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View Full Version : Attraction lines with a walker?


Ktharee
04-23-2012, 12:07 PM
My 69 year old mother recently had hip surgery and will be attempting Disney World with us using a walker. Is there a spot at most attractions that she could wait at with a cast member while the rest of us wait on line, where she would then be able to join us to ride along? Any help is greatly appreciated. :goodvibes

powellrj
04-23-2012, 12:26 PM
Would she be willing to use an ECV instead of a walker? I have used a walker many times, but WDW can be really crowded and you tend to walk slower and need to concentrate when you are using one and I think it would be easier to just use an ECV.

JennyWren
04-23-2012, 12:29 PM
If you go to Guest Relations and explain her condition, they will give you a Guest Assistance Pass. The pass will help you gain access to whatever necessary accommidations she will need at each attraction.

Ktharee
04-23-2012, 12:38 PM
Would she be willing to use an ECV instead of a walker? I have used a walker many times, but WDW can be really crowded and you tend to walk slower and need to concentrate when you are using one and I think it would be easier to just use an ECV.

Thank you for the advice, but she will not use an ECV. She's never even driven a car and is not confident in her ability to operate one. There is no talking to her about it.:( The walker she is using has wheels and she moves fairly well with it. We've also suggested the wheelchair, but she believes it will be better for her to walk, albeit slower. She has a cane as well.

Ktharee
04-23-2012, 12:39 PM
If you go to Guest Relations and explain her condition, they will give you a Guest Assistance Pass. The pass will help you gain access to whatever necessary accommidations she will need at each attraction.

Thank you for that information, I did not know that. :thumbsup2

Mama Who
04-23-2012, 01:07 PM
Thank you for that information, I did not know that. :thumbsup2

There's a whole sticky post here with info on the GAC. Take a few minutes to read the sticky. It will really, really help.

dzorn
04-23-2012, 01:34 PM
My 69 year old mother recently had hip surgery and will be attempting Disney World with us using a walker. Is there a spot at most attractions that she could wait at with a cast member while the rest of us wait on line, where she would then be able to join us to ride along? Any help is greatly appreciated. :goodvibes

There really is not a way for her to join you in the regular lines as they wrap around.

Denise in MI

crashbb
04-23-2012, 01:47 PM
If you go to Guest Relations and explain her condition, they will give you a Guest Assistance Pass. The pass will help you gain access to whatever necessary accommidations she will need at each attraction.

Unfortunately, for stamina issues (which is sounds like this is), the accommodation is for the guest to use an ECV or wheelchair, the OP's mother will not use.

OP - would your mother be willing to use the wheelchair, but, when she feels like walking, use it was a walker (i.e. push the chair)?

Ktharee
04-23-2012, 02:27 PM
There's a whole sticky post here with info on the GAC. Take a few minutes to read the sticky. It will really, really help.

thank you very much, I will read up on that! :)

Ktharee
04-23-2012, 02:27 PM
There really is not a way for her to join you in the regular lines as they wrap around.

Denise in MI

Ok, I understand. Thank you!:goodvibes

Ktharee
04-23-2012, 02:30 PM
Unfortunately, for stamina issues (which is sounds like this is), the accommodation is for the guest to use an ECV or wheelchair, the OP's mother will not use.

OP - would your mother be willing to use the wheelchair, but, when she feels like walking, use it was a walker (i.e. push the chair)?

You know, she just might have to. I've spoken to her and her concerns really lie in that she's afraid my Dad is going to knock into people while pushing her around and that stress is really going to affect her enjoyment. We've decided that after day one, she will see how it goes. If it's too much with the cane/walker combo, we'll rent a chair. I told her not worry, everything will be fine and I won't let Dad push her around. haha

Thank you everyone for the advice and input, much appreciated! :goodvibes

Cheshire Figment
04-23-2012, 03:10 PM
The lines for almost all attractions at WDW are "mainstreamed". This means that the queue is set up to allow wheelchairs and/or ECVs to go through the line just as a person without a mobility problem. As it was built prior to the ADA, the Magic Kingdom is most likely to have non-mainstreamed lines. Some attractions, such as Splash Mountain and Haunted Mansion you will go part way through the regular queue and then be diverted. Other attractions, such as Big Thunder Mountain or SpaceShip Earth you will initially be directed to an accessible entrance.

All the theaters are set up with seats (usually in the back row) removed so a wheelchair or ECV can pull into a space and there will be regular seating on either side of the space for the others in the party.

Where there are quantity limits on space, or other limitation involving accessibility, you may have to wait longer to see a show or ride an attraction than people without disabilities.

The normal (and official) response of Guest Relations to people with mobility and/or stamina issues is to recommend rental of a wheelchair or ECV. The Guest Assistance Card (GAC) is intended for "invisible" disabilities not related to mobility or stamina. A wheelchair or ECV is sufficient to notify Cast Members of special assistance normally needed. However, if a person has other issues, such as auditory or visual, they would probably also need a GAC.

Note that a GAC is not intended to allow bypassing of lines, and it so states on the card itself. The only people who will get the special Front Of The Line GAC are where a terminal or medically fragile child is traveling on a trip from Make A Wish or similar foundation.

Basically a person has a certain amount of energy available to them daily. If they relax during the day the amount of energy available will increase; when they sleep at night they recharge their system,

However, when in pain energy is used up much faster than in normal conditions. If you become exhausted, with by what you have done or, more importantly, what you have done while in pain your system will not recharge to the original energy level overnight and you are starting the next day with a lower amount of energy available.

You might pick a location at least a half mile from where she lives and ask her would she like to walk there. If she hesitates, then say "and back", and of she is still not sure then add "at least three times in a row".

Once around the World Showcase Lagoon Promenade is more than 1 miles; most people tend to average 8 - 12 miles per day at WDW.

utterrandomness
04-23-2012, 03:56 PM
Basically a person has a certain amount of energy available to them daily. If they relax during the day the amount of energy available will increase; when they sleep at night they recharge their system,

However, when in pain energy is used up much faster than in normal conditions. If you become exhausted, with by what you have done or, more importantly, what you have done while in pain your system will not recharge to the original energy level overnight and you are starting the next day with a lower amount of energy available.


Once around the World Showcase Lagoon Promenade is more than 1 miles; most people tend to average 8 - 12 miles per day at WDW.

I find Spoon Theory is a good way to explain these ideas to people, it's fairly easy to find just by googling. I really recommend looking it up.

I Love Pluto
04-23-2012, 04:27 PM
A rollator - which has a seat - is a GREAT alternative to a walker. I use an ECV. When I''m not riding on it - I take the rollator with me. Instant seat! :thumbsup2

ttintagel
04-24-2012, 03:41 PM
The lines for almost all attractions at WDW are "mainstreamed". This means that the queue is set up to allow wheelchairs and/or ECVs to go through the line just as a person without a mobility problem.

You know, I keep hearing this about "almost all attractions," and I have to say, it doesn't match up with my experience at all. When I visited WDW in a wheelchair less than a year ago, I only visited three attractions where a CM didn't come out and direct me to another entrance before I even attempted to join the queue.

For the OP, might your mother be interested in using one of those rollator walkers with a built-in seat?
(http://www.amazon.com/Medline-Deluxe-Folding-Rollator-Walker/dp/B0007VO08U) Then, she could take a rest when she needed to. I think they can go in queues like a regular walker - someone correct me if I'm wrong.