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View Full Version : are plug in personal fans allowed? other battery powered devices?


pixielizzie
08-14-2012, 01:47 PM
I can't remember if I can bring a small fan for my stateroom? Hot flashing is an issue for my partner. What about battery powered devices? Thanks!pirate:

lundve
08-14-2012, 01:56 PM
My youngest needs the fan for white noise or he will not sleep. We packed a smallish fan in our luggage and used it each night. We plugged it in off one of the outlets in the desk and sat it on the floor. HTH

pixielizzie
08-14-2012, 02:01 PM
That does help!:hug:

Itinkso
08-14-2012, 02:03 PM
We requested and used an air purifier in our SPH cabin on the Magic. The room steward brought it in on embarkation day and we used it continuously; the provided white noise from it was a plus!

Clotho
08-14-2012, 03:56 PM
You mean they supplied you with an air purifier? I had no idea that was an option?!

Itinkso
08-14-2012, 04:19 PM
You mean they supplied you with an air purifier? I had no idea that was an option?!

It was when we sailed in 2005. It had been suggested to request one for the white noise factor due to having a connecting room but came in handy because our TA had flowers delivered to our cabin and DD and I unfortunately have major allergies. We gave away the flowers to a family on deck but the air purifier sure did help!

kuhltiffany
08-14-2012, 05:38 PM
I took a travel white noise machine with me when we were on the Dream in May. We used it every night, so when people ask about noise in our Aft room we honestly have no idea what they're talking about:lmao:

pixielizzie
08-15-2012, 03:02 PM
I guess I was confused because you can't bring irons so I thought all plug-in items were forbidden but now that I think about it you can bring lap tops, cameras, mp3 players...duh!:rotfl:
Anyone know about battery powered device i.e. hand held fans? I guess I'm paranoid that it will be considered a weapon...:blush:

DisneyDee27
08-15-2012, 03:14 PM
I guess I was confused because you can't bring irons so I thought all plug-in items were forbidden but now that I think about it you can bring lap tops, cameras, mp3 players...duh!:rotfl:
Anyone know about battery powered device i.e. hand held fans? I guess I'm paranoid that it will be considered a weapon...:blush:
I bought a small 6" fan for the cruise. I honestly never used it after the first night. The AC was awesome. It was a plug in and I had no questions or concerns from the staff or room steward. I packed it in my checked luggage so I didn't have to worry about the security check. I'm sure you can bring a handheld fan. The port security may ask what it is but once they see it's not a weapon you should be fine.
:)
Dee

mareed
08-15-2012, 10:45 PM
I copied this from DisneyCruise.com but didn't bookmark the page - must have been somewhere that they listed prohibited and allowed items, because I marked fishing equipment as prohibited.

Allowed:
A small portable fan. However, please contact Guest Services to have the Chief Electrician approve the use of your particular appliance in the stateroom.

magrudersmakes3
08-16-2012, 07:46 AM
I always bring a travel fan everywhere I go for the white noise. I brought an extension cord along and asked the room steward about how to get it checked. She took a look at it and said she would note it, but it would be fine.

mrsfuzzmo
08-16-2012, 11:23 AM
The reasoning behind no irons is of course the fire hazard. As long as your fan isn't running at over !00 degrees, you'll be fine :):lmao:

CandyMandy
08-16-2012, 01:26 PM
Allowed:
• A small portable fan. However, please contact Guest Services to have the Chief Electrician approve the use of your particular appliance in the stateroom.

Great - one more bureaucratic thing to deal with right at the start of a cruise.

We should get a couple of hundred guests of so on the same cruise flooding guest services with phone calls right after getting into their staterooms, all asking for the Chief Electrician to come make sure they are in compliance when they plug in their half watt whatever. The complaints about delays in said Chief Electrician getting around to a given cabin (and the fact that particular staff member would be less than happy after going to the 80th cabin or so) would put a quick end to that policy. :lmao:

Cruise
08-16-2012, 03:46 PM
Great - one more bureaucratic thing to deal with right at the start of a cruise.

We should get a couple of hundred guests of so on the same cruise flooding guest services with phone calls right after getting into their staterooms, all asking for the Chief Electrician to come make sure they are in complaince when they plug in their half watt whatever. The complaints about delays in said Chief Electrician getting around to a given cabin (and the fact that particular staff member would be less than happy after going to the 80th cabin or so) would put a quick end to that policy. :lmao:

Better than a few thousand people flooding the life boat stations due to an electrical fire. I've seen the condition of some cords and appliances that people think are "okay" and it's frankly quite scary.

CandyMandy
08-16-2012, 04:31 PM
Better than a few thousand people flooding the life boat stations due to an electrical fire. I've seen the condition of some cords and appliances that people think are "okay" and it's frankly quite scary.

Modern cruise ships are not wired like a 19th century tenement. Two words that describe one of the primary differences:

CIRCUIT BREAKER.

And I've seen these trip on cruise ships, when a neighboring cabin plugged in something with a large enough amperage draw (like a standard household iron). If individually inspecting passenger plug ins that have made it onboard through prior outside other screening was critical to cruise ship fire safety, every line would do it.

And if you study cruise ship fires, the overwhelming majority are caused by accidents outside cabins. The one noteworthy one that was caused by a passenger in their cabin had nothing to do with with an electrical item. Instead, it was the result of something that Disney should but still stubbornly refuses to ban:

BALCONY SMOKING.

And here is an example of the results of a fire started by the latter, what a smoker on a baclony caused on the Star Princess on March 23, 2006:

http://www.cruiselawnews.com/uploads/image/Liffridge-43(2).jpg

http://cruiseshipfires.com/Ships/Star_Princess_Fire_2.jpg

One person died as a result of this. Several others were hospitalized with serious smoke inhalation injuries. The final cost to Princess owner Carnival (in terms of damage and cancelled cruises) was over $34 million dollars.

The final report on this determined the general area in which the fire started and that the smoker who started the fire in all likehood knows they were responsible.

But to no surprise, that person has never come forward.

mhsjax
08-16-2012, 05:52 PM
Modern cruise ships are not wired like a 19th century tenement. Two words that describe one of the primary differences:

CIRCUIT BREAKER.

And I've seen these trip on cruise ships, when a neighboring cabin plugged in something with a large enough amperage draw (like a standard household iron). If individually inspecting passenger plugs ins that have made it onboard through prior outside other screening was critical to cruise ship fire safety, every line would do it.

And if you study cruise ship fires, the overwhelming majority are caused by accidents outside cabins. The one noteworthy one that was caused by a passenger in their cabin has nothing to do with with an electrical item. Instead, it was the result of something that Disney should but still stubbornly refuses to ban:

BALCONY SMOKING.

And here is an example of the results of a fire started by the latter, what a smoker on a baclony caused on the Star Princess on March 23, 2006:

http://www.cruiselawnews.com/uploads/image/Liffridge-43(2).jpg

http://cruiseshipfires.com/Ships/Star_Princess_Fire_2.jpg

One person died as a result of this. Several others were hospitalized with serious smoke inhalation injuries. The final cost to Princess owner Carnival (in terms of damage and cancelled cruises) was over $34 million dollars.

The final report on this determined the general area in which the fire started and that the smoker who started the fire in all likehood knows they were responsible.

But to no surprise, that person has never come forward.

I am terrified every time I see or smell a person smoking on their balcony. This is one of the reasons people shouldn't leave items on the balcony. Person above is smoking, and like an idiot throws it over, person 2 decks below has an article of clothing out to dry, it catches on fire. I think they should ban smoking on balconies. PERIOD. Have a smoking area, or club or whatever, but NO SMOKING ON BALCONIES. I saw at least one butt on my balcony each morning on our last cruise. It scares the crap out of me.

CandyMandy
08-16-2012, 09:10 PM
I saw at least one butt on my balcony each morning on our last cruise. It scares the crap out of me.

I hear you and the fact you found smoker residue on your balcony (ugh) shows that there are smokers on DCL (and certainly other lines) who do what I see drivers doing all the time - throwing their still smoldering butt out the window. When those sorts of people go on cruises (including DCL) the "toss it" behavior continues, probably exacerbated by the idea "I'm surrounded by water so this is perfectly safe."

Outside the secondary smoke/stench issues non smokers with balconies have to often have to deal with on DCL, and the "yuck" factor you experienced, when is this cruise line going to understand the risk they are also taking by still allowing smoking on balconies? What sort of accident is going to have to happen before Disney wakes up?

Tonka's Skipper
08-17-2012, 08:37 AM
The reasoning behind no irons is of course the fire hazard. As long as your fan isn't running at over !00 degrees, you'll be fine :):lmao:

The reason for a CM/electrical to examine the fan is not heat from normal use. Its to be sure the fan has a *auto stop* if it is knocked or falls over.

Many fires are caused but fans falling over, the the motor over heating due to the resistance to the fan blades.

Its not about DCL trying to cause guests more bureaucratic stuff on the cruise. The engineering staff has plenty of other things to do!:thumbsup2

AKK

CandyMandy
08-18-2012, 05:16 PM
Many fires are caused but fans falling over, the the motor over heating due to the resistance to the fan blades.

Given our highly litigious society, it has become virtually impossible to purchase an electrical appliance in the US (including portable fans) that is not UL listed. The below link is to UL/AMSI standard 507, which covers fans. If those with engineering knowledge read it, they will see getting a fan UL listed specifically includes locked rotor tests, which are designed to exactly replicate the conditions a motor is subjected to when the fan blades are immbolized. The test determines if the motor windings reach unsafe temperature levels. If they do, the fan fails and does not receive a UL listing. :teacher:

Interestingly, the UL 507 standard does not require any so-called "auto-stop" features. So per the prior post, a DCL "electrical engineer" could conceptually reject the use of a fan that has passed some of the most rigorous safety testing known to man. :rolleyes:

http://bbs.dianyuan.com/bbs/u/31/1121733973.pdf