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View Full Version : Please shoot me: Yet another tipping thread...


Maistre Gracey
09-09-2003, 01:05 AM
Okay, I have read every tipping thread known to mankind, plus a few extra just for good measure.
I have always had my own tipping guidelines (for the most part VERY generous), but I just read on the DIS tipping guidelines that $3 per bag is the appropriate amount for bellmen.
I can justify ten bucks for three bags, but I travel with four people, involving 15 bags (including small ones). Should we really be tipping 50 clams for the amount of bags that fit on one cart???

What are your thoughts? Perhaps a typo on DIS guidelines??? :confused:

Canadian Tom
09-09-2003, 07:11 AM
Holy Smokes: 15 bags, wow! My wife and I travel and we only use the carry-ons. If it won't fit in the bag, you can't take it. So we just drag(roll) our bags in by ourselves.

Granny
09-09-2003, 07:25 AM
Maistre G....I think any tip guidelines need to have some common sense applied to them. $3 a bag might be fine if you have a couple of bags, but obviously is a little over the top for your example.

I usually look at a few factors when tipping bell services. Not only the quantity of baggage but what types of items. We drive to WDW, so our "baggage" is often lots of boxes, sacks, non-perishable groceries, etc. So handling our "bags" is a lot different than just putting a few suitcases on the trolley! :)

My guess is that you have been tipping a pretty good amount, and that it is appropriate. If you have 15 bags that fit on one cart, $45 is exhorbitant, IMHO.

CRobin
09-09-2003, 09:11 AM
Originally posted by Maistre Gracey
I just read on the DIS tipping guidelines that $3 per bag is the appropriate amount for bellmen.

I'm with Granny on this one. I usually go for about $10-$15 for the whole cart. And that's on top of what I give the guy who unloads the car, which is usually another $10.

$3 a bag is probably appropriate if you have a couple of bags. But a volume discount does apply here.;)

Disney Doll
09-09-2003, 09:27 AM
I must be a cheapskate, because I do a $1 or maybe $2 if it's a REALLY heavy or weird thing that they have to carry. For 15 bags I'd probably give them $20-$25.

If one of the bellpersons was really good, or extra helpful ro whatever, obviously that would change what I tip.

Terry S
09-09-2003, 09:33 AM
Can someone please post a link to the guidelines?

Just a thought here, but does the $3 include getting them out of the car and bringing them up to the room. In this case I would be safe since I tip $1.50 (small bag) - $2.00 (big bag) per bag to both the person who takes them out of the car and the one who brings them up to the room.

Nanajo1
09-09-2003, 09:44 AM
The bellman who takes our luggage from the car to the desk gets $1-$2 per bag with a $5 min. Usually the limo driver has gotten the bags out of the trunk. The bellman who delivers the bags to the room gets another $1-2 per bag. If we have groceries plus 2 medium size suitcases it usually totals $25-30 just to get the bags to the room. It is an expense we figure into our budget. Like tipping skycaps.
Some day I'll be such a great packer we will just have carryons!

Terry S
09-09-2003, 09:56 AM
Well I think just found the ones on the DIS. Here is what it says:

Bellman should normally be tipped $3 per bag when delivering bags to your room.

So I think that I would be okay, since I tip the guy that helps the town car guy take them out of the car and then stores them $1.50 - $2.00 per bag and then I tip the guy that actually brings them up to the room $1.50 - $2.00 per bag. Well, if that is not okay, than I guess I am cheap. I had thought I was being generous. I always go to the bank and get $200 in $5s and $1s before we go and I go through all of them with tipping different people for our luggage.

Laurabearz
09-09-2003, 10:12 AM
Interesting.....

We tip 2 bucks per valet..... 5 bucks for our first luggage trip, then 10 bucks to the person who brings it to the room..... give or take.... we always have STUFF since we have kids....

Our next trip we will tip the guy/gal who brings our stuff to our room a bit more, since we will have, waiting for us, a lot of baby stuff... swing, excersaucer, potty seat, etc..... so 20 bucks will pass thru our hands.....

Never really thuoght about this much.... I do know when I go to the bank I request a lot of singles and 5's....... lol

zulaya
09-09-2003, 11:43 AM
I guess I must be the only one who takes care of my own luggage and groceries. I don't like relinquishing control of my stuff.

palmtreegirl
09-09-2003, 12:57 PM
When we were leaving the YC this past trip we had a cart load full of stuff and we tipped the bellmen, well it was actually a bellwomen, 20.00.

Lyndarella
09-09-2003, 01:01 PM
Everyone I travel with brings just one bag plus a purse/bag to carry. (This includes grocery items. We don't need a lot of clothes since we have a washer/dryer while we are there.) There are only 2 or 4 of us in our group. We arrive by shuttle (we love the long ride -- it's the only time we see anything non-Disney) and tip the driver $5 TOTAL to help unload the bags. After that we prefer to control the bags ourselves. Since we each have just one, it's no trouble.

Maistre Gracey
09-09-2003, 01:28 PM
Thanx everyone! I am happy to see that my tipping practices are in line with the majority of folks here.
Thanx for also answering my next tipping question, which was how much do you tip the person taking the luggage from the car.

Ya, I know... 15 pieces of luggage. :eek:
My MIL travels with us, and I swear she brings a suitcase with eight purses, and another with eight pairs of shoes. :p

Johnnie Fedora
09-09-2003, 02:19 PM
Frankly, I think the Disney process of having 2-3 bellmen handle your luggage before it gets to your room is annoying. I think $10 (one cart) from the trunk to the room (whether is get stored or not) should be plenty. It takes less than 10 min for a round trip luggage delivery, and I can't see paying 2-3 persons $10 each. Often times, we do our own luggage...I like the set up at HH where you push your own cart.

On our last DVC trip, when I called for luggage to be delivered from storage, a grandmotherly bellperson showed up at the door with the cart. It felt really strange watching her unload the cart, I thought she may code lifting our big bags so I ended up doing the heavy ones by myself.

jmminarik
09-09-2003, 05:28 PM
I just treat the guy who hauls up our stuff at OKW to a couple of pints at the Rose and Crown. :)

-joe

crisi
09-09-2003, 06:23 PM
Boy, if everyone tipped $3 a bag, I'd want to be a bellperson at a DVC resort.

Lets see, average number of people in a party = 4
Average number of bags in a party = 6 (seems reasonable for four people to have six bags - we already know some people really skew the mean, and anyone with just a couple bags doesn't use the bellhop)
3x6= $18
For what, about fifteen minutes of work (unless you are way down the hallway at BWV).
With multiple carts in action and teamwork during busy times, one hop unloading, one taking you to your room, you can get enough efficiency in the system to keep a continual cycle. $72 an hour in tips.

I have a problem paying anyone handling my bags more per minute than I make. I'm pretty generous, but at that point it becomes worthwhile for me to handle my own bags and just make a couple trips.

Happy Birthday Cat
09-09-2003, 06:34 PM
ncligs: Please oh please read the title. Maistre Gracey is screaming out for some animation on this one!

HBC

ncligs
09-09-2003, 07:02 PM
Originally posted by Happy Birthday Cat
ncligs: Please oh please read the title. Maistre Gracey is screaming out for some animation on this one!

Please shoot me...........

http://216.40.249.192/s/contrib/blackeye/2gunsfiring_v1.gif

http://users.telenet.be/eforum/emoticons4u/violent/sterb003.gif

Maistre Gracey
09-09-2003, 07:11 PM
You guys are too much! :teeth:

Happy Birthday Cat
09-09-2003, 08:22 PM
My faith has been restored!!!!;)

HBC

CarolMN
09-09-2003, 08:41 PM
Originally posted by zulaya
I guess I must be the only one who takes care of my own luggage and groceries. I don't like relinquishing control of my stuff.

You're not the only one. That describes me to a tee! I don't even like to valet park a RENTAL vehicle. Maybe it's a Minnesota thing?? :p :teeth:

JimC
09-09-2003, 08:42 PM
Skycap: $1/bag ($2 for particularly large or heavy bags)

Bell Services: $1/bag ($2 for particularly large or heavy bags). If your luggage is going to be stored (either before or after check-in), consider tipping twice--once for the person who receives your bags, and again for the person who delivers them from storage.

Taxi/Towncar/Shuttle driver: $1/bag if the driver assists you with your luggage.

Dean
09-09-2003, 10:45 PM
I did a search to supplement my knowlege and experience. Most sites say $1-$1.50 per bag, a couple $1-2 per bag and one $2-3 per bag, less if they are not delivered but merely unloaded. The industry standard is to tip at the delivery point. The idea is that over the long haul, it will even out as one unloads one trip and delivers another. I suspect most actually pool their tips anyway. Every situation is different. Was it raining, were they big, small, heavy, etc. I would think a $5 min for most situations would be appropriate.

The industry standard for valet is to tip on pickup, usually $2-3 bucks are what most recomment. Housekeeping is not a tipped position at WDW, per Disney but many tip anyway.

It seems that DVC members are particularly generous in the areas of tipping. While I find it admirable, I think it will hurt all of us in the future as todays tip becomes tomorrow's expectation. Personally I hate the tipping mentatlity. Just tell me what it costs and I'll decide to participate or not. It's just a way to transfer some salaries to others beside the employer.

TDC Nala
09-09-2003, 11:06 PM
They must not like it when they see me coming... I bring one lousy bag and I carry it myself. I tip the shuttle driver a buck to get it out of the bus.

Solo traveling has its advantages...

Johnnie Fedora
09-09-2003, 11:16 PM
Originally posted by crisi
I have a problem paying anyone handling my bags more per minute than I make. I'm pretty generous, but at that point it becomes worthwhile for me to handle my own bags and just make a couple trips.

Exactly!!! I think WDW employees in positions receiving tips (especially employees at the deluxe resorts and restaurants) probably make more money than I do.

Lisa F
09-10-2003, 07:31 AM
I just tip in Yen. $5 worth is about 600 Yen. This way I'm happy and only have to tip $.10 per bag for my 50 bags and they are happy because they think they made "a lot." By the time they realize 600 yen isn't all that much and they have to fly halfway around the world it's too late to slit my tires (I drive a rental anyway).

Seriously, I think $3/bag is excessive. We tend to tip very generously when we get good service. We tip at least 20% in restaurants unless the service is poor, which often comes out to $4-10 for most of the meals we have, and that person takes care of us for about an hour, refilling our water glasses, bringing our food, and making sure we have an enjoyable time. I'm not giving someone the same tip I give for being served a $50 meal over the course of an hour for putting a suitcase, toiletry bag and briefcase on a rolling cart and 5 minutes later unloading them. Next they will expect you to tip the checkin person $5/person checking in (because they have to print more keys!). We usually tip $1-2/bag. If we have less than 5 bags we generally just give them a $5, if we have more it's $1/bag (if we have more it generally means a bunch of small bags that can be unloaded 2-3 at a time because we only have one BIG suitcase).

Lisa

InstImpres
09-10-2003, 08:22 AM
I too do mostly $1-$2 per bag but more over look at how much time they spent with me. My last 2 DVC trips the bellman spent time in my room giving me lots of info (probably a standard talk) but it felt personal. I than give the tip with time and a min. amount in mind,

I do have to say my friends at curbside check-in at Newark airport tend toget more per bag, as I have seen them have something "accidentially misrouted" for no:( or poor tipping.

JMHO
Sandy

mickeys#1fan
09-12-2003, 06:11 PM
A buck a bag is the standard I think.

anniet
09-12-2003, 07:01 PM
Don't lie Maistre Gracey.

We all know you have 15 bags for 4 people because you have to take your "public" wardrobe in one bag and then "play" clothes in 3 other bags.

C'mon leave them at home and lighten the load!

http://e4u.deltait.com.au/dressed/bek079.gifhttp://e4u.deltait.com.au/dressed/bek089.gifhttp://e4u.deltait.com.au/dressed/bek076.gifhttp://e4u.deltait.com.au/dressed/bek070.gifhttp://e4u.deltait.com.au/dressed/bek004.gif

Maistre Gracey
09-12-2003, 08:27 PM
Originally posted by anniet
Don't lie Maistre Gracey.

We all know you have 15 bags for 4 people because you have to take your "public" wardrobe in one bag and then "play" clothes in 3 other bags.

C'mon leave them at home and lighten the load!

http://e4u.deltait.com.au/dressed/bek079.gifhttp://e4u.deltait.com.au/dressed/bek089.gifhttp://e4u.deltait.com.au/dressed/bek076.gifhttp://e4u.deltait.com.au/dressed/bek070.gifhttp://e4u.deltait.com.au/dressed/bek004.gif HA, HA!!! Okay, okay, I confess. :p
The high heels and purses are mine too! :teeth:

......not that there's anything WRONG with that. ;)

DeeP
09-12-2003, 08:38 PM
Originally posted by Lisa F
I just tip in Yen. $5 worth is about 600 Yen. This way I'm happy and only have to tip $.10 per bag for my 50 bags and they are happy because they think they made "a lot." By the time they realize 600 yen isn't all that much and they have to fly halfway around the world it's too late to slit my tires (I drive a rental anyway).

Seriously, I think $3/bag is excessive. We tend to tip very generously when we get good service. We tip at least 20% in restaurants unless the service is poor, which often comes out to $4-10 for most of the meals we have, and that person takes care of us for about an hour, refilling our water glasses, bringing our food, and making sure we have an enjoyable time. I'm not giving someone the same tip I give for being served a $50 meal over the course of an hour for putting a suitcase, toiletry bag and briefcase on a rolling cart and 5 minutes later unloading them. Next they will expect you to tip the checkin person $5/person checking in (because they have to print more keys!). We usually tip $1-2/bag. If we have less than 5 bags we generally just give them a $5, if we have more it's $1/bag (if we have more it generally means a bunch of small bags that can be unloaded 2-3 at a time because we only have one BIG suitcase).

Lisa
Other then the Yen, which is hilarious btw, :)
I agree 100% with the points made by Lisa and also tip excatly the same way.

manning
09-12-2003, 11:37 PM
here is a sight

http://209.238.192.105/tipping.htm


IT SAYS:


Guide to Tipping


The importance of tipping is often overlooked by unseasoned travelers. The custom of leaving a gratuity varies throughout the world; when in doubt, tip. Failure to tip (or to tip enough) can literally sabotage a hotel stay or return dining room experience. Whether rightfully or wrongfully, a hotel staff often gauges a client by the initial tips distributed upon check-in.

Taxicabs and Hotel Courtesy Cars

A gratuity equivalent to US $2 to $5 is usually satisfactory, depending on the distance, service, driver, and route. If the driver handles your baggage, an additional $1 per bag is appropriate and, in some countries, expected. In fact, some taxi drivers routinely add a surcharge for each piece of luggage placed in the trunk (or, the "boot", as it is referred to in Europe).

Chauffeurs

A private chauffeur should receive around 10% of the total fare, though tipping is not expected in some countries. In general, chaffeurs in North America and Europe expect to receive a gratuity, whereas those in Asia and the South Pacific do not.

Airport Porters

At airports (as well as train stations), the traditional gratuity is $1 per bag for normal sizes, or $2 per bag for large or heavy items. In reality, the more you tip, the better the odds that your baggage will arrive promptly when you do. A minimum tip of $5 per porter is a good practice.

Hotel Porters

$1 to $2 per bag is standard for transporting luggage to and from the room (called "up bell" and "down bell"). A minimum tip of $5 to $10 is recommended, depending on the quality of the establishment and the helpfulness of the porter. Tipping a porter too lightly upon check-in may make it difficult to obtain efficient service from the staff throughout the remainder of your stay. In contrast, a generous gratituity will usually get you prompt service and, often, extra attention. Checking into a luxury hotel or resort, an initial tip of $20 is not out of the question.

Hotel Doorperson

Tip $2 for summoning a taxi by phone ($5 at a deluxe hotel), or $1 for hailing one from the street. When checking out, leave $2 to $5 when departing, if he or she faithfully opened the door for you each time you entered and left the premises.

Concierge or Guest Services Representative

A tip is customary for any special service, such as restaurant reservations, theater tickets, tour bookings, or travel arrangements. Depending on the complexity and expense of the service rendered, a grauity equivalent to $10 to $20 is traditional.

Housekeeping Staff

At resorts, a tip of $1 per night should be left for the housekeeping staff. For special services, such as retrieving or delivering laundry, $1 to $2 is standard.

Parking Valet

Tip $2 to $5 for parking and delivering your car from the hotel garage or restaurant parking lot. A generous gratuity when handing over the keys will usually ensure prompt delivery and special attention, such as parking the car close to the entrance. On the other hand, "stiffing" the valet will virtually assure you of a long wait in front of the hotel.

Food and Beverage Service

In the North America and Latin America, the customary tip for food and beverage service is 15% to 20% of the total tab. Room service waiters should receive a minimum of $5, if the applicable percentage comes to a lesser amount. In Europe, restaurants traditionally add a gratuity of %10 to 15% to the bill. In this case, an additional 5% to 10% may be left to acknowledge especially fine service. In any case, it's traditional to round up the total, leaving any small change for the food service staff. For special services such as checking a coat or bag, tip $2 to $5 upon retrieval.

Where Tipping is Not Expected

In most South Pacific and many Asian destinations, tipping is neither customary nor expected. In Polynesian culture, tipping is even considered insulting. However, at many American-brand hotels and upscale resorts, porters have become accustomed to receiving standard gratuities for transporting luggage. On the other hand, some hotels discourage or prohibit tipping, to keep the staff from "working" guests for tips. In these instances, a 10% to 15% contribution to the staff "gift fund" at check-out may be appreciated. (Of course, it's usually impossible to ascertain whether your contribution will actually be given to the staff.) When in doubt, ask the hotel receptionist for tipping advice.

anniet
09-13-2003, 08:00 AM
Originally posted by manning
In Polynesian culture, tipping is even considered insulting.

Does this mean we don't have to tip at the Polynesian?

I wouldn't want to insult anyone. :eek:

colleen costello
09-13-2003, 11:57 AM
One more reason I love OKW. We drive up and my hubby carries the luggage, and he gets NO tip! Plus no one sees my cheapo luggage and poptarts and pool toys... :)

DeeP
09-13-2003, 12:07 PM
And I love having the valet parking, luggage service etc., even with the tipping to me they are part of vacation. And so is room service, we love getting a nice room service breakfast at least once per trip and relaxing in our villa, that to us is vacation to the max.
You have to hand it to Disney they have created a complete vacation kingdom that meets everyone's taste, budget and desires.

patsal
09-13-2003, 12:50 PM
Well, I didn''t read everything, but I must admit that many people get carried away with tipping. Not that I care if you drolp $50.00 for having your bags delivered to your room, etc. However, did you stop to think what that adds up to as an hourly wage? And no it is not my responsibility to make-up for the people who do not tip. While historically the service indusrty is underpaid, I can't say that about anyone who is tipped $50 just for bringing a few bag on a cart to my room! Call me frugal, but I tip $1.00 per bag and round that up (If I have 4 bags I give $5, etc). I tip mousekeeping $1 per person per day in a regular room and DVC $1. per person on TT day and $2 per person on regular cleaning day. The valet who empties my luggage or loads it gets a tip, but on regular drop off I do not tip. I tip $2.00 each time I pick up. At restaurants I tip 15% for average service (less for poor service) and $20 percent for good service, excellent service may warrant more of a tip as well as if I have special requests that need to be met.
JMHO but some people get way too carried away with tipping:rolleyes:

Lesley
09-13-2003, 10:10 PM
I tend to overtip in some areas....and pretty much fit the guidelines in others. Recently I realized I was tipping 20% on every restaurant visit.....and I was getting some pretty average to poor service very regularly. I've scaled back....basically tipping 15% for satisfactory service and above for good service (the better the service, the higher the tip).

I think the multiple bell person system at WDW is intended to confuse higher tipping out of the guest....it has always seemed odd to me...and often the person who unloads the car does bring the stuff to the room (particularly at odd hours)...Of course, the time I accidentally poked the bellman in the eye as he unloaded my van, he got very good tips from me for the rest of the trip! If felt so awful about that!

freediverdude
09-13-2003, 10:42 PM
Well I usually don't participate in the bell services and valet, partly because the tipping can start to get out of hand after a while, and partly because I like to have access to my bags in the car instead of being stored, and like to put a special lock on the car (similar to a club), and sun reflectors in the windshield, which I wouldn't expect a valet parker to do. But on the other hand, I would much more consider participating if they made those services as a flat add-on fee to your room, including all gratuities, where I wouldn't have to worry about digging into the wallet each time and hoping I have the right change and everything. For instance, if they made the valet a flat $10 a day fee that included gratuity, and a one time fee of $20 for a one cart bell services for your stay that included the gratuity, I would be more inclined to just go ahead and use those services.

jmminarik
09-15-2003, 08:27 AM
Originally posted by freediverdude
For instance, if they made the valet a flat $10 a day fee that included gratuity, and a one time fee of $20 for a one cart bell services for your stay that included the gratuity, I would be more inclined to just go ahead and use those services.

In theory you're already paying for these services with dues, so Disney can always make it clear that these are non-gratuity positions, but then you're going to have to change the entire US culture of tipping to make it work. There will always be someone handing out tips in this country...as evidenced by the fact that mousekeeping is supposedly not a gratuity compensated position.

I think it all comes down to 1) how and where you were raised, 2) how much you can afford to spend on tips and 3) if you ever worked in a position where tips were an intragal part of your income.

These tipping threads are always slightly amusing and educational. If you can dig out the demographics of the posters, you can learn quite a bit about the tipping habits of different income levels and different localities...and if you have non US posters, how tipping seems to work elsewhere. For example, if you want continued prompt service in an eastern US city bar, tip big early and keep them going for at least a few rounds...but don't tip a barkeep in the UK unless it's to buy them a beer.

It all comes down to tip what _you_ want. As a general rule at Disney, the service will be good regardless of any gratuities...and if the big tipper gets their car a little faster (or whatever), accept that as part of human nature.

-Joe
in a curmudgeony and pontificating mood. It's monday. :p