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janetd
03-13-2003, 08:59 PM
Received my Disney credit card this week and plan to just not activate it.

It is a little chilling to read the WDW resort forum, for example, and read notices of concerns about possible upgrades, codes, postcard rates,etc. and realize that this is the pool of customers Disney is targeting. Tons of emails agonize over whether the extra money for a deluxe hotel or concierge at same is worth the cost. People rhaposodize about Disney magic.

I gues it must have been impossible for Disney not to go for the ultimate goudge.

SAKPEG99OKW
03-13-2003, 09:37 PM
Janet I totaly agree with you. I will not be getting the Disney card. Why should I. I use my AMEX for everything and get 2pts for every dollar I spend, sometimes 4pts. Why shoud I use the Disney card and get 1pt for every $100 I spend. I was a faithfull DC member for 8 yrs. Now they have lost me as a Disney store shopper. I will buy everything I can from the Diseny Deals web page, and pay rock bottom with my AMEX. If you ask me this card is a big slap in the face for all the old DC members. Way togo MIKE, another great decision. When will the Disney board learn that MIKE has lost his magic and is killing Disney........

Scott :(

disneychrista
03-13-2003, 11:38 PM
While I agree that the Visa is a poor replacement for the Disney Club, but I for one will get much more use out of the Visa and rewards then I will out of the Disney Club card.

My Disneyland AP will get me more discounts at Disneyland then the DC ever could. And If I use my new Disney Visa, I will get that 1%. Which may not sound like much but it is 1% more then if I didn't use the Disney Visa.

I rarely purchase anything at the Disney Store because there isn't anything to purchase.

YoHo
03-14-2003, 12:11 AM
The Disney CLub card was a terrible replacement for the old Magic Kingdom club to begin with.

The Disney Visa is really no different from any rewards program with any other visa card.
It would have been magical if they HAD given you more, but hey. Mike never HAD any magic.

d-r
03-14-2003, 01:06 AM
I agree 100% with the first poster.

I saw on radp where someone had been turned down b/c of credit.

I've also seen posts on various forums where people didn't know to get the "DVC" logo on the card, so bank 1 told them to simply reapply, get a new card, and turn off the first one.

I don't think people are thinking about these things as credit cards that will impact their credit.

Also, Christa, I don't compare this card straight up to the disney club, I compare it to Disney Club + American Express. When AMEX was the official card, you could turn in those points for tickets, breakfasts, etc., you got discounts on things like water craft rental, dining, and 20% at world of disney. I haven't seen anything that begins to suggest that this card is better than that combination.

Again, to me, this wouldn't have been so bad if there hadn't been all that talk months ago about these wonderful new reward programs that would be so beneficial to regular and frequent customers. This seems to cut out some frequent customers, and to abuse others for more profit. I think it is shameful, to be honest.

DR

KNWVIKING
03-14-2003, 08:06 AM
"Janet I totaly agree with you. I will not be getting the Disney card. Why should I. I use my AMEX for everything and get 2pts for every dollar I spend, sometimes 4pts. Why shoud I use the Disney card and get 1pt for every $100 I spend. "

Yes, AMEX gives pts for each $$ spent, as do several other cards, but 350 amex pts are not going to get you an AP- not even close. The Disney card is a simple 1% rebate on purchases to earn basically Disney Dollars. This card is no worse then tons of other cards that offer 1% back on something. It also charges no annual fee- at least for now- which the majority of reward cards do. I haven't received mine yet,but from things I've read it appears they are leaving the door open to other benifits that may be similar to DC discounts.

I have the DC card, but only because the discount on two APs pays the fee. We use our DVC card for what few DS purchases we make. I don't understand why Disney can't offer both cards but I'm not ready to knock their new card without at least knowing what it offers.

KNWVIKING
03-14-2003, 08:13 AM
"The Disney CLub card was a terrible replacement for the old Magic Kingdom club to begin with. "

I know very little about the old MKC card, but I know back in '95 it was offered to employees of companies that chose to subscribe to it. For me,the MKC was worthless because it wasn't availible to me. how was the MKC so much better ? Don't read this as an "Accusational" type question, I just want to knowwhat made the MKC card so great.

All Aboard
03-14-2003, 08:18 AM
Vike, if your company was not an MKC participant you could still buy one for about $30 a year. I was lucky enough to get the free version.

What made MKC nicer was the in-park discounts on dining and shopping, but those slowly eroded away to near nothing by the time DC took over.

YoHo
03-14-2003, 01:01 PM
gcurling is right. Anyone could get a MKC card. In fact if you paid for it instead of getting the free one it offered more perks.

The discounts were bigger then DC, they were offered at more places, you got phenominal hotel and Travel company discounts. IT was an excellent deal.


(actually my Disneyland Annual offers just about all the Discounts that MKC did. Of course it cost me more then $30)

Teri1
03-14-2003, 01:52 PM
I had the free MKC card and when I was shopping at the World of Disney Store in DD the clerk saw my AAA diamond card and said "Oh you have the AAA diamond card, use that instead because the discount is twice that of the MKC card." Until I hear the rewards are worth having the Disney Visa I will wait. My Mastercard has a 8.9 % rate, that would save me more money than having the Disney Visa at this point.

DiznEeyore
03-14-2003, 01:58 PM
Originally posted by Teri1
I had the free MKC card and when I was shopping at the World of Disney Store in DD the clerk saw my AAA diamond card and said "Oh you have the AAA diamond card, use that instead because the discount is twice that of the MKC card."
You received a discount with your AAA diamond card? I've never heard of this...could you elaborate please?

Teri1
03-14-2003, 02:08 PM
When you book a vacation with AAA besides the AAA discount on your package or room only reservations you get a AAA diamond card with a list of stores, restaurants and activities at WDW you can use it on. It comes with your final packet just before you leave on vacation. AT that time, I was refering to the discount, it was 20% off at the selected stores in DD. The MKC only offered a 10% discount at that time.

lrodk
03-14-2003, 06:38 PM
I've been accumilating AMEX reward points since 1991. I have about 150,000 pts, which means I've speant about $150,000 over that time(a scarythought). There have been a few offers here and there where I earned double rewards points for certain time periods on specific purchases. But those were few and far between. In essence I earned 1 point for every dollar I spent. I've looked at various ways to redeem points recently. Most of the choices fall into the same price range. Basically I can redeem these points for items that range in prices up to $1200, but not more. If you do the math my redemption rate best-case-scenario is 0.8%. In comparison Disney's reward program at 1% is perfectly in line with AMEX's reward levels. The only differences iI can see are the redemption choices, with Disney's slanted toward their own offerings. Also AMEX charges for it's program while Disney's is included for free. Based on what I've seen, I still prefer AMEX's over Disney's because of the broader range of choices for redemption.

d-r
03-14-2003, 08:15 PM
I realized that the Amex points weren't equal value of point per dollar, and like you Irodk, I like that there are more options. But I am not sure if the disney visa card points are one point = one dollar - are they?

KNWVIKING
03-14-2003, 08:45 PM
No,$100.00 in purchase equals $1.00 in dizdollars, basically your typical 1% rebate card. While AMEX gives 1 pt per $1.00 spent, 100 pts buys virtually nothing. 50,000 pts may sound impressive, but $500 dizdollars will buy more diz product.

disneychrista
03-14-2003, 09:07 PM
Originally posted by d-r
But I am not sure if the disney visa card points are one point = one dollar - are they?
The disney card is not giving points but like KNWVIKING pointed out a simply 1% rebate in the form of Disney Dream Dollars (basically disney dollars). So $100 spent = $1 in Dream Dollars.

Gillian
03-15-2003, 07:13 AM
I was just looking at the Amex rewards catalog. There are several gift certificate rewards that are about the same as Disney.

We are looking at $100 Home Depot GC for 10,000 points. All of the other store GCs are the save value. They have Gap, Coach & others. The worst deal is $100 in travellers checks for 20,000 points.

Since I'm not working anymore & DH's company cut back on business travel AND changed to Diner's club, it isn't worth it for us to pay for the Amex program. We've spent most of our points but still have 30k left. I think we'll get it in home depot GCs, because we're doing some projects around the house. Not as much fun as Disney, but worthwhile. :)

We are not getting the Disney Visa because the rates aren't good. We are looking into other options after we cancel amex.

roymccoy
03-15-2003, 12:09 PM
Wanna know something scary? I have had an AMEX card since 1990 and I have 880,000 points. (I use the card for everything from business to mortgage payments)
I get these catalogs for big screen TV's and one year Jaguar leases. The AMEX rewards program is the best of all of them. A lot of months, they offer double and even triple points. Also, you'd be surprised at how many different companies take AMEX for payments. Phone company, car insurance, mortgage payments, property taxes, DMV, even the IRS! I also have a Hilton rewards card and I have just a few points on that one. (Not that I haven't tried!)

AMEX also has the extra added benefit of MAKING you pay the entire balance off every month. (As long as you stick with the card that doesn't revolve)

Just my two cents, but I like the AMEX card.

Roy

gtrist4life
03-15-2003, 05:24 PM
I received my Disney Visa yesterday and I also have an Amex that's for business travel expenses.

I'm planning on using the Visa for everything possible that we would normally pay for during the month. Bills, groceries, clothes, gas, etc.

The Amex rewards program for the one I have costs $75 a year, so if you charge $10,000 a year that equals to about $100, Lot of work/spending for $25.

I'm thrilled to be getting Disney Dollars for everyday items. But then again, I've not been "spoiled?" (probably not the best word) on some of the more advantageous programs of the past.

Peace
G4L

Daphne
03-16-2003, 09:37 AM
what stinks about the visa is that you have to spend money on it to get the rewards. At least with the DC you get the discounts up front. I always use it for my stay at OKW because it had the best discount, AP usually wasn't available, and I use it at the disney store and to renew my pass. I don't want another credit card!! :(

Luckymommyx2
03-17-2003, 02:53 PM
d-r, I agree with what you said. It is scary some of the things I've been reading on these boards. I've seen several posts saying that they want the card just to get the "From Day One" card (or whatever it says.) It is scarier to know that Bank One is telling these people that didn't get the type of card they want to just reapply then cancel the other card! I do not think that all of the people getting this card understands the potential effects it could have on his/her credit. Hey, but we're all adults, aren't we?!

KaterBell
03-17-2003, 03:34 PM
I'm one of "those people" that is cancelling the first card to get the DVC member card.... I currently have great credit, and pay off my cards every month anyway, and never carry over a balance.... I'm planning on using the Disney VISA the same way, or doing balance transfers to my Amex to rack up the miles.

ToddS
03-18-2003, 09:43 AM
I don't compare this card straight up to the disney club, I compare it to Disney Club + American Express. When AMEX was the official card, you could turn in those points for tickets, breakfasts, etc., you got discounts on things like water craft rental, dining, and 20% at world of disney. I haven't seen anything that begins to suggest that this card is better than that combination.


I recently posted my thoughts on the Disney Visa vs. The AmEx/DC combination on the DVC Forum, and I thought I'd repeat them here, for the sake of discussion:

Most important, I think, is the fact that, depending on how you use your rewards, AmEx's Membership Rewards works out to roughly 1% (or less) in most cases, making the rewards value equal to (or less than) the Disney Visa's earnings. It's true that the Disney Visa earns you only one Dream Reward point per $100 spent, while AmEx earns you one Membership Rewards point for every $1, but the DR points are each worth $1, while the MR points are essentially each worth only a penny! (again, this depends on how you spend them, but a $50 Gap gift card costs 5000 MR points. That's a penny per point! And some rewards work out to even less.) So in both cases, $100 of spending earns you basically $1 of reward. At the risk of oversimplifying, the Disney Visa points are worth $1 each, while the AmEx MR points are worth $0.01 (or less) each. One has to keep this in mind when comparing the programs. Also, while the MR points could be used for only a select few rewards at WDW from a pre-set list, and the DC discount was basically good only at Downtown Disney, and only in a few stores, the Visa rewards, as I understand them, can be used for anything anywhere at WDW.

Second, in comparing that 1% reward to a 20% discount on the DC, I think you may be comparing apples to oranges. Look at it like this: let's say that BEFORE, you spent $52000 per year on your AmEx, paid it in full every statement, and you had a DC card; and NOW instead you will spend $52000 per year on your Disney Visa and pay it in full every statement. BEFORE, you would earn 52000 MR points, which you could trade for a six-day Park Hopper Plus (a $308 value, for a 0.6% reward value, just over one-HALF a percent) with 2000 MR points left over (call it a $20 gift card for the store of your choice at the going 1% rate) and you could use your Disney Club to save 20% on your Downtown Disney Shopping (say $200 off of $1000 worth of shopping). All told you've gotten $508 of "free" stuff out of your DC and MR, assuming you'd spend $1000 at DD or save the $200 in some other form of DC discount. And you are spending $120 in membership fees for these programs, if I am correct. ($50 AmEx, $30 MR, $40 DC). NOW, spending the $52000 on your Disney Visa gives you $520 Dream Reward dollars, which will BUY you a Premium Annual Pass outright. That is, 100% OFF your PAP, just for spending money you were spending anyway. Also that's $52000 expediture for a $520 reward -- a full 1%, while you only got 0.6% when you used the MR points for a 6-day PHP. And there are no fees as long as you pay your balance each statement.

So, to summarize:
AmEx/DC combo:
annual spending: $52000 (for example)
reward value: $508 (assuming you can get $200 in discounts out of DC in a year; you might have to spend another $800 to "save" this $200!)
fees: $120
net benefit: $388

Disney Visa:
annual spending: $52000 (for example)
reward value: $520 (no matter what you use it for at WDW!)
fees: $0
net benefit: $520

Now granted most of us don't spend $52000 a year on our credit card, but in that case the $120 in fees for the AmEx/DC option just weighs heavier against its benefits! For instance, if you spent only $4000 per year on either option, the AmEx/DC option would get you a $25 character breakfast for 3500 of your MR points with 500 left over towards $5 worth of a gift card, and, say, $50 savings on a $250 shopping spree, but you still would have spent $120 in fees, so you are DOWN $40 on the deal. Spending the same $4000 on your Disney Visa, you'd get $40 in Dream Reward dollars to spend as you'd like at WDW. $40 benefit, no fees.

So to some, a 1% "reward" can be better than a 20% discount.

I am by no means THRILLED with the Disney Visa's offerings, but I think that many will find that, for them, the overall benefit is AT LEAST as good as the old AmEx/DC combo!

AKemel
03-18-2003, 10:25 PM
Than of course there is AmEx Cash Reward Card. It gives 1.5% cash back on all purchases and doubles it to 3% back at supermarkets, gas stations and drug stores. And there is no Annual Fee.

d-r
03-18-2003, 11:59 PM
Todds.


I think the key part of what you said is " think that many will find that, for them, the overall benefit is AT LEAST as good as the old AmEx/DC combo!"

"many"

And that may very well work for a specific example. Now run the figures on the discounted disney packages, versus getting a room only with the previous Disney club discount. Or, add in the 20% amex discount at WOD, the dining discounts, or the water craft, cirque, etc. Where's the Disney magazine subscription, and so on. While it may work for a specific purchase, I think the overall picture is probably more complex.

(now I am going to add something small here. I've read that it is not 1%, but 1 "Dream dollar" or whatever for every $100 spent, such that you could spend up to $199 and only get 1 magic dollar, is that correct? I hope that, as people have posted there, the reward dollars do have a dollar per dollar redemption rate).

Now, I agree that some may benefit on some purchases, but I'm not sure that those who don't want to commit to a new credit card - or do not have the credit history to be able to - will find those deals as good as they had when they could simply pay a flat rate for Disney Club without having to sign up for a credit card.

Have you ever noticed people freelancing for those citibank cards they give to college students? They will offer free prizes or incentives to everyone who will feel out one of those applications and let them fax it in. I think they do that because there is a profit reward for every application that they generate. This is why I think that Disney is trying to generate some quick capital from their most loyal customers by enticing them with day 1 or dvc on a credit card. Disney is going to make a profit on every dollar that is spent on these cards.

Contrast that with this:
http://disboards.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=162725

Is this the type of customer relations management that was described? Do you think it is a good idea to shut out or alienate a segment of their most loyal customers in order to make some quick cash from others?

I really don't, and I find it really vile of disney to do this, frankly.

DR

All Aboard
03-19-2003, 08:51 AM
you could spend up to $199 and only get 1 magic dollar, is that correct?No, you'd get two. They round up (or down). So, if you spent $149.99 during a month, you'd only get one.

DemoBri1
03-19-2003, 04:26 PM
Originally posted by SAKPEG99OKW
I use my AMEX for everything and get 2pts for every dollar I spend, sometimes 4pts. (

Correct me if I am wrong, but didn't Disney disavow themselves from American Express sometime last year? Are you still able to utilize AMEX points for Disney stuff, or are you just saying that you are accumulating points for something other than Disney?

I do agree that the rewards on this card are pretty poor, but hey it's better than nothing I guess. They really could have made it a 2% or 3% reward though. I will be interested to see what will need to be done in order to gain the stated double and triple the awards bonuses.

Brian

ToddS
03-19-2003, 05:21 PM
DR -

You make a lot of excellent points (as I knew you would!) which is why I left myself some wiggle room in my closing statement, as you also point out, when I said
I am by no means THRILLED with the Disney Visa's offerings, but I think that many will find that, for them, the overall benefit is AT LEAST as good as the old AmEx/DC combo!
But my basic points, despite my rather long-winded post (sorry!) were that (a) I got the impression from some posts in this discussion that a lot of people who were really unhappy with the Disney Visa's benefits might be misunderstanding some of these benefits (which, incidentally, does not necessarily mean that I do understand them! ;)) and (b) I thought that there might be some (like myself, I am hoping) who might get equal or more value out of the Disney Visa than the AmEx just by virtue of the way they already spend at WDW. HOWEVER, I certainly need to agree with you here...
I'm not sure that those who don't want to commit to a new credit card - or do not have the credit history to be able to - will find those deals as good as they had when they could simply pay a flat rate for Disney Club without having to sign up for a credit card.

...If you need to make major changes to the way your WDW trips are currently structured and finanaced to benefit from the new card, then I can definitely see where the end of DC and the Start of Disney Visa are a HUGE disappointment. But if one is currently spending enough on AmEx to have made the fees for MR worthwhile, then I can't see where one couldn't get a similar benefit out of the Disney Visa. I'm sure sorry to see DC go, as I was when MKC ended, and I definitely sympathize with people's negative impression of the new card. I just am hoping that I can make good of it, and trying to be as positive about it as I can. I seem to find myself doing this with lots of Disney's recent changes!

KNWVIKING
03-19-2003, 06:05 PM
Because of my spending habits I will get much more benifit from the new CC. However, I would like to know the logic behind dropping the DC card. I don't see any major up-side to getting rid of it. People that don't want or can't get a credit card are now bitter and possibly lost as customers, and these were people willing to pay an annual fee. I'm sure one of Disney's concerns may have been that people would "double dip" them by making DC discount purchases and paying for them with the reward card, but with todays computerized system safeguards to eliminate that could have been put into place if they so chose,(fun though, the GM card gives double rebate on GM dealership parts & service purchases as an extra reward for customer loyalty). Maybe with enough complaints Disney will realize they should reinstitute the DC card.

freediverdude
03-20-2003, 08:47 PM
And then there's the category of people like me, who pay for a premium annual pass every year, spend several thousand dollars every year in Disney theme parks, have good credit in that I don't have any delinquencies on my credit report and always make my payments on time, and was even willing to pay an annual fee, and was still turned down by Bank One, because they are so picky and looking for certain types of profiles. The only excuse they could come up with for mine was that they didn't like the amount of some of my balances :rolleyes: You would think someone who spends that much money with Disney and stays in their deluxe hotels with a $1500 room key limit each time would be worthy of one of their credit cards, even with a small limit or something. Well two people can play at this game. From now on, I will no longer get any cash advances from the ATMs inside Disney World, so Bank One will no longer get any ATM fees from me (all the ATMs now say Bank One and are $2 per use, and I usually use them once or twice per trip, and go to Disney at least every month or two, so they were getting quite a little bundle from me, but no longer). Needless to say, I won't ever be having anything to do with Bank One ever again, and I think someone at Disney should be hearing about cases like mine, although I don't know who that should be. Goodbye Bank One!

disneychrista
03-20-2003, 08:58 PM
Originally posted by freediverdude
And then there's the category of people like me, who pay for a premium annual pass every year, spend several thousand dollars every year in Disney theme parks, have good credit in that I don't have any delinquencies on my credit report and always make my payments on time,...The only excuse they could come up with for mine was that they didn't like the amount of some of my balances
Do you have a lot of high balances on cards/accounts that you already have? If your debt to income ratio is to high then they will look at you as being a bad credit risk, regardless of how "clean" your payments are etc.

d-r
03-21-2003, 12:42 AM
Originally posted by freediverdude
And then there's the category of people like me, who pay for a premium annual pass every year, spend several thousand dollars every year in Disney theme parks, have good credit in that I don't have any delinquencies on my credit report and always make my payments on time, and was even willing to pay an annual fee, and was still turned down by Bank One, because they are so picky and looking for certain types of profiles. The only excuse they could come up with for mine was that they didn't like the amount of some of my balances :rolleyes: You would think someone who spends that much money with Disney and stays in their deluxe hotels with a $1500 room key limit each time would be worthy of one of their credit cards, even with a small limit or something. Well two people can play at this game. From now on, I will no longer get any cash advances from the ATMs inside Disney World, so Bank One will no longer get any ATM fees from me (all the ATMs now say Bank One and are $2 per use, and I usually use them once or twice per trip, and go to Disney at least every month or two, so they were getting quite a little bundle from me, but no longer). Needless to say, I won't ever be having anything to do with Bank One ever again, and I think someone at Disney should be hearing about cases like mine, although I don't know who that should be. Goodbye Bank One!


This is the problem. And this is a problem beyond those customers who just don't want to bother rearranging their credit card habits to save a disney dream dollar.

Disney is making a bad mistake here. Instead of delivering on the promise that they were going to get to know their frequent customers at a better level, they are letting another company (bank 1) make decisions about the relationships they have with their most loyal customers, based on a single score derived by another company (I forget who makes that Fico score; Fair Isaac? Standard and Poore? Anyway, you get my point). Both of those outside companies have no interest beyond turning a profit.


So, Disney, is it worth it to you to raise some quick capital by letting these other two companies determine your relationships with your best customers?

Seems like a bad idea to me.

DR

d-r
03-21-2003, 12:48 AM
Originally posted by disneychrista
Do you have a lot of high balances on cards/accounts that you already have? If your debt to income ratio is to high then they will look at you as being a bad credit risk, regardless of how "clean" your payments are etc.

But that is the point - why on earth should that matter at all for someone wanting to join a frequent disney customer reward program? Why should access to disney club-type discounts be limited to only those people who a credit card company doesn't like the income ratio of? That doesn't make a bit of sense to me.

As I just said, instead of Disney deciding how they want to develop their relationship with a frequent and repeat guest, they have given that over to other companies, in the interest of making some quick capital. I'm sure that there are many other loyal customers who are feeling a bit burned. It was such a stupid move for them to get rid of the disney club that anyone who wanted to could join - they could have had this credit card in addition to that. But no, they had to give people a reason to sign up for this card. I wonder if Disney sees any profit just for people signing up - like the hawkers on college campuses do.

DR

d-r
03-21-2003, 12:54 AM
And one last piece of information, this from Larworth's other thread about Micheal Eisner's comments at the shareholder meeting:


Disney Card is a key part of our CRM program. There will be bonus opportunities coming.


Just in case anyone doubted that this was not a part of the customer relations management program. So, the bold new customers relations management program will cut out those who don't want another credit card, can't get one, or that another company decides it doesn't want to give one - is this REALLY the way you want to do this Disney??

DR

crusader
03-21-2003, 05:43 AM
So, Disney, is it worth it to you to raise some quick capital by letting these other two companies determine your relationships with your best customers?

Answer - yes!

Reality - probably not. I suspect the picture is much bigger here. How do all those new signers really know what profiling advantages the mighty Disney co. now has with their credit access. Afterall, they willingly gave all that personal info over for the "opportunity" to enroll.

There are two main advantages here - tap into the merchant fee revenue arena and specifically tarket your consumer market based on their habits and lifestyles. And 100,000 people already gave everything over for the words "first" to appear on their plastic credit card.

Seems so much more costly than a DC ever was.

disneychrista
03-21-2003, 10:22 AM
Originally posted by d-r
But that is the point - why on earth should that matter at all for someone wanting to join a frequent disney customer reward program? Why should access to disney club-type discounts be limited to only those people who a credit card company doesn't like the income ratio of?
Because this is a Credit Card not a discount program (ie Disney Club). I see it as two seperate programs. The Credit Card is not replacing the Disney Club because they are not the same thing. As far as I can see there are NO discounts, per se, in connection with the Disney Visa Maybe once the Club closes at the end of the year this will be added, but I for one, am not holding my breath.

Disney made the decision to close the Disney Club. Bank One along with Disney made the decision to start a Disney Rewards Visa. Did one have to do anything with the other? I am not convienced.

Sarangel
03-21-2003, 10:29 AM
The Credit Card is not replacing the Disney Club because they are not the same thing.Actually, this is part of the problem.

When Disney chose to shut down the Magic Kingdom Club, they assured the cardholders that the replcement (Disney Club) would be better than the original. Most of us who belonged to both would disagree. Similarly, once Disney chose to dismantle the Disney Club, they assured us that the new program would be better... We got a Visa Card that seems not to have any of the benefits of the Disney Club, and limited rewards compared to other co-branded Visa cards. Additionally, it has the *benefit* of alienating anyone who, for whatever reason, doesn't want/need or can't get a credit card.

Given that the Magic Kingdom Card was begun as a way to reward loyal and regular customers, this downgrading of the original purpose has put some noses out of joint.

Sarangel

disneychrista
03-21-2003, 10:43 AM
Originally posted by Sarangel
Similarly, once Disney chose to dismantle the Disney Club, they assured us that the new program would be better... We got a Visa Card
This is where I am not 100% convienced. Is the Visa the "replacement" for the Disney Club? I am not sure how it even CAN be called a replacement, because that would be comparing apples and oranges. Disney has said they could "deliver stronger promotional offers through other methods". Those methods may or may not be through the Disney Visa.

CasualObserver
03-21-2003, 11:01 AM
Come on people, how many times could you whip out your MKC or DC card at Wal-mart and show Mickey in all his glory? Now, you can show that you are a fan of the Mouse with each and every purchase.

I guess that Disney also gets more advertising exposure by show their card to all the cashiers around the world....

I guess Disney gets a piece of that interest on all the unpaid balances each month...

Oh, you do get a small "reward" for using their card (which is only good at Disney stores, so they get the reward back - which is good for Disney).

Boy, I don't know how anyone thought the Disney Visa was not as good as the MKC.

Casual Observer

KNWVIKING
03-21-2003, 11:35 AM
"I guess Disney gets a piece of that interest on all the unpaid balances each month..."

So pay your balance every month & don't allow Disney to collect any interest.

"Oh, you do get a small "reward" for using their card (which is only good at Disney stores, so they get the reward back - which is good for Disney)."

If Disney is where my vacation dollars are going to be spent, why wouldn't I want a reward card, regardless of the size of the reward, that allows me to earn a few diz bucks just for doing something I already do- use credit cards for virtually everything I can.

"Boy, I don't know how anyone thought the Disney Visa was not as good as the MKC."

Sarcasm aside, I never had a MKC card & only got the DC card for the AP pass discount,(discount covered DC fee). For me personally, the Visa is a better option. I will never pay interest on a balance.It doesn't have an annual fee.

CasualObserver
03-21-2003, 12:49 PM
Okay, all sarcasm aside.

My problem with the Disney Visa card is that it, to me, is indicative of a management philosophy of dipping ever deeper into the pockets of the loyal fans rather than extending the fan base. It appears that mgmt feels that they are unable to gain new fans (e.g. Iger's comment about the 90's being an "aberration").

While I didn't take advantage of the MKC (it ended when I had the opportunity to take advantage), it was a pure benefit to the card holder because it gave discounts and could be obtained free. It expanded the base by encouraging new customers to travel to the parks.

Then came The DC program when the ability to get a free card ended and it only became useful to people willing to spend over $250 on products before seeing a payback. This didn't try to expand the base because it carries with it a perception that it is for people who travel regularly to the parks - not the first-time or one-time visitor.

Now we have the Disney Visa which, while not carrying a fee, carries a much lower "reward". This, again, is targeted at the loyal because the redemption of rewards is made with Disney alone. Therefore, it is the loyal who would get the card and use it during the months coming up to their trip in order to redeem the reward during their travels. The first time or new customer is not going to jump through those hoops.

If Mgmt keeps on the path of trying to extract more money from a shrinking base, they will lose their base altogether. In prior years, Disney exceeded expectations and, in doing so, expanded their customer base. Closing attractions without replacements, turning all shops into clones of each other with respect to their product offerings, developing sequel after sequel, and similar mgmt actions does not result in exceeding expectations.

In order for Disney to return to it's former self, mgmt must show that they are not bankrupt of ideas, not suffering from a drought of determination to exceed expectations, and not focused on fleecing their oyal customers. Mgmt simply needs to return the ideal of providing top-quality, unique entertainment at reasonable prices. I say they have failed. The entertainment values slip each and every year .


Casual Observer

freediverdude
03-21-2003, 04:42 PM
I agree with d-r. Disney is letting these other companies decide who will get to participate in a "magic fun-filled" card based on a credit score or some other type of profiling, and I think it's a mistake. Whether or not it's a replacement for the DC is irrelevant- the point is, Disney is not making the decision of who gets this card, and potentially turning off frequent and loyal guests who would like to use it, and have even shown responsibility with credit to Disney directly by having use of those room keys with a credit card attached! Christa is right about one thing, Bank One is not looking out for who would be the best customer for Disney, they're looking for the type of profile account that they want to include in their portfolio, regardless of how it affects Disney. And that is what is wrong, and why Disney shouldn't be doing this. I guess I'll go ahead and accept one of about 5 other pre-approved offers (not "invited to apply", but pre-approved) i received while waiting to see if I got the Disney card, and call that my Disney card- maybe tape a Mickey on it or something. Like I said, Goodbye Bank One! And I hope Disney wises up about how it's affecting all the guests who didn't fit into Bank One's little profile.

KNWVIKING
03-21-2003, 08:21 PM
Years ago when GM started their rebate card, they were virtually accepting everybody. People I worked with who had been turned down by Sears were getting the card. While I understand what GM's motivation was for doing so,were they really doing these people a favor by allowing them to get further into debt ? It's even worse today. Look at the number of bankruptcies(sp) being filed by everyday people. A local lawyer I know files 500 case a month, and were talking about a small town in South Jersey. CC companies know your financies almost as well as you do. They know your income,they know your debt, AND they know your potential debt. Potential debt is a pocket full of credit cards with zero balances. You my have a great credit rating,zero balances,good income,etc. but if your potential debt ratio gets too high they will turn you down. Someday add up all the availible credit you have in your wallet or purse. If you sudden maxed all your cards buying DVC points, could you afford to make all the payments ? As crazy as this may sound,CC companies will assume this is a possibility before they issue a card. And none of this is Disneys fault.

Just think, if Disney had just offered both the DC and Visa card, we could all concentrate our energies on more important threads, like Little Red, My Peoples and Chicken Fingers. Or maybe take a walk around the neighborhood with DW.

cindyfan
03-22-2003, 08:15 PM
So, to summarize:
AmEx/DC combo:
annual spending: $52000 (for example)
reward value: $508 (assuming you can get $200 in discounts out of DC in a year; you might have to spend another $800 to "save" this $200!)
fees: $120
net benefit: $388

Disney Visa:
annual spending: $52000 (for example)
reward value: $520 (no matter what you use it for at WDW!)
fees: $0
net benefit: $520


But, you see.....it has so much to do with the way you use the AmerEx.....
trying to use AmerEx rewards for Disney tickets etc...just is not as benificial as so many other uses.....
For example:
We use the AmEx pts for Car rental....you get $ for PT there....so if I plugged that into your equation.....
reward value: $520 for car rental + $200 in DC discounts = $720
fees: $120
net benefit: $600
DING DING!! AmEx wins by $80

That is just one example. Here's another:
What about using AmerEx pts for airfare?
I can take that 52000 pts convert them to airline pts and "on average" from what it usually costs to fly for us.....We can get 2 free tickets to FL. Avg cost for us $300......therefore we have now raised our AmerEx net benefit to $680!!!!!

I don't think at this point you can convince me the Disney Visa has a better rewards program than AmerEx.

IMHO.....my Target Visa has a much better rewards program too! For every $1000 spent you get a coupon to save 10% for one day with no limit at Target stores. So this has alot of potential. I've already saved $50 having just spent $3000. That is 1.6% And it is on things I am going to buy anyway....like toilet paper and laundry soap. And they donate 1% to my school!

KNWVIKING
03-22-2003, 08:31 PM
The comparison was Amex diz rewards vs Diz Visa reward.

You can get a BJ's (similar to a Sam's Club) Visa. Pays 1% on all purchases, 1.5% on BJ purchases. If you routinely spend $600 per year at BJ's anyway,the use their card. When you accumulate $50.00 in reward,make needed purchases at BJ's, use the reward, and put the cash you would have paid into a WDW vacation account.

Virtually all reward cards have the same reward level,just base it or state it a little differently. What seperates them are the "extras", like no annual fee (very rare for a reward card) or potential additional perks, (as the Diz card already has & have teased about additionals).

d-r
03-23-2003, 08:19 AM
Originally posted by disneychrista
Because this is a Credit Card not a discount program (ie Disney Club). I see it as two seperate programs. The Credit Card is not replacing the Disney Club because they are not the same thing. As far as I can see there are NO discounts, per se, in connection with the Disney Visa Maybe once the Club closes at the end of the year this will be added, but I for one, am not holding my breath.

Disney made the decision to close the Disney Club. Bank One along with Disney made the decision to start a Disney Rewards Visa. Did one have to do anything with the other? I am not convienced.


Ummmmm, Christa....

The whole point of this visa was that it was to replace the disney club....

From the LA Times last October:

Disney said Monday it would replace the Disney Club with a "co-branded" Disney/Visa credit card with which customers will be able to accumulate points that can be redeemed toward discounts on Disney merchandise and vacations.

And from the Orlando Sentinal, concerning the demise of the disney club and the introduction of the credit card:

"We have not forgotten these club members," Foster said. "We do feel like we're developing a program that is going to be much better than the Disney Club."



Originally posted by disneychrista
I am not sure how it even CAN be called a replacement, because that would be comparing apples and oranges
Actually, you got it! That is exactly the problem, this is exactly the point that I was making.

The problem is that this is not a good replacement for the disney club.

d-r
03-23-2003, 08:23 AM
Originally posted by KNWVIKING
"I guess Disney gets a piece of that interest on all the unpaid balances each month..."

So pay your balance every month & don't allow Disney to collect any interest.

.

FWIW, they are getting a percentage of every purchase you make - the merchants pay a percentage for the credit card purchase.

disneychrista
03-23-2003, 11:08 AM
Disney said Monday it would replace the Disney Club with a "co-branded" Disney/Visa credit card with which customers will be able to accumulate points that can be redeemed toward discounts on Disney merchandise and vacations.
This is the first time that I have seen anything (of course internet BB excluded) saying that the Visa was a replacement for the Disney Club.
I have read statement, including from the Disney Club website, about being able to/wanting to
deliver stronger promotional offers through other methods. But no mention of what those other methods are.

KNWVIKING
03-23-2003, 04:37 PM
"FWIW, they are getting a percentage of every purchase you make - the merchants pay a percentage for the credit card purchase."

Generally, the percentage of sale the merchant surrenders goes to the issueing bank. I was always told the card sponsor receives the bulk of the annual fee and a portion of interest charges.

BeautyLLM
03-23-2003, 08:59 PM
My husband works for one of the major credit card companies (not Bank One) and just explained how this works...

BankOne is the credit card issuing bank. They paid a huge up front payment to The Disney Company in order to become the "Official credit card of the Disney Company". They also pay for the actual cards (about $1 each) and for all the marketing of the new credit card program ie...they want not only for you to be a new card holder, but they come up with creative ways to get you to use your card (ie Disney points) and to revolve your payments.

The issuing bank makes its money by collecting late fees, interest and annual fees. Usually, after some given period of time or after a specified profit, the issuing bank will then split these profits with Disney.

The merchant bank is the bank that the store or restaurant sends it's receipts to at the end of each business day. The store receives payment on a charge purchase minus a "discount" from the merchant bank. Let me give an example:

I go to my local shoe store and charge shoes for $100 on my new Disney credit card. The shoe store sends the receipt to the local bank that they have chosen as their merchant bank, in this case called Leslie's Bank. Leslie's Bank sends the shoestore $98.75. In otherwords they paid a 1.25% discount on the transaction. The discount is split between the merchant bank (Leslie's Bank), the issuing bank (Bank One) and the VISA Company.

American Express is different because there is no "middleman" ie merchant bank. They take care of the entire transaction themselves. They offer alot of benefits to customers, but their discount is higher ( about 2.5 %) so, from Disney's point of view, if they can get customers to use the new Disney card more than AMEX at their parks and stores, their profits will be higher at the end of the year (because they will be paying a lower discount).

Hope this helps to clarify....

.

crusader
03-24-2003, 07:28 AM
They paid a huge up front payment to The Disney Company in order to become the "Official credit card of the Disney Company".

Rest assured there is more money being gained than this.

My problem with the Disney Visa card is that it, to me, is indicative of a management philosophy of dipping ever deeper into the pockets of the loyal fans rather than extending the fan base.

Exactly -

These are the "collectors" and avid spenders. The fans will be enticed by the new card and line up to get one. They are looking for deals and consider themselves to be insiders when it comes to Disney.

Now, everytime they are presented with a purchase, they will contemplate using this card having been convinced there is something to gain here. The massive spending will be justified by the trinket distributed as a reward.

But who ultimately reaps the benefits? The merchant carrier and you can believe Disney as well. Eventually there will be an annual fee for this - similar to the free checking a bank first offers when it opens.

BeautyLLM
03-24-2003, 08:42 AM
Also, it wouldn't surprise me if Bank One was the merchant bank, after all, Disney just severed a long relationship with SunTrust on property and replaced them with BankOne.

I said something recently in another thread (can't find my exact words) but I would like to try to repeat it here. The Disney Company is in business for one reason, and that is to make money. Anyone who thinks otherwise is too caught up in the "magic". The real magic of Disney is creating the illusion that their main objective is to give us happiness and pleasure, whether that be by making a theme park experience fun, or creating a fairytale wedding or making a wonderful family movie. The more we enjoy Disney, the more money we spend! I am not being at negative here...I love the Disney parks and movies and music and pins and I am perfectly willing to pay for all of it. The old addage "you get what you pay for" is true here...you pay a premium, but you get quality in return. The Disney Company profits, and everyone's happy. They did this new credit card deal to make money, not to give us Disney points. They are a huge corporation...this shouldn't be so shocking to everyone....

MelissathePooh
03-24-2003, 10:42 AM
Everyone knows they (Disney) has done this to make money, and its obviously well within their right to do so as a business. I hope that Disney stays profitable. What the argument is that this transition from MKC to DC to Disney Visa has been misleading and does not offer the same benefits or advantages as what it is replacing.

MKC, which became DC was available to EVERYONE. Many loyal repeat guests/patrons of Disney are going to be excluded from the Disney Visa due to a variety of reasons, but thats okay with Disney because they will make more money on it. Its purely a business decision, but its not necessarily the best business decision in terms of public opinion from some of their most loyal patrons.

Does anyone know what the available benefits will be with the new Visa? What will the points be redeemable for?

Melissa

YoHo
03-24-2003, 11:06 AM
Just to Clarify, Disney Never used Sun Trust in California. Disneyland has Ugh, I can't remember then name. Its a California Bank.

So while Disney World's Affiliation may have to do with this, it isn't company wide.

Also, its interesting that Disneyland Very recently switched from Arrowhead Bottled Water to Disani. Well after the Coke exclusivity stuff wnet through.

disneychrista
03-24-2003, 11:07 AM
Quote from Disney Dream Rewards Dollars guide
Disney Dream Dollars are good for most Disney Merchandise, park tickets, hotel, food and more at participating locations. They can even be used in combination with special offers and discounts.


Once you've earned 20 Disney Dream Reward Dollars you can redeem depending on where you would like to spend them.
*A reward certificate good at Walt Disney Resort and Disney Cruise Line, available in denominations of 10 reward dollars.
*A reward certificate good at Disneyland Resort available in denominations of 10 reward dollars.
*A reward card good within the US at Disney Store, Disneystore.com, Disney Catolag available in denominations of 10 or 20 reward dollars.

CasualObserver
03-24-2003, 11:48 AM
Originally posted by BeautyLLM
I said something recently in another thread (can't find my exact words) but I would like to try to repeat it here. The Disney Company is in business for [B]one reason, and that is to make money. Anyone who thinks otherwise is too caught up in the "magic".

My problem with this has nothing to do with the illusion that Disney is not a business. It is, instead, from a business perspective that is the root of my disagreement.

Disney mgmt is operating from a purely short-term perspective -- i.e. Let's get this big payment from Bank One and make the quarter look better.

I would rather see them create programs to expand their base and, thereby, increase the profits of the company in the long term. Taking away MKC and replacing it with the paid DC, then taking away the DC and replacing it with the Disney Visa results in continually reducing the base.

Expanding the fan base for the long run will result in greater profitability for Disney.


Casual Observer

BeautyLLM
03-24-2003, 03:20 PM
I agree with you on this CO...

Expanding the fan base for the long run will result in greater profitability for Disney.

but I disagree with you on this...

Taking away MKC and replacing it with the paid DC, then taking away the DC and replacing it with the Disney Visa results in continually reducing the base.

for several reasons...

*most of the people who participated in DC were already loyal Disney fans who were happy to get some discounts on Disney stuff. These people will grumble, but for the most part I bet they will keep coming back.

*many of the people who currently shop at TDS or go to WDW or DL have no clue what DC is...I can't tell you how many times I have used my DC card at TDS and had a guest ask me what it was.

*lately (as someone posted earlier in this thread), DC discounts have been very poor. You do better with the AP discounts and the Amex discounts. Unless you have children to shop for, there is nothing to buy at TDS, so DC is useless there. People who don't have an AP or an Amex can get better deals with Mousesavers codes than they ever could with DC.

*I think the lower attendance at WDW(according to what I have read, attendance really isn't down at DL) has more to do with the weak economy we are experiencing and possibly fear of terrorism which may be inhibiting people from flying.

So, yes, Disney needs to do something to increase the fan base, but I don't see where doing away with a basically useless "discount" club and adding a credit card and is going to hurt them in the long run.

raidermatt
03-24-2003, 04:29 PM
Just think, if Disney had just offered both the DC and Visa card... True, but sadly, they are not.

Regarding the deal between Bank One and Disney, its hard to say exactly what the arrangement is, but BeautyLLM's description is probably pretty close. Its very possible, however, that Bank One does not share the interest or fees with Disney at all. In many of these reward deals, the issuing credit card company (in this case, Bank One), pays the partner (in this case, Disney), a set amount for each reward point or dollar EARNED.

So its possible that Disney IS getting paid each time you use the card, and only Bank One loses out when the balance is paid off at the end of the month.

That said...
most of the people who participated in DC were already loyal Disney fans who were happy to get some discounts on Disney stuff. These people will grumble, but for the most part I bet they will keep coming back. Quite a questionable strategy for a service company, dontcha think?
The real magic of Disney is creating the illusion that their main objective is to give us happiness and pleasure, whether that be by making a theme park experience fun, or creating a fairytale wedding or making a wonderful family movie. Yet so many can easily see through this illusion when it comes to the Visa for DC/AMEX swap. Seems like the magician needs some better tricks!

Disney Dream Dollars are good for most Disney Merchandise, park tickets, hotel, food and more at participating locations. One thing I'm curious about are the restrictions. The word 'most' is used, yet I didn't see in the materials what the reward dollars could not be used for. I suspect any restrictions are extremely limited, but am still curious...

This is the first time that I have seen anything (of course internet BB excluded) saying that the Visa was a replacement for the Disney Club. With all of the opinions floating around, mixed with the real info, its easy to miss this stuff. But the clippings posted by D-R are consistent with Disney's statements last year when it was announced DC was going away.

BeautyLLM
03-24-2003, 07:12 PM
Quite a questionable strategy for a service company, dontcha think?

I wasn't suggesting that this was a strategy, I was just stating that I don't think that Disney is going to lose alot of loyal fans due to discontinuation of the DC program.

Yet so many can easily see through this illusion when it comes to the Visa for DC/AMEX swap. Seems like the magician needs some better tricks!

Again, their main concern is the bottom line. Why does everyone seem so surprised by this?

CasualObserver
03-24-2003, 08:20 PM
Originally posted by BeautyLLM
*most of the people who participated in DC were already loyal Disney fans who were happy to get some discounts on Disney stuff. These people will grumble, but for the most part I bet they will keep coming back.

*many of the people who currently shop at TDS or go to WDW or DL have no clue what DC is...I can't tell you how many times I have used my DC card at TDS and had a guest ask me what it was.

[/B]

My point is that Disney started out with a fan-base builder: MKC which could beobtained for free and just flat-out encouraged people to come to the parks. Then they dropped that to the DC which basically required $250 in purchases in order to start to pay off the initial fee. This is not something that a new fan is going to do. The new fan is going to first visit the parks, then buy memory items during the trip. This is the first example of switching from a fan expansion philosophy to an "exploit the existing base" philosophy. Now, they dropped the DC because after $250 in purchases, Disney wasn't getting the good end of the deal (10% off). Instead, they switch to the Visa which has a 1% "reward". This means that the same Disney fan must spend $2999 in order to get a $29.99 plush. Is a new fan willing to drop 3 grand with a Disney they haven't yet come to love?

Basically, they have increased the committment by an order of magnitude required by someone in order to get the same return.


*lately (as someone posted earlier in this thread), DC discounts have been very poor. You do better with the AP discounts and the Amex discounts. Unless you have children to shop for, there is nothing to buy at TDS, so DC is useless there. People who don't have an AP or an Amex can get better deals with Mousesavers codes than they ever could with DC.


Yet another reason to back up my assertion that Disney is attempting to put more revenue burden on fewer people. MKC was an excellent value, DC was not so great, Visa even less.

For you AP holders, I would be concerned. There is already storm clouds on the horizon in the form of Disney Mgmt unhappy that AP holders are about the only visitors to DCA. I'm sure they are well into the search for a way to dip deeper into your pockets. <


*I think the lower attendance at WDW(according to what I have read, attendance really isn't down at DL) has more to do with the weak economy we are experiencing and possibly fear of terrorism which may be inhibiting people from flying.


First, I never said that WDW attendance had anything to do with Visa.

Second, I don't by into Mgmt's line that WDW is bad solely because the ecomony is down. If that were true, then other parks would be suffering as well, but Universal is up as are other parks. That line is simply more Mgmt finger-pointing. The economy is down, 9/11 happened, but other parks are up, why not Disney?
I say it has a lot to do with percieved value.

Casual Observer

freediverdude
03-24-2003, 08:58 PM
I don't know if this is true or not, but another thing I was thinking about the attendance drop, is that WDW has become so huge, with so many theme parks, and water parks, and shopping and dining venues, and on and on it goes, with umpteen million different ticket options and packages and everything, that even contemplating a WDW trip for a lot of families just seems overwhelming once they start to look into it. WDW is something, that if you don't know very much about it, becomes a major investment in not only money, but major time planning something like that. In comparison, some of the other parks seem much simpler to just book a nearby hotel and visit that park, with much simpler ticket decisions. Not that I think the other parks really compare to Disney in certain ways, but I think to the general public, sometimes it seems simpler and less expensive to visit one of these other places, and not have to take around a week off with major expense and planning to visit someplace like WDW. It may seem simpler to a lot of people to just pick up and spend a long weekend at Universal or the Busch parks. You would have to know Disney pretty well to be able to take a short weekend trip there and get much out of it I think. I'm wondering with maybe more uncertain times, people are getting less willing to commit to a longer, more involved and expensive vacation. If this IS the case, I'm not sure how Disney would get around this, except maybe trying to advertise the different resort/theme park areas of Disney as separate smaller vacations or something. Something like a promotion for "Hey, spend 2 nights at an Epcot area resort, and visit both Epcot and Disney Studios, with special 3 day ticket!" or something like that. Or maybe Disney thinks they are better off sticking to pushing the week-long vacations, thinking it will get better, which it might, who knows.

raidermatt
03-25-2003, 12:10 PM
Again, their main concern is the bottom line. Why does everyone seem so surprised by this? Nobody is surprised by this. What IS surprising is how some fail to consider the possibility that there is more to analyzing these types of programs than just figureing what the bottom line impact will be this quarter or this year.

A classic example was cutting EE. It immediately had a positve impact to the bottom line. Those who were already booked and paid still came, and Disney saved on operational costs.

Great move, right? After all, we can see that Disney is concerned with the bottom line, right?

Oops.

Disney didn't think very many guests would decide not to stay on-site just because EE went away. But they were very wrong. Bookings suffered, which had a carry-down effect to attendance.

Now, you may think that the elimination of DC will have no such impact, and you maybe right. But those who disagree are not forgetting about the bottom line, they just think the long toerm impact to the bottom line will be something other than what you expect.

YoHo
03-25-2003, 12:54 PM
Will somebody PLEASE confirm for me whether The Disney Club card is gone or not. Half the posters here say its gonna stay and half of them are saying its gone. Somebody quote me a legitimate source saying its gone RIGHT NOW. Otherwise half of the complaints here are baseless.

And just to Clarify, MKC was gotten for free if you worked for a Disney partner company. MKC Gold cards were paid for and had significantly better discounts and value.

IF The Disney CLub card is still kicking around, then The Disney Visa becomes not so big a deal especially if you can stack rewards with Discounts and cheaper DC vacations with 6 Month's no interest etc.

hopemax
03-25-2003, 01:27 PM
http://disneyclub.disney.go.com/images/TourImages/faq.html

YoHo
03-25-2003, 01:37 PM
Thankyou, now let the anger continue.

disneychrista
03-25-2003, 01:54 PM
Disney Club is still alive but barely breathing. Time of Death expected Dec 31, 2003, 11:59:59pm

DancingBear
03-27-2003, 06:33 AM
A few points:

--The statement was made earlier that MKC started as a benefit for loyal fans. My understandings was that MKC was started as a promotional program offered through major employers. Since it was free to those company's employees, the program was not directed to loyal fans. The publicly available pay membership option was, I believe (and I was such a paid member), a secondary use for the program.

--Comparisons to the AMEX program are meaningless. The AMEX deal expired. Who knows what happened in the negotiations between Disney and AMEX.

--A disproportionate number of DIS Board members were Disney Club members, but in my experience helping friends plan WDW trips, the program was not well-known. I am sure that the Visa will be more widely distributed and promoted.

--Doing away with the Disney Club, and enticing those loyal members over to the Visa, had to be part of the Visa program negotiations. It would be very attractive for Bank One to get immediate access to these loyal customers, and Bank One wouldn't want some competing program out there diluting the strength of the Visa program.

--It seems to me that Disney has been taking many, many steps to overhaul its marketing efforts for WDW---codes, postcards, come-back rates, getting all of your info when you call CRO, etc. Undoubtedly there will be some missteps, and some decisions will prove wrong (EE), but I wouldn't assume that all of these issues aren't being considered by the powers that be.

BeautyLLM
03-27-2003, 07:37 AM
When was EE eliminated?

DancingBear
03-27-2003, 10:36 AM
EE was eliminated sometime after 9/11 (I believe around the end of 2001) and renamed (Magic Hour) and restored in Fall 2002.

raidermatt
03-27-2003, 12:03 PM
Comparisons to the AMEX program are meaningless. The AMEX deal expired. Who knows what happened in the negotiations between Disney and AMEX. They are not meaningless to a customer.

The AMEX deal expired because Disney chose another route, taking a deal they liked better.

Doing away with the Disney Club, and enticing those loyal members over to the Visa, had to be part of the Visa program negotiations. It would be very attractive for Bank One to get immediate access to these loyal customers, and Bank One wouldn't want some competing program out there diluting the strength of the Visa program. If the DC was such a small group of customers, as you stated previously, this should have been of little concern.

Further, if there is value in loyal customers, is there not a significant risk in taking a program they enjoy away from them? And replacing it with something many of them will not qualify for?

It seems to me that Disney has been taking many, many steps to overhaul its marketing efforts for WDW---codes, postcards, come-back rates, getting all of your info when you call CRO, etc. Undoubtedly there will be some missteps, and some decisions will prove wrong (EE), but I wouldn't assume that all of these issues aren't being considered by the powers that be. Nothing wrong with marketing efforts, but the problem comes when the value of something as significant to guest purchase decisions as EE is so blatantly mis-judged, and seen only as part of a marketing overhaul.

It does not prove the Disney Visa deal is a bad move overall, but it does bring into serious question Disney's overall understanding of their guests needs and wants (the importance of which is the first thing taught in most "Intro to Marketing" courses).

KNWVIKING
03-27-2003, 12:36 PM
"Second, I don't by into Mgmt's line that WDW is bad solely because the ecomony is down. If that were true, then other parks would be suffering as well, but Universal is up as are other parks. That line is simply more Mgmt finger-pointing. The economy is down, 9/11 happened, but other parks are up, why not Disney?"

IMO, people go to Central Florida because of WDW. The economy,war,terror,etc has absolutely affected travel, especially air and international. IOA/US offer a great product,on a much smaller scale. It offers a great addition to a WDW trip, especially to travels that make frequent WDW trips. I don't believe the increase at IOA is due to people forgoing a WDW trip,but rather adding an IOA trip to a WDW trip. In other words, less people are traveling to Central florida/WDW because of recent events, but more of those that do go are adding a visit to IOA/US.