, got to choose the menu for the Masters opening dinner a couple of weeks ago...his choice.....Caribou and lobster...now that's Canadian

BTW, I had elk in a local restaurant 2 weekends ago...it was delicious...it was done up like a fillet mignon....mmmmmm

Nutsy
04-23-2004, 06:24 PM
Well we sure don't have anything called Graham's Wafers over here, so looks like that recipe is out:( Unless we have something similar........who knows?

Cruisin
04-23-2004, 10:14 PM
Hey Nutsy, graham wafers are not heavy (to mail) nor expensive( to buy) if you need some let me know.

Try looking in the cracker section of your grocery store, I think that is where they are kept in our store. Here you can get graham wafers or graham wafer crumbs.

Nutsy
04-23-2004, 10:16 PM
Thanks Robin. Are they bland or pleasant to taste? Just trying to work out what our alternative would be that's all....

Wafers..........are they plain wafers, as in a biscuit. Ice Cream Wafer whatever?

Cruisin
04-23-2004, 10:22 PM
They are not really bland, they are kind of sweet.

They are brown in colour and usually come in squares, that are attached together in rectangles that you snap the squares out of. If you can picture that!! Not a dark chocolate brown but more of a golden brown colour.

They are more like a cookie (or a biscuit) than a cracker. Ice cream wafers here are dark brown in colour and usually soft. Graham wafers are crunchy.

What are looking at making with the graham wafers?

Nutsy
04-23-2004, 10:31 PM
It was Nanaimo Bars, but we'll find something else I'm sure.........

I'ts just finding something that is relativley easy & not too expensive, as it has to serve 30 odd people, but they just get at taste, not a whole serve.

faithinkarma
04-24-2004, 09:26 AM
Graham wafer crumbs are what we use to make a crust that is not a pastry. Like a crust for a cheesecake. Do you have anything similar in Australia? I am thinking that yu must, byt they are called somethng completely different.

A bit of trivia......Graham crackers were named for a man who believed unhealthy diet led to sexual excess.

http://www.snopes.com/food/origins/graham.htm

this site will give you a picture of what we are talking about....the crackers, not the excess:crazy:

and if you want to get really adventurous, the following is the recipe to make graham crackers.

http://www.pastrywiz.com/archive/recipe/0465.htm

SkylarKD
04-24-2004, 10:53 AM
My turn to help! I've lived all across the country - I'm in my 5th province now! I was born in Ontario, and have lived there, Alberta, Newfoundland, BC and now New Brunswick. I've also spent a significant amount of time in PEI and Nova Scotia. I consider myself a Newfoundlander (see the flag in my signature?), as I spent high school and my first university degree in Newfoundland. Give me the ocean and fiddle and accordian music any day!!

First off, I have to say that English Canadians don't consider themselves British, or say that they live in British provinces. We recognize our British heritage, but now, we're Canadians. We would just consider most of our provinces English provinces.

Interesting tidbits:

New Brunswick is the only officially bilingual province. Quebec did not ratify our 1982 constitution, so the province is not officially bilingual. (weird, huh? ;) )New Brunswick has a large Acadian population. Despite this, all of the provincial governments, and the federal government, offer bilingual services, and many tourist destinations do as well.

Newfoundland did not become a part of Canada until 1949. Before that, it was not a part of Britain, as many people think. Newfoundland was a separate country, with its own Prime Minister and its own currency. Newfoundlanders did, however, fight with Britain in the two World Wars, which I think is where some of the confusion comes from. It's interesting, when you ask most people in Newfoundland where they are from, they respond that they consider themselves a Newfoundlander first, and a Canadian second. This is more so with the older generation, but the younger generation also has a lot of provincial pride, and you often see young people wearing the provincial Newfoundland flag, or the Republic of Newfoundland flag. Also, wherever "O Canada" is sung in Newfoundland, you can guarantee "The Ode To Newfoundland" (Newfoundland's anthem) will be sung as well!

How people select, prepare, cook & consume food

This is very dfferent all across the country, as people have mentioned. Our country is so huge and has so many ethnicities, it's hard to narrow it down.

Most people buy their food from grocery stores and farmer's markets. In rural areas, people may have their own garden in which they grow some vegetables and herbs. In the coastal regions, fishing is a big part of the lifestyle, although there are restrictions on how much you can fish, and when. Hunting is popular in some parts of Canada too. I know people go moose and bird hunting in Newfoundland and New Brunswick, but I don't know much about hunting in each province. If anyone reading this is a hunter, maybe they can enlighten you more on this.

An interesting (and easy!) breakfast/snack that your son could make for his project is a Newfoundland dish we call toutons (the "ou" is pronounced like when you say ouch or towel). Quite simply, it's fried bread dough. Go to the bakery and buy white bread dough. Cut it up into pieces about the size of a golf ball and fry them in a pan with butter. Don't cut them too big or they won't cook all the way through and they'll stay dough-y. They're perfect when they're golden brown on both sides. Don't let the butter burn or it will turn your toutons an icky black/brown colour. :crazy2: Serve them hot with maple syrup or berries. It's not the most healthy treat in the world, but it's a tasty alternative to waffles or pancakes.

Clothing

This varies a bit depending on where you live, but all Canadians experience winter. In the Vancouver, British Columbia area though, unless you're in the mountains, winter is very short, and not severe at all. When I lived just outside Vancouver, we only had a few snowfalls, only one amounting to anything you'd have to shovel. In most places in Canada, people are well-acquainted with their shovels and snow-blowers! ;) Summers can be quite hot, especially in southern Ontario, where the pollution and humidity also plays a factor. In the Atlantic provinces (NB, NS, PEI & NL), the summers are generally moderate; around 25 degrees C. (although Fredericton, NB, where I live now, can be surprisingly hot, because it's not by the ocean).

Shelter

Houses, apartments, etc. Homeless shelters are available for the homeless who choose to use them.

Special events......eg. births, marriages, deaths, birthdays, anniversaries, special ceremonies

Oh my... that's a loaded question. Again, it really varies depending on the area and ethnicity. I think marriages occur the most frequently in churches/temples/mosques/etc., but a lot of people are now turning to non-religious ceremonies. Canada is moving towards the legalization of same-sex marriages. Ontario and British Columbia courts have allowed same-sex marriages, and the Federal government is working on changing the definition to include same-sex marriages. This is a hot topic, as most polls seem to say that the country's opinions are about equally divided. Most funerals seem to be done in churches and halls, with people sitting in chairs/benches and people speaking one at a time behind a podium. I haven't been to that many funerals though. I'd imagine different ethnicities have different customs.

In Newfoundland, we have a special tradition for Christmastime, called Mummering. There are different incarnations of this around the world. You can find information on mummering on the bottom of this page about Newfoundland customs. http://www.geocities.com/sky_lar/nfldcustoms.html

Something else that is popular in Newfoundland for birthdays, and apparently in the rest of Atlantic Canada as well (I never encountered it when I went to school in Alberta & Ontario!), is getting 'creamed' on your birthday. Essentially, watch out on your birthday at lunchtime in school, because someone is liable to smush a piece of cake in your face! (I HATED this custom! *L*)

Availability of food & other resources

The fish and seafood stocks have been regulated in recent years due to worries about depletion. There never seems to be much trouble finding what you need in grocery stores though! I think our logging resources are doing okay, although they're being harvested faster than the trees can grow back. There have been fairly recent oil and mineral deposits found and developed in Newfoundland & Labrador. If your son wants to know more about them, he can search Hibernia and Voisey's Bay. People from other parts of Canada will have to comment on the resources there.

Financial restraints (economy)

The Canadian dollar fluctuates with the American dollar.
Canada generally has what are considered, rightly or wrongly, as "have" and "have-not" provinces. Ontario, Alberta and BC are considered "have" provinces, and the rest (I'm not sure about Quebec though) are considered "have-not" provinces. This stems from the amount of resources in each province, but also largely from the population. ON, SB, BC and QUE have most of Canada's population (I'm sure your son can find figures on this somewhere). The Federal government gets money from each province, and then redistributes the money to help out provinces that are in financial difficulty. This can get rather technical, and some people find this a source of heated debate, but those are the basics.

Technological infulences

Canada is influenced by the technology in the United States and from Asia, but Canada actually has the highest rate of internet usage per capita in the world, and is the government that is generally considered the most progressive in moving towards online government. A fairly easy to read explanation (depending on how old your son is, I don't remember if you said) of e-governemnt in Canada can be found here: http://www.accenture.com/xd/xd.asp?it=enweb&xd=industries/government/capabilities/gove_capa_focused.xml Just skip to the part about Canada and look at the glossary for definitions. Many government services are now online, including filing for taxes, and Employment Insurance services. The high Internet usage is linked to Canada's high literacy rates.

Religion

I believe the majority of Canadians are Christian, but there are a lot of different religions and ethnicities, particularly in larger cities. There must be statistics on this somewhere, but I'm not sure where. Maybe the government of Canada's Heritage department website?

Other cultures

Maybe someone else can give you some information on Aboriginal culture in Canada, because that is a huge influence in Canada today, and certainly in the past. Also, some information about the Innu and Inuit in Labrador and the Territories (Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunuvut) would be valuable to your son's project.



.... Wow, I wrote a lot. (amazing what you can do when you're procrastinating! ;) Hopefully some of this will be helpful!

DSNY FN
04-24-2004, 12:52 PM
I love graham crackers with butter on them or with beanutbutter on them.

faithinkarma
04-24-2004, 01:26 PM
What a wealth of information. I learned a lot, and I am Canadian LOL I lived in Quebec for over 50 years.

Only thing I might add is that Quebec also now allows same sex marriages

http://www.cnn.com/2004/WORLD/americas/03/19/quebec.gay.marriage.ap/index.html

SkylarKD
04-24-2004, 01:30 PM
faithinkarma > I didn't realize that! 3 down, 7 provinces & 3 territories to go! ;)

I've only visited Quebec twice, briefly, so I didn't feel qualified to give any info on that province. I loved it though, and would like to visit again! It's such a beautiful province with so much history! :)

Nutsy
04-24-2004, 11:39 PM
Those Graham Crackers are a mystery. I think if we decide to to with those bars, we will find something to use that is readily available over here. I've certainly never seen anything that resemlbes those......

But..........that is not to say that we don't have something, just I've never seen anything.

We do have crackers tho... "Polly want a Cracker" LOL

Ok, serious stuff.........we have several types of crackers, but just no sure what the equivalent would be..........I need to do a bit more research I think.

Keep the info coming folk...............the more the merrier.......the more we have the more we can use.

Thanks everyone you've been great:D

DutchsMommy
04-25-2004, 07:07 AM
Check in the grocery store "baking aisle" to see if they have any type of crushed biscuits in a box that you would add butter/margarine to to make a base for squares, pies, cheesecake etc.

I know they sell a version of this in our grocery store that is crushed up "Oreo cookies" - not sure if you have those in Australia, but they are from a large American company, so I figured maybe you would have them there too.

If you can't find it, I would think any base you use for squares would be fine.

from Canada
04-25-2004, 02:16 PM
If you can't find them in a grocery store, I'd go to a bakery and ask them what they use in their cheesecake crusts. (Maybe cheesecake is made differently there though?).
Im embarrassed to say that although I am Canadian, and know where Nanaimo BC is, and have eaten MANY nanaimo bars, I didn't know that they came from nanaimo B.C. ...Duh!!!!
"You learn something new every day!"
Karen

Rachael Q
04-25-2004, 04:39 PM
Nutsy,

The closest thing I can think of that would work is the Arnotts tea biscuits crushed up.

If he has to include a bit on the language...

In Australia we say a car has a bonnet, a boot and gets filled with petrol. Here a car has a hood, a trunk and gets filled with gas.

In Aus the you ring someone on the phone, and it may be engaged, here you call someone and it may be busy.

In Aus a jumper is something you wear when it's cold - here a jumper is a dress like thingy (that was real clear), if you are cold here you put on a sweater.

In Aus hockey is played on grass or astroturf, here that would be refered to as field hockey. Hockey here is played on ice. After 7 years I still say Ice Hockey and people laugh at me!

In Aus you may live in flat, and if you share it, you have a flatmate, here you have an apartment and if you share you have a roommate (even when you have separate rooms!)

In Aus we throw old stuff in the rubbish, here they through it in the trash or the garbage.

In Aus we say capsicums, here they are called peppers.

In Aus we eat biscuits, here it's cookies (a biscuit here is more scone like and is served with savory dishes and gravy!)

In Aus we put tomato sauce on our chips, here they put ketchup on their fries.

On the subject of food, portion sizes in Canada are bigger than they are in Aus. When I first came to Canada (I am in BC) I could never finish a meal - whether home cooked or at a restaurant. When I took my DH and my inlaws home for a visit, they always felt as if they hadn't eaten enough.

In Aus if you have an entree - it's the course before the main meal, here entree is the main meal!

Canada is much like home, in that their "food" has been very much influenced by the migrants who have made their home here. Just like "Australian" cuisine has been influenced by Greek, Italian, Vietnamese etc cuisine, so has Canadian cuisine.

I had to do a presentation on Australian cuisine here not so long ago - I had to do the dessert section....I made lamingtons, pavlova, and I managed to get hold of some King Island Cheeses (and some Grandfather Port).

And this weekend I am making Anzac biscuits to take to work.

Nutsy
04-26-2004, 09:08 PM
Cool Rachael:D So are you originally an Aussie??


I knew the car stuff & the cookies/biscuit/scone thing

Apartment I kinda figured was the same as a flat, but roommate is intersting

I knew the trash/garbage one & the peppers & the sauce/ketchup



Thanks for your input, some of the info was new to me, so I've learnt something new thanks to you.:D

Rachael Q
04-27-2004, 01:06 AM
Aussie, born and bred! Well Tasmanian!

Lived in Hobart for 20 years, lived in Sydney 2 years and spent all my childhood summers in and around Melbourne. My dad's fmaily is from there.

Where about's are you?

Lynda Silk
04-27-2004, 10:03 AM
I might have missed this but another celebration we have in Canada is Canada Day on July 1! This is a statutory holiday so no one has to go to work and there are parades and fairs and picnics during the day. Often during the night, there are fireworks displays. Many of city halls have "open house" with cake and drinks where the mayor and city government officials chat with the locals.

We also celebrate Queen Victoria's birthday; the closest Monday to May 24 is a statutory holidy in honour of her birthday. And of course we celebrate Remembrance Day in honour of our veterans and soldiers who served so well in all the past wars and who now serve in peacekeeping activities around the world. We are very famous for our peacekeeping endeavours and we are very proud of the soldiers who provide so much help and humanitarian work in nations less fortunate than ours. Our Thankgiving is earlier than the same holiday celebrated in the U.S. Ours is usually on the 2nd Monday of October and we eat turkey and cranberry sauce.

Also, someone mentioned on another thread that Canadians say "washroom" while Americans say "restroom".

In addition to our addiction to donuts, we also love Chinese food! Go to the smallest town in any province and you will still find at least 1 Chinese restaurant!

We also have our own professional football (like the American football) league called the CFL (Canadian Football League) although it is very small compared to professional football in the States.

We call ourselves "Canucks", an affectionate form of Canadian.

Just a few extra things I thought I would mention! Good luck with the project!

Nutsy
04-27-2004, 05:09 PM
Hi Rachael:wave: I'm in Brisbane..............I have a cousin in Tassie, but never been there.

At least it's warmer up there than down in Tassie hey?;)

Nutsy
04-28-2004, 11:07 PM
Ok guys I have a question for you.

The Aboriginal People.......are they your native people.

Like the Eskimo /Innuit is to Alaska?

We have Aboriginals over here too & they are the natives (dark people).

I've been trying to find where it classifies what Aboriginals are, but haven't as yet found anything.

Debbie
04-29-2004, 05:06 AM
Yes, aboriginals are our native peoples. North American Indian in the south and Innuit in the arctic regions. Indian and Eskimo are terms that are offensive in the native languages and hence are politically incorrect, so....native peoples/aboriginals. In the old Western movies of the 40's and 50's, the natives were often referred to as "redskins", but skin colour is a beautiful shade of golden brown, that of course ranges from pale to dark. Eyes are usually brown, as is hair-dark and straight. However, I taught at a central school for 10 years, and there was a tourist attraction just south of the school. I remember some of the kids being photographed. One of our native students (red hair, blue eyes) was in the picture as well as one of the non-natives. (darker skin, brown hair, brown eyes). The tourist didn't know any different. Click here (http://northumberlandtourism.com/reg_images/148.jpg) for a pic of one of the native child dancers.

RoyalCanadian
04-29-2004, 11:55 AM
If your child wants to have some good natured fun in class, he can tell them that one of the most Canadian of all clothing lines is "Roots." I understand a couple of Aussie boys got in trouble a couple of years ago for wearing "Roots" jumpers to school one day. The word, of course, has a completely different connotation down under.
Gotta love the Aussies -- never seem to take a vacation shorter than 6 months in length and when they tell you to drop by if you're in the neighbourhood, that neighbourhood genereally is the Southern Hemisphere. I have so many great memories of my 10 weeks and $5000 spent in Australia in 1989-90 -- what a wonderful place to be.

Nutsy
07-14-2004, 06:48 AM
This assignment is a goer, so be prepared for more questions if we need more answers:D

alohamom
07-14-2004, 08:18 AM
Let's not forget all our Canadian talent: Alanis Morrisette, Celine Dion, Shania Twain, Jim Carrey, Mike Myers, Michael J. Fox, Avril Lavigne etc... Plus many great writers like Margaret Atwood, Mordecai Richler(sp?), Margaret Lawrence, Anne Marie Mcdonald etc...This has been so much fun to read on a rainy Ontario morning, great thread Nutsy!:wave2:

SkylarKD
07-14-2004, 11:53 AM
Yes, aboriginals are our native peoples. North American Indian in the south and Innuit in the arctic regions.

There are Innu and Innuit in northern Canada. People often think they are just different terms for the same people, but they are two separate aboriginal groups, with separate languages.

:)

eleanor
07-14-2004, 12:37 PM
Also I use a serviette at dinner and Yanks use a napkin. I get lots of strang looks when I ask for one. (Serviette that is).

Susan--Ontario
07-14-2004, 12:50 PM
There are other subtle language differences between Canada and the US. We put our garbage in the garbage can and they put their trash in the trash can. When we need to go we use a washroom, they use a restroom.

We drink pop and they drink soda. We have licence plates on our cars and they have tags. We have tags in our clothes and they have tickets.

Of course there are also language differences between provinces. I haven't really travelled in Canada at all so I can't help you with some examples there.

Ask lots of questions, we love to talk!!:crazy:

Cruisin
07-14-2004, 03:29 PM
:wave2: Nutsy

Glad to see the project is back on.

Hope everything turns out well for your son!

Let us know, what he decided to prepare and how he decorates.

SkylarKD
07-14-2004, 03:43 PM
Originally posted by Susan--Ontario
Of course there are also language differences between provinces. I haven't really travelled in Canada at all so I can't help you with some examples there.

I went to school in Alberta, Ontario & Newfoundland. Since university, I've lived in BC and New Brunswick. My fiance is from PEI.

I call it a "bookbag" or "backpack", he calls it a "kit-bag".

I've always called coloured pencils "pencil crayons". In Newfoundland, they call them "leads".

I've always called folders that hold 3-ring paper "duo-tangs". In Newfoundland, people thought I was speaking Greek. *L* But apparently in PEI they also call them "duo-tangs".

That's all I can think of right now! :wave2:

Nutsy
07-15-2004, 06:40 AM
Guys, we need such things as customs (Cultural), celebrations, special events, foods, housing (what type eg......brick/tiimber.....2 storey or single) any special clothing(occasions eg. Scots wear kilts)

Technological Influences ( if you know)

Religion (Christian/Catholic or whatever)

If you have specific ways of celebrating certain events

Also are they just the two main languages? French & English?


We really appreciate any help you can give us. Every little bit makes our task that bit easier

::yes:: :D

Nutsy
07-15-2004, 06:44 AM
Oh & do you serve a particular food/dish at any time? eg Pumpkin Pie on Thanksgiving like Americans do.

What about street parades, or fireworks or any of those sorts of celebrations?

Any special ceremonies?

Any traditions for weddings, christenings, anniversaries etc?

SkylarKD
07-15-2004, 07:49 AM
If you re-read this thread, you'll find the answers to some of those questions, especially in early posts. Here's some information I posted a while ago, with some additions to answer your new questions:

---

My turn to help! I've lived all across the country - I'm in my 5th province now! I was born in Ontario, and have lived there, Alberta, Newfoundland, BC and now New Brunswick. I've also spent a significant amount of time in PEI and Nova Scotia. I consider myself a Newfoundlander (see the flag in my signature?), as I spent high school and my first university degree in Newfoundland. Give me the ocean and fiddle and accordian music any day!!

First off, I have to say that English Canadians don't consider themselves British, or say that they live in British provinces. We recognize our British heritage, but now, we're Canadians. We would just consider most of our provinces English provinces.

Interesting tidbits:

New Brunswick is the only officially bilingual province. Quebec did not ratify our 1982 constitution, so the province is not officially bilingual. (weird, huh? )New Brunswick has a large Acadian population. Despite this, all of the provincial governments, and the federal government, offer bilingual services, and many tourist destinations do as well.

Newfoundland did not become a part of Canada until 1949. Before that, it was not a part of Britain, as many people think. Newfoundland was a separate country, with its own Prime Minister and its own currency. Newfoundlanders did, however, fight with Britain in the two World Wars, which I think is where some of the confusion comes from. It's interesting, when you ask most people in Newfoundland where they are from, they respond that they consider themselves a Newfoundlander first, and a Canadian second. This is more so with the older generation, but the younger generation also has a lot of provincial pride, and you often see young people wearing the provincial Newfoundland flag, or the Republic of Newfoundland flag. Also, wherever "O Canada" is sung in Newfoundland, you can guarantee "The Ode To Newfoundland" (Newfoundland's anthem) will be sung as well!

How people select, prepare, cook & consume food

This is very dfferent all across the country, as people have mentioned. Our country is so huge and has so many ethnicities, it's hard to narrow it down.

Most people buy their food from grocery stores and farmer's markets. In rural areas, people may have their own garden in which they grow some vegetables and herbs. In the coastal regions, fishing is a big part of the lifestyle, although there are restrictions on how much you can fish, and when. Hunting is popular in some parts of Canada too. I know people go moose and bird hunting in Newfoundland and New Brunswick, but I don't know much about hunting in each province. If anyone reading this is a hunter, maybe they can enlighten you more on this.

An interesting (and easy!) breakfast/snack that your son could make for his project is a Newfoundland dish we call toutons (the "ou" is pronounced like when you say ouch or towel). Quite simply, it's fried bread dough. Go to the bakery and buy white bread dough. Cut it up into pieces about the size of a golf ball and fry them in a pan with butter. Don't cut them too big or they won't cook all the way through and they'll stay dough-y. They're perfect when they're golden brown on both sides. Don't let the butter burn or it will turn your toutons an icky black/brown colour. Serve them hot with maple syrup or berries. It's not the most healthy treat in the world, but it's a tasty alternative to waffles or pancakes.

Clothing

This varies a bit depending on where you live, but all Canadians experience winter. In the Vancouver, British Columbia area though, unless you're in the mountains, winter is very short, and not severe at all. When I lived just outside Vancouver, we only had a few snowfalls, only one amounting to anything you'd have to shovel. In most places in Canada, people are well-acquainted with their shovels and snow-blowers! Summers can be quite hot, especially in southern Ontario, where the pollution and humidity also plays a factor. In the Atlantic provinces (NB, NS, PEI & NL), the summers are generally moderate; around 25 degrees C. (although Fredericton, NB, where I live now, can be surprisingly hot, because it's not by the ocean).

Shelter

Houses, apartments, etc. Most frames are made with wood, and some houses have brick, some have siding... the country is so big that it's hard to say one thing is typical. Same with size. Some are small bungalows, some are large multi-storey houses... I'm sure this would be a hard question to answer about most developed countries. Homeless shelters are available for the homeless who choose to use them.

Special events......eg. births, marriages, deaths, birthdays, anniversaries, special ceremonies

Oh my... that's a loaded question. Again, it really varies depending on the area and ethnicity. I think marriages occur the most frequently in churches/temples/mosques/etc., but a lot of people are now turning to non-religious ceremonies. Canada is moving towards the legalization of same-sex marriages. Ontario and British Columbia courts have allowed same-sex marriages, and the Federal government is working on changing the definition to include same-sex marriages. This is a hot topic, as most polls seem to say that the country's opinions are about equally divided. Most funerals seem to be done in churches and halls, with people sitting in chairs/benches and people speaking one at a time behind a podium. I haven't been to that many funerals though. I'd imagine different ethnicities have different customs.

In Newfoundland, we have a special tradition for Christmastime, called Mummering. There are different incarnations of this around the world. You can find information on mummering on the bottom of this page about Newfoundland customs. http://www.geocities.com/sky_lar/nfldcustoms.html

Something else that is popular in Newfoundland for birthdays, and apparently in the rest of Atlantic Canada as well (I never encountered it when I went to school in Alberta & Ontario!), is getting 'creamed' on your birthday. Essentially, watch out on your birthday at lunchtime in school, because someone is liable to smush a piece of cake in your face! (I HATED this custom! *L*)

I can't really think of any special clothing. Again, it depends on your culture. Canadian Scots may still wear kilts, Asian Canadians may wear their traditional outfits on special occasions, East Indians may wear their traditional clothing... I know I'm saying this a lot, but it all depends. Canada is so large and made up of so many different cultures that it's hard to define certain clothing as Canadian. Maybe a touque? (winter hat) :teeth:

Availability of food & other resources

The fish and seafood stocks have been regulated in recent years due to worries about depletion. There never seems to be much trouble finding what you need in grocery stores though! I think our logging resources are doing okay, although they're being harvested faster than the trees can grow back. There have been fairly recent oil and mineral deposits found and developed in Newfoundland & Labrador. If your son wants to know more about them, he can search Hibernia and Voisey's Bay. People from other parts of Canada will have to comment on the resources there.

Financial restraints (economy)

The Canadian dollar fluctuates with the American dollar.
Canada generally has what are considered, rightly or wrongly, as "have" and "have-not" provinces. Ontario, Alberta and BC are considered "have" provinces, and the rest (I'm not sure about Quebec though) are considered "have-not" provinces. This stems from the amount of resources in each province, but also largely from the population. ON, SB, BC and QUE have most of Canada's population (I'm sure your son can find figures on this somewhere). The Federal government gets money from each province, and then redistributes the money to help out provinces that are in financial difficulty. This can get rather technical, and some people find this a source of heated debate, but those are the basics.

Technological infulences

Canada is influenced by the technology in the United States and from Asia, but Canada actually has the highest rate of internet usage per capita in the world, and is the government that is generally considered the most progressive in moving towards online government. A fairly easy to read explanation (depending on how old your son is, I don't remember if you said) of e-governemnt in Canada can be found here: http://www.accenture.com/xd/xd.asp?...apa_focused.xml Just skip to the part about Canada and look at the glossary for definitions. Many government services are now online, including filing for taxes, and Employment Insurance services. The high Internet usage is linked to Canada's high literacy rates.

Religion

I believe the majority of Canadians are Christian, but there are a lot of different religions and ethnicities, particularly in larger cities. There must be statistics on this somewhere, but I'm not sure where. Maybe the government of Canada's Heritage department website?

Other cultures

Maybe someone else can give you some information on Aboriginal culture in Canada, because that is a huge influence in Canada today, and certainly in the past. Also, some information about the Innu and Inuit in Labrador and the Territories (Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunuvut) would be valuable to your son's project.

Special foods

I think this varies with family, culture and province. The only particular food I can think of that a lot of people eat on the same occasion is turkey for Thanksgiving. Maybe someone else can help with this.

Celebrations

We celebrate Canada Day on July 1st every day. This is "Canada's Birthday". It's a national holiday, and many cities and towns have fairs, markets, entertainment and fireworks to celebrate the day. We also celebrate Victoria Day - the Queen's birthday. There are often fireworks for this. Most cities & towns also have a Santa Claus parade in late Novenber or early December, to get people in the Christmas spirit.

We also celebrate Remembrance Day on Novenber 11th, to honour those who have fought in the wars. There is often a military parade on this day, and cities, towns and schools across the country have services and wear poppies in honour of the soldiers. The poem, "In Flanders Fields" by John McRae is usually read. (It's beautiful - read it if you have never read it)


These websites should help:

Canada International: http://canadainternational.gc.ca/(Particularly, look at the "About Canada" section on this website: http://canada.gc.ca/acanada/acPubHome.jsp?font=0&lang=eng)

Culture Canada: http://www.culturecanada.gc.ca/

Culture.ca: http://www.culture.ca/canada/

Images Canada: http://www.imagescanada.ca/index-e.html (This is neat, but maybe not all that helpful. Check it out & see.)

Nutsy
07-15-2004, 09:28 PM
Sklyark, thank you so very much..............that info is great.

I find info from the people rather than that found is books is so much better.

I really appreciate your time in typing all that up, you've been a huge help to us.

Thank you Thank you Thank you:flower3: :cool1: