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View Full Version : 2 BR--Safety Concerns-Take two


Johnnie Fedora
07-01-2003, 12:27 AM
After experiencing the dedicated 2BR at BCV, I am convinced that many 2BR layouts (at least at the "hotel style" resorts) pose a real safety issue for famlies with little ones. For our adventerous kids, the balcony off the 2nd bedroom is a real safety hazard. I would never consider placing our kids in the 2nd BR alone. Our oldest, can open both locks on the patio door, and allow balcony access to the yonger one(s) (who loves to stand on the patio chairs). Since you can't hear or see the second BR balcony doors from the living room, monitoring is a big problem. Also the sinks and extra water access are a big temptation.

For those of you that stay in a 2 BR with little ones, what do you do about the unmonitored access to the patio doors?

Johnnie

magicmouse2
07-01-2003, 12:51 AM
We stayed at a villa last year (offsite) and our 5 yr old let herself out during the night to catch frogs. Imagine the shock when there was a knock at the door at 3am. She was stood there gleefully telling us about the huge frog she almost caught!!!:eek:

Request a first floor room, then the balcony is not an issue:D

A1A1
07-01-2003, 12:54 AM
Don't really understand why your last thread was closed. The issue wasn't the number of people. Also, the two bedroom holds more than 5--I think it is 8!

Anyway, I have always been concerned about access to the balcony. You can turn your back for a minute and have a tragedy. I wish there were higher locks on those doors. You know, high enough for parents to reach, but not little ones.

EAP'sDAD
07-01-2003, 01:35 AM
At Home Depot the sell a patio door lock bar. we bought this last time. 2yr old DS has no fear and will get the lock open on any door, well this item does is fits up at the top were even older kids can't reach it and fits tightly between the sliding door and the frame. My DW has a problem opening it it so tight. well DS 2 and DS 4 were able to sit in the LR of our 1 br while we did other things and there was no way for them to get out, and let me tell you they spent the first day trying there hardest. it cost like $10 and I had suggested that the should supply this to a CM and she thought that it was a great idea since they are asked about this alot. I wonder who I should contact at Disney?

disneyberry
07-01-2003, 01:46 AM
yes, i too have thought about this problem.
it seems strange because i'd think that most of the people who stay in 2-bdrm units are families.
and the logical sleeping configuration would be the parents sleep in the master bedroom. and the children sleep in the 2nd bedroom.

so you'd think that the balcony doors in the 2nd bedroom would have more childproof locks or something.

or perhaps if they had a lock that could only be unlocked with a key. and the resort staff has the key. so parents who are concerned about this might be able to request that the resort lock the balcony for the length of the stay.
i don't know, i guess there's a lot of complications with setting up any extra safety measure.

just having a simple higher lock won't help if kids are prone to getting a chair and standing on it to reach the lock.

*sigh* it's hard to figure out a good solution.

i've actually also thought about kitchen safety.
what if your child goes into the kitchen and turns on the oven or stove?
is there a switch in a fuse box that could be turned off? for ex. turn off the electricity to the kitchen appliances to prevent any accidents from happening if children turn on the stove/oven?
(actually i was thinking this is especially important for any autistic persons, or even someone like my grandma who has alzheimer's and is a perfectly capable adult who can operate appliances, unlock doors, but might not have the correct mental judgement etc.)

CaptainMidnight
07-01-2003, 03:46 AM
We have very young children as wall and have the little ones sleeping in the same room as us at night. They just strech out in sleeping bags on the floor and one in the crib. They are too young to be in a strange room by themselves at night. I share your safety concerns, including the one about a little kid standing on a chair on the balcony.

We have purchased some child safety devices we take on trips with us, like covers for the electrical plugs that we install when staying at a DVC resort and a couple of other devices to help protect small curious fingers. We've used a portable kid gate to keep the littlest one out of the kitchen as well, and the living room coffee table to block an exit and establish a play area boundary.

I also don't understand why your original thread about child safety was closed.

rbuzzotta
07-01-2003, 07:14 AM
I also have those concerns (with my 2 younger DD's) and will be faced with them in a few weeks!!

This time my oldest DD will have a friend with her and that scares me that these pre-teens may try to escape for some adventure!!!!

The VWL Five
07-01-2003, 07:29 AM
It's a constant battle with us. We have a 4, 3 and 2 year old. They have been to Disney twice (first trip they were almost 3, 18 mo and 6 mo (yes we were nuts). Each kid feeds off the trouble the other one causes so we always have someone getting into trouble.

As parents we have split up in our sleeping arrangements to help with the kids. The wife takes the 2 girls in the 2nd br and I take my son in the master. Works well.

During the day we shut the door to the 2nd br to keep the kids out. Add some kid proof locks for the kitchen and just keep them in our sight the best we can.

The balcony scare me big time. Each time we've been down, there has been a lock at the top of the slider. We just locked it without the kids seeing us. This way they don't even know it's there. It has worked so far.

I'm sure we'll need a backup plan........... the bar sounds good.

Richyams
07-01-2003, 07:54 AM
How is overcrowding a one bedroom or studio any different?

The kids still can get up in the middle of the night, still wander to a patio door. Still do anything they could in the two bedroom.

I think this is a made up excuse to try to justify spending less points and overcrowding rooms.

Get the two bedroom, have your kids sleep in the master with you, you will be following the rules, your kids won't be taught unethical ways of getting around rules and they will be safe with you in the master.

Little chains and/or bells may help also.

floridafam
07-01-2003, 08:03 AM
You can pick up a safety pack at any local baby store or Toys R' Us.

I don't think they can make higher locks, etc. on doors for fire safety-shorter people/children have to be able to get out if there was a fire.

Hang a strip of jingle bells on the door at night.

I guess you can look at it both ways-I don't want my children to be able to get out on the balcony at night but I want them to know how and be able to get out in an emergency.

As far as the fuse in the kitchen goes-I'm not sure on this one. Is the fuse box in the kitchen? If you turn the fuse off will this shut off any smoke detectors that are "hard wired"?

In any child safety pack there should be the knobs that fit over the stove so they can't turn it on.

I guess I would just use a gate if my kids were little enough. I do understand your feelings about the kids being way in the other room. If you have really young ones I guess the only solution is for the parents to sleep in each of the rooms with one of the kdis.

PamOKW
07-01-2003, 08:31 AM
I think it's fine for parents to discuss among themselves how to handle their concerns and to share ideas about bringing locks, etc. However, I don't think it's the responsibility of DVC to solve the problem of children leaving the rooms. I realize being in a strange place with Mickey out there somewhere is a temptation but what do you do at home? Do you sleep with your children and barricade the doors in your home?

As this thread shows, the concerns with kids can be never ending. With the real little ones it's concern that curiousity may bring them harm. With the older ones, it's a sense of adventure that may have them sneaking out. However, any of this can also happen in your own home.

Terry S
07-01-2003, 08:35 AM
There are a few 2 bedroom dedicated rooms with no balcony off the 2nd bedroom. I had one last time and it was really nice not having to worry about that. The kids also somehow felt safer knowing that no one could come through that door at night. I have requested one of these type of rooms for our next trip.

TwirlerGirl
07-01-2003, 09:13 AM
Hi Everyone,

We have an escape artist in our home. He just turned 5yo. I've added extra locks to all
patio doors, we have a fenced yard and have added extra locks on the gates as well. Safety locks were also added to the front door, the door to the garage area and the basement doors.
A curious child at 3, 4, 5 ... can open doors and let strangers in or get out their self. Until they learn and undestand the danger you protect them from harm. Last year at WDW we worried about the balcony as well. At home certain rooms are off limits to the children like the living room, my bedroom, the basement without adult supervision and we set the rules at the villa as well. But that balcony was very tempting, as a quick fix we moved the lungeage infront of the sliding door and made it very difficult to open the door. We allowed the children on the balcony from the main door but only after reciting the rules that we set. This worked for us but can understand anyone stilled worried about the other balcony. As far as sleeping in the room alone, they didn't so we avoided that problem. Next time I'll try the bar for the door. I wish they had the extra lockes at the top of the doors like we had installed at home! You can not be with your child every second of everyday and it only takes a second for a accident to happen.

Johnnie Fedora
07-01-2003, 09:54 AM
Originally posted by Richyams
How is overcrowding a one bedroom or studio any different?

The kids still can get up in the middle of the night, still wander to a patio door. Still do anything they could in the two bedroom.

I think this is a made up excuse to try to justify spending less points and overcrowding rooms.

Get the two bedroom, have your kids sleep in the master with you, you will be following the rules, your kids won't be taught unethical ways of getting around rules and they will be safe with you in the master.

Little chains and/or bells may help also.

Please Rich lets stay focused, I don't think there are any references in this post to what you refer to as hypothetical overcrowding. You may be confusing this thread with another one. :rolleyes:

As far as your safety points, each family is different. Ours kids do not to wander at night so I'm not as concerned.

Little bells may be a good idea, I'm sure I could unethically hear them from the living room patio door, but I doubt I could ethically hear them from the 2nd bedroom patio door.

Also, 1st floor rooms at BCV have the pool hazard to worry about, which is a BIG worry with a little escapee.

Pam...You are right, all these things (and more) can happen at home. But I and the kids are more familiar with our surroundings there. And yes, our door at home is locked with locks the kids can't manipulate yet. I don't think its necessarily Disneys responsibility to change anything, but the patio door locks aren't high enough, and are often misaligned. I usually bring a phillips screwdriver along so the locking plate can be adjusted to work properly. I have also stayed in a 2 BR where the upper floor window locks were not in place and the 5th floor bedroom window opened. :eek: Something I noticed and called about on check out day. A child wouldn't have to stand on a chair to fall out as the bedroom windows are very low.

Parents need to be sure do a safety check on these things with the units before unpacking to make sure all the safety features are functioning.

jk1
07-01-2003, 09:56 AM
i've actually also thought about kitchen safety.
what if your child goes into the kitchen and turns on the oven or stove?
is there a switch in a fuse box that could be turned off? for ex. turn off the electricity to the kitchen appliances to prevent any accidents from happening if children turn on the stove/oven?

What do you do at home?

Terry S
07-01-2003, 10:27 AM
Originally posted by Johnnie Fedora
Pam...You are right, all these things (and more) can happen at home. But I and the kids are more familiar with our surroundings there.

Johnnie..... I think you have solved your own problem with the quote above. You need to go to BCV more often so that you kids are familiar with the surroundings. ;) Hey, that works for me, any excuse to go more often!

dianeschlicht
07-01-2003, 11:17 AM
Another solution might be a dedicated 2 BR at OKW until the kids are older. You can monitor and lock the big patio door quite easily. I must say, I would be more concerned about older kids sneaking out than young ones escaping.

rbuzzotta
07-01-2003, 11:26 AM
"Do you sleep with your children and barricade the doors in your home? "


No, I don't sleep with my children at home, BUT, my doors have somewhat of a barricade!! Everytime a point of entry/exit door or window is opened in my house, bells chime!!! The chimes are especially loud in the master bedroom!!

No escaping our house!!! LOL!!

riggins
07-01-2003, 12:08 PM
We took a baby monitor with us last November when we stayed in a 2-bedroom at OKW. We turned it on at night when we went to sleep so we could hear if DD was up milling around at night. You may be opposed to "espionage" with your older kids, but it works well with the little ones. They aren't going to be able to unlock and open the door without making some noise, especially if you pile a few things in front of it. If you don't still have one from when they were babies, you pick up an inexpensive one for $20-25.

Claudia1
07-01-2003, 12:50 PM
Terry S, I like the way you think!

riggins beat me to the baby monitor idea.

When our 10 yr DS was a toddler, he was also an escape artist. Our primary tools of the trade were the door knob covers and 2 Fisher-Price motion/door alarms. We still have them and you might find them on Ebay. Also, you can do a Google (or other serach engine) search for door motion sensors. There are some for under $20.

A baby monitor and a couple of well-placed motion sensors could cover most of the problem areas.

We also move furniture to block areas.

JudithM
07-01-2003, 01:50 PM
Originally posted by PamOKW
I think it's fine for parents to discuss among themselves how to handle their concerns and to share ideas about bringing locks, etc. However, I don't think it's the responsibility of DVC to solve the problem of children leaving the rooms.

Pam, well said :); I agree.

In May we had a six-year old with us on the third floor of an elevator building at OKW. She has been to WDW several times usually at the Poly or Contemporary concierge (upper level floors). We didn't think twice about letting her out on the balcony although one of the three adults was with her :).

twinmomplus2
07-01-2003, 04:27 PM
Walter Drake, sells alarms for patio doors that are attached with velcro. It will not damage the door. And emits a pretty peircing screech. We too have our toddlers sleep on an air mattress in the master bedroom. But... nana is in the 2nd bedroom and since we can not see the door when we are not in there..... we bring the little alarms.

MikeSquared
07-01-2003, 06:03 PM
You should be able to use a few of those door knob alarms like the ones they advertise in Sky Magazine. They're made to hang on a door knob, you could use a suction cup with a hook on the patio doors, and if the door is moved the alarm sounds. Not only will it wake you, it might just scare the little buggers so they don't do it again. Whom ever asked about the range, I think the knobs just pull off and you could put them in a drawer or cabinet.

CaptainMidnight
07-01-2003, 07:32 PM
Originally posted by Richyams
How is overcrowding a one bedroom or studio any different?

The kids still can get up in the middle of the night, still wander to a patio door. Still do anything they could in the two bedroom.

I think this is a made up excuse to try to justify spending less points and overcrowding rooms.

Get the two bedroom, have your kids sleep in the master with you, you will be following the rules, your kids won't be taught unethical ways of getting around rules and they will be safe with you in the master.

Little chains and/or bells may help also.
This line of discussion obviously violates the posting guidelines regarding discussions of room occupancy. That is not what this thread is about. Pretending it is is "cheating" regarding the guidelines.

CaptainMidnight
07-01-2003, 07:42 PM
"Do you sleep with your children and barricade the doors in your home? "
Well, no we don't, and the response seems a bit derogatory. At home the boys room is child proofed, with electrical outlets covered, windows appropriately locked, and no sharp objects, stove knobs, or other dangerous items within reach. For the little ones, we also have a gate at their bedroom door to prevent them from getting up in the middle of the night and getting into kitchen items (which is also pretty child proofed with knives up high, and locks on the appropriate cabinets.) We have taken several precautions at home to make sure our small children are safe.

A nice discussion of ideas about how we could also promote safety for little children in the resorts would seem to be a worthwhile discussion, and some of the snide comments are not needed as a part of that discussion. For example, we bring covers for the electrical outlets. Doesn't take much time. Another item to be aware of is how to get in the bathroom if it ecomes locked from the inside by a little kid. I believe a dime works well at Vero beach to unlock the door. I'm not sure about the other resorts.

PamOKW
07-01-2003, 08:14 PM
It was not meant to be snide at all. I also think this is a perfectly acceptable place for people to share ideas on how to keep their kids safe at a DVC resort. I just don't think it is necessary for the resorts to be built "baby proof" any more than one's home is built completely "baby proof". Suggesting people pack nightlights, outlet covers, etc. is great. It just seems some of the concerns become excessive and begin to look for DVC to make changes that might make parents happier but infringe on others who use DVC. The set up of the units was known before purchasing. The stoves, microwaves, balconies etc. are not a surprise.

Now, think about putting a piercing alarm on the doors. I sure would enjoy being in the unit next door when that goes off in the middle of the night.

Once again, posting may not be coming across the way it would in person. I understand children in unfamiliar surroundings may need more attention and very young children alone in a bedroom would be a concern. Asking for ideas about the balcony made perfect sense and the reminders about other things like the plugs etc. also make sense. It just seems that this is not really all that much different from home where you've developed ways to watch the kids or from staying in other hotels with balconies where you may not see what's happening when you are in the bathroom, etc.

twinmomplus2
07-01-2003, 08:19 PM
Somthing that requires the power of one double A battery. I can assure you will not be heard by the next unit. This unit is about 4 inches long. I do not believe it would offend anyone. And as a prior poster stated. If they set it off once, they will be frightened to do it again. It is meant to warn parents not to announce the blitzkreig.

disneyberry
07-01-2003, 08:43 PM
Originally posted by jk1
What do you do at home? jk1, in my parents' home (where my grandmother lives), they flip the fuse box switch off that controls the stove and oven. my grandma used to cook at home for years until her alzheimer's symptoms started affecting her, and one time she set a dish on fire on the stove. from that point on, we asked her to please not worry about cooking, we'd cook for her. but she doesn't remember this all the time, and still will try to cook. to prevent accidents from happening, we make sure no electricity (the range is electric, just like at DVC) is working on the range/oven.
this was just one of the many small things i was worried about regarding safety at DVC, if my grandma comes on the trip with us.

but anyway, sorry for the digression.

btw, i agree, a 1st floor unit facing any pool would be a concern for young children walking out of the patio to the pool area when there is no lifeguard.
(for my family, i was worried about Alzheimer's wandering issues)

i guess safety is just something that means packing lots of extra things if you want it.

as an aside, i was one of those children who locked myself inside a hotel bathroom when i was very young, and i didn't know how to open the lock again, so my parents had to send for maintenance to force open the door to get me out. :eek:

Sammie
07-02-2003, 12:54 AM
at the 2 bedroom my family stayed in at BCV there was a lock that was well out of the reach of a child unless they were very tall for their age, or stood on a chair to reach it.

I think Disney has done their part by putting the lock up high, parents have to do their part to keep kids off chairs to get to it. :)

mmmcq
07-02-2003, 06:44 AM
We have a 3yr old who aspires to be an escape artist. Life with two teen sisters is just too exciting. On previous trips we've been in a hotel room together or in a 1BR with mini-mouse in with us in a crib. I bought a toddler size air mattress at a camping store for her to sleep with us on this trip. I think a little rearranging of the furniture near the doors might help. And on this trip the main area of our 1BR will be so crowded with the teens luggage..that there may not be an easy way out.

As an echo to previous posts, it is harder to handle the safety issues on the road. The kids are familiar with the rules at home and even though you inform them upon arrival what the "new" rules are in the hotel room/WDW ....the situation is just so new and WDW is soooo exciting....that there is likely a LOT of "testing" of limits that will go that you won't experience at home

Our home is 99% childproofed, but even those efforts are sometimes not enough. We have gates on the top and the bottom of the stairs to prevent mid-night wanderings. Our MBR is adjacent to our toddler's and I'm a really light sleeper. Yet we sometimes don't hear the toddler's door open and close and don't know she's awake until she's standing beside my bed.

Despite a baby monitor with two portable units my DH recently didn't hear our toddler get up from a nap. When he went upstairs to check on her she was standing naked in the hallway (behind the gate) with her hair standing up on end. My DH asked her what she was doing...and she said she was shampooing her hair at the sink. It was hysterical....although it was also sobering. We rechecked the shampoo supplies and bathroom shelves for safety - amongst other things.

By coincidence, not design, we've alway been on a ground level at WDW. So I appreciate that safety on the balconies has come up in discussion and at least made us more aware of precautions we might want to take. That's what this board is supposed to be about.