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Bella the Ball 360
09-06-2003, 06:47 AM
I had seen a show like 20/20 do a piece on saftey at the theme parks and a few years back. It stuck out in my mind that WDW and Dl policed itself as far as saftey was concerned. For some reason they were not subject to state inspections. I am pretty sure that is what I remember. Does anyone else remember this piece??

It has always stuck out in my mind and there has been this tiny little nagging that what if they decided to skimp on saftey along with everything else. I am not saying that this is the case with this accident but the nagging is not going away.

Go to Snopes.com and check out "No one ever dies on Disney property".

Bella the Ball 360
09-06-2003, 06:48 AM
Should read WDW and DL policed themselves...

C.Ann
09-07-2003, 11:58 AM
Originally posted by Bella the Ball 360
I had seen a show like 20/20 do a piece on saftey at the theme parks and a few years back. It stuck out in my mind that WDW and Dl policed itself as far as saftey was concerned. For some reason they were not subject to state inspections. I am pretty sure that is what I remember. Does anyone else remember this piece??


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I think this may be what you were remembering...

www.msnbc.com/news/602899.asp?pne=msn&cp1=1

Another Voice
09-07-2003, 12:30 PM
"It has always stuck out in my mind and there has been this tiny little nagging that what if they decided to skimp on saftey along with everything else. "

The size of the Disneyland Resort maintenance department (both budget and manpower) that covers Disneyland, California Adventure, three hotels and Downtown Disney is "rumored" to be smaller now than the maintenance department that just handeled Disneyland in 1993.

After the accident on 'Roger Rabbit', the California legistlature finally passed regulations making theme park safety subject to state law. This was after years of delay caused by Disney lobbying.

Since the law came into effect Disney has been trying to pass federal laws to strip the states of their power to regulate the industry and to substitute much weaker laws in place of state or local ordinances.

Florida, at this point, does not regulate maintenance.

wdwguide
09-07-2003, 12:39 PM
Originally posted by Another Voice


Florida, at this point, does not regulate maintenance.

Nor will they ever unless something really serious happens. This state is run on (and by) Mickey Mouse... Just look at the Reedy Creek Improvement district... they didn't keep much of the promises they made to push it through the legislature, but nobody ever said anything about it because central Florida and Orlando was for the longest time (and to a large degree still is) dependent on the income Disney generates.

Bella the Ball 360
09-07-2003, 12:57 PM
Thanks Safteymom I think that was exactly the program to which I was referring, it does answer my question. I think that everyone should read this article before we are confident that saftey is what we assume it to be.

mitros
09-07-2003, 01:20 PM
Apparently, the state is run by any large company that has a PAC working on the state legislature and governor. A recent good example is how the phone companies forcefully lobbied the legislatures to pass the phone bill increase, and the ink was not even dry on the bill and the phone companies are already asking for a substantial rate increase! Who the h e double hockey sticks is kiding who? The state takes us all for imbeciles, doing something so brazen right under our stupid noses! :mad:

Bella the Ball 360
09-07-2003, 02:27 PM
AGain sorry C.Ann mixed you up with another post I was reading. SO Thanks C.ANN for the article.

HB2K
09-07-2003, 05:42 PM
That is probably the most negative, sarcastic piece of literature ever written. How that author can blame Disney, or any park for that matter for guest error, which is the main cause of most of those incidents, is beyond me. If he doesn't like Disney, he should just say so.
Go shake your snowglobe.

C.Ann
09-08-2003, 01:29 PM
Originally posted by thedscoop
Both of these statements are factually incorrect.

Disney, along with IAAPA in general, is opposing Congressman Markey's attempt to move fixed-site amusement park safety regulation from state jurisdiction to the jurisdiction of the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Also, the Florida Department of Agriculture does regulate fixed-site amusement parks. For parks over a set number of employees (such as Universal and Disney), that department has a legal document which still requires state regulation of certain types of accidents and sets out certain maintenance requirements.
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Is this a recent development? And if so, does it require the reporting of all accidents (non-fatal as well as fatal) and can the general public gain access to that info?