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Majkman
04-12-2012, 09:23 PM
I think I'll hang out over here in the disAbilities section, because I know Suw from MN, can be very informative as other moderators, and not get flamed badly for my concerns.

I am 46 years old and will be making my 45th venture to the Happiest Place on Earth. This April is 42nd anniversary of my open heart surgery. The last 10 years I have been through 4 pacemakers. Of course the rides that I do ride have all the warning signs, and I walk right past them as I have done so for decades.

The concern that I have is the heat and the long exposure that I may be thru in June. I would like to qualify for a GAC card, but not at the expense of not being able to ride the thrill rides. I'm more concerned about the lengthy lines in the heat.

I guess I would just go to Guest relations and explain my situations, with the understanding that I've ridden these rides since I was a kid and would like to continue to do so. Would I need a doctor's note? I certainly have proof of the pacemakers.

The rides are exciting and I've ridden them hundreds of times before, but the thrill rides discourage those with heart ailments, and I can see the representative banning me from those.


oh, what to do,

Have a MAGICAL DAY,

Andy

LockShockBarrel
04-13-2012, 12:00 AM
The warnings are there as just that, warnings. They aren't there as restrictions like height. However it's my understanding that by bordering a ride with a warning against it's advice (neck/back problems, heart trouble, pregnancy) you are in effect saying "I see this warning and choose to go against it, therefore I accept the responsibility of anything that may happen in regards to my medical issues."

There isn't really a GAC for heat, only an accomedation to wait in a covered line and nearly all of the queues are covered. Most of the sun and heat exposure you will encounter will be between rides and waiting in other lines, such as those for character greetings or food carts. A GAC does not restrict someone from a ride in any way. Someone could get a GAC to avoid stairs but it wouldn't prevent them from riding anything so long as they were able to board the ride vehicle.

Having the pacemaker does not qualify you for a GAC, just like autism, ADHD, diabetes, etc does not qualify you. It is not based on diagnosis, but on what accomedations you would need. You do not need a doctor's note, you need to be able to explain clearly to a CM an accomedation that would help you. For instance "I had knee surgery" will not explain "I need to avoid stairs and need moving walkways stopped to safely board a ride vehicle".

I would say based on my experience reading through these boards and my experience in the park that planning and FPs will help you more than anything, that absolutely you can try to get the GAC to help with covered lines but I don't think you'll find you need to use it much, and that (not to sound rude) if you choose to ignore the warnings posted at the rides, it's all on you.

Cheshire Figment
04-13-2012, 12:18 AM
1. They will not ban you from anything. The warnings are warnings, not something stronger.

2. The only time a person is not allowed on a ride is if they present a danger to other Guests.

3. You do not need any sort of "proof", including a doctor's note, to get a GAC.

4. You have to explain your needs and they will issue a GAC that will best suit your needs.

5. A GAC is not intended to allow you to skip lines, and of course does not affect the distance between attractions.

disneylandkitkat
04-13-2012, 12:33 AM
I have a premium anual pass. I go almost every weekend. I have had open heart surgery twice and a stint once. They will give u a stamp with a wheel chair on it. Pretty much u get all of the perks of being in a wheel chair with out actually having one. At disneyland alot of ride are shorter waits but some are longer but have an alternative wait area if you want. At DCA how it is all wheel chair assesible the card doesn't help much there BUT U CAN MENSION IF STAIRS ARE A PROBLEM THEY WILL GIVE U A STAMP THAT WILL HELP IF THE RIDE HAS STAIRS. They will let u ride all the rides. It will not have what ur exact problem is on the card. I ride every ride every weekend noone has ever told me I couldn't ride a certain ride because I have a GAC.

dclfun
04-13-2012, 11:07 AM
I have a premium anual pass. I go almost every weekend. I have had open heart surgery twice and a stint once. They will give u a stamp with a wheel chair on it. Pretty much u get all of the perks of being in a wheel chair with out actually having one. At disneyland alot of ride are shorter waits but some are longer but have an alternative wait area if you want. At DCA how it is all wheel chair assesible the card doesn't help much there BUT U CAN MENSION IF STAIRS ARE A PROBLEM THEY WILL GIVE U A STAMP THAT WILL HELP IF THE RIDE HAS STAIRS. They will let u ride all the rides. It will not have what ur exact problem is on the card. I ride every ride every weekend noone has ever told me I couldn't ride a certain ride because I have a GAC.

Please do not post what stamp someone *can* get. The OP needs to explain needs, not ask for a particular stamp which may or may not even be available.

Majkman
04-13-2012, 02:30 PM
Thank you disneylandkitkat for the information. I was initially looking to nsee what, and if there would POSSIBLY be options that MIGHT be given to me by Guest Services that wouldn't restrict my ability to ride the rides I choose to.

I'm glad someone understands the daily grinds and headaches that are associated with our disabilities.

For those who don't understand, heart disease is just that....a disability. Eating right, exercising, watching less TV, not riding thrill rides.....none of that will cure it. Certain things can slow the process down, other things, such as extended time in the sun, drinking too much alcohol, seditary lifestyles do contribute to it.

It's not contagious, you won't catch it by touching a door handle after I do, I can assure you that I won't hurt anybody. I was just looking for information, that if I choose to aid my visit to WDW, would a trip to Guest relations be a waste of time.

I of course started my original post by stating I wasn't looking to start a flame, but there are those who feel the need to have their opinions heard whether it answers the questions or not. Too bad.:sad2:

utterrandomness
04-13-2012, 02:39 PM
I don't think people were trying to flame you, or to say that heart disease isn't a disability, they were merely stating that you do not need a diagnosis to get a GAC, you just need to tell them what you need.

I'm glad that you found this board to be a helpful place.

deegack
04-13-2012, 03:17 PM
I don't think people were trying to flame you, or to say that heart disease isn't a disability, they were merely stating that you do not need a diagnosis to get a GAC, you just need to tell them what you need.

I'm glad that you found this board to be a helpful place.

exactly, I read all the replies and none of them seem in anyway a flame, just an explanation of how the process works. I mean DD has CP but just saying that to a CM won't tell them what her needs are. They are different for every person.

LockShockBarrel
04-13-2012, 10:26 PM
I did not flame you or insinuate that you don't have a disability. I explained how the process worked, and most of it was information you can find in the GAC FAQs. I don't appreciate you implying that I don't "get it".

buffettgirl
04-14-2012, 09:03 AM
I also don't see any flaming. People are just tyring to help you understand what guest services is going to say when you get there. You say you are more concerned with lengthy lines in the heat, and people are just asking - what are you going to do the other 90% of your day when you're walking to and from rides, going to and from buses, etc etc. The line time is only a fraction of time spent in the park and there is no GAC that will prevent you from being in the heat all the rest of the day.

Take a peek at sue's sticky note at the top of this forum and then read post #6 for everything you need to know about a GAC. :)

seashoreCM
04-15-2012, 11:57 AM
Do a daydream, pretending you are touring through the park normally, minding your own business.

At what time or place would you expect you would have trouble* continuing on?

This is when you think of the need for a Guest Assistance Card. The card will be stamped or marked so CM's looking at the card can direct you or assist you in getting around the specific trouble. Such as stairs.

CMs may not stop you from riding at all simply because of your GAC.

* If the trouble is running out of energy or stamina while walking, Guest Relations will suggest that you get a wheelchair as the first remedy. Simply having a wheelchair does not require having a GAC. With rare exceptions, no remedies are entertained or granted when the trouble is having to defer to a later time your getting on a ride because there are other guests waiting.

kaytieeldr
04-15-2012, 07:59 PM
For those who don't understand, heart disease is just that....a disability.
Very respectfully, not having a particular disability doesn't mean people don't understand it, don't believe it's a genuine disability, or don't empathize with the disabled person.

Especially on THIS forum.

As others have said, Guest Assistance Cards are stamped based on the assignee's needs, not diagnosis or condition. Different people with pacemakers likely have different needs.

But there's no GAC that will shorten the distance between attractions or lessen the amount of time you spend out in the heat and sun getting from one ride or show to another. It's interesting that Disneyland apparently does things a certain way, but you're not going there. It makes more sense to take advice from Walt Disney World regulars :).

SueM in MN
04-16-2012, 08:20 AM
To clarify 2 things:

GAC CARD STAMPS:
The reason it was advised not to ask for a specific card is that describing your needs will help the CM issung the card know what you need and give you something that will help to meet them. Asking for a "wheelchair card" at WDW is going to let you avoid stairs, but since most attractions are wheelchair accessible thru the regular queue, it will not shorten your distance or even necessarily keep you in a cooler or less sunny spot.

Using a wheelchair entrance is not a "perk" as an earlier poster called it. Wheelchair entrances are there because the regular line is not wheelchair accessible in some way, so there is a different way in for guests to get around that. At Disneyland, many of the attractions were not built with accessibility in mind and there was not much space, so many attractions have regular entrances that are not accessible and there was not space to make them accessible.
DCA was built with accessible lines (called Mainstream Lines) , which was why the poster who wrote about that stamp said it "doesn't help much there."

WDW has the blessing of space, so even at MK and Epcot, where not all attractions were originally built to be accessible thru the main line, most were changed to become accessible.
MOST attractions at all of the WDW parks have Mainstream lines. This means the ones that don't have Mainstream lines may actually have a longer wait because anyone with mobility devices has no choice - they have to use that area because the regular way is not accessible.
And, where there is an impediment, such as stairs, in most cases, guests wait in the regular line. The 'pull off point' for guests to get around it is just before the impediment or just before boarding, not going in the exit or an alternative entrance.
In some cases, the wheelchair access will go around something that matters to you, such as stairs. In other cases, it won't matter to you because the point of the wheelchair access is to get a mobility device to the unload side of a track.

DISABILITIES:
This may muddy the waters more, but please hang on until the end and it should be clearer.
A heart condition is not a disability.
Neither is Down Syndrome, Cerebral Palsy, Asthma, COPD, Cancer, Autism, Diabetes or any other condition or disease anyone can name.

They are all conditions that can CAUSE or RESULT in disability that limits life activities, but just having the condition does not necessarily mean there are any disabilities connected with it. That is not just me saying it, that is how the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) is written.
For any condition, there are ranges. Some people with heart disease have no disability and get thru their regular life without problems.
That's me. I do have a heart condition which causes my heart rate to accelerate to a high level and I get short of breath with certain activity; basically climbing more than one flight of stairs or going up a long, steep ramp. Those things are easy to avoid, so I do to have any disability.
When I was pregnant, with the extra stress of pregnancy, I was not able to walk 100 feet without problem, despite being on medication to try to help the symptoms. So during pregnancy, I did have a disability related to heart disease.

My youngest daughter has Cerebral Palsy.
One of her doctors when she was little also had CP. In his case, it caused weakness in one leg, that he dealt with by using a brace on that leg. His CP did not affect his ability to function, so he did not consider it a disability.
In my DD's case, her CP causes some muscles to be very tight and others to be very loose. As a result of that, she can't walk, stand up or sit without support. As another result, she can't speak and needs assistance with fine motors skills like eating. Those are some of the disabilities associated with her CP.

This is not to say that any condition or disease doesn't exist, is not serious or doesn't cause disabilities. Just that, pretty much whatever condition someone mentions can be anywhere on that spectrum from no disability associated with it to severe disability. Just mentioning the condition does not say what the disability or needs are, so there is a lot of room for misundestanding and people may not get their needs met.

Piper
04-16-2012, 08:57 AM
To clarify 2 things:

GAC CARD STAMPS:
The reason it was advised not to ask for a specific card is that describing your needs will help the CM issung the card know what you need and give you something that will help to meet them. Asking for a "wheelchair card" at WDW is going to let you avoid stairs, but since most attractions are wheelchair accessible thru the regular queue, it will not shorten your distance or even necessarily keep you in a cooler or less sunny spot.

Using a wheelchair entrance is not a "perk" as an earlier poster called it. Wheelchair entrances are there because the regular line is not wheelchair accessible in some way, so there is a different way in for guests to get around that. At Disneyland, many of the attractions were not built with accessibility in mind and there was not much space, so many attractions have regular entrances that are not accessible and there was not space to make them accessible.
DCA was built with accessible lines (called Mainstream Lines) , which was why the poster who wrote about that stamp said it "doesn't help much there."

WDW has the blessing of space, so even at MK and Epcot, where not all attractions were originally built to be accessible thru the main line, most were changed to become accessible.
MOST attractions at all of the WDW parks have Mainstream lines. This means the ones that don't have Mainstream lines may actually have a longer wait because anyone with mobility devices has no choice - they have to use that area because the regular way is not accessible.
And, where there is an impediment, such as stairs, in most cases, guests wait in the regular line. The 'pull off point' for guests to get around it is just before the impediment or just before boarding, not going in the exit or an alternative entrance.
In some cases, the wheelchair access will go around something that matters to you, such as stairs. In other cases, it won't matter to you because the point of the wheelchair access is to get a mobility device to the unload side of a track.

DISABILITIES:
This may muddy the waters more, but please hang on until the end and it should be clearer.
A heart condition is not a disability.
Neither is Down Syndrome, Cerebral Palsy, Asthma, COPD, Cancer, Autism, Diabetes or any other condition or disease anyone can name.

They are all conditions that can CAUSE or RESULT in disability that limits life activities, but just having the condition does not necessarily mean there are any disabilities connected with it. That is not just me saying it, that is how the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) is written.
For any condition, there are ranges. Some people with heart disease have no disability and get thru their regular life without problems.
That's me. I do have a heart condition which causes my heart rate to accelerate to a high level and I get short of breath with certain activity; basically climbing more than one flight of stairs or going up a long, steep ramp. Those things are easy to avoid, so I do to have any disability.
When I was pregnant, with the extra stress of pregnancy, I was not able to walk 100 feet without problem, despite being on medication to try to help the symptoms. So during pregnancy, I did have a disability related to heart disease.

My youngest daughter has Cerebral Palsy.
One of her doctors when she was little also had CP. In his case, it caused weakness in one leg, that he dealt with by using a brace on that leg. His CP did not affect his ability to function, so he did not consider it a disability.
In my DD's case, her CP causes some muscles to be very tight and others to be very loose. As a result of that, she can't walk, stand up or sit without support. As another result, she can't speak and needs assistance with fine motors skills like eating. Those are some of the disabilities associated with her CP.

This is not to say that any condition or disease doesn't exist, is not serious or doesn't cause disabilities. Just that, pretty much whatever condition someone mentions can be anywhere on that spectrum from no disability associated with it to severe disability. Just mentioning the condition does not say what the disability or needs are, so there is a lot of room for misundestanding and people may not get their needs met.


:thumbsup2 Exactly! I have had most of the same "conditions" for most or all of my life. Sure, I had "bad days," but for the most part I was very active. As I have aged (and added a few new challenges due to degeneration and a stroke,) things have changed for me. I can no longer walk further than 30 feet, stand for more than 5 minutes, etc. I, too, have a congenital heart condition (2 valves in the heart don't quite function correctly and I have some "backwash" that can cause shortness of breath and fatigue.) I coped with it better in my younger days :lmao: but now I use wheels in my everyday life!

Just telling a CM what conditions I have would be of no use. Telling what I need in order to have a "good" day is what I do to get the help I need!

I Love Pluto
04-16-2012, 10:08 AM
I do agree with the last few statements. I have had the same disabilities for my entire life. I have only needed a GAC for them for the last 5 years.

I especially like the advice given by seashoreCM. Do a mental walk through the park. What is difficult for you? That's what you need a GAC for. :thumbsup2

disneylandkitkat
04-17-2012, 01:15 AM
It seems like alot of people think u are walking though the park like a normal person. With heart dissease I sit on a bench in the shade go on a ride most of the time sit while in the line. Get off the ride have to sit some more then walk to the train go around a couple time finnally go on another ride then start the process again with heart problems ur not walking around the park going on ride after ride. I do agree with the op people can be so rude.

smidgy
04-17-2012, 01:59 AM
To clarify 2 things:

GAC CARD STAMPS:
The reason it was advised not to ask for a specific card is that describing your needs will help the CM issung the card know what you need and give you something that will help to meet them. Asking for a "wheelchair card" at WDW is going to let you avoid stairs, but since most attractions are wheelchair accessible thru the regular queue, it will not shorten your distance or even necessarily keep you in a cooler or less sunny spot.

Using a wheelchair entrance is not a "perk" as an earlier poster called it. Wheelchair entrances are there because the regular line is not wheelchair accessible in some way, so there is a different way in for guests to get around that. At Disneyland, many of the attractions were not built with accessibility in mind and there was not much space, so many attractions have regular entrances that are not accessible and there was not space to make them accessible.
DCA was built with accessible lines (called Mainstream Lines) , which was why the poster who wrote about that stamp said it "doesn't help much there."

WDW has the blessing of space, so even at MK and Epcot, where not all attractions were originally built to be accessible thru the main line, most were changed to become accessible.
MOST attractions at all of the WDW parks have Mainstream lines. This means the ones that don't have Mainstream lines may actually have a longer wait because anyone with mobility devices has no choice - they have to use that area because the regular way is not accessible.
And, where there is an impediment, such as stairs, in most cases, guests wait in the regular line. The 'pull off point' for guests to get around it is just before the impediment or just before boarding, not going in the exit or an alternative entrance.
In some cases, the wheelchair access will go around something that matters to you, such as stairs. In other cases, it won't matter to you because the point of the wheelchair access is to get a mobility device to the unload side of a track.

DISABILITIES:
This may muddy the waters more, but please hang on until the end and it should be clearer.
A heart condition is not a disability.
Neither is Down Syndrome, Cerebral Palsy, Asthma, COPD, Cancer, Autism, Diabetes or any other condition or disease anyone can name.

They are all conditions that can CAUSE or RESULT in disability that limits life activities, but just having the condition does not necessarily mean there are any disabilities connected with it. That is not just me saying it, that is how the ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) is written.
For any condition, there are ranges. Some people with heart disease have no disability and get thru their regular life without problems.
That's me. I do have a heart condition which causes my heart rate to accelerate to a high level and I get short of breath with certain activity; basically climbing more than one flight of stairs or going up a long, steep ramp. Those things are easy to avoid, so I do to have any disability.
When I was pregnant, with the extra stress of pregnancy, I was not able to walk 100 feet without problem, despite being on medication to try to help the symptoms. So during pregnancy, I did have a disability related to heart disease.

My youngest daughter has Cerebral Palsy.
One of her doctors when she was little also had CP. In his case, it caused weakness in one leg, that he dealt with by using a brace on that leg. His CP did not affect his ability to function, so he did not consider it a disability.
In my DD's case, her CP causes some muscles to be very tight and others to be very loose. As a result of that, she can't walk, stand up or sit without support. As another result, she can't speak and needs assistance with fine motors skills like eating. Those are some of the disabilities associated with her CP.

This is not to say that any condition or disease doesn't exist, is not serious or doesn't cause disabilities. Just that, pretty much whatever condition someone mentions can be anywhere on that spectrum from no disability associated with it to severe disability. Just mentioning the condition does not say what the disability or needs are, so there is a lot of room for misundestanding and people may not get their needs met.

I must say, I have never read anything so succinct and easy to understand. I dont' think I've ever heard anything explained so perfectly.

smidgy
04-17-2012, 02:10 AM
It seems like alot of people think u are walking though the park like a normal person. With heart dissease I sit on a bench in the shade go on a ride most of the time sit while in the line. Get off the ride have to sit some more then walk to the train go around a couple time finnally go on another ride then start the process again with heart problems ur not walking around the park going on ride after ride. I do agree with the op people can be so rude.

people are not rude. they are trying to help us. they are explaining what exactly a GAC is.

they are saying that a person needs to go to guest services and communicate to the CM exactly what it is they need that may be different from what the ordinary guest experiences.

the poster who tried (in a rather unique way, I might add) to help out by saying "do a daydream, pretend you are touring through the park normally. what do you need?
was only trying to help...
hubby and I were talking just yesterday about whether or not we will get a GAC for his low vision. and we talked about each ride and/or attraction, and what it would or would not do for us.
seashoreCM was not insinuating that you are walking throught the park like a normal person. she meant to imagine walking through the park,like normal FOR YOU, and think: what do YOU need?
the people on the disabilites board are very helpful.

kaytieeldr
04-17-2012, 02:14 AM
It seems like alot of people think u are walking though the park like a normal person. With heart dissease I sit on a bench in the shade go on a ride most of the time sit while in the line. Get off the ride have to sit some more then walk to the train go around a couple time finnally go on another ride then start the process again with heart problems ur not walking around the park going on ride after ride. I do agree with the op people can be so rude.
Nobody's being rude. People are being factual. It's regrettable that you see rudeness where there's none.

The entire Disneyland Resort is about the same size as Disney's Hollywood Studios in Florida. Magic Kingdom is 23% larger than Disneyland.


Everything is more spread out.
There's more walking between attractions.
Few, if any, queues require waiting out in the heat/sun.
While a GAC with a place to sit and wait might help the OP once he's at the attraction and based on his needs, it's not going to help him get between the attractions.
Getting between the attractions is more stressful and requires more stamina than waiting in the lines.
Disney's advice regarding stamina issues is for the affected person to use a wheelchair or ECV - and I guarantee this will not compel the CMs to ban the OP from riding.

Isabel57
04-17-2012, 03:33 AM
http://www.infoocean.info/avatar3.jpgWould I need a doctor's note? I certainly have proof of the pacemakers.

SueM in MN
04-17-2012, 06:42 AM
I must say, I have never read anything so succinct and easy to understand. I dont' think I've ever heard anything explained so perfectly.
Thank you.
Nobody's being rude. People are being factual. It's regrettable that you see rudeness where there's none.

The entire Disneyland Resort is about the same size as Disney's Hollywood Studios in Florida. Magic Kingdom is 23% larger than Disneyland.


Everything is more spread out.
There's more walking between attractions.
Few, if any, queues require waiting out in the heat/sun.
While a GAC with a place to sit and wait might help the OP once he's at the attraction and based on his needs, it's not going to help him get between the attractions.
Getting between the attractions is more stressful and requires more stamina than waiting in the lines.
Disney's advice regarding stamina issues is for the affected person to use a wheelchair or ECV - and I guarantee this will not compel the CMs to ban the OP from riding.

::yes::
The distances are way more at WDW.
People no have used pedometers while there have done anywhere from 3 to 9 miles of walking A DAY.
Most of that is between attractions, not in lines.
The distance around World Showcase is a mile and guests can easily walk 1/2 mile or more from the parking or bus area just to get into the park. Even some of the ride queues involve more that 1/4 mile of walking - even if there is no wait. A GAC will not shorten that distance.
Someone who is worried only about the attractions is not going to do well getting around the parks, so that is what we are trying to make sure the OP realizes.

The warnings are out there for people to make the decisions themselves. The CMs do not know why the wheelchair or ECV is being used and don't judge whether people can go on an attra tion based on that.
http://www.infoocean.info/avatar3.jpgWould I need a doctor's note? I certainly have proof of the pacemakers.
no.
Check out post 6 of the disABILITIES FAQs thread near the top of this board or follow the link in my signature.
people are not rude. they are trying to help us. they are explaining what exactly a GAC is.

they are saying that a person needs to go to guest services and communicate to the CM exactly what it is they need that may be different from what the ordinary guest experiences.

the poster who tried (in a rather unique way, I might add) to help out by saying "do a daydream, pretend you are touring through the park normally. what do you need?
was only trying to help...
hubby and I were talking just yesterday about whether or not we will get a GAC for his low vision. and we talked about each ride and/or attraction, and what it would or would not do for us.
seashoreCM was not insinuating that you are walking throught the park like a normal person. she meant to imagine walking through the park,like normal FOR YOU, and think: what do YOU need?
the people on the disabilites board are very helpful.
::yes::

buffettgirl
04-17-2012, 09:27 AM
yes yes yes, a thousand times yes. "Do a daydream" is pretty much what I say when I'm talking to other parents who have kids with diabetes and who are wondering if they should get a GAC. The answer is different for everyone. Think about what would be needed in your typical day at Disney, think about all possible scenarios and how you'd handle them (good and bad) and then think about what Disney might be able to do to help. Many times the answer becomes "nothing".

I think the info here saves people a whole lot of aggravation because if nothing else we're trying to help people assess their needs prior to arrival.

I'll give you a perfect 'for instance'. My child also has low vision issues and I'm currently thinking about what he might need. Perhaps we'll ask for up close seating at shows (of which we'll probably only do one show.. ) but the majority of his issues have revolved around walking in the very dark (for him) queue lines. Because his eyes never adjust to the light and dark the way ours do a queue that we enter in the dark, stays dark. Could a GAC help? Probably not, since any alternate entry would most likely also be dark. Could a mini flashlight help? 100% it would help more than anything. Do I need Disney to do anything? nope. (unless I get flack for carrying a flashlight...) Will we have some issues in the park at night? Yes. Can a GAC do anything? No. So this is what my thought process is like. It's like this mental list that is constantly going and by the time we get to WDW the list will be complete and I'll know exactly what I need to ask for with the GAC - what my specific needs are for my child. It won't be "My child has low vision" because that doesn't tell them anything.

And lastly - Sue rocks the socks off this forum. She needs a public thank you for all she does.

goofieslonglostsis
04-17-2012, 09:59 AM
It seems like alot of people think u are walking though the park like a normal person. With heart dissease I sit on a bench in the shade go on a ride most of the time sit while in the line. Get off the ride have to sit some more then walk to the train go around a couple time finnally go on another ride then start the process again with heart problems ur not walking around the park going on ride after ride. I do agree with the op people can be so rude.

Actually, I think both OP and yourself are perhaps being a bit sensitive here. Stamina is an issue for most here, if not all. Something as "innocent" as an allergy can have a huge impact on stamina. A "mere" usage of certain medication or "just" having a chronic pain will influence stamina. I find it rather shocking to assume that those that have tried to help out in this topic don't get that subject.

However, they don't dwell on it. Indeed, that might be one of the few things they could be "blamed" for. Such a thing is a far cry however from flaming or "not getting it". As someone with serious stamina issues (and yes; amongst many others included with a non "average" ticker a.k.a. heart) I am a firm believer that practicle information on which option there are and aren't there (for instance because they simply aren't realistic at WDW, at certain times of year etc.) is the most powerfull help and tool when trying to find out how to navigate parks with stamina issues.

And yes, the information given so far are all not just reality but the best ones in preparing for a trip. Will it result in perfect to each detail equality for all? No. Such a thing is a fairytale that nobody incl. WDW can provide. They do their best, aren't perfect in each and all, but definately aren't singling out those with stamina issues either. It is what it is. It isn't as it would be without any health issue what so ever, but then again such is life.

One does with what one has. When having stamina issues that will result in taking breaks, using mobility aids, slowing down and what not more. WDW can't do squat about that when the biggest energy sucker are the distances that one travels to and from. Heat issues; again something Disney does adress but can do very little about as long as they don't control the weather and most of the time will be spent going to and from. That's where limitations come into play and our own responsibility to also take our own part.

Honestly OP; take a breath, laugh and then think about it. Just pick any ol' disability or chronic illness and how one with said would do a park. There are very little out there that do not have to pace themselves, make adjustments and what not. On here it is a first hand experience like no other. When looking for support there is a great board on here for general disability/health topics. On this part it's aimed more towards how to do WDW. Many have spent their time trying to help OP out with that. Something that apparently has it's value depends on things that I somehow lost. Many of the people that have posted on this thread, I've come to know as very helpfull non judgemental folks. Folks that will even take out the time to privately help out and/or share stories through PM and what not. Back in the days -here grandma talking :rolleyes1 - when I first came here they did the same for me and had a huge impact on how enjoyfull my first trip was. I've been trying to repay ever since and know that I'm hardly an exception. These are mostly very nice, accepting, understanding people with very well intentions. Go crazy for a sec and reread the whole thread keeping in mind all means best and all will have their own stamina issues if not also heart issues. I can't come to any other conclusion than that you'ld have to find it was a bit off to accuse anybody of flaming, let alone not getting it.


For what's it's worth; the daydream-advice could very well be something that could be added to the stickies IMHO. VERY to the point, VERY clear and VERY easily to understand for those newbe's looking to learn what might be their personal hurdles at WDW and how to communicate this to Guest Services (and what to expect and what not).



Buffetgirl; have son try out counting steps and remembering movement directions everywhere he goes. Will be of no help a first time around -all being new- and some times afterwards -remembering all can take some time- but when doing an area for the 5th time it can be a great help to know it's 15 steps this way before he has to take 3 steps thataway. Each will take their own time before it becomes a bit of second nature that is a helpfull aid, but I've found it an amazing help at those moments my eyes leave me wondering. Have been doing it long enough now that when I am in a totally new surrounding, I can find my way on memory the 2nd or 3rth time. Most of which without conciously remembering numbers or directions of steps etc. Or by now in my case; how many spins -manual chair- or how many seconds -powerchair- a movement takes. It's second nature, comparable to no longer thinking about how my chair functions. Obviously this is not without risks :rolleyes1 on Main Street and more is needed there when seeing too little at any time, but it's a great tool to navigate lines when you also take some precautions to make sure there is some space left to not bump into masses when making a little mistake. I tend to inform those in front and behind me in line for certain rides when I know I might be blinded for some moments to not get too close, explaining those sight things and the fact that while I'm extremely carefull a powerchair does not stop on the dime. Never had anything but respectfull responses. And quite a hand full of youngsters that would respond with talking me through the whole line out of own initiative. *imagine a 3 year old seriously trying to talk me through the line*. :love::lmao:

buffettgirl
04-17-2012, 10:52 AM
Buffetgirl; have son try out counting steps and remembering movement directions everywhere he goes. Will be of no help a first time around -all being new- and some times afterwards -remembering all can take some time- but when doing an area for the 5th time it can be a great help to know it's 15 steps this way before he has to take 3 steps thataway. Each will take their own time before it becomes a bit of second nature that is a helpfull aid, but I've found it an amazing help at those moments my eyes leave me wondering. Have been doing it long enough now that when I am in a totally new surrounding, I can find my way on memory the 2nd or 3rth time. Most of which without conciously remembering numbers or directions of steps etc. Or by now in my case; how many spins -manual chair- or how many seconds -powerchair- a movement takes. It's second nature, comparable to no longer thinking about how my chair functions. Obviously this is not without risks :rolleyes1 on Main Street and more is needed there when seeing too little at any time, but it's a great tool to navigate lines when you also take some precautions to make sure there is some space left to not bump into masses when making a little mistake. I tend to inform those in front and behind me in line for certain rides when I know I might be blinded for some moments to not get too close, explaining those sight things and the fact that while I'm extremely carefull a powerchair does not stop on the dime. Never had anything but respectfull responses. And quite a hand full of youngsters that would respond with talking me through the whole line out of own initiative. *imagine a 3 year old seriously trying to talk me through the line*. :love::lmao:
ah, thank you for that. We're new to the whole vision thing, but we know it's progressive, so any tips that he can use now to help him later are extremely helpful. He had a hell of time last year on space mountain and if I remember R&R, because he simply couldn't see the floor in front of him. he did get bumped from behind by others on foot many times because he's young when he can't see he just stops. Not entirely their fault for walking into him, so we had to make sure that dh and I were a sandwich for him. lol. In normal light situations he's still pretty much ok (but not for distance vision,) so I think the dark situations just surprise him. So that's why we're trying to think of small flashlight that he can whip out when he needs it. That was something that was suggested to me after our visit last year.

Honestly, I can't think of any other forum where we can get so much help from so many families and people who honestly GET IT without anyone ever ever ever muttering "oh you poor thing."

goofieslonglostsis
04-17-2012, 11:30 AM
ah, thank you for that. We're new to the whole vision thing, but we know it's progressive, so any tips that he can use now to help him later are extremely helpful. He had a hell of time last year on space mountain and if I remember R&R, because he simply couldn't see the floor in front of him. he did get bumped from behind by others on foot many times because he's young when he can't see he just stops. Not entirely their fault for walking into him, so we had to make sure that dh and I were a sandwich for him. lol. In normal light situations he's still pretty much ok (but not for distance vision,) so I think the dark situations just surprise him. So that's why we're trying to think of small flashlight that he can whip out when he needs it. That was something that was suggested to me after our visit last year.

Changes like light to dark and vice versa can be very difficult for many to adjust to or takes (a lot) more time. Could very well be a thing for him. One of the reasons I'll never be friends with the Bug-line.

Flashlights are indeed great as in making things visual, although it might not help if getting adjusted takes more time (eyes still are in the dark). If too much light is an issue; sun glasses or for lighter problems wearing a cap is great. :)

Seeing how his situation unfortunately is progressive; might it be helpfull to look for experience from those dealing with (partial) blindness? Not only are they the experts in navigating when eye sight fails but I know folks where it also has been a great support to be able to talk to someone who's "been there". For both him and yourselfs as parents.

Ever considered discussing if a seeying eye dog might be beneficial to him now or in the future? It's a very personal thing obviously but maybe an option to explore? Not a reason to do it, but would mean the sandwich-job isn't just your job as parents anymore. ;)

Seeing as you are sandwiching anyway; for some it can work to keep in mind what vision there is left and have that work in your favour. For instance if he sees bright red the best; wear a red shirt when being the front sandwich. So if he does get disorientated, he knows what large easily to see colour he can look for and know it's his dad or mom. A simple tap would then be enough to ask your help which might leave him feeling more secure to do his thing -knowing he can find help if need be- and for you guys also to relax knowing he can find you. If his vision is already too poor for that or gets to poor for it; sounds work for some. I know of a girl who'ld have a tiny remote control in her pocket. If she'd use it, a receiver in dads or moms pocket would make a sound (recognisable for her but not desturbing in all kinds of situations) so she'ld know where mom or dad is by hearing the location of the sound. For her that made a big difference in feeling in control versus having to ask her parents where they were (or like she put it; my baby brother cries for mommy, I'm already 5 and a big girl not a baby).


Honestly, I can't think of any other forum where we can get so much help from so many families and people who honestly GET IT without anyone ever ever ever muttering "oh you poor thing."

*shakes head agreeingly*

buffettgirl
04-17-2012, 01:44 PM
thank for for so much great info (I hate that we've taken the thread OT but ..it is what it is).. I never thought that maybe a flashlight wouldn't help. arrg. His pupils almost have no reaction to light anymore but he doesnt' find the sunlight bothersome at all, just the dark.
we haven't contacted our local blindness agency yet but it is something that we will be doing withing the next year or so, because eventually he will need services at school in one capacity or another and they're going to be the ones to help us with what needs to happen. Right now it's mostly a low light issue and a loss of color and loss of distance. up close things are helped with magnifying glasses and reading glasses etc.

I Love Pluto
04-17-2012, 04:28 PM
It seems like alot of people think u are walking though the park like a normal person. With heart dissease I sit on a bench in the shade go on a ride most of the time sit while in the line. Get off the ride have to sit some more then walk to the train go around a couple time finnally go on another ride then start the process again with heart problems ur not walking around the park going on ride after ride. I do agree with the op people can be so rude.

Now - I, too, am taking offense.

I never said that you should imagine yourself running through the parks like there is nothing wrong with you.
I said - Imagine a walk through the parks - The things you have trouble with would be ON YOUR GAC.

DO NOT quote me erroneously. Thank you!

Chickenlady
04-17-2012, 05:07 PM
http://www.infoocean.info/avatar3.jpgWould I need a doctor's note? I certainly have proof of the pacemakers.

You do not need a doctor's note. CM are trained not to ask for such information. Your explanation will be enough.

disneylandkitkat
04-18-2012, 01:25 AM
Now - I, too, am taking offense.

I never said that you should imagine yourself running through the parks like there is nothing wrong with you.
I said - Imagine a walk through the parks - The things you have trouble with would be ON YOUR GAC.

DO NOT quote me erroneously. Thank you!

stating a fact about how i feel at the park is not quoting anyone. consittering i use gac every weekend along with my fiancee that uses it for another reason I have had almost 20 years of a gac every weekend i think i know how it works and yes i have been to walt disney world several times also. I feel like u r attacking me for no reason.

goofieslonglostsis
04-18-2012, 05:23 AM
stating a fact about how i feel at the park is not quoting anyone.

True.

Yet, when you go as far as to post "It seems like a lot of people think........" is no longer just posting a mere personal concerning statement but one that goes beyond oneself and extends to others. Which does come with the obvious result that some people can and in this case will react to it.

Personally, if it were just a personal "this is how I do the parks", I wouldn't have come out to post at that point either. Perhaps poor communication, but that exact part I just refered to made me react. Came across for me as you outing a sentiment that the used "a lot of people" can be read as "a lot of people on this thread". Which for me triggered enough to vent my opinion and experience and jump in for those that have posted and without a single one being left out; all mean very well and have yet to show real signs of not getting it.

kaytieeldr
04-18-2012, 10:49 AM
stating a fact about how i feel at the park is not quoting anyone. consittering i use gac every weekend along with my fiancee that uses it for another reason I have had almost 20 years of a gac every weekend i think i know how it works and yes i have been to walt disney world several times also. I feel like u r attacking me for no reason.
Respectfully, you know how your GAC works and how your fiancÚ's GAC works. That's it. You don't know how the OP's GAC will work (if he gets one - because, again, Walt Disney World's recommendation to guests with stamina issues is to use a wheelchair or ECV) even though you both have pacemakers because you are two different people with different needs.

I have to admit, I'm curious about some things you said earlier.
It seems like a lot of people think you are walking though the park like a normal personFirst, why do you think a person with a pacemaker isn't a 'normal' person? And you're aware this is the disABILITIES forum, right? So even the the responders don't have pacemakers, we or family members have disabilities.

With heart dissease I sit on a bench in the shade go on a ride most of the time sit while in the line. Where do you sit while in lines? Do you have a mobility assistance device, and if not, mightn't one help?

seashoreCM
04-18-2012, 07:47 PM
I have to admit, I'm curious about some things you said earlier.
First, why do you think a person with a pacemaker isn't a 'normal' person? ?
Way--all (well) ... We could redefine "normal" to refer to all those guests who don't need any special treatment (such as a GAC) to get around the parks and enjoy things. With a fairly broad definition of normal we might have canopies over all the queues to shield persons from the sun, cool air blown at everyone during hot weather (or all the queues indoors), a continuous bench following every twist and turn in the queue so some people could sit down and slide along. All the ride vehicles would be designed so ECV's could be rolled aboard with no CM intervention (and also fold down seats so those who did not bring an ECV or wheelchair would not have to stand). The end result of this is that the rides could handle far fewer guests over the course of a day. That is, many more guests won't be able to ride things of their choice at all that day.

Instead we have a somewhat narrower definition of normal and we have what we see at Disney today.

By the way, as far as shortening the walking distances, the 1963-64 New York Worlds Fair had chauffeured ECV's (they were gasoline powered) that you could hail like taxis to take you from (for example) It's a Small World to Carousel of Progress if you were unable or unwilling to walk.

LockShockBarrel
04-18-2012, 09:47 PM
So by the arguements presents through this thread...I should feel like people don't "get me" because they don't have my exact fainting issues and knee problems, therefore cannot give me accurate advice regarding them? :confused3

The OP didn't ask a "needs specific" question. Even if they did, it needs to be understood that lots of disablities/issues/quirks will fall under that "need" umbrella. There's a ton of reasons that someone might need to stay out of the sun, or not use stairs, or have a walkway slowed down. The disablity/issue/quirk is less important than the need.

disneylandkitkat
04-19-2012, 01:24 AM
Respectfully, you know how your GAC works and how your fiancÚ's GAC works. That's it. You don't know how the OP's GAC will work (if he gets one - because, again, Walt Disney World's recommendation to guests with stamina issues is to use a wheelchair or ECV) even though you both have pacemakers because you are two different people with different needs.

I have to admit, I'm curious about some things you said earlier.
First, why do you think a person with a pacemaker isn't a 'normal' person? And you're aware this is the disABILITIES forum, right? So even the the responders don't have pacemakers, we or family members have disabilities.

Where do you sit while in lines? Do you have a mobility assistance device, and if not, mightn't one help?

Where in this thread does it state I have a pace maker which I don't. I let the op know what I get doesn't mean they will get it too. I also mention they can get a stair stamp if that would help them. Normal ment its not easy like most getting from point a to point b I agree how it's a dissabillity board everyone has that problem maybe shouldn't of used thoughs words. I sit down in almost every que on the ground do a wheel chair wouldn't help because that won't make my heart stronger like walking will. Eeven though I sit alot I do alot of walking at the park just in short durations helps my heart.

kaytieeldr
04-19-2012, 07:38 AM
My mistake, then. I misread your post. I went back and read it again
I have a premium anual pass. I go almost every weekend. I have had open heart surgery twice and a stint once. They will give u a stamp with a wheel chair on it. Pretty much u get all of the perks of being in a wheel chair with out actually having one.
WDW's general response to guests with stamina issues is to use a mobility assistance device.
There are no perks to being in a wheelchair. Often, the wait is longer.
Having a wheelchair doesn't mean you have to sit in it every moment. It could be used as a walker, and as a seat only when necessary. With most lines constantly moving, this (or a walker with seat) seems more sensible than sitting on the floor and getting up every couple of minutes, only to walk a few feet and sit on the floor again.

goofieslonglostsis
04-19-2012, 07:42 AM
Where in this thread does it state I have a pace maker which I don't. I let the op know what I get doesn't mean they will get it too. I also mention they can get a stair stamp if that would help them. Normal ment its not easy like most getting from point a to point b I agree how it's a dissabillity board everyone has that problem maybe shouldn't of used thoughs words. I sit down in almost every que on the ground do a wheel chair wouldn't help because that won't make my heart stronger like walking will. Eeven though I sit alot I do alot of walking at the park just in short durations helps my heart.


In general;

- a wheelchair does not mean one only can use them while sitting in it 24/7. They can very well be used to walk behind and not use until somebody needs to sit down and/or break for whatever reason.
- just like how one can use said wheelchair, there are many other aids available that offer the same benefit of combined walking and resting/sitting where need be and/or better.




For the rest? Think it's best for the board and myself to not even get into that subject anymore. Not worth it.

goofieslonglostsis
04-19-2012, 07:47 AM
There are no perks to being in a wheelchair.

Let's not tell lies on here. There are perks. Always having room to put stuff and not lug around bags. To-tal-ly worth getting the chair. The perk of having it match your outfit. Perk of not needing to bother with that oh so tiring activity called walking. The perk of checking out guys butts in plain sight. The perk of so many people watching at you, talking about you and always have an opinion about you so basically being Famous if not a VIP. And the list goes on and on.

Off course none of those are WDW-offered, but who's nitpicking?



*disclaimer for those who need/want it; this is a personal view stated in a personal humor, writer is not responsible for your experiences in real and does not guarantee you any of the above happening to you*

SueM in MN
04-19-2012, 08:15 AM
I have a premium anual pass. I go almost every weekend. I have had open heart surgery twice and a stint once. They will give u a stamp with a wheel chair on it. Pretty much u get all of the perks of being in a wheel chair with out actually having one. At disneyland alot of ride are shorter waits but some are longer but have an alternative wait area if you want. At DCA how it is all wheel chair assesible the card doesn't help much there BUT U CAN MENSION IF STAIRS ARE A PROBLEM THEY WILL GIVE U A STAMP THAT WILL HELP IF THE RIDE HAS STAIRS. They will let u ride all the rides. It will not have what ur exact problem is on the card. I ride every ride every weekend noone has ever told me I couldn't ride a certain ride because I have a GAC.
I am quoting you because you have posted that you feel attacked. I do not feel anyone has attacked you, but want to try to explain why people have posted what they have ( not trying to read their minds, but reading what they wrote).

If I had a problem similar to the original poster and read this, my thought would be, "OK. If I get a GAC with those things, I am good. It will take care of my needs. I can even sit in lines. It doesn't help much at DCA, but this poster says he can avoid stairs, so it should be OK."

No one has said the OP should not request a GAC or does not need a GAC.
They have basically written, go to Guest Relations to explain your needs to get a card that best fits the needs.
They have gone on to explain that WDW is more like DCA - most of the lines are wheelchair accessible, so as you wrote yourself "how it is all wheel chair assesible the card doesn't help much there".
It seems like alot of people think u are walking though the park like a normal person. With heart dissease I sit on a bench in the shade go on a ride most of the time sit while in the line. Get off the ride have to sit some more then walk to the train go around a couple time finnally go on another ride then start the process again with heart problems ur not walking around the park going on ride after ride. I do agree with the op people can be so rude.
In most of the posts before this one, people have assumed that anyone who is worried about lines WILL have problems walking from place to place. So, they are not assuming anyone is walking around like a 'normal' person. They are assuming that the needs someone has in lines continue to be a problem outside of lines.

They are basically saying -"a GAC may help you in attractions, but don't forget about getting around between attractions. GACs won't help outside of lines."
So, there were a lot of mentions about how big the parks are, how much walking needs to be done just to get from place to place, how long some of the ride queues are and that a GAC won't change the distance walked, even if the wait is short. I didnt go back to review everything, but believe some people also mentioned that most queues don't have a place to sit while waiting unless the guest has a mobility device they can sit on while in line.

People have commented that WDW suggests that people who are worried about stamina in lines should consider a wheelchair or ECV because the distance between things is greater than the distance in lines.
This is a fact - stated on WDW's website and on their park maps.
stating a fact about how i feel at the park is not quoting anyone. consittering i use gac every weekend along with my fiancee that uses it for another reason I have had almost 20 years of a gac every weekend i think i know how it works and yes i have been to walt disney world several times also. I feel like u r attacking me for no reason.
People have posted that WDW is not like DL because WDW has mostly accessible lines. Suggesting that the OP talk about their needs to Guest Relations instead of just saying "I need this stamp" is not attacking.

I am making an assumption that someone who visits the DL parks every weekend is probably not getting a new GAC every weekend and probably doesn't have to answer a lot of questions when they get a new one.
I know that at WDW, they will give out GACs for longer duration of time (like valid for 3 months) to guests with annual passes who visit frequently. If someone already has a GAC and is just renewing it, the CM usually will not ask a lot of questions. They ask a few basic things and assume that the old GAC met the needs, so the same thing should be fine.

I know also that some people in the early days of this board read about a certain stamp on their GAC, asked for that stamp and then came back and posted about the difficulties they still had. As they posted, it became clear that they would have benefitted from other assistance, but they hadn't thought about those tags since they thought they knew what they needed and asked for that.
That's one of the reasons why we request that people not post what stamps they got - people tend to think "oh, I need that stamp," but if they explained their needs to the CM at Guest Relations, something else would be suggested.

Also, there are many people who really would benefit from using a wheelchair or ECV, which is why people recommend them. People even pointed out that using one does not mean the CMs will question whether a guest using one should be riding things with warnings. WDW puts the warnings out the and it is up to the guest ( with guidance from their doctor) to decide if the warning means they should ride or not.

Just because you have a mobility device doesn't mean it has to be used all the time. Some people use ECVs and wheelchairs to get from place to place and then walk in lines. Some who need to walk, but need to sit occasionally have gotten the recommendation to consider a rollator (walker with a seat). Taking something to sit on is the only way to guarantee a seat while waiting.
Those things are ways to conserve energy so the guest can do more in the park.

Where in this thread does it state I have a pace maker which I don't. I let the op know what I get doesn't mean they will get it too. I also mention they can get a stair stamp if that would help them. Normal ment its not easy like most getting from point a to point b I agree how it's a dissabillity board everyone has that problem maybe shouldn't of used thoughs words. I sit down in almost every que on the ground do a wheel chair wouldn't help because that won't make my heart stronger like walking will. Eeven though I sit alot I do alot of walking at the park just in short durations helps my heart.
You mentioned several times that you sit in line - most people would not assume that meant sitting on the ground. Most people would assume it means having a place to sit WITHOUT sitting on the ground.

I have seen CMs at WDW tell people they need to stand up when they have been sitting on the fround or on handrails. This has included long lines that a moving slowly, like Soarin' and attractions where people are standing in a preshow or gathering place, like the Muppet Show, Laugh Floor or Ellen's Energy Adventure.
CMs said that sitting on the ground was considered a tripping hazard for othe guests. So, even though you have been doing it successfully, I would not count on being able to do it in all cases. In addition, many people would have a difficult time getting up and down from the ground.

disneylandkitkat
04-19-2012, 11:27 PM
Just wanted to say sorry... I guess people didn't understand me completly and I didn't understand them.

disneylandkitkat
04-19-2012, 11:29 PM
My mistake, then. I misread your post. I went back and read it again

WDW's general response to guests with stamina issues is to use a mobility assistance device.
There are no perks to being in a wheelchair. Often, the wait is longer.
Having a wheelchair doesn't mean you have to sit in it every moment. It could be used as a walker, and as a seat only when necessary. With most lines constantly moving, this (or a walker with seat) seems more sensible than sitting on the floor and getting up every couple of minutes, only to walk a few feet and sit on the floor again.

sorry I thought u were attacking i guess u weren't. have a magical night or day

utterrandomness
04-19-2012, 11:32 PM
sorry I thought u were attacking i guess u weren't. have a magical night or day

It's generally okay to assume that no one on this board is trying to attack anyone. We mostly have really good intentions and just want people to be armed with the most useful information so they're better equipped to deal with their needs while at Disney. This isn't to say that there's never disputes over whose information is better, but I think this is one case where good intentions can be assumed.

I Love Pluto
04-20-2012, 01:13 PM
Good intentions CAN be assumed on this board. That's why we read it, that's why we post on it, and that's why we ask questions of others.

When I ask a question on this thread - or any other on the DIS boards - I get answers from people who CARE!

WHY else would any of us be here? :goodvibes

WantToGoNow
04-22-2012, 02:05 PM
Last October my dd27 got her first GAC after a CM asked her why she was leaving a line. We use FP when we can to minimize the standing in lines. The sign said 10 minutes so we thought she would be fine - once we got into the line and saw that it would be much longer. She told the CM why we were leaving and that we would get a FP and she was told to go to Guest Services and to ask for a GAC. Our trip was so much better because we didn't have to worry about her passing out all the time. She can walk all day - but she cant stand still for more than a few minutes without her blood pressure and heart rate dropping - which will be followed by her dropping as well. An ECV would be the obvious answer for her but she refuses to use one until she has to.