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View Full Version : Anyone take PB&J sandwiches through airport security?


marciemouse
04-04-2012, 10:04 AM
We are on a flight that is over our normal dinner time, so I was thinking of packing peanut butter and jelly sandwiches for our daughters. But I'm wondering if TSA will let them pass through? I'm thinking yes, but I don't want to bother if they're going to make me throw them away. TIA!

TDC Nala
04-04-2012, 10:06 AM
Yes, you can take sandwiches. You could not take jars of peanut butter or jelly, but you can take sandwiches.

The only thing you may want to watch out for is that if there is a peanut allergic person on your flight, the airline may ask that you not open or unwrap any peanut products onboard. So, if there's something else your children will eat, to be safe you should bring that instead of peanut butter, because you could end up bringing the sandwiches and then being unable to eat them on the flight.

I have a friend who just last month brought trail mix for the plane and was unable to open it onboard the flight due to an allergy announcement.

LaurenT
04-04-2012, 10:25 AM
Yes, you can take sandwiches. You could not take jars of peanut butter or jelly, but you can take sandwiches.

The only thing you may want to watch out for is that if there is a peanut allergic person on your flight, the airline may ask that you not open or unwrap any peanut
products onboard. So, if there's something else your children will eat, to be safe you should bring that instead of peanut butter, because you could end up bringing
the sandwiches and then being unable to eat them on the flight.

I have a friend who just last month brought trail mix for the plane and
was unable to open it onboard the flight due to an allergy announcement.

This would have to be a very rare situation. I was a flight attendant for 5 years and never came across this. Also rather odd since for so many years a bag if peanuts was the snack of choice for most airlines.

marciemouse
04-04-2012, 10:29 AM
Thanks!

Hannathy
04-04-2012, 10:29 AM
Yes you can take them and eat them.
Eating peanut butter does not bother a peanut allergy person altho they will try to tell you otherwise. But peanut protein has to be in the air for it to be a risk and there is no peanut protein released form peanut butter.

They also can ask you not to eat but they can't force you not to eat them.

TDC Nala
04-04-2012, 10:38 AM
This would have to be a very rare situation. I was a flight attendant for 5 years and never came across this. Also rather odd since for so many years a bag if peanuts was the snack of choice for most airlines.

I've had it happen two or three times and my friend just came across it last month. I'm not comfortable with assuming it won't happen.

And yes, I believe it is true that they can only make a request. They can't force you not to eat the sandwiches or open peanut products. So if you're good with disregarding the request to feed your kids, it's likely you won't get arrested or anything like that, but most folks don't want to disregard the request.

Tropical Wilds
04-04-2012, 10:39 AM
The last several flights I've had to Disney, they've announced peanut allergies and asked that no peanut products be opened on the flight. We've been given 100 Calorie treats and cereal bars as our snacks.

While it might be unusual in general, flying to Disney, which is going to have a ton more people and children, and children being the ones who're most sensitive to peanuts and peanut allergies.

LaurenT
04-04-2012, 10:50 AM
Perhaps it's a new thing (well, new since I flew - over twenty years ago).
Still, all those flights and never an issue with anyone reacting to the peanut bags that were handed out to everyone. I guess I would honor the request, but I think it's a bit silly.

Tropical Wilds
04-04-2012, 10:50 AM
Yes you can take them and eat them.
Eating peanut butter does not bother a peanut allergy person altho they will try to tell you otherwise. But peanut protein has to be in the air for it to be a risk and there is no peanut protein released form peanut butter.

They also can ask you not to eat but they can't force you not to eat them.

Why would you defy a request like that? There are a million snacks that you could have that aren't peanut-based. Making a stand like "you can't make me not eat it" when the reason you're asked to do so is for the health and comfort of somebody on the plane seems a little... Selfish. Especially since the person who has the allergy could be seated adjacent to you and it could very well present a very real issue for them.

Just be considerate and plan ahead... Pack fruit, rice cakes, jelly and fluff sandwiches, popcorn...

TDC Nala
04-04-2012, 10:54 AM
Southwest is the only current airline I can think of that still hands out peanuts as a matter of course. Airtran has been giving out pretzels and while you can select from a bunch of stuff on Jet Blue, they don't have peanuts. I don't think US Airways gave out any food. I'm not talking about long-haul flights but the short ones I've been on between DC and Orlando.

Tropical Wilds
04-04-2012, 10:58 AM
Southwest is the only current airline I can think of that still hands out peanuts as a matter of course. Airtran has been giving out pretzels and while you can select from a bunch of stuff on Jet Blue, they don't have peanuts. I don't think US Airways gave out any food. I'm not talking about long-haul flights but the short ones I've been on between DC and Orlando.

I can't remember the last time I got peanuts on Southwest and I fly them exclusively. I've gotten cereal bars, pretzels, and 100 Calorie Packs of Lorna Doone cookies.

thewesterberg
04-04-2012, 11:01 AM
Delta has been handing out peanuts recently. The last few times I've flown with them (the latest being in February) I've received packages of peanuts on every flight.

KimK2006
04-04-2012, 11:01 AM
Also rather odd since for so many years a bag if peanuts was the snack of choice for most airlines.

That is exactly what I was thinking....

Hannathy
04-04-2012, 12:27 PM
Why would you defy a request like that? There are a million snacks that you could have that aren't peanut-based. Making a stand like "you can't make me not eat it" when the reason you're asked to do so is for the health and comfort of somebody on the plane seems a little... Selfish. Especially since the person who has the allergy could be seated adjacent to you and it could very well present a very real issue for them.

Just be considerate and plan ahead... Pack fruit, rice cakes, jelly and fluff sandwiches, popcorn...

And they should be considerate of others also!

I will eat my PB&J because there is no scientific reason not to. Me eating a PB&J does no harm to an allergy person unless they plan on grabbing it and eating it. Peanut butter does not release peanut protein into the air and that is what they react to. So I will not open a pack of peanuts right under their noses because that is a risk but I will eat my no risk to them sandwich.

serenitygr
04-04-2012, 12:43 PM
Delta has been handing out peanuts recently. The last few times I've flown with them (the latest being in February) I've received packages of peanuts on every flight.

Hi the westerberg! I was going to say the same thing- we flew Delta in February and were offered a bag of peanuts. (so were our 4 kids!) Then I noticed your name- are you by any chance from MN? (we are!)

LSUfan4444
04-04-2012, 12:49 PM
Yes, you can take sandwiches. You could not take jars of peanut butter or jelly, but you can take sandwiches.


Can someone please explain this logic?

bumbershoot
04-04-2012, 12:51 PM
Yes you can take them and eat them.
Eating peanut butter does not bother a peanut allergy person altho they will try to tell you otherwise. But peanut protein has to be in the air for it to be a risk and there is no peanut protein released form peanut butter.

They also can ask you not to eat but they can't force you not to eat them.

It might not harm a person, but it can SCARE a person. Imagine you're extremely allergic to something, and suddenly you can smell that something. You don't know if it's peanuts in a bag, peanut butter, or this new PB2 thing I keep hearing about on Weight Watchers that is peanut POWDER that you reconstitute with water to make PB less fatty.

Imagine what your thoughts are. Or if you're a parent of a very allergic child and you're smelling this, not knowing.

Don't you want to be KIND to that potential person?

Just eat it at the gate, where people can get away from you.

savvy?71
04-04-2012, 01:02 PM
We often bring food items through security/on plane either from home or purchased in airport. Liquids are the no-no. So I imagine any reasonable food item (not say, a crockpot of stew), would be allowed.

As for peanuts in-flight, ugh. No allergies here, I just can't stand them. We fly SW 2x a year (Disney & Vegas, and just got back from Vegas, in fact, a few days ago). Peanuts were offered, always are. SW actually keeps going around with their snack tray with various options (100 cal snacks, peanuts, pretzels, breakfast bars, etc...).

skilesare
04-04-2012, 01:07 PM
The only thing you may want to watch out for is that if there is a peanut allergic person on your flight, the airline may ask that you not open or unwrap any peanut products onboard.

Not sure if serious?:confused3

They've been passing out peanuts on planes for a hundred years. There is no way they could de-peanut a plane. The guy who sat in their seat an hour before probably spilled the peanut dust in the seat trying to lick the wrapper.

The World. lol

alcie27
04-04-2012, 01:08 PM
Couldn't you just use another nut butter or sun butter rather than peanut butter?

savvy?71
04-04-2012, 01:12 PM
I forgot to mention in my earlier post that on our Vegas flight, my mom brought a sleeve of Do-Si-Dos (peanut butter sandwich girl scout cookies) in her purse.

Woe to anyone who would have dared confiscate her Do Si Dos.

rachellm
04-04-2012, 01:12 PM
It might not harm a person, but it can SCARE a person. Imagine you're extremely allergic to something, and suddenly you can smell that something. You don't know if it's peanuts in a bag, peanut butter, or this new PB2 thing I keep hearing about on Weight Watchers that is peanut POWDER that you reconstitute with water to make PB less fatty.

Imagine what your thoughts are. Or if you're a parent of a very allergic child and you're smelling this, not knowing.

Don't you want to be KIND to that potential person?

Just eat it at the gate, where people can get away from you.

I've never met anyone with a peanut allergy that severe (my daugher has a class 4 peanut allergy and airborn is not a concern) but I know most people with such a serious allergy plan their flight times to avoid nut products as much as possible. Like taking the first flight in the am.

As for eating it at the gate - when I bring lunch foods for my kids I plan for them to eat them at their normal lunch time. Which is likely while we're in the air ... not while we're sitting at the gate. Plus you wouldn't know in advance if someone on your flight has a severe allergy. You wouldn't know that until an announcement was made on board.

As for scaring people - having a kid with allergies is scary. But you get used to it and you know what steps to take to keep your kids as safe as possible. So I can't imagine anyone panicing at the sight of my sandwich. And I'd be happy to explain to them that there was no risk :)

This is all irrelevant for me since we don't eat pb ;) but we take sunflower seed butter and jelly sandwiches on flights quite often.

Music City Mama
04-04-2012, 01:14 PM
And they should be considerate of others also!

I will eat my PB&J because there is no scientific reason not to. Me eating a PB&J does no harm to an allergy person unless they plan on grabbing it and eating it. Peanut butter does not release peanut protein into the air and that is what they react to. So I will not open a pack of peanuts right under their noses because that is a risk but I will eat my no risk to them sandwich.

What if you get peanut butter on your hands and you touch a surface my child touches? That WILL cause my child to react. I'm so not militant about other people eating peanuts/peanut butter (in fact, we still keep it in our house for DH and me), but it's the attitude about it that really bothers me. Unless you or someone you love (especially a child) has a potentially deadly allergy, you won't get it -- and I don't expect you to, and by all means, eat your precious peanut butter on a flight, but there are other ways for my child to react to peanut butter without ingesting it.

nicki.momof3
04-04-2012, 01:15 PM
Southwest is the only current airline I can think of that still hands out peanuts as a matter of course. Airtran has been giving out pretzels and while you can select from a bunch of stuff on Jet Blue, they don't have peanuts. I don't think US Airways gave out any food. I'm not talking about long-haul flights but the short ones I've been on between DC and Orlando.

Delta gives out peanuts (I had them in Dec.) on the detroit to orlando flight.

rachellm
04-04-2012, 01:15 PM
Couldn't you just use another nut butter or sun butter rather than peanut butter?

Sure that's possible. But other nut butters or sun butter don't really taste that much like PB. You can tell a difference. Plus - they're expensive. I wouldn't want to pay $5 for a jar of sun butter just so I wouldn't risk exposing anyone to nuts on a plane.

yankeepenny
04-04-2012, 01:22 PM
Perhaps it's a new thing (well, new since I flew - over twenty years ago).
Still, all those flights and never an issue with anyone reacting to the peanut bags that were handed out to everyone. I guess I would honor the request, but I think it's a bit silly.


silly? really?????:mad:

for some folks, just touching any object or furniture which may have crumbs or a small smear of the food could be life threatening. They can go straight into anaphalactic shock and if not treated quickly, could die as well.

I dont find the requests silly.

WDSearcher
04-04-2012, 01:22 PM
Can someone please explain this logic?
Sure. For the same reason that you can't bring bottles of water or other liquids or gels in amounts that large through security. I'm sure if you had a tube of PB or a packet of jelly that were under 3 oz and packed in your one-quart ziplock bag, no one would bat an eye. But if you had a full jar of jelly and a full jar of PB ... well ... there's a lot that can be hidden in that, if you're inclinded to do so.

And -- unrelated to the security thing -- why would you WANT to carry a full jar of PB and a full jar of jelly onto a plane? If it's just to have food for the kids during the flight, it's a whole lot easier to make the sandwiches before you leave and pack them already constructed than to break out PB, jelly, bread and knives on that little fold-down tray table. Not to mention the clean up after you've made the sandwiches, and making sure that the tray table is clean before you put a piece of bread down on it. :scared1:

And if you want to bring PB and jelly with you on the plane so that you can make your own sandwiches once you get to the resort, then I can't believe that the prices in Florida -- even at Disney -- are so much higher that it would be worth lugging the jars through airports rather than just buying them once you get to Florida.

:earsboy:

ILoveToRun
04-04-2012, 01:24 PM
As for eating it at the gate - when I bring lunch foods for my kids I plan for them to eat them at their normal lunch time. Which is likely while we're in the air ... not while we're sitting at the gate. Plus you wouldn't know in advance if someone on your flight has a severe allergy. You wouldn't know that until an announcement was made on board.


Maybe you could ask the podium if they know about any peanut ban before boarding. If there is, just eat at the gate. If not, then bring it. That way, it won't be a waste when you're on board and more important, there won't be any hungry kids.

chimilady
04-04-2012, 01:27 PM
This would have to be a very rare situation. I was a flight attendant for 5 years and never came across this. Also rather odd since for so many years a bag if peanuts was the snack of choice for most airlines.

I've only flown maybe 3 times int he last 4 years and I can tell you that I have had it happen twice. Kids today are more allergic than ever, and yes, more kids go through MCO than any other airport in the US.

Yes you can take them and eat them.
Eating peanut butter does not bother a peanut allergy person altho they will try to tell you otherwise. But peanut protein has to be in the air for it to be a risk and there is no peanut protein released form peanut butter.

They also can ask you not to eat but they can't force you not to eat them.

:scared1::scared1::scared1: It's like people are saying hey, I don't like peanutbutter but I'll just say I'm allergic. Peanut allergies are often deadly. Would you really be so selfish as to possibly kill another kid? Seriously? Perhaps you are correct, but perhaps kids wipe their mouths with their hands and smear it on the seat, or wipe their mouths on a napkin which then gets carted down the aisle right past a peanut allergic kid. Really? You would rather KILL a child on their way to the Happiest Place on Earth just so your kid can have PB? Wow.

WDSearcher
04-04-2012, 01:31 PM
Not sure if serious?:confused3

They've been passing out peanuts on planes for a hundred years. There is no way they could de-peanut a plane. The guy who sat in their seat an hour before probably spilled the peanut dust in the seat trying to lick the wrapper.

The World. lol
When was the last time you were on a flight? I did several Orlando-LAX flights last year, and none of them served peanuts. On a recent flight from Orlando to Houston, one of the flight attendants made an announcement that there was someone on the flight who was severely allergic to peanuts and requested that anyone within a certain group of rows not eat any peanut products. And they offered to move passengers either into or out of the "no peanuts" area if they requested it.

:earsboy:

SwiberFam
04-04-2012, 01:31 PM
You could buy Wowbutter, its made from soy if you are worried about other peoples allergies.

rachellm
04-04-2012, 01:33 PM
silly? really?????:mad:

for some folks, just touching any object or furniture which may have crumbs or a small smear of the food could be life threatening. They can go straight into anaphalactic shock and if not treated quickly, could die as well.

I dont find the requests silly.

I can't speak for someone else who used the word "silly." But I can sorta see the point.

First, I think people who are that severly allergic are very rare. It's not like the majority of people with peanut allergies will have an anaphalactic reaction to residue or airborne particles.

And for those that are truly that allergic - I can't see that making an announcement for one flight will make that much difference. Just because no one on your flight eats anything doesn't mean that you aren't sitting in the seat where someone ate a pb sandwich, some roasted peanuts and a reeses on the last flight. It's not like they're cleaning the planes that well in between flights.

I've never been on a flight where they made an annoucement to the whole plane. I have been on a flight where they asked the 2-3 rows around the person to refrain from eating peanuts - and if anyone refused they were ready to move people around to accomodate everyone.

stargazertechie
04-04-2012, 01:35 PM
This would have to be a very rare situation. I was a flight attendant for 5 years and never came across this. Also rather odd since for so many years a bag if peanuts was the snack of choice for most airlines.

No joke- my last 3 flights to/from florida have had a peanut allergy announcement.

savvy?71
04-04-2012, 01:40 PM
I would imagine the parent of a child who has a peanut allergy would inform the flight crew and the crew would make an announcement to help avoid any reactions.

I further dare to imagine that passengers wouldn't think twice about wanting to avoid a crisis, regardless of how unlikely/minor, if an announcement was made. Since I loathe peanuts/peanut butter, I certainly wouldn't pick that battle as my hill to die on "I WILL EAT MY PB SAMMICH!" And I am certain if asked, my mom would have refrained from eating her Do-Si-Dos. Not that there were many small children heading to Vegas last week.

It seems pretty simple & reasonable.

LaurenT
04-04-2012, 01:43 PM
silly? really?????:mad:

for some folks, just touching any object or furniture which may have crumbs or a small smear of the food could be life threatening. They can go straight into anaphalactic shock and if not treated quickly, could die as well.

I dont find the requests silly.

As I said, I flew for the airlines for 5 years. Never ever ever had any issue with anyone reacting to the peanuts we handed out or any peanut product anyone had brought on board. As has been said by PPs, there are sill airlines handing out peanuts today. As far as someone smearing some peanut grease on the seat and then another person's child putting their hand on it and then to their mouth..well...that could happen with someone on a previous flight when there was no peanut alert. So, yes, i think it's kind of silly because i don't think there's a genuine risk. As i also said, i would respect he request anyway.
If you can show me one documented case of a peanut reaction from someone on an airplane, i will change my mind.

thedonduck
04-04-2012, 01:52 PM
If you can show me one documented case of a peanut reaction from someone on an airplane, i will change my mind.

Not that I want to get involved in a PB argument , I was genuinely curious if there have been any problems with reactions on a flight :rolleyes1... google found me this

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18681085?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

disneychic2
04-04-2012, 01:54 PM
We often bring food items through security/on plane either from home or purchased in airport. Liquids are the no-no. So I imagine any reasonable food item (not say, a crockpot of stew), would be allowed.


:lmao::lmao::lmao:

I forgot to mention in my earlier post that on our Vegas flight, my mom brought a sleeve of Do-Si-Dos (peanut butter sandwich girl scout cookies) in her purse.

Woe to anyone who would have dared confiscate her Do Si Dos.


You seriously crack me up!!:rotfl2::rotfl2::rotfl2:


OP, I'll bet you didn't expect to raise such a ruckus when you asked your simple question, right? Anyway, DH and I take deli sandwiches that have been refrigerated overnight and they keep pretty cold in our insulated bag for enjoyment on the plane. I understand how important it is to feed your kids when they are hungry, so hopefully you'll find a good solution. Good luck!

Tropical Wilds
04-04-2012, 01:54 PM
And they should be considerate of others also!

I will eat my PB&J because there is no scientific reason not to. Me eating a PB&J does no harm to an allergy person unless they plan on grabbing it and eating it. Peanut butter does not release peanut protein into the air and that is what they react to. So I will not open a pack of peanuts right under their noses because that is a risk but I will eat my no risk to them sandwich.

They should be considerate of others by what... Not having a peanut allergy?

Again, I think it's a little selfish for you to make a decision that affects another person's heath and decide that you'll eat your sandwich, even when asked not to due to an allergy issue, because you've assessed a person you never met and their allergy and made a decision that could impact them very negatively in an area where they have no ability to get help simply because you want a PB&J. You can choose from hundreds of other snacks, but you'd choose something like this to make a stance on... For reasons that are beyond me... Instead of just doing the decent thing and having a different snack.

Sorry, I find this unfathomable, especially considering the environment, where the allergy sufferer could be a child. Is your sandwich really THAT important that you'll put another person in danger in an environment where they can't get immediate care?

All it takes is the flight attendant picking up your trash and touching the allergy-affected person. You touching the handle of the bathroom. The overhead compartment Having the person sit next to you or your family who're having the snack. Having kids who aren't as conscious of such things make a mess of their food.

Just do the decent thing and bring something other than a PB product.

I've never been on a flight where they made an annoucement to the whole plane. I have been on a flight where they asked the 2-3 rows around the person to refrain from eating peanuts - and if anyone refused they were ready to move people around to accomodate everyone.

How embarrassing for the person... It opens them up for being harassed, makes the whole plane privy to their personal medical condition, and if it's a kid, it could be really humiliating.

rachellm
04-04-2012, 02:01 PM
How embarrassing for the person... It opens them up for being harassed, makes the whole plane privy to their personal medical condition, and if it's a kid, it could be really humiliating.

It's not like they said - The kid in seat 19A has a peanut allergy, can you refrain from eating peanuts.

They just went row by row for a few rows (I don't know how many exactly) and explained that someone in the vicinity had an allergy. They asked if anyone had a problem refraining from eating peanut items and offered to reseat them if that was the case. No one knew who it was. No one had to share their medical history with the plane or be embarrassed.

It was really not a big deal.

DisneyMomma81
04-04-2012, 02:02 PM
silly? really?????:mad:

for some folks, just touching any object or furniture which may have crumbs or a small smear of the food could be life threatening. They can go straight into anaphalactic shock and if not treated quickly, could die as well.

I dont find the requests silly.

Then they better have their epi pen handy. My kids and I don't have any food allergies, just allergies to growing things outside, some years are worse than others, so far this year has been great so far.

kkandaj
04-04-2012, 02:03 PM
What if you get peanut butter on your hands and you touch a surface my child touches? That WILL cause my child to react. I'm so not militant about other people eating peanuts/peanut butter (in fact, we still keep it in our house for DH and me), but it's the attitude about it that really bothers me. Unless you or someone you love (especially a child) has a potentially deadly allergy, you won't get it -- and I don't expect you to, and by all means, eat your precious peanut butter on a flight, but there are other ways for my child to react to peanut butter without ingesting it.

Agree with this. The protein that IS in peanut butter can be smeared on seats, without you even being able to see it. If a child then gets that protein on their hands and wipes their mouth, that IS considered ingestion. And it can cause harm--and even death.

When making our flights for May, SWA asked about allergies. After telling them of DS's food allergies (peanut is 1 of 5), they said they will make an announcement requesting that no one eat peanut products and will let me on the plane early to wipe his/our seats down. I told her we do not need the announcement since our family will be creating a buffer around him and no one will be getting pb on him, but that I will need to make sure the seats are clean. Sadly, many adults don't know how to clean up after themselves on a plane. In my son's case, the cheez it's and m&m's that are left around can do just as much harm as the peanut products.

Until your child is laying lifeless in your arms, because of a reaction to a food, you may not "get it." I pray this never happens to any of you. It is horrible! And I can guarantee most of you would not like to see someone's child lifeless on an airplane. Especially over a sandwich???

OP--as a mom to a food allergy kid, the pb/jelly is okay. Just please make sure you have your children wash their hands (even with wipes) so that the food isn't smeared everywhere. Have a great trip!:wizard:

LMN
04-04-2012, 02:05 PM
I am sorry, but if my child had such a severe peanut allergy, I would not endanger their life by exposing them to so many people, such as on public transportation. I would certainly not expect or ask a plane full of total strangers to refrain from eating peanut products just for my child. Whatever happened to the days of inconveniencing yourself before you would ever ask others to be inconvienced??

kkandaj
04-04-2012, 02:19 PM
I am sorry, but if my child had such a severe peanut allergy, I would not endanger their life by exposing them to so many people, such as on public transportation. I would certainly not expect or ask a plane full of total strangers to refrain from eating peanut products just for my child. Whatever happened to the days of inconveniencing yourself before you would ever ask others to be inconvienced??

Just curious--do you expect a child with life threatening allergies to never leave their house? EVERYWHERE we go, there are people...the mall, the park, the grocery store, school, people eating everywhere. Are we supposed to hide our children from society because people think they have to eat at all times?

We don't ever ask anyone to not eat around our child (he has life threatening allergies to not only peanuts, but tree nuts, eggs, milk and soy), but we also can't keep him from LIVING a life. Not taking public transportation? What?

Though I would never wish this life on anyone, I would love for people to walk in our shoes for one day, so they would have a little bit of compassion. It's heartbreaking...from a child's perspective and a mother's perspective.

GenevieveRaqs
04-04-2012, 02:30 PM
Agree with this. The protein that IS in peanut butter can be smeared on seats, without you even being able to see it. If a child then gets that protein on their hands and wipes their mouth, that IS considered ingestion. And it can cause harm--and even death.



I hope this doesn't come across as argumentative (I don't like PB at all, and can take or leave peanuts in general, so you won't have a problem with me causing contamination on a plane!!). I'm genuinely curious...

I see this issue come up most often about planes. I assume this is because 1) peanuts were the traditional airplane snack for decades and 2) you're dealing with a small cabin and recycled air. But on this thread I've seen way more comments concerned with contact (peanut butter smeared on a seat, etc.) than with airborne particle issues. But wouldn't there be just as much risk of this if people eat their PB crackers and PBJ at home before arriving at the airport? I can't imagine trying to keep an allergic child from touching, well, anything, anywhere! The seats at the gate, the rail on the escalator...

We are lucky that my DS does not have any allergies (my DH is highly allergic to stone and core fruits), but he DOES have a rare, misunderstood and potentially life-threatening disease. I completely understand the parental fear of something happening to your child when you are so, so careful. I feel for those who have to deal with severe allergies.

WDSearcher
04-04-2012, 02:31 PM
I am sorry, but if my child had such a severe peanut allergy, I would not endanger their life by exposing them to so many people, such as on public transportation. I would certainly not expect or ask a plane full of total strangers to refrain from eating peanut products just for my child. Whatever happened to the days of inconveniencing yourself before you would ever ask others to be inconvienced??
If your kids don't have severe allergies, it's easy for you to say that. When you do have a kid with allergies, you actually tend to try your darnedest to help make their life as normal as possible, while taking the appropriate precautions and keeping a watchful eye.

I don't think it is a huge inconvenience or hardship to ask those few folks who may have tossed a bag of peanuts or a PB&J in their carry-on to refrain from eating it. It's not like everyone on the plane is packing PB&J and will perish if it cannot be consumed while flying. How many people is it affecting? A handful? Maybe? And, really, if it is a huge inconvenience or hardship to not be able to have peanuts during the flight, then I'm sure those folks can be moved to a more peanut-friendly part of the plane. Interestingly enough, I've heard of several people who died from eating peanuts. I've never heard of anyone who died from NOT eating peanuts. :rolleyes1

Whatever happened to the days of compromising a little so that everyone has a chance to enjoy life?

:earsboy:

goofy4tink
04-04-2012, 02:39 PM
This would have to be a very rare situation. I was a flight attendant for 5 years and never came across this. Also rather odd since for so many years a bag if peanuts was the snack of choice for most airlines.
In the past 10 years, I have had 5 flights that had FAs asking passengers not to open peanut products due to severe allergies onboard that flight. I fly probably just twice a year, sometimes three times a year.

Yes you can take them and eat them.
Eating peanut butter does not bother a peanut allergy person altho they will try to tell you otherwise. But peanut protein has to be in the air for it to be a risk and there is no peanut protein released form peanut butter.

They also can ask you not to eat but they can't force you not to eat them.
Peanut dust can be in the air, which could set off an allergic reaction. And, worse yet?? An allergic child sits in a seat recently vacated by a very messy child...a child that had had peanut butter crackers or sandwich. Now, there is peanut residue on the seat, arms and possibly tray. Yes, the vast majority of parents of these kids will ask to board early in order to do a proper cleaning and sometimes even spread out a sheet over the area.

Perhaps it's a new thing (well, new since I flew - over twenty years ago).
Still, all those flights and never an issue with anyone reacting to the peanut bags that were handed out to everyone. I guess I would honor the request, but I think it's a bit silly.
Well, 20 years ago we didn't see peanut free tables or classrooms in schools either. But they sure do exist today!!!

Can someone please explain this logic?
It's the whole 3-1-1 issue. If a substance will not hold it's shape when removed from it's container, it has to be in a 3oz, or smaller, container and be put into your quart sized baggie if you are using carryon baggage. And peanut butter and jelly most certainly do not hold their shape outside their jars.
But in a sandwich is fine since there really isn't close to 3oz of it.

As I said, I flew for the airlines for 5 years. Never ever ever had any issue with anyone reacting to the peanuts we handed out or any peanut product anyone had brought on board. As has been said by PPs, there are sill airlines handing out peanuts today. As far as someone smearing some peanut grease on the seat and then another person's child putting their hand on it and then to their mouth..well...that could happen with someone on a previous flight when there was no peanut alert. So, yes, i think it's kind of silly because i don't think there's a genuine risk. As i also said, i would respect he request anyway.
If you can show me one documented case of a peanut reaction from someone on an airplane, i will change my mind.
Have you seen someone go into anaphylactic shock?? I have. It isn't pretty. I watched my dd's best friend almost die from a food allergy last May. So, yes, it is a genuine risk.

I am sorry, but if my child had such a severe peanut allergy, I would not endanger their life by exposing them to so many people, such as on public transportation. I would certainly not expect or ask a plane full of total strangers to refrain from eating peanut products just for my child. Whatever happened to the days of inconveniencing yourself before you would ever ask others to be inconvienced??

And exactly how do you think these families are going to travel??? They have to use a car because so many people refuse to give up their peanut butter for a few hours on a plane???? Seriously??

Here's the thing. My dd, now 18, has always been what we call a 'discriminating' eater. Yeah, that is our nice way of saying picky, picky, picky!!! Her diet consisted of...peanut butter sandwiches (creamy only please), milk/dairy, mac and cheese, pasta and butter/parm cheese, cheeseburgers/hot dogs. And some veggies and fruits.
So, it was easy to just pack her a peanut butter sandwich when flying. But, after that first request to not use peanut products, we stopped doing it. There are other things you can bring to eat. You can actually sit at the gate and eat your sandwich there if you have to. Bring a baggie full of frozen veggies and add some grapes or cheese. Or some other kind of fruit. There are ways around this.

To the OP...can you bring a pb/j sandwich through security? Yes, you can. And in all likelihood, you won't be asked to not eat it on the plane. But, it could happen.

LaurenT
04-04-2012, 02:40 PM
Not that I want to get involved in a PB argument , I was genuinely curious if there have been any problems with reactions on a flight :rolleyes1... google found me this

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18681085?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_RVDocSum

interesting link, thanks for posting
I did notice that it says that not enough is known about the circumstances (paraphrased)..such as if that airline typically serves peanuts, or if that passenger actually ate something on the plane that may contain peanuts (cookies comes to mind)...
But it does look like they need to do more research on it.

thewesterberg
04-04-2012, 02:49 PM
Hi the westerberg! I was going to say the same thing- we flew Delta in February and were offered a bag of peanuts. (so were our 4 kids!) Then I noticed your name- are you by any chance from MN? (we are!)

Yup, we're in MN too! Up in Duluth.

nchulka
04-04-2012, 02:54 PM
After not flying for several years I have been on 4 flights this past month on Southwest (thank you free flights with the Southwest Credit Card!) On every flight they gave me a bag of peanuts. I'm sure it stinks to have a close family member be severely allergic to peanuts, but if we start banning them everywhere where does it end? Do we also ban other food items that people are allergic too? Do we ban peanuts at ballgames? Do we have to change the song from buy me some peanuts and cracker-jacks to buy me some pretzels? What if some people are allergic to pretzels???

SDSorority
04-04-2012, 03:01 PM
After not flying for several years I have been on 4 flights this past month on Southwest (thank you free flights with the Southwest Credit Card!) On every flight they gave me a bag of peanuts. I'm sure it stinks to have a close family member be severely allergic to peanuts, but if we start banning them everywhere where does it end? Do we also ban other food items that people are allergic too? Do we ban peanuts at ballgames? Do we have to change the song from buy me some peanuts and cracker-jacks to buy me some pretzels? What if some people are allergic to pretzels???

:wave2:

Those of us that are celiac ARE allergic to pretzels. :thumbsup2 :rolleyes1

To the OP- you will probably be fine with a peanut butter sandwich on a plane. If you're concerned about having peanut butter on a plane and someone telling you not to eat it, have you ever tried almond butter or Sun Butter (sunflower seed butter)? Both are really good :goodvibes

TDC Nala
04-04-2012, 03:02 PM
I never heard of anyone being allergic to pretzel dust in the air.

goofy4tink
04-04-2012, 03:05 PM
After not flying for several years I have been on 4 flights this past month on Southwest (thank you free flights with the Southwest Credit Card!) On every flight they gave me a bag of peanuts. I'm sure it stinks to have a close family member be severely allergic to peanuts, but if we start banning them everywhere where does it end? Do we also ban other food items that people are allergic too? Do we ban peanuts at ballgames? Do we have to change the song from buy me some peanuts and cracker-jacks to buy me some pretzels? What if some people are allergic to pretzels???
I hear ya, I really do. BUT...there is a huge difference between an airplane and a ball game. An airplane is an enclosed space..which is seldom cleaned adequately. I'm happy that you got your free peanuts, but how would you feel if the child two rows down from you started wheezing and having breathing issues because the person seated in his seat prior to his flight, had gotten peanut oil all over the arm rests?? I mean really, come on now. It's peanuts people. And there are few foods that cause this severe of a reaction.

But, I guess the each person's right to carry peanuts/peanut butter outweighs others right to safe travel. This subject has been done to death over on the Transportation board. I'm pretty much done with it here as well.:confused3

Hannathy
04-04-2012, 03:10 PM
If a child is so young that they don't know to not put their fingers in their mouth why don't they wear gloves when leaving their seat?

Do they wear gloves at Disney? shopping? It is disingenuous to only worry about peanut butter residue on a plane.And most do not have an anaphylatic reaction to peanut butter on their skin it is usually only a contact reaction.

Also for the peanut protein in the air to do any harm it has to be at a pretty concentrated amount not the amount someone eating peanuts several rows away would cause.

I don''t mind someone doing things to keep themselves safe but don't do things that are not necessary, base actions on scientific facts not emotions.

gtpoohbear
04-04-2012, 03:16 PM
I always bring PB&J sandwiches on the plane, never had a problem with TSA or on board. I suppose if there was someone sitting very close by who had a SEVERE (life-threatening) allergy, there might be cause for concern, but I really doubt that my kid eating a sandwich in row 4 is going to cause a problem for someone in row 17. If someone, by some chance is THAT allergic, I seriously hope they have an epi-pen or something b/c I don't see how they can possibly go through life without coming into contact with such a minute amount.

I certainly don't want to cause harm to someone b/c of my food, but I have a hard time believing that it is truly dangerous in the vast majority of circumstances. We fly fairly often, probably 15-20 different planes per year for about the last 10 years, and have never once heard such and announcement, or heard of it from anyone else (until reading this thread). Maybe I've just been lucky, or maybe certain airlines (which I don't fly) tend to do it more... still having a hard time accepting that this is a real problem. Again, not saying that it isn't, it just seems very odd to me.

Bottom line - I'd bring the PB&J, and on the off-chance that you happen to be seated next to someone who might die b/c of it... know that you'll have to go hungry for a bit. But I wouldn't lose sleep over that possibility.

Sinderelly
04-04-2012, 03:16 PM
This should not cause so many arguments lol. If you are traveling on a plane just pack other snacks IN CASE there is a peanut allergy. There have been some great suggestions fruit, cheese, crackers etc. That way your kids will have something to eat and no one will have to worry about peanut allergies. It just seems so simple :confused3

goofy4tink
04-04-2012, 03:19 PM
And there is a very similar thread regarding this same issue over on the Disabilities board. And pretty much the same reactions.

Music City Mama
04-04-2012, 03:26 PM
I hope this doesn't come across as argumentative (I don't like PB at all, and can take or leave peanuts in general, so you won't have a problem with me causing contamination on a plane!!). I'm genuinely curious...

I see this issue come up most often about planes. I assume this is because 1) peanuts were the traditional airplane snack for decades and 2) you're dealing with a small cabin and recycled air. But on this thread I've seen way more comments concerned with contact (peanut butter smeared on a seat, etc.) than with airborne particle issues. But wouldn't there be just as much risk of this if people eat their PB crackers and PBJ at home before arriving at the airport? I can't imagine trying to keep an allergic child from touching, well, anything, anywhere! The seats at the gate, the rail on the escalator...

We are lucky that my DS does not have any allergies (my DH is highly allergic to stone and core fruits), but he DOES have a rare, misunderstood and potentially life-threatening disease. I completely understand the parental fear of something happening to your child when you are so, so careful. I feel for those who have to deal with severe allergies.

No worries, your post doesn't come across as argumentative or confrontational at all. :)

I will answer your question from my perspective. My post was in response to another poster who suggested that unless someone who was allergic to peanuts consumed their PB sandwich, that person wasn't going to have a reaction. I was just making the point that it is possible to react without consuming them (if after touching PB they touched their mouth, their nose or even their eyes) -- I'm not saying they'd necessarily have an anaphylactic reaction (although they might), but they more than likely would react. To say it's "scientifically impossible" or whatever it was, just really rubbed me the wrong way. We take our own precautions with cleaning areas, washing hands, etc., so it's not too much of an issue -- the insensitivity about it from some people just boggles my mind, though.

Sweettears
04-04-2012, 03:31 PM
I can't remember the last time I got peanuts on Southwest and I fly them exclusively. I've gotten cereal bars, pretzels, and 100 Calorie Packs of Lorna Doone cookies.

I have on about 50% of the flights I've taken over the last few months.

As far as being asked to refrain, I fly frequently and have only heard the announcement once.

amarberry
04-04-2012, 03:41 PM
They should be considerate of others by what... Not having a peanut allergy?

Again, I think it's a little selfish for you to make a decision that affects another person's heath and decide that you'll eat your sandwich, even when asked not to due to an allergy issue, because you've assessed a person you never met and their allergy and made a decision that could impact them very negatively in an area where they have no ability to get help simply because you want a PB&J. You can choose from hundreds of other snacks, but you'd choose something like this to make a stance on... For reasons that are beyond me... Instead of just doing the decent thing and having a different snack.

Sorry, I find this unfathomable, especially considering the environment, where the allergy sufferer could be a child. Is your sandwich really THAT important that you'll put another person in danger in an environment where they can't get immediate care?

All it takes is the flight attendant picking up your trash and touching the allergy-affected person. You touching the handle of the bathroom. The overhead compartment Having the person sit next to you or your family who're having the snack. Having kids who aren't as conscious of such things make a mess of their food.

Just do the decent thing and bring something other than a PB product.



Thank you! I just don't understand how some people feel like they are being persecuted and having "their rights" taken away because they are politely asked not to eat peanuts for a couple of hours BECAUSE SOMEONE COULD DIE. Real nice.

I have a daughter with a severe food allergy (not peanuts). About a month ago, she ended up needing her epipen administered at school and had to be transported to the hospital in an ambulance. We believe her reaction occurred because there was residue on shared math tools in her classroom (reaction occurred about an hour after lunch period) and she probably put her hands in her mouth (she's 7). Pretty scary. Her class now has some new sanitation protocols in place to protect her and the other food allergy student in the class...not to mention that a little extra hand washing in the classroom is really beneficial to the entire class for preventing other illnesses.

What happened to my daughter was pretty scary and, yes, extreme and unusual. When traveling, we make sure to wipe her seat, tray table, etc. down on airplanes and always carry benedryl and 2 epipens as a precaution. My husband or I sit next to her as a buffer if we are in a row with a stranger. She needs to ingest what she is allergic to, but as you can see from what happened to her last month, it's possible. It is very scary to know that you are 10,000 feet up in the air away from paramedics and hospitals, but I think we take a lot of precautions to mitigate the possibility.

My kids eat peanut butter pretty much everyday. They enjoy their PB&J sandwiches very much. However, as a rule, we never take PB&J on a plane because I do think about how the oil and residue gets on the seats and trays unlike other types of food, and being on an airplane, it would be a lot harder to get medical care in the event of an emergency.

My kids, who are 4 and 7, can get by for a few hours without eating peanut butter. I don't understand why an adult couldn't in the event of an announcement that there was an allergy on a plane. I hope those of you who feel so put out never have a family member with a severe food allergy, or any disability for that matter. Talk about a lack of compassion and maturity.

amarberry
04-04-2012, 03:47 PM
Do they wear gloves at Disney? shopping? It is disingenuous to only worry about peanut butter residue on a plane.And most do not have an anaphylatic reaction to peanut butter on their skin it is usually only a contact reaction.



It is not disingenuous. An airplane is isolated from medical care in the event of an anaphylactic reaction. Chances are a paramedic could reach a person within minutes of a reaction on ground. That is the difference with an airplane.

mickeyluv'r
04-04-2012, 03:47 PM
Okay, here's my two cents....

You could make sandwiches and take them through security, but it might be easier to just buy something at the airport. I know not all airports have great options, but many do. Most have something, and letting the kids pick is a great way to kill some time.

I further find that eating before I get on then plane is a great way to kill the time.

It's also MUCH easier to eat at a food court table than to try and balance your lunch on an airplane tray, where you could have turbulence, and other disturbances.

Regardless of a potential peanut allergy, eating anything smelly on the plane, where the air is confined, is a bit inconsiderate. Nobody wants to smell your food. I am kind of glad they no longer serve meals on planes; the odor was horrible.

Beyond that, I can tell you MCO has LOTS of inexpensive options.

kkandaj
04-04-2012, 03:49 PM
I hope this doesn't come across as argumentative (I don't like PB at all, and can take or leave peanuts in general, so you won't have a problem with me causing contamination on a plane!!). I'm genuinely curious...

I see this issue come up most often about planes. I assume this is because 1) peanuts were the traditional airplane snack for decades and 2) you're dealing with a small cabin and recycled air. But on this thread I've seen way more comments concerned with contact (peanut butter smeared on a seat, etc.) than with airborne particle issues. But wouldn't there be just as much risk of this if people eat their PB crackers and PBJ at home before arriving at the airport? I can't imagine trying to keep an allergic child from touching, well, anything, anywhere! The seats at the gate, the rail on the escalator...

We are lucky that my DS does not have any allergies (my DH is highly allergic to stone and core fruits), but he DOES have a rare, misunderstood and potentially life-threatening disease. I completely understand the parental fear of something happening to your child when you are so, so careful. I feel for those who have to deal with severe allergies.

We do have to keep DS from touching lots of things--it's not only the seats on a plane, but the handles on doors, playground equipment, McDonald's play areas :scared1: (this is for his other allergies), rides, etc. I'm sure when people see me, they think I'm a germaphobe, when in reality, I'm a foodaphobe. DS was hospitalized for 4 days after his first reaction to soy, he was 10 weeks old. He was green, laying in my arms not moving as he vomited and had diarrhea and I ran into the ER. It took the nurses 8 times to get his IV in. That was his worst reaction. His mildest was his face swelling up like Will Smith in Hitch. There have been several reactions in between, some life threatening, some not. In the past two years, he has had no accidental exposures, but that is because we are very vigilant and wipe down everything.

And I appreciate your curiousity. Conversation and education is the only way that people will really understand food allergies. That's why I just ask that people wash their hands and clean up after themselves, I never ask them not to eat something. It is our responsibility to keep DS safe and we are always prepared with epi-pens just in case, but of course, we would like to avoid reactions.

MisWal
04-04-2012, 03:54 PM
I don't understand why an adult couldn't in the event of an announcement that there was an allergy on a plane. I hope those of you who feel so put out never have a family member with a severe food allergy, or any disability for that matter. Talk about a lack of compassion and maturity.

I agree!

TDC Nala
04-04-2012, 04:04 PM
Yes, they do sometimes make that announcement on a plane, that there is an allergic passenger and sometimes the airline personnel do ask the entire plane not to open or consume any peanut or nut products.

Will the airline personnel stop you if you decide to eat a peanut butter sandwich anyway? No, because they cannot control what people bring aboard with them. I'm not going to go into whether or not it is actually a resonable request or is borne out of fear rather than any real danger. But if the request is made, and you personally are of a mind to accede to it, then your children won't be eating those peanut butter sandwiches on the plane. Just to let the OP know that such a request MIGHT be made, so they may decide to proactively bring some other type of sandwich.

matheke
04-04-2012, 04:05 PM
If you can show me one documented case of a peanut reaction from someone on an airplane, i will change my mind.

See if you can find any of the old episodes of "Airline". The show was about Southwest and I think it was on A&E. There was an episode where a passanger notifies SWA that he had a severe peanut allergy when he booked his flight. I think he was flying through BWI or MDW. Anyway they served peanuts on his flight after he had told the flight crew of his allegy, They laughed at him and served the peanuts anyhow. When he got off the plane he filed a complaint with the gate agent. The camera crew was there to film him filing the complaint. He raised his shirt and had huge red welts all over his chest and back and that was after he took his benedryl.

And now for a little comic relief, probally why you never noticed any peanut allergies when you flew was because all the kids were coughing and hacking from the smoking section.

Times they are a changing.

Dan

mesaboy2
04-04-2012, 04:10 PM
Once, I thought I knew all the hot-button topics on here. Then, I opened this thread.

rn448698
04-04-2012, 04:11 PM
I haven't read anything on this thread except the first subject line. How in the world did this turn into this many posts? My hunch is that it somehow devolved into whether it is nice to eat peanut butter in a confined space. My vote is that one shouldn't eat peanut butter in a confined space if made aware of someone else in said space with a peanut allergy.

Now to go see if my prediction is correct...

GenevieveRaqs
04-04-2012, 04:11 PM
Thanks, Music City Mama and kkandaj for providing your thoughts on my questions.

kkandaj, your experience with your DS sounds absolutely terrifying. I imagine it is still always scary, having to worry about exposure constantly. But nothing beats having a very, very sick child and having no idea what's wrong.

NikP
04-04-2012, 04:12 PM
Southwest will make substitutions to the peanut snacks if someone on board has an allergy. We fly twice yearly to mco and they have alway accommodated us. We preboard the first flight of the day and wash the area my son will sit. We also place a blanket for him to sit on. We carry multiple epi pens.

Some here obviously do not know that an epi pen will not cure a reaction to an life threating allergy. An epi pen buys you 15 minutes so you can reach a hospital. We carry as many epi pens as we feel we need based on the time it would take to get to a hospital. If my son is reacting I would demand the plane land as soon as possible. If necessary I would be taken away in hand cuffs and my son by ambulance. My son is old enough to know not to touch his face unless he washes his hands. Also some might not realize that exposure to allergens do not always trigger the same reaction every time. We are always prepared for the worst and hope for the best. We are also very fortunate that we live in Canada because we lead the world in allergy awareness and labeling requirements.

Pine View
04-04-2012, 04:30 PM
I have friends that have declared their daughter allergic to peanuts. They have never had her tested. But, when they fed it to her two different times she threw (spit) it up. No breathing issues. No rashes. Couldn’t possible be the kid just doesn’t like it, right?
No one can now eat peanuts anywhere near her or in her classes.
While there are people truly allergic, I have to believe there are so many because the parents like to jump on the peanut allergy band wagon. This makes it hard for the ones that truly are. These parents won't risk their kids health on the actions of others.
I have a sever allergy to lots of perfumes. It has something to do with the base chemicals. I just can’t see people being told to shower and use no smelly products on my flights. Taking Benedryl helps me relax on the flights too. We have always had epi/Benedryl around.

Dashzap
04-04-2012, 04:46 PM
We are on a flight that is over our normal dinner time, so I was thinking of packing peanut butter and jelly sandwiches for our daughters. But I'm wondering if TSA will let them pass through? I'm thinking yes, but I don't want to bother if they're going to make me throw them away. TIA!

Go for it. We take soynut butter sandwiches for our flights, no problem. You can't bring drinks though.

kaytieeldr
04-04-2012, 04:48 PM
How embarrassing for the person [with a peanut allergy, on a commercial flight]... It opens them up for being harassed, makes the whole plane privy to their personal medical condition, and if it's a kid, it could be really humiliating.

You know how rarely I disagree with you. This is one of those times. Especially given that there are varying degrees of sensitivity, and that its the airborne peanut dust or direct contact that causes problems, and that most allergic persons don't have an "all about me, the heck with you" attitude - a peanut-free zone makes the most sense.

It can easily be announced and arranged discreetly at the gate.

Given the prevalence on this forum, a lot of folks would probably be surprised to know that peanut allergies occur, to varying degrees, in 1.2% or less of the population.

bookgirl
04-04-2012, 04:54 PM
I've taken a pb sandwich through and never have a problem. Love PB and it doesn't spoil.

Dashzap
04-04-2012, 05:04 PM
I just don't understand how some people feel like they are being persecuted and having "their rights" taken away because they are politely asked not to eat peanuts for a couple of hours BECAUSE SOMEONE COULD DIE.

Oh my, you should see a PTA meeting when there is a suggestion to not serve food at holiday parties. The screaming! The shouting! The accusations!:eek: :rotfl:

We fly Southwest with a kid with food allergies. Warn them when you buy your ticket and they'll serve a non-peanut snack, likely a "may contain". They have never made any announcement other than noting the snack served would not be peanuts due to allergy.

I think people are more likely to be nervous about flying with a potentially life threatening situation such as an allergy because of:
1) the enclosed small space
2) the lack of access to medical care (epinephrine only lasts so long)

We figure it's safe since the kid hasn't reacted yet after 7 years of school where pretty much everything is smeared with peanut butter sandwiches. His reactions have been from consumption of allergens.

mattsdragon
04-04-2012, 05:13 PM
Once, I thought I knew all the hot-button topics on here. Then, I opened this thread.

This is an obscure one to be sure, and I just started following it like watching a train wreck (or a FP thread).

I do recall one a few years back about someone mentioning the fact that they serve crustables on pirates cruise or whatever it was called. It got vicious. And one other about the use of latex baloons and the positives and negatives concerning them an mylar balloons.

Allergies. . .another DIS taboo.

mesaboy2
04-04-2012, 05:20 PM
This is an obscure one to be sure, and I just started following it like watching a train wreck (or a FP thread).

I do recall one a few years back about someone mentioning the fact that they serve crustables on pirates cruise or whatever it was called. It got vicious. And one other about the use of latex baloons and the positives and negatives concerning them an mylar balloons.

Allergies. . .another DIS taboo.

I suppose I shouldn't be surprised. After all, we've seen multipage back-and-forths on the evils of water and bubbles in just the last week. ;)

mattsdragon
04-04-2012, 05:23 PM
I suppose I shouldn't be surprised. After all, we've seen multipage back-and-forths on the evils of water and bubbles in just the last week. ;)

That's why we gotta just keep doing what we do and get things off topic (or in someone elses words. . .be smarmy).

I got dibs on Grumpy, you can be Dopey, Sleep or Sneezy (too soon for an allergy thread?)

kaytieeldr
04-04-2012, 05:24 PM
If I have brought Uncrustables to eat on a flight, unless the allergic perso is my seatmate I will eat the sandwiches:


They're thawed and at optimum eating level
I'm an adult
I don't drip / drop
I don't smear
I don't get peanut butter on anything (just in me)
I wipe my hands and mouth and crumple the napkin and put it inside other trash
I place my trash directly in the trash bags being held by the gloved Flight Attendants
I don't kiss, lick, or slobber over anyone else on (or off) the plane.

Pine View
04-04-2012, 05:37 PM
I don't kiss, lick, or slobber over anyone else on (or off) the plane.


:rotfl2::rotfl2::rotfl2:

StarGirl11
04-04-2012, 05:43 PM
I can't remember the last time I got peanuts on Southwest and I fly them exclusively. I've gotten cereal bars, pretzels, and 100 Calorie Packs of Lorna Doone cookies.

They handed out peanuts on my flight to and from Nashville last week. Maybe it varies some from route to route?

WendyinMaryland
04-04-2012, 05:48 PM
My son has a severe peanut allergy. There is a huge difference between one or two people eating peanut butter on a plane because they have brought it, and an ENTIRE PLANEFUL of people opening a bag all at once. My son did react once because of other people eating peanut butter, and no one touched him. He was OK, because I gave him his Benadryl. While I know that peanut butter can not be banned, I do appreciate airlines that do not serve it in en-masse ... I think that is a reasonable compromise.

When my son was born, and we found out about his allergy, I became much more aware of the presence of food ...... people walk around with food and eat constantly. We are a nation of on-the-move eaters. I went to my daughter's ballet recital, in a nice theatre, and the kid next to me broke out a bag of peanut M&M's and made a huge mess eating them. Quite frankly, allergies or not, people have become rude with food, period. It used to be considered impolite to eat in front of other people, and people did not snack so much ... they actually ate meals at a table. Again, until I had my son, I might have thought it was as simple as just avoiding planes ... but as my recital experience shows, food is everywhere. I do what I can to make him safe.

Personally, even before my son was born, I think peanut butter is way to pungent smelling of a food for close quarters. Just like I would not microwave certain seafood dishes at work because of the odor.

And yes, there are more allergic people than before. That does not mean it is bogus. The peanut has changed drastically over time ... not in taste, but in the genetic engineering of the seed to give it economically advantageous properties, such as a bigger harvest or the ability to store the peanuts longer before they are processed. It is not the same peanut that existed years ago.

We have other allergies in our family, too. But, most other foods are not anaphylaxic unless you personally ingest them. Peanuts, with their oil and their dust, are simply different. My son and husband are allergic to eggs, but I can sit right next to them and eat eggs with no problem. I would never do that with peanut butter.

Anyway, I did not mean to write an essay. This is an issue that is really easy to oversimplify ..... until it happens to you.

thedonduck
04-04-2012, 05:58 PM
Do we ban peanuts at ballgames? Do we have to change the song from buy me some peanuts and cracker-jacks to buy me some pretzels? What if some people are allergic to pretzels???

Just to throw this out there (because I just saw it on the nightly news) many major league ballparks now have peanut free sections where no one is permitted to have anything that contains peanuts. Unfortunately it is part of times now and until we can figure out why so many children are coming down with such severe allergies to things like peanuts, we need to all become more vigilant in accommodating to those people.

CamoMama
04-04-2012, 06:54 PM
If I have brought Uncrustables to eat on a flight, unless the allergic perso is my seatmate I will eat the sandwiches:


They're thawed and at optimum eating level
I'm an adult
I don't drip / drop
I don't smear
I don't get peanut butter on anything (just in me)
I wipe my hands and mouth and crumple the napkin and put it inside other trash
I place my trash directly in the trash bags being held by the gloved Flight Attendants
I don't kiss, lick, or slobber over anyone else on (or off) the plane.


Good lord, why would an adult want to eat uncrustables? They taste awful and they're terrible for you.

http://www.rodale.com/worst-food

"Back in the day, homemade peanut butter and jelly sandwiches were considered a quick lunch fix, but Smucker's has managed to turn this old favorite into a packaged supermarket product. Uncrustables are premade PB&J sandwiches with the crusts already removed, and they're full of dangerous high-fructose corn syrup and heart-damaging hydrogenated oils. They are devoid of healthy fiber, which makes you want to eat more in the long run."

JMB123
04-04-2012, 07:00 PM
I didn't read all of the replies, so I don't know if this has been mentioned, but...the reason it's so important to ban peanuts on a flight where there is a person with a severe allergy is that an epipen only lasts 20 minutes. It would take a lot longer than that for a plane to land and an ambulance to bring the person to the hospital. Even if you bring several epipens, it's a very dangerous situation for a person with a life-threatening allergy.

If you're playing on a playground and your peanut allergic child gets peanut butter on them and has a reaction, you call 911. What do you do if this happens on an airplane?

On a side note, most airlines will only refrain from serving peanuts and/or make an announcement about not eating them if someone on the flight has the allergy. You have to pre-register as having an allergy and you have to confirm at the gate one hour prior to the flight leaving. This way, they have time to make sure there is an alternate snack available. On most airlines, you're given a document to hand to the flight attendant as a reminder.

It's a great idea to bring PB&J, just have an alternate available in case they ask you not to eat peanuts.

pbrim
04-04-2012, 07:22 PM
Yes, you can take sandwiches. You could not take jars of peanut butter or jelly, but you can take sandwiches.


Can someone please explain this logic?

There is no logic. No rhyme or reason. All the nonsense we now have to go through at airports does not make us one whit safer and only costs money, damages our dignity, and sometimes endangers our health. It is not "security", it is "security theatre" designed to scare people so that they won't protest anything being done in the name of "security"

Betty Rohrer
04-04-2012, 07:44 PM
because of breathing problems, i guess on my next flight i will have to put on ticket about alleregy to scentsto make sure no one uses near me. not talking about headache but serious breathing issues, ie needing oxygen. nonscented wipes okay. yes i will miss church this week because of flower scents. yes i know you want your child safe but you could be causing someone else a major problem. and yes it includes perfumes.

kaligal
04-04-2012, 07:53 PM
Why would you defy a request like that? There are a million snacks that you could have that aren't peanut-based. Making a stand like "you can't make me not eat it" when the reason you're asked to do so is for the health and comfort of somebody on the plane seems a little... Selfish. Especially since the person who has the allergy could be seated adjacent to you and it could very well present a very real issue for them.

Just be considerate and plan ahead... Pack fruit, rice cakes, jelly and fluff sandwiches, popcorn...

They do it for the same reason that people use scented body wash, lotions and perfume. They live their lives however they see fit and expect those with medical conditions to take care of themselves.

Frankly, as the mom of a kid with a life-threatening nut allergy, I think anyone who has one and depends on strangers to keep them safe is a fool.

You cannot expect the whole world to change for you and your allergies.

kaligal
04-04-2012, 07:56 PM
because of breathing problems, i guess on my next flight i will have to put on ticket about alleregy to scentsto make sure no one uses near me. not talking about headache but serious breathing issues, ie needing oxygen. nonscented wipes okay. yes i will miss church this week because of flower scents. yes i know you want your child safe but you could be causing someone else a major problem. and yes it includes perfumes.

My whole life, I met only one other person with this problem! We actually started a friendship discussing it. :)

Welcome to our tiny little club. :worship:

Are you waiting for Tide to make unscented Pods? I look every time I'm in the store.

Pine View
04-04-2012, 08:09 PM
My whole life, I met only one other person with this problem! We actually started a friendship discussing it. :)

Welcome to our tiny little club. :worship:

Are you waiting for Tide to make unscented Pods? I look every time I'm in the store.

See post 70! There are three of us here now. Two of my DD and their children too. Unscented everything and double rinses at least.

kaligal
04-04-2012, 08:12 PM
See post 70! There are three of us here now. Two of my DD and their children too. Unscented everything and double rinses at least.

OMG! I do the extra rinse, too!

Amazing. Never met anyone else who mentioned the extra rinse.

Very cool. :teeth:

I didn't read the whole thread. I rarely do, lol.

yankeepenny
04-04-2012, 08:41 PM
add me to the extra rinse cycle group.
been doing it for years.
that way, no problems.
:goodvibes

serenitygr
04-04-2012, 09:15 PM
Yup, we're in MN too! Up in Duluth.

Hey- that's COOL! We are only about 70 miles from you- have you been to Grand Rapids? We are only about 10 miles east of that just off HWY 2. What a small world!

gk90
04-05-2012, 12:44 AM
Our allergist told us to use unscented detergent and do the extra rinse when DS was having problems with itching. We did it for several years and fortunately he seems to have outgrown this allergy.

kaligal
04-05-2012, 12:52 AM
Our allergist told us to use unscented detergent and do the extra rinse when DS was having problems with itching. We did it for several years and fortunately he seems to have outgrown this allergy.

That is wonderful. He's so lucky. I'm always so happy for people whose allergies stop.

I wish I outgrew allergies.

Kids today are lucky. There are so many meds that help on the market. As a kid, when Spring rolled around, I had to take medicine that made me fall asleep in school. Then along came Seldane. Amen and Alleluia. Now, you can go into a drug store and get Zyrtec. Amazing. :goodvibes

I figured out the extra rinse on my own. I figure most of it out on my own.

I don't listen to the allergist all the time, so he tends to not bother giving me instructions too much. If I did, I couldn't eat almost anything, would be living in the southwest and washing myself with weird powders. The allergists get all wiggy about hives. I've had hives every day of life since I was about six. I can live with hives as long as I'm not sick.

My allergist calls me Pandora, in reference to the box and not Pandora herself...or so I like to think. :)

kaytieeldr
04-05-2012, 01:02 AM
Good lord, why would an adult want to eat uncrustables? They taste awful and they're terrible for you.

http://www.rodale.com/worst-food

"Back in the day, homemade peanut butter and jelly sandwiches were considered a quick lunch fix, but Smucker's has managed to turn this old favorite into a packaged supermarket product. Uncrustables are premade PB&J sandwiches with the crusts already removed, and they're full of dangerous high-fructose corn syrup and heart-damaging hydrogenated oils. They are devoid of healthy fiber, which makes you want to eat more in the long run."
Wow. I never expected to be explaining why I make certain food choices... then again, this is the DIS...
Often when I travel, I'm up before 5 AM to work all day and heading directly to the airport to fly cross-country
Thawed Uncrustables fit neatly in certain otherwise-disposable office supply containers
Uncrustables are self-contained
And bless your heart for your concern about my diet; six or twelve Uncrustables a year aren't going to be what kills me

melcia
04-05-2012, 02:44 AM
This is my first time posting here and I'm saddened at what I have to say.

My name is Mel and I have multiple food allergies. I'm 30 years old and wasn't diagnosed until my mid 20s, which means that throughout my life, I experienced a lot of food that I now can't have. One of those foods are peanuts.

When I was first diagnosed, I experienced EXTREME anxiety to the point where I barely left my house and was terrified of being exposed to peanuts in any way. My allergist told me about picking up oils etc from doorknobs and just how scary this world is for someone with allergies and I had a horrible time coming to terms with it.

Anxiety is not fun. And reading posts like this, where people are saying those with food allergies should just stay away and not go on planes or in public, well frankly hurts. It took me awhile to finally feel like living again and getting the courage to face being in situations that might cause me to be exposed. But I carry benadryl and my epi-pen and hope for the best.

Those of you who seem not to understand how serious food allergies are, if someone is severely allergic, if they are exposed to the allergen, within minutes their throat could close up, they could break out in painful hives, and the ability to breathe could be gone. Epi pens last 15 minutes, giving the victim a short window of time to get to an ER. It takes longer than 15 minutes to do an emergency landing on a plane. So think of that when you say that they should just carry their epi pen and shut up about their allergies.

Sometimes, in life, you have to not do something to help the people around you. Yes, I understand that peanut butter is a cheap, fun protein that kids like. However, for many people, children included, it's as deadly as suffocation and as risky to be around as an open bucket of acid.

I humbly, and respectfully urge you to be considerate of others and when you're in closed air situations (planes, subways etc) that you refrain from eating peanut products. Yes, it is an inconvenient, but you very well might save someone's life by limiting yourself for an hour or so.

Think of others and remember that when you're complaining about a minor inconvenience for an hour, that those of us with food allergies are inconvenienced for the rest of our lives.

Thank you.

kaligal
04-05-2012, 02:52 AM
This is my first time posting here and I'm saddened at what I have to say.

My name is Mel and I have multiple food allergies. I'm 30 years old and wasn't diagnosed until my mid 20s, which means that throughout my life, I experienced a lot of food that I now can't have. One of those foods are peanuts.

When I was first diagnosed, I experienced EXTREME anxiety to the point where I barely left my house and was terrified of being exposed to peanuts in any way. My allergist told me about picking up oils etc from doorknobs and just how scary this world is for someone with allergies and I had a horrible time coming to terms with it.

Anxiety is not fun. And reading posts like this, where people are saying those with food allergies should just stay away and not go on planes or in public, well frankly hurts. It took me awhile to finally feel like living again and getting the courage to face being in situations that might cause me to be exposed. But I carry benadryl and my epi-pen and hope for the best.

Those of you who seem not to understand how serious food allergies are, if someone is severely allergic, if they are exposed to the allergen, within minutes their throat could close up, they could break out in painful hives, and the ability to breathe could be gone. Epi pens last 15 minutes, giving the victim a short window of time to get to an ER. It takes longer than 15 minutes to do an emergency landing on a plane. So think of that when you say that they should just carry their epi pen and shut up about their allergies.

Sometimes, in life, you have to not do something to help the people around you. Yes, I understand that peanut butter is a cheap, fun protein that kids like. However, for many people, children included, it's as deadly as suffocation and as risky to be around as an open bucket of acid.

I humbly, and respectfully urge you to be considerate of others and when you're in closed air situations (planes, subways etc) that you refrain from eating peanut products. Yes, it is an inconvenient, but you very well might save someone's life by limiting yourself for an hour or so.

Think of others and remember that when you're complaining about a minor inconvenience for an hour, that those of us with food allergies are inconvenienced for the rest of our lives.

Thank you.

As a person with my own allergies and the mom of a kid with a nut allergy, let me tell you...

You can hope that the world will change to accommodate your situation...and it sure would be nice...but don't bet your life on it, which is exactly what you're doing if you count on it.

Hope for the ideal...ask for the ideal, if you want...but PLAN for the fact that the world will keep on going like it always does.

melcia
04-05-2012, 03:16 AM
As a person with my own allergies and the mom of a kid with a nut allergy, let me tell you...

You can hope that the world will change to accommodate your situation...and it sure would be nice...but don't bet your life on it, which is exactly what you're doing if you count on it.

Hope for the ideal...ask for the ideal, if you want...but PLAN for the fact that the world will keep on going like it always does.

Trust me I know. I can't eat at restaurants anymore. I don't eat anything that I don't prepare. I get that no one accommodates me. However there is nothing wrong with complying with a request if it creates a protective, safe environment for someone.

It's basic human decency. If someone around you says that they are severely allergic to whatever, then one ought to willingly comply.

It saddens me that on a message board for Disney we have such narrow minded and harsh people. Disney is actually an amazing place for people with allergies. That's why I'm planning a vacation there, to be honest.

aubriee
04-05-2012, 03:50 AM
My kids, who are 4 and 7, can get by for a few hours without eating peanut butter. I don't understand why an adult couldn't in the event of an announcement that there was an allergy on a plane. I hope those of you who feel so put out never have a family member with a severe food allergy, or any disability for that matter. Talk about a lack of compassion and maturity.

My mom is 78 y/o, slighty senile, and a very brittle insulin dependent diabetic. She is very set in her ways and refuses to veer from what she was taught when she was first diagnosed as a diabetic over 25 years ago. She never goes anywhere without a peanut butter sandwich or those prepacked pkgs of cheese crackers and peanut butter. I have tried to teach her that there are better foods for her to carry, in case her blood sugar drops, but she insists that's what the instructer in her diabetic class told her to carry and it works, so why should she change. Again she is elderly, stubborn as an ox, and slightly senile, which make reasoning with her difficult. When she flies with me she will have peanut butter of some sort with her in case her blood sugar drops. There is no reasoning otherwise with her. Her blood sugar does have a tendency to drop frequently, even if she's eaten well and she has passed out numerous times. So if her sugar were to drop on a flight she would eat her peanut butter snack. In her mind she could not do without it, so if an announcement was made after we had boarded she'd be in trouble.

I don't have a problem refraining from eating peanut products on a flight. What I have a problem with, is parents not talking to the gate agents prior to boarding, to have them make an announcement, so that people who are planning on using a peanut product as a snack, has a chance to purchase something else prior to boarding. Instead they wait until they get on the plane and then have the FAs announce a peanut free flight. It's too late then for others to purchase something different. My mom may not be happy about it, but if she heard the announcement of a peanut free flight and we had time to grab her something else prior to boarding, she'd probably accept it. However, it we are at 20,000 feet and her sugar drops she's going to have to eat something and with flights now serving just pretzels she'd be in trouble. Juice would only hold her so long, before she's going to need a protein and a starch. All I ask is that parents of kids who need a peanut free flight, please have the gate agent announce that, prior to boarding so that others have a chance to purchase something (or in my case have time to not only purchase something else, but time to get the info through to a senile elderly woman who would absolutely panic at the thought of not being able to eat her peanut butter if she needed it).

CamoMama
04-05-2012, 04:24 AM
All I ask is that parents of kids who need a peanut free flight, please have the gate agent announce that, prior to boarding so that others have a chance to purchase something (or in my case have time to not only purchase something else, but time to get the info through to a senile elderly woman who would absolutely panic at the thought of not being able to eat her peanut butter if she needed it).

Parents of children with allergies cannot be held responsible for when the airline chooses to make an announcement. It has been stated by parents here already that they make the airline aware of the allergy at booking and check in an hour early to ensure that there are non-peanut snacks available on the plane. The airline chooses when to make that announcement, if it's too late for you to make changes then perhaps you could bring that up to the airline.

Seriously, I find it ridiculous that any parent would place their own or their children's comfort over the life of another child. I am really shocked by the callousness shown by PPs here. My kids don't have any allergies and I have no idea how stressful that may be, to know that something most people take for granted could kill your child if they even just come into contact with it. If I were around anyone with a severe allergy I would have no problem modifying my routine for a short time to ensure that I am not accidentally the cause of someone else's death.

SMorgan711
04-05-2012, 07:51 AM
And they should be considerate of others also!

I will eat my PB&J because there is no scientific reason not to. Me eating a PB&J does no harm to an allergy person unless they plan on grabbing it and eating it. Peanut butter does not release peanut protein into the air and that is what they react to. So I will not open a pack of peanuts right under their noses because that is a risk but I will eat my no risk to them sandwich.


and I bet you'd be the first person to complain when the plane has to make an emergency landing to get someone who's having an allergic reaction to the ER....

kaytieeldr
04-05-2012, 08:09 AM
When I was first diagnosed, I experienced EXTREME anxiety to the point where I barely left my house and was terrified of being exposed to peanuts in any way. My allergist told me about picking up oils etc from doorknobs and just how scary this world is for someone with allergies and I had a horrible time coming to terms with it.Which is why it irks me when a complete stranger criticizes my occasional, entirely self-contained, ready-to-eat meal selection where (again, unless I slobber, kiss, or lick someone/something after eating) there's NO opportunity for any peanut product to spread.

Parents of children with allergies cannot be held responsible for when the airline chooses to make an announcement. It has been stated by parents here already that they make the airline aware of the allergy at booking and check in an hour early to ensure that there are non-peanut snacks available on the plane. That's parents here.

This is a "revolves around me" world, and the bulk of travelers don't operate as you've described. Some people just don't care how their medical issues affest others. Check the Transportation board. Many people haven't flown in years, or at all. They're not thinking 'allergies', they're thinking 'reduce stress'. When the passenger doesn't inform the airline until onboard/in flight the airline can't announce until then - and that's too late to change the snack.

While the link to the phone research someone posted earlier is based on self-reporting, and realistically a person who didn't survive a anaphylaxis attack on a plane couldn't respond, searching for 'peanut allergy fatalities on flights' brought up no actual results, i.e. no instances in which a person didn't survive.

Dashzap
04-05-2012, 08:15 AM
See post 70! There are three of us here now. Two of my DD and their children too. Unscented everything and double rinses at least.

Same here. Gives us rashes and headaches, but no life threatening issues. Can't stand candles either.

Dashzap
04-05-2012, 08:19 AM
Just curious, not a criticism of anyone's technique, but is there no other portable food that will deal with a blood sugar emergency aside from peanuts/peanut products/nuts?

5forDis
04-05-2012, 09:30 AM
Then they better have their epi pen handy. My kids and I don't have any food allergies, just allergies to growing things outside, some years are worse than others, so far this year has been great so far.


Wow, DisneyMomma---you really have no grasp of life threatening allergies. Have the EpiPen handy?! Obviously, you must know that an individual receiving epinephrine needs to be in an emergency room within 30 minutes and therefore your Disney-bound flight will be making an emergency landing. Epinephrine does not always save a person...this is a misconception. Most times it will work, but my child needed a second dose and airway support within 30 minutes of LICK of peanut butter.

I also have no problem with other people eating PB&J sandwiches on a flight. We wipe her seat down & cover it before she sits. Peanut butter does not release aerosolized proteins (like little bags of peanuts do---dust is released). I understand the smell of peanut makes allergic people uncomfortable but the reality is that it is not a risk.

My daughter has experienced 2 airborne reactions (not on a plane). We choose specific airlines to fly because they do not serve peanuts & we understand there is a chance someone ate a peanut butter sandwich in the seat on a flight before us (see above: wiping and covering the seat, tray table, arm rests, etc). We choose early morning flights to hopefully get a recently-cleaned airplane.

Back to OP: Yes, you can bring sandwiches through security. It is your choice what you decide to pack. I don't know if there are some situations where you will be asked to refrain from eating them...maybe, because it sounds like many people have a lack of information about life threatening allergies. If your child was eating a PB&J and seated next to my daughter, then I would move my daughter's seat. The risk while in the air would not be worth it if my daughter touched the sandwich. You sitting on the same plane as us and not right next to my daughter? Not a problem.

TDC Nala
04-05-2012, 09:31 AM
Again she is elderly, stubborn as an ox, and slightly senile, which make reasoning with her difficult. When she flies with me she will have peanut butter of some sort with her in case her blood sugar drops. There is no reasoning otherwise with her. Her blood sugar does have a tendency to drop frequently, even if she's eaten well and she has passed out numerous times. So if her sugar were to drop on a flight she would eat her peanut butter snack. In her mind she could not do without it, so if an announcement was mad after we had boarded she'd be in trouble.



When you fly with your mom, could YOU maybe bring along an alternate snack from the start (I get that she refuses to bring anything but peanut butter), so she will have something to eat if she does intend to abide by the request not to eat her peanut butter should it happen? If she would eat the peanut butter anyway even with the announcement there isn't an issue (at least as far as your mom getting her snack).

If she then refuses to eat it, well, can't do anything about that but at least she would HAVE an alternate, no matter when the announcement is made.

I remember a thread a long time ago on the cruise board, a mother with a child severely allergic to nuts, she was assured that her party would be taken care of on the ship and given their own table where nuts would be kept away from her child. This wasn't enough for her. She wanted her family to have the full cruise experience, so she was asking for opinions on what might happen if her family did not go the special accommodation route and was assigned at a table with another, unrelated family. She wanted this hypothetical family to agree to give up ordering any dish that contained nuts while they shared the table with her family. When some of the responders said they would ask to be moved to another table rather than comply with her request that they give up nut products for dinner for the duration of the cruise, she got angry. She accused the posters of not caring about her child and/or her child's disability. It wasn't even a situation where they said they'd order the nuts anyway; they just said they'd ask to sit at another table.

The poster had the option of getting a table that would be safe for her family, she just didn't want her family "isolated." But it was still up to her to be proactive, as it was her child who had the allergy, and not up to the people who would have been sitting with her. She either didn't get that or she really badly wanted to get around it.

Lees3rwe
04-05-2012, 10:48 AM
I haven't read the whole thread, but did want to say that in my former job as a preschool director, I saw an allergic reaction to nuts first hand.
The child just picked up a toy that another child who had had peanut butter toast for breakfast touched. His face started swelling and he was wheezing. He had NEVER had that type of reaction to just touching something before.

So, you never know what can happen. Personally, if my child were that allergic, I would drive everywhere I went because I could control the situation and I could stop if I needed to.

Lees3rwe
04-05-2012, 11:27 AM
and because I am a control freak.

I happen to have severe environmental allergies and asthma.
If I get anywhere NEAR Febreeze, it sets me into an attack.
I read threads on here all of the time about people taking those Glade plug ins and Febreeze for their resort room, even one woman talked about putting lavender oil on the matress and pillows.
People just have no idea if they don't live with allergies.

proud_canadian
04-05-2012, 11:49 AM
I have had an anaphlactic reaction to nuts, so I know a lot about this topic. I know personally, I get nervous when I see someone eating nuts close to me, because I know most people have poor hygeine habits and won't wash their hands after they eat. However, the big difference between the airline scenario is that if someone has a reaction on the ground it could be life threatening, but chances are an ambulance will be reasonably accessible. What some people don't understand is that when you have an allergic reaction, it isn't as simple as just using an epi-pen and all is great. You still need immediate medical attention and hours of medical monitoring. Essentially the epi-pen(s) just buy you time until you can get to a hospital or real medical care. However, in the air, even if an airplane has to make an emergency landing, by the time they get close enough to an airport, get clearance, land etc. it will most likely be too late.

So, if you bring peanut butter on an airplane, and someone has an allergy, even if they don't have a reaction, you will make them nervous and uncomfortable all flight worrying what if. What happens if you or your kids get peanut butter on their hands and then it gets on the seat etc and someone on the flight after you has a reaction? It really is inconsiderate and selfish, especially when so many alternatives around.

I also think it's only a matter of time before Disney stops selling PB and J sandwiches!!! ;)

Lynne M
04-05-2012, 01:55 PM
What some people don't understand is that when you have an allergic reaction, it isn't as simple as just using an epi-pen and all is great. You still need immediate medical attention and hours of medical monitoring. Essentially the epi-pen(s) just buy you time until you can get to a hospital or real medical care.

This is so true. I'm sure people hear 'peanut allergy' and think "oh, for pete's sake, give the kid a benadryl and they're fine, stop being all dramatic about your kid getting a few hives."

I've had one anaphylactic reaction, after an allergy shot. My throat did swell, but it was caught very quickly and I was treated right in the allergists office, so I was very lucky in that I didn't have to go to the ER.

It's not just a matter of taking medication and then you're fine. I felt awful for a week. The side effects of the epinephrine and steroids they load you up with make you feel absolutely terrible. I was in bed for the first two days, utterly miserable. I never want to go through that again.

I've gotten a lot more respectful of other people's allergies after that experience. Going without a snack on a couple-hour airplane flight is nothing compared to what a child with a severe peanut allergy would go through. Not to mention that it's a ruined vacation. Had I gotten hit with that on the way to WDW, I would have spent the vacation in the hotel room. No way could I have done a theme park for days after that.

CamoMama
04-05-2012, 02:22 PM
That's parents here.

This is a "revolves around me" world, and the bulk of travelers don't operate as you've described. Some people just don't care how their medical issues affest others.

Are you kidding me? I have a child with special needs, so I know what it's like to need to make special arrangements. Our lives REVOLVE around our kids' medical issues. Notifying the airline isn't about how their issues affect others, it's about making sure that kid is safe. If you don't inform the airline in advance it will not be possible for them to ensure that your medical needs are met. I don't know any parent who would risk that.

You are the one who has a "revolves around me" attitude. That kid might die, but it's okay as long as you get your peanut butter crackers, right?

LSUfan4444
04-05-2012, 02:33 PM
Sure. For the same reason that you can't bring bottles of water or other liquids or gels in amounts that large through security.

That doesn't really explain the logic behind it, it just gives an example of something else that isnt allowed.


I'm sure if you had a tube of PB or a packet of jelly that were under 3 oz and packed in your one-quart ziplock bag, no one would bat an eye. But if you had a full jar of jelly and a full jar of PB ... well ... there's a lot that can be hidden in that, if you're inclinded to do so.

Now that explains a possibility, but if is to protect against being able to hide something inside of it, then it is totally different than bringing a full bottle of water through security. What can you hide inside a bottle of water that you can't hide in a PB&J sandwich?


And -- unrelated to the security thing -- why would you WANT to carry a full jar of PB and a full jar of jelly onto a plane? ....... And if you want to bring PB and jelly with you on the plane so that you can make your own sandwiches once you get to the resort, then I can't believe that the prices in Florida -- even at Disney -- are so much higher that it would be worth lugging the jars through airports rather than just buying them once you get to Florida.

:earsboy:

We always fly with food in our checked bags (and wine, beverages, etc) because we like certain brands of food, prefer buying local when we can and we know what we have when we leave, not deal with what we can get once we arrive. It also allows us to do less shopping once we arrive. If we could fly with certain things in our carry on, I would prefer to do so.

I undertand laws have to be drawn, it just seems silly that one guy can walk through security with a 6" meatball sub from subway (as long as he has it in a container), but I can't have a bottle of cologne or a jar of peanut butter.

kaligal
04-05-2012, 02:48 PM
Just curious, not a criticism of anyone's technique, but is there no other portable food that will deal with a blood sugar emergency aside from peanuts/peanut products/nuts?
There are. Many diabetics use that. It has the required protein and sugar. It is easy to buy, easy to carry and easy to eat. Doesn't taste bad, either. It isn't an emergency cure. But it is helpful.

People who want to avoid allergens can beg, plead, demand, shake their fists at the sky or bang their heads against the wall. It won't stop the world from moving along, as it always does.

It is stupid and dangerous to rely on other people to keep you or your child safe. This is something that must be done by you.

I never even considered that other people - the rest of the world - could be changed. I honestly don't know why anyone would. Of course it would be nice...but it won't happen. Attempting it a waste of time and energy. And, like I said, relying on it is stupid and dangerous.

The sooner people start relying on themselves to keep them and their kids safe, the better off we will all be.

Schmeck
04-05-2012, 02:56 PM
Large containers of liquids and gels are banned because they can mask/hide/be filled with propellants and explosives. Hasn't anyone been following the news in the past 5 years?

A PP asked why people can't be slightly inconvenienced for the sake of others - blame the internet. One person will hear how peanuts were banned, another will ask for tree nuts to be banned, hey, my daughter is contact allergic to bubbles and apples, can we ban those too?

There are so many allergens, and so many activists out there now. There is no way to be "slightly" inconvenienced - everyone wants their needs met, and we all know our rights.

book_junkie
04-05-2012, 03:11 PM
and because I am a control freak.

I happen to have severe environmental allergies and asthma.
If I get anywhere NEAR Febreeze, it sets me into an attack.
I read threads on here all of the time about people taking those Glade plug ins and Febreeze for their resort room, even one woman talked about putting lavender oil on the matress and pillows.
People just have no idea if they don't live with allergies.

You can add my hubby (and by marriage me) to the uber allergy club. Free and clear detergent, fabric softener, bleach alt, extra rinse, free soaps, etc. And because of his current regiment for Crohn's, hand sanitizer everywhere and wipes for seats to protect against germs.

Allergies like these are scary in person, seen it twice at different workplaces.

bumbershoot
04-05-2012, 03:16 PM
I've had one anaphylactic reaction, after an allergy shot. My throat did swell, but it was caught very quickly and I was treated right in the allergists office, so I was very lucky in that I didn't have to go to the ER.

Yikes!

I've had two mystery reactions to food, both times without ANY medication at all. Once was on my honeymoon; the Westin sent up some sort of dessert with congratulations, and I still don't know what caused the reaction, but it was scary. Just as we were about to call someone, it started to ease. It's happened one other time, but I had been diagnosed with asthma by then and had an inhaler, and it worked, even though I don't know why I had the reaction. So scary. Usually my allergies contain themselves to sneezing, and foods like dairy just "prime" me to more sneezing, but those were anomalies!



People who want to avoid allergens can beg, plead, demand, shake their fists at the sky or bang their heads against the wall. It won't stop the world from moving along, as it always does.

It is stupid and dangerous to rely on other people to keep you or your child safe. This is something that must be done by you.

I never even considered that other people - the rest of the world - could be changed. I honestly don't know why anyone would. Of course it would be nice...but it won't happen. Attempting it a waste of time and energy. And, like I said, relying on it is stupid and dangerous.

The sooner people start relying on themselves to keep them and their kids safe, the better off we will all be.

Well, I'm someone who changed their behavior based on information on a message board. I saw multiple discussions of peanut butter, and fear, and peanuts, and peanut dust, and I decided that my family would change what we bring on board. DH sometimes has problems with blood sugar, DS gets hungry FAST and can get headaches b/c of it, and we're vegetarian, so there's not a WHOLE lot we can do other than nut-based bars, etc, but we've changed.

And that's why I'm always first to respond with "it would be kind to come up with something else", because that's what I have done.

I know that not a lot of people on the dis find me to be *kind*, but my fellow passengers on airplanes, if they knew that my snacks that I bring for my family, or just the fact that we eat peanut stuff out at the gate, have changed, would consider me to be kind.

kaligal
04-05-2012, 04:25 PM
Well, I'm someone who changed their behavior based on information on a message board. I saw multiple discussions of peanut butter, and fear, and peanuts, and peanut dust, and I decided that my family would change what we bring on board. DH sometimes has problems with blood sugar, DS gets hungry FAST and can get headaches b/c of it, and we're vegetarian, so there's not a WHOLE lot we can do other than nut-based bars, etc, but we've changed.

And that's why I'm always first to respond with "it would be kind to come up with something else", because that's what I have done.

I know that not a lot of people on the dis find me to be *kind*, but my fellow passengers on airplanes, if they knew that my snacks that I bring for my family, or just the fact that we eat peanut stuff out at the gate, have changed, would consider me to be kind.
Keeping my son safe has nothing to do with whether or not a bunch of strangers would think you were kind, if only they could see inside your heart. I don't care about that. I care about my son.

Frankly, it doesn't matter if you change your eating habits or not. I can't trust you or anyone else to keep him safe. I go forth into the world assuming that danger is present and I take the necessary steps.

Trusting the rest of the world puts his life at risk and that isn't a gamble I'm prepared to take.

Eat your nuts, don't eat your nuts...doesn't matter a bit to me. I'm not counting on you.

I protect him no matter what.

luvthemouse71
04-05-2012, 04:39 PM
There are many common myths about peanut allergy. Smelling peanuts is not thought to cause systemic reactions.http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=6&ved=0CE0QFjAF&url=http%3A%2F%2Fjunkfoodscience.blogspot.com%2F20 08%2F02%2Ffood-fears-run-amuck-government-outlaws.html&ei=Zw9-T8s0gaDyBPjc5IkO&usg=AFQjCNGYRi7b0exfyv5PPvZINRf3P3ZPFg

CamoMama
04-05-2012, 06:07 PM
There are many common myths about peanut allergy. Smelling peanuts is not thought to cause systemic reactions.http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&cd=6&ved=0CE0QFjAF&url=http%3A%2F%2Fjunkfoodscience.blogspot.com%2F20 08%2F02%2Ffood-fears-run-amuck-government-outlaws.html&ei=Zw9-T8s0gaDyBPjc5IkO&usg=AFQjCNGYRi7b0exfyv5PPvZINRf3P3ZPFg

That link does make a distinction between simply smelling peanuts and inhaling peanut dust. It does say that the risk of anaphylaxis from inhaling dust is small, but it doesn't say it's not possible. Why not err on the side of caution when you're 30,000 feet in the air in a completely airtight cylinder?

luvthemouse71
04-05-2012, 06:18 PM
The doctor they interviewed stated that they did a study with highly allergic children and exposed them to peanut dust- there was not one systemic reaction. He also said that fears of peanut dust come not from scientific fact but from fear mongering.

livndisney
04-05-2012, 06:42 PM
The doctor they interviewed stated that they did a study with highly allergic children and exposed them to peanut dust- there was not one systemic reaction. He also said that fears of peanut dust come not from scientific fact but from fear mongering.

Oh sure-post logic on an emotional Dis thread:thumbsup2

fly girl
04-05-2012, 07:25 PM
Haven't read through all the posts, but after the first 5 pages I have to comment:

OK, I am currently a flight attendant for a major airline that serves peanuts on every flight. I also have been doing this for the past 15 years so I can say it with some knowledge.



If a passenger informs the airline of a peanut allergy we do one of two things.


1. If it is a mild or standard allergy we refrain from serving peanuts 3 rows forward and 3 rows aft of the person with the allergy. This is the most common occurrence. I will talk to the passenger once they board to make sure that is acceptable, and the allergy is mild. I will offer to wipe down their seat (it's leather) and tray table for them if needed.


2. If they have a SEVERE allergy the plane is cleared out of all peanut products, the entire plane is vacuumed before boarding, and the row of seats and tray tables the passenger with the allergy will be in is wiped down and disinfected. That is really all we can do.

During boarding, I will make a PA explaining the severe allergy and to refrain from consuming any products with peanuts. I will again repeat the announcement once we are in air and explaining our service.


Passengers understand, in all my years I have never heard one complaint about not being able to eat peanuts in either circumstance. Seriously, how hard is it to refrain from eating peanut products for a couple of hours? And we will always have alternative snacks to provide.



OK, hope that cleared up what the airlines do. Granted, I have only worked for one airline but my guess is that it is pretty standard protocol these days.

:)

CamoMama
04-05-2012, 07:27 PM
The doctor they interviewed stated that they did a study with highly allergic children and exposed them to peanut dust- there was not one systemic reaction. He also said that fears of peanut dust come not from scientific fact but from fear mongering.

That's actually not what the article says at all the words fear mongering do not appear.

“the typical inhalation reaction would be similar to that suffered by a cat-allergic person exposed to a cat walking into a room: itchy eyes, sneezing, and runny nose.” As he said, the “chance of a life-threatening anaphylactic reaction from airborne exposure is very small.”

Typical, not extreme; very small, not zero. He says that the smell of peanuts does not cause a reaction, but peanut dust can. The article actually mentions the presence of proteins in peanut dust and says if there is no protein there is no reaction.

Again, when death is a possibility I think we should all err on the side of caution. Especially when the inconvenience is as minor as just not eating peanuts for the short time you're on an airplane.

kaytieeldr
04-05-2012, 08:04 PM
Are you kidding me? I have a child with special needs, so I know what it's like to need to make special arrangements. Our lives REVOLVE around our kids' medical issues. Notifying the airline isn't about how their issues affect others, it's about making sure that kid is safe. If you don't inform the airline in advance it will not be possible for them to ensure that your medical needs are met. I don't know any parent who would risk that.

You are the one who has a "revolves around me" attitude. That kid might die, but it's okay as long as you get your peanut butter crackers, right?

It's great that you're proactive and inform the airline in advance of your party member's potentially life-threatening allergy (and take the first flight of the day in each direction to ensure the plane is as clean as possible, and preboard, and wipe down the area where that person will sit, and put some type of covering on the seat/armrests/tray?).

Not everybody does. Over the years here, I've seen reports from people whose fellow passengers don't mention allergies until peanuts are served.

And you have me confused with someone else. I'm the one with the self-contained pb&j sandwich.

Nicoleclaw
04-05-2012, 08:32 PM
It is not disingenuous. An airplane is isolated from medical care in the event of an anaphylactic reaction. Chances are a paramedic could reach a person within minutes of a reaction on ground. That is the difference with an airplane.

That is exactly what I was going to say. All of these other examples are on the ground in a much more open space. Plus, even with an epipen, they often need to be re-administered 15 minutes later AND even if the allergic person does not need another dose, you DO need to be in a hospital asap after the epipen is given. Epinepherine is not something to fool around with and medical attention is needed to monitor the reaction to that alone.

Nicoleclaw
04-05-2012, 08:33 PM
Haven't read through all the posts, but after the first 5 pages I have to comment:

OK, I am currently a flight attendant for a major airline that serves peanuts on every flight. I also have been doing this for the past 15 years so I can say it with some knowledge.



If a passenger informs the airline of a peanut allergy we do one of two things.


1. If it is a mild or standard allergy we refrain from serving peanuts 3 rows forward and 3 rows aft of the person with the allergy. This is the most common occurrence. I will talk to the passenger once they board to make sure that is acceptable, and the allergy is mild. I will offer to wipe down their seat (it's leather) and tray table for them if needed.


2. If they have a SEVERE allergy the plane is cleared out of all peanut products, the entire plane is vacuumed before boarding, and the row of seats and tray tables the passenger with the allergy will be in is wiped down and disinfected. That is really all we can do.

During boarding, I will make a PA explaining the severe allergy and to refrain from consuming any products with peanuts. I will again repeat the announcement once we are in air and explaining our service.


Passengers understand, in all my years I have never heard one complaint about not being able to eat peanuts in either circumstance. Seriously, how hard is it to refrain from eating peanut products for a couple of hours? And we will always have alternative snacks to provide.



OK, hope that cleared up what the airlines do. Granted, I have only worked for one airline but my guess is that it is pretty standard protocol these days.

:)

Can I ask what airline, being that my son is allergic?

Nicoleclaw
04-05-2012, 08:44 PM
because of breathing problems, i guess on my next flight i will have to put on ticket about alleregy to scentsto make sure no one uses near me. not talking about headache but serious breathing issues, ie needing oxygen. nonscented wipes okay. yes i will miss church this week because of flower scents. yes i know you want your child safe but you could be causing someone else a major problem. and yes it includes perfumes.

Honestly, that would be fine with me. I would have no problem giving something up for a few hours to help keep someone else safe and healthy....part of being a compassionate person I guess?

Mrs K
04-05-2012, 08:56 PM
It's amazing how many peanut allergy "experts" we have here! I am a pediatric nurse and have a child with severe peanut allergies. I have spent the last 16 years gathering info on food allergies, and certainly don't consider myself an expert. My DD can't even go into a candy store that sells loose nuts without having a reaction. Trust me she is not being dramatic or trying to get special treatment. She would give anything to have the freedom her friends have to eat anything and go anywhere without carrying Epi-pens and worrying about potential reactions. Yes she does lead a normal life, but it's a constant worry. Food allergies are not a choice, they are a disability, like any other disability. I seriously don't think anyone would treat a child in a wheelchair the way they treat an allergic child, or adult. I don't expect people to change their lives because my child could die, but please be considerate. You or your children won't die without having a peanutbutter sandwich on a plane, but mine could. By the way, we don't fly anymore, but the day will come that my DD will want or have to fly. She and others deserve to be safe. Thanks for letting me vent. I'm stepping off my soap box now.

disneyshakeygirl
04-05-2012, 09:28 PM
It's amazing how many peanut allergy "experts" we have here! I am a pediatric nurse and have a child with severe peanut allergies. I have spent the last 16 years gathering info on food allergies, and certainly don't consider myself an expert. My DD can't even go into a candy store that sells loose nuts without having a reaction. Trust me she is not being dramatic or trying to get special treatment. She would give anything to have the freedom her friends have to eat anything and go anywhere without carrying Epi-pens and worrying about potential reactions. Yes she does lead a normal life, but it's a constant worry. Food allergies are not a choice, they are a disability, like any other disability. I seriously don't think anyone would treat a child in a wheelchair the way they treat an allergic child, or adult. I don't expect people to change their lives because my child could die, but please be considerate. You or your children won't die without having a peanutbutter sandwich on a plane, but mine could. By the way, we don't fly anymore, but the day will come that my DD will want or have to fly. She and others deserve to be safe. Thanks for letting me vent. I'm stepping off my soap box now.

Thank you - I have severe food allergies (mine fit into the percentage of airborne as well) and this is how I feel. To those who are on this thread, please take this time to read what I have to say. It's rambly, but I have to get it out.

I did not choose to have these allergies, I do not want them. At times, I feel they are an embarrassment and a burden. I would do ANYTHING to be rid of them. However, they are a part of me and that's that. As Mrs.K mentions above, I do not expect you to change your lives for me. I know my allergies, and I know what precautions to take. I know what sort of impact my allergies have - in fact, a major airline told me to cancel my flight this upcoming summer and walk. To England.

Please, please try to look at things from our point of view. Please, it's a few hours without a peanut butter sandwich. We have our lives to worry about in those few hours if there are nuts. When I was little, my parents phoned up the same major airline that I'm flying to England with, and offered to replace all the nuts on the plane with anything the airline wanted. From chips to caviar, they said "Take your pick". The airline said nope, our passengers demand nuts.

We are considering other people's feelings here. But please consider ours. Again though, I don't expect you to change your lives, but please think about our lives too.

CamoMama
04-06-2012, 12:13 AM
It's great that you're proactive and inform the airline in advance of your party member's potentially life-threatening allergy (and take the first flight of the day in each direction to ensure the plane is as clean as possible, and preboard, and wipe down the area where that person will sit, and put some type of covering on the seat/armrests/tray?).

Not everybody does. Over the years here, I've seen reports from people whose fellow passengers don't mention allergies until peanuts are served.

And you have me confused with someone else. I'm the one with the self-contained pb&j sandwich.

I responded to what I quoted, period. You need to learn to read. I didn't say my child has an allergy, I said my child has special needs. And I call BS. If a parent has a child with a LIFE THREATENING allergy, they do not wait until the last minute. Mild allergies I'll buy that, but life threatening? Not a chance. Whether or not your sandwich is "self contained" you are possibly threatening the life of another person for your own convenience. That makes you a terrible human being.

kaytieeldr
04-06-2012, 03:47 AM
I actually do know how to read, very well.

Believe as you wish, I have no intention of searching through seven years of threads for random posts. It does happen. Who knows why? The traveler doesn't think about the possibility of peanuts on the flight until they're on the plane or the snack's being served? They booked online? They're jerks?

I'm confused why it was necessary to quote-endquote self-contained. The sandwich is prepared in a factory on bread easy to eat but sturdy enough not to break or crack accidentally, in circular form with its filling completely inside the sandwich and the entire circumfurence securely crimped. How is that not self-contained?

I tried (again) to find information about deaths from peanut allergies on flights. Nothing. Then I looked for fatalities period. According to this, there are 100-200 TOTAL deaths from food allergies in the U.S. annually; the second response indicates about 11 or 12 of those are due to peanut allergies.

Small comfort if it's your loved one, I'm aware; but while exposure to peanut protiens (dust) could be fatal in highly allergic persons, the actual number of deaths imply rarity.

This http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/12/10/nut_allergy_hysteria/ is another interesting article. It's not about the above poster's daughter's situation, but rather in part about how the fear of peanut allergies "could" (that word again ;)) be exacerbating the problem

fly girl
04-06-2012, 06:49 AM
Can I ask what airline, being that my son is allergic?

Check your pm.

CamoMama
04-06-2012, 07:06 AM
Small comfort if it's your loved one, I'm aware; but while exposure to peanut protiens (dust) could be fatal in highly allergic persons, the actual number of deaths imply rarity.

This http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/12/10/nut_allergy_hysteria/ is another interesting article. It's not about the above poster's daughter's situation, but rather in part about how the fear of peanut allergies "could" (that word again ;)) be exacerbating the problem

Seriously? You admit that it is possible, and that if it was your child the fact that its rare doesn't make it any easier. Yet you would still endanger someone else's life to eat a sandwich? I know what uncrustables are. My kids have eaten them once or twice, but not since I paid attention to the label. They are not smush proof. Or crack proof. Or anything proof. They can and do leak. It happens. And even if they don't, why would you want to take any chance at all with someone's life, just to prove a point? Just wow. People are really and truly horrible.

They really need to close this thread. It's kind of disgusting.

maxiesmom
04-06-2012, 07:12 AM
There are thousands of food options out there. I can't understand why it would be a big deal to avoid the 1 that is well known for causing allergic reactions.

As others have stated, there is no way to get the kind of medical care an allergic reaction warrants in an airplane. Once you use an Epi Pen you need to get to the hospital immediately. Kind of hard to do if you are flying thousands of feet above the earth.

okeydokey
04-06-2012, 07:20 AM
There are thousands of food options out there. I can't understand why it would be a big deal to avoid the 1 that is well known for causing allergic reactions.

As others have stated, there is no way to get the kind of medical care an allergic reaction warrants in an airplane. Once you use an Epi Pen you need to get to the hospital immediately. Kind of hard to do if you are flying thousands of feet above the earth.

I agree. I honestly don't see what is so horrible about not eating one particular food for a 2 or 3 hour period. To prove a point at someone else's expense is just so baffling.

And to answer the OPs first question, we usually don't carry snacks on a plane if it is going to be around dinner time. We just pick something up at the airport or delay a meal an hour or so if we need to.

deegack
04-06-2012, 07:37 AM
There are thousands of food options out there. I can't understand why it would be a big deal to avoid the 1 that is well known for causing allergic reactions.

As others have stated, there is no way to get the kind of medical care an allergic reaction warrants in an airplane. Once you use an Epi Pen you need to get to the hospital immediately. Kind of hard to do if you are flying thousands of feet above the earth.

There are very few proteins that don't require refrigeration. So taking a turkey sandwich is not an easy solution. You can do it but it is cumbersome and requires planning. While you can slap together pb&j and throw it in you bag. Some people have medical needs that require they eat meals at certain times like the elderly diabetic people dismissed up thread. (why is her disability dismissed so easily? She could have blood sugar issues that make her slip into a diabetic coma and require hospitalization and her pb sandwich could prevent that.)
I personally am flying in the morning but landing right at dd lunch time. Its pretty hard to argue with a two year old and I don't want to just feed her junk and a cereal bar is only a temporary solution. We are planning on eating at the airport before boarding me but if we are delayed I probably will pull out an uncrustable (whole wheat of course) so she isn't screaming that she is hungry.

Hannathy
04-06-2012, 09:36 AM
There are thousands of food options out there. I can't understand why it would be a big deal to avoid the 1 that is well known for causing allergic reactions.



Because there isn't just 1 food!



I love how all the scientific facts and proof is just thrown out the window on this thread but all the emotions and personal stories are automatically believed!

Get the real scientific facts. You have to have peanut protein in the air to have a REAL not emotionally based reaction, peanut butter does not release protein in the air so no inhalation danger to the allergy person. None, nada, the empty set. If they get them selves worked up from the smell I can't help that.

Yes from loose peanuts they can have a reaction BUT only in certain concentrations. Like the whole plane opening their peanut bags all at once, 1 person at the other end of the plane isn't going to do it-the physics of it do not allow enough parts per whatever in the air to reach the person.


I still haven't heard from any of the people with a peanut allergy my question.
Why don't you wear a mask and gloves? That way you are protecting you and claim that is all you want to do.

kaligal
04-06-2012, 10:21 AM
Because there isn't just 1 food!



I love how all the scientific facts and proof is just thrown out the window on this thread but all the emotions and personal stories are automatically believed!

Get the real scientific facts. You have to have peanut protein in the air to have a REAL not emotionally based reaction, peanut butter does not release protein in the air so no inhalation danger to the allergy person. None, nada, the empty set. If they get them selves worked up from the smell I can't help that.

Yes from loose peanuts they can have a reaction BUT only in certain concentrations. Like the whole plane opening their peanut bags all at once, 1 person at the other end of the plane isn't going to do it-the physics of it do not allow enough parts per whatever in the air to reach the person.


I still haven't heard from any of the people with a peanut allergy my question.
Why don't you wear a mask and gloves? That way you are protecting you and claim that is all you want to do.Outside a hospital, the masks draw attention and are embarrassing. They make a kid different. It's a stupid reason not to wear it, but a powerful one.

You have to understand how frightening it is to know your child can die.

Many people don't believe that allergies like this exist and those folks are beyond reason...and honestly, too dumb to bother with. if you're one of those people, just say so...spare people the burden of explaining stuff to someone who simply can't understand it.

Especially if your child has already had an anaphylactic reaction...it is a very scary thing.

Of course mothers will become emotional.

I never bit my tongue so hard as I did the day a teacher's actions caused my son to into anaphylaxis. Very emotional.

For these moms, keeping the child alive is a much harder task then it is for others. It is part of daily life. And it does take a toll.

What they really are saying is, "This is so scary and hard for me that I want it to just go away and have everything be fine, so I can stop worrying. The stress of the worry alone is almost too much to bear. Help me make this go away, will you?"

It's not going anywhere. Even the ones who yell and scream and pretend to make it about other people being bad for eating nuts know its not going anywhere. But it is hard for them.

Lighten up on the moms.

livndisney
04-06-2012, 11:17 AM
Outside a hospital, the masks draw attention and are embarrassing. They make a kid different. It's a stupid reason not to wear it, but a powerful one.

You have to understand how frightening it is to know your child can die.

Many people don't believe that allergies like this exist and those folks are beyond reason...and honestly, too dumb to bother with. if you're one of those people, just say so...spare people the burden of explaining stuff to someone who simply can't understand it.

Especially if your child has already had an anaphylactic reaction...it is a very scary thing.

Of course mothers will become emotional.

I never bit my tongue so hard as I did the day a teacher's actions caused my son to into anaphylaxis. Very emotional.

For these moms, keeping the child alive is a much harder task then it is for others. It is part of daily life. And it does take a toll.

What they really are saying is, "This is so scary and hard for me that I want it to just go away and have everything be fine, so I can stop worrying. The stress of the worry alone is almost too much to bear. Help me make this go away, will you?"

It's not going anywhere. Even the ones who yell and scream and pretend to make it about other people being bad for eating nuts know its not going anywhere. But it is hard for them.

Lighten up on the moms.

Ok, but if the Mom's are so emotional worrying their kids could die-why would they be concerned that wearing a mask makes the child different? I would do anything to keep my kid alive. If wearing a mask keeps then alive and healthy why not do it? Why force your needs on everyone else?

Personally I just don't buy the whole a mask makes my kid different. Using that logic no kids would be in wheelchairs, have braces, or wear glasses.

I have a kid with allergies(if I walked on a plane and asked for all the people on the plane to refrain from eating all of the allergens(or even just the serious ones, trust me no one would be happy.) I also have allergies (also life threatening), so it is not that I "don't understand" trust me I DO. But I have to be reasonable. If something saves my life or my kids- I don't care how silly it looks I am going to do it. Because my allergies are my problem.

Getting "emotional" and making unreasonable demands just makes it harder for everyone else.

danny1649
04-06-2012, 11:19 AM
On our Transportation Board can give you solid information to your question.Though I do feel it has been answered for you with good replies. Thanks Danny

maxiesmom
04-06-2012, 11:22 AM
There are very few proteins that don't require refrigeration. So taking a turkey sandwich is not an easy solution. You can do it but it is cumbersome and requires planning. While you can slap together pb&j and throw it in you bag. Some people have medical needs that require they eat meals at certain times like the elderly diabetic people dismissed up thread. (why is her disability dismissed so easily? She could have blood sugar issues that make her slip into a diabetic coma and require hospitalization and her pb sandwich could prevent that.)


It is easy to freeze a bag a peas, and use that to keep your turkey sandwhich cold. :thumbsup2 So I'm not dismissing someone else's medical need. It is easy enough to pack a food that isn't such a known allergen. There is no reason why someone has to have peanut butter (or peanut products) and only peanut butter.

PaulaSB12
04-06-2012, 11:30 AM
I've only flown maybe 3 times int he last 4 years and I can tell you that I have had it happen twice. Kids today are more allergic than ever, and yes, more kids go through MCO than any other airport in the US.



:scared1::scared1::scared1: It's like people are saying hey, I don't like peanutbutter but I'll just say I'm allergic. Peanut allergies are often deadly. Would you really be so selfish as to possibly kill another kid? Seriously? Perhaps you are correct, but perhaps kids wipe their mouths with their hands and smear it on the seat, or wipe their mouths on a napkin which then gets carted down the aisle right past a peanut allergic kid. Really? You would rather KILL a child on their way to the Happiest Place on Earth just so your kid can have PB? Wow.
That is a little over the top eat a peanut butter sandwich and KILL A CHILD really you can't live your life on what if, nor should you as a allergy child's parents expect everyone else to not eat a product because of your child.

livndisney
04-06-2012, 11:32 AM
It is easy to freeze a bag a peas, and use that to keep your turkey sandwhich cold. :thumbsup2 So I'm not dismissing someone else's medical need. It is easy enough to pack a food that isn't such a known allergen. There is no reason why someone has to have peanut butter (or peanut products) and only peanut butter.

In YOUR opinion it is easy. In others reality it is not. By making these judgements you are dismissing someone else's medical need.

kaligal
04-06-2012, 11:53 AM
Ok, but if the Mom's are so emotional worrying their kids could die-why would they be concerned that wearing a mask makes the child different? I would do anything to keep my kid alive. If wearing a mask keeps then alive and healthy why not do it? Why force your needs on everyone else?

Personally I just don't buy the whole a mask makes my kid different. Using that logic no kids would be in wheelchairs, have braces, or wear glasses.

I have a kid with allergies(if I walked on a plane and asked for all the people on the plane to refrain from eating all of the allergens(or even just the serious ones, trust me no one would be happy.) I also have allergies (also life threatening), so it is not that I "don't understand" trust me I DO. But I have to be reasonable. If something saves my life or my kids- I don't care how silly it looks I am going to do it. Because my allergies are my problem.

Getting "emotional" and making unreasonable demands just makes it harder for everyone else.You don't buy it. That's fine. It's not for sale.

And by the by, moms who had the choice to not have their kid in a wheelchair would also elect to not do that.

If you want to beat up on moms of kids with life-threananing conditions...or in wheelchairs, have at it.

I was just explaining why it might be nice not to do that.

Lighten up on the moms or don't. I don't care much which path you choose.

maxiesmom
04-06-2012, 11:55 AM
In YOUR opinion it is easy. In others reality it is not. By making these judgements you are dismissing someone else's medical need.

How is throwing a bag of frozen peas in with a turkey sandwhich not easy? Because I honestly can't see how it is not.:confused3

livndisney
04-06-2012, 12:02 PM
You don't buy it. That's fine. It's not for sale.

And by the by, moms who had the choice to not have their kid in a wheelchair would also elect to not do that.

If you want to beat up on moms of kids with life-threananing conditions...or in wheelchairs, have at it.

I was just explaining why it might be nice not to do that.

Lighten up on the moms or don't. I don't care much which path you choose.

You completely missed the point. Let's get rid of the "emotion" and look at the logic.

Of course we moms don't want our kids in a wheelchair. Just like we don't want them to have allergies. But that is not a choice.

No Mom is going to choose to not have her kid in a wheelchair if the chair HELPS the child. No Mom expects people(total strangers) to carry her child around correct? Of course they don't, they get their child a wheelchair.

If a mask keeps a child alive(helps the child) than that is a logical solution. Demanding that no one eat peanuts/peanut butter is not logical-it is emotional.

Personally I do not want to have to rely on total strangers to keep my kid(or myself) alive.

kaligal
04-06-2012, 12:05 PM
It is easy to freeze a bag a peas, and use that to keep your turkey sandwhich cold. :thumbsup2 So I'm not dismissing someone else's medical need. It is easy enough to pack a food that isn't such a known allergen. There is no reason why someone has to have peanut butter (or peanut products) and only peanut butter.
Spend about six months purchasing, making and carrying around turkey sandwiches...and bags of frozen peas...and then come back to tell us that it is so easy.

I think you'll find it easier, cheaper and less wasteful to toss some crackers in your purse and forget about them until you need them.

It isn't just pb, either.

If you want to stop using thing that trigger allergies, there are many things that need to be changed. And the entire world has to change with you or it is no use at all.

Hannathy
04-06-2012, 12:05 PM
How is throwing a bag of frozen peas in with a turkey sandwhich not easy? Because I honestly can't see how it is not.:confused3

It is a lot bigger, takes up more room. And if you are short on space can be a big difference.

Adds weight to carry

It is wet, the condensation can get on everything

Only stays cold so long, my Peanut butter will last a very long time.

You now have a bag of peas to throw away and deal with
it is wasteful, why should I waste a bag of peas for no good reason? wasteful for the cost and just the idea of throwing away good food for no good reason.

I will do what I need to do and can do to help people when the request is reasonable and scientifically based. If not I won't, I don't live my life making decisions based solely on emotions.

kaligal
04-06-2012, 12:09 PM
You completely missed the point. Let's get rid of the "emotion" and look at the logic.

Of course we moms don't want our kids in a wheelchair. Just like we don't want them to have allergies. But that is not a choice.

No Mom is going to choose to not have her kid in a wheelchair if the chair HELPS the child. No Mom expects people(total strangers) to carry her child around correct? Of course they don't, they get their child a wheelchair.

If a mask keeps a child alive(helps the child) than that is a logical solution. Demanding that no one eat peanuts/peanut butter is not logical-it is emotional.

Personally I do not want to have to rely on total strangers to keep my kid(or myself) alive.
And you will please point out where I suggested that anyone should demand anything.

Honestly, what ARE you talking about?

livndisney
04-06-2012, 12:11 PM
How is throwing a bag of frozen peas in with a turkey sandwhich not easy? Because I honestly can't see how it is not.:confused3

A vegatarian child cannot eat turkey.
A child with sensory issues cannot eat turkey.

Let's not oversimplfy this ok? Not every solution works for everyone. For example for years I worked with a disabled student who everyday ate the same lunch. Changing his lunch was not an option. He ate 1/2 of a peanut butter sandwich(on white bread).

Throwing a bag of peas in with a turkey sandwich was not "easy" for him.

TDC Nala
04-06-2012, 12:23 PM
I thought the thread was discussing the airline's possible request that people not eat peanut products on a flight due to an allergic passenger. Not a demand that no one ever eat any peanut butter anywhere.

At any rate the airlines can't force their passengers to not eat the food they brought with them. You do have to consider that you may freak someone out (allergic person or parent of the allergic person) by pulling out that sandwich. Or when they smell the peanut butter. Even if you think they don't really have any reason to be freaked out. Depends on your attitude toward that, I guess.

livndisney
04-06-2012, 12:25 PM
And you will please point out where I suggested that anyone should demand anything.

Honestly, what ARE you talking about?

Oh, I am sorry-let me try and simply it for you.

You stated:the masks draw attention and are embarrassing. They make a kid different.

To which I replied:
Ok, but if the Mom's are so emotional worrying their kids could die-why would they be concerned that wearing a mask makes the child different? I would do anything to keep my kid alive. If wearing a mask keeps then alive and healthy why not do it?

You stated (more than once-but not demanding)
Lighten up on the moms.
Lighten up on the moms or don't. I don't care much which path you choose.

As far as what I am "talking" about, to put it simply-the best thing we can do as allergy parents is lose the emotion(we all know kids pick up on that). If more Mom's applied logic and not emotion, they may just find people trying to be reasonable.

cinderella73
04-06-2012, 12:57 PM
And they should be considerate of others also!

I will eat my PB&J because there is no scientific reason not to. Me eating a PB&J does no harm to an allergy person unless they plan on grabbing it and eating it. Peanut butter does not release peanut protein into the air and that is what they react to. So I will not open a pack of peanuts right under their noses because that is a risk but I will eat my no risk to them sandwich.

My child had a anaphalatic reaction to someone opening a PB granola bar in the same room when he was 3 . It was terrifying .Until it happened I didnt know it was possible either . The reaction to just a airborn scent in PN allergies has been proven.

Ita always going to depend on the persons sensitivity , immune system, just how close they are sitting , etc. whether or not they will react. Skin contact wth the nut residue can also cause reactions , sometimes just hives , sometimes all out anaphalaxis. Its just never worth taking that risk when you are talking about someones life.

cinderella73
04-06-2012, 01:10 PM
Because there isn't just 1 food!



I love how all the scientific facts and proof is just thrown out the window on this thread but all the emotions and personal stories are automatically believed!

Get the real scientific facts. You have to have peanut protein in the air to have a REAL not emotionally based reaction, peanut butter does not release protein in the air so no inhalation danger to the allergy person. None, nada, the empty set. If they get them selves worked up from the smell I can't help that.

Yes from loose peanuts they can have a reaction BUT only in certain concentrations. Like the whole plane opening their peanut bags all at once, 1 person at the other end of the plane isn't going to do it-the physics of it do not allow enough parts per whatever in the air to reach the person.


I still haven't heard from any of the people with a peanut allergy my question.
Why don't you wear a mask and gloves? That way you are protecting you and claim that is all you want to do.

Just wanted to add that we do use gloves. We take them with us everywhere. We keep a mask handy also , but lets face it , kids do not want to wear them for long. My kid is more than willing to put one on intil we get out of a danger zone. He remembers having real not imaginary reactions to air born scent from when he was to little to know what Pb even was , hence not having a mental reaction. He had no idea the granola opened was PB and I had no idea at the time that you could even react to just scent myself. He could not breath. Imagine watching your 3 yr old gasping for air .

Even if you dont think its a real risk , I am sure you can agree its not worth the risk.

Remember that many young children would squirm and pull a mask off. And then you have teenagers who half the time are to "cool" to even carry a Epi-pen let alone a mask. A scary thought for us moms.

So yes there are those of us that have issues severe enough to warrant a mask and gloves. And plenty of us do. But its hard enough to feel like your inconviencing others when you only want to stay safe. I dont want to tell anyone what to do. I just pray they care enough to do so.

Hannathy
04-06-2012, 01:21 PM
Remember that many young children would squirm and pull a mask off. And then you have teenagers who half the time are to "cool" to even carry a Epi-pen let alone a mask. A scary thought for us moms.



Then you put it on in a way they can't take it off if it is that critical.

And that is a bunch of bull about the teen ager! They are old enough to know better. I am not going to do unnecessary things for an immature teenager, who should know better, or face the consequences.

And you say they don't want to do something, well then,You are asking us to have our kids and ourselves do things we don't want to. Why is it ok for us but not the allergy folks?

deegack
04-06-2012, 01:29 PM
It is a lot bigger, takes up more room. And if you are short on space can be a big difference.

Adds weight to carry

It is wet, the condensation can get on everything

Only stays cold so long, my Peanut butter will last a very long time.

You now have a bag of peas to throw away and deal with
it is wasteful, why should I waste a bag of peas for no good reason? wasteful for the cost and just the idea of throwing away good food for no good reason.

I will do what I need to do and can do to help people when the request is reasonable and scientifically based. If not I won't, I don't live my life making decisions based solely on emotions.
Exactly and honestly I have enough to remember to bring for my own disabled child. Im not
going to add weight and bulk
to my bags because someone may have a peanut allergy. And what would I do for the return trip? Peas don't stay frozen forever and I dont like to throw away food. If I was seated right next to someone with a peanut allergy I wouldnt give it to her but then they would have to listen to her I'm hungry until we land. Like I said cereal bars and goldfish only do so much.

deegack
04-06-2012, 01:34 PM
Then you put it on in a way they can't take it off if it is that critical.

And that is a bunch of bull about the teen ager! They are old enough to know better. I am not going to do unnecessary things for an immature teenager, who should know better, or face the consequences.

And you say they don't want to do something, well then,You are asking us to have our kids and ourselves do things we don't want to. Why is it ok for us but not the allergy folks?

Dd doesnt like to wear her ankle braces but she does. My nephew nephew has a severe lung issues and doesn't like to use his nebulizer several times a day and his vest to help declog his lungs but he does. We all do things we don't want to. At some point a teenager is going to have to advocate for himself. Carrying an epi pen is the tip of the iceberg.

cinderella73
04-06-2012, 02:07 PM
Then you put it on in a way they can't take it off if it is that critical.

And that is a bunch of bull about the teen ager! They are old enough to know better. I am not going to do unnecessary things for an immature teenager, who should know better, or face the consequences.

And you say they don't want to do something, well then,You are asking us to have our kids and ourselves do things we don't want to. Why is it ok for us but not the allergy folks?

Of course if its my child I would do everything that you suggested , and I do. If my kids forgets their Epi-pens they get seriously grounded . If my kid didnt want to wear that mask I would hold it in place intil the danger was gone. But not all moms are comfortable with that. Each mom has to make hard choices between providing safety and alowing their child a sense of normalacy . Thankfully my kids are good about dong what they need to to stay safe , but I dont judge others who may not use masks or gloves when needed.

I also remember what its like to be a " I know more than everyone else" teenager. Even though my kid knows better and was raised to respect his allergy and take safety seriously, not everyones kid is.

Would I want some one elses teenager to have a reaction just because they were stupid enough to not carry that Epi ? Nope.You said they should deal with the consequences, but you do know those consequences are death right ? Most of us know that at that age most kids have this false sense of immortality . They do stupid crazy things sometimes.

If I see some kid skateboarding down a hill with headphones on and car coming toward him do I say " Stupid kid should know better." and let him get hit ? Or do I jump in and try to save the kid ? I would try to help him even if he was irresponsible. Its called compassion and love for others. But I think some people are to concerned with self entitlement to see what its really all about.

Do you think a smoker is entitled to smoke in a enclosed enviorment next to someone with a oxygen tank also? No one says anyone should not eat Pb or smoke or anything else. But a couple hours of refrain and consideration for others should not infringe upon your personal being to greatly.

kaligal
04-06-2012, 02:08 PM
Oh, I am sorry-let me try and simply it for you.

You stated:the masks draw attention and are embarrassing. They make a kid different.

To which I replied:
Ok, but if the Mom's are so emotional worrying their kids could die-why would they be concerned that wearing a mask makes the child different? I would do anything to keep my kid alive. If wearing a mask keeps then alive and healthy why not do it?

You stated (more than once-but not demanding)
Lighten up on the moms.
Lighten up on the moms or don't. I don't care much which path you choose.

As far as what I am "talking" about, to put it simply-the best thing we can do as allergy parents is lose the emotion(we all know kids pick up on that). If more Mom's applied logic and not emotion, they may just find people trying to be reasonable.
You should direct your comments toward people who have disputed that.

And if you want your kids to wear masks, like Prince's kids, go for it.

I'm not here to criticize other people's parenting or to chastise them for being emotional when they have children who could die. If that's your thing, like I said, have at it.

But Puhleeze (!) direct your arguments about people not demanding stuff of others toward someone who actually did that.

Anya22
04-06-2012, 02:19 PM
I didn't read every single post in this thread, but I just had to make a request. I have a severely peanut allergic child. I don't expect all of the passengers to leave their PB&Js at home, but I do have one request (and I wish I could tell the whole wide world). If you do bring anything onto the plane for you or your kids to eat that contains peanuts, please wipe your hands and kids' hands with wet wipes afterward. Thanks!

goofy4tink
04-06-2012, 02:26 PM
Because there isn't just 1 food!



I love how all the scientific facts and proof is just thrown out the window on this thread but all the emotions and personal stories are automatically believed!

Get the real scientific facts. You have to have peanut protein in the air to have a REAL not emotionally based reaction, peanut butter does not release protein in the air so no inhalation danger to the allergy person. None, nada, the empty set. If they get them selves worked up from the smell I can't help that.

Yes from loose peanuts they can have a reaction BUT only in certain concentrations. Like the whole plane opening their peanut bags all at once, 1 person at the other end of the plane isn't going to do it-the physics of it do not allow enough parts per whatever in the air to reach the person.


I still haven't heard from any of the people with a peanut allergy my question.
Why don't you wear a mask and gloves? That way you are protecting you and claim that is all you want to do.
Okay....we are not just talking about airborne here...but also the leaving of peanut oil behind. And I think I was pretty clear about that...you get a 4 y/o kid, sitting there, eating his pb sandwich on the flight. Okay, no biggie. But, along comes a 6 y/o, with a severe peanut allergy. Mom proceeds to clean the area to the best of her ability and then puts a sheet down, over the seat and arms. Ds now comes along and plops himself down in that same seat. But about 20 mins into the flight, his little fingers wipe across an area that still had peanut residue on it. He then puts his fingers in his mouth, nose, eyes..whatever. And now...he reacts.
Should he wear a mask?? Maybe. Should he be wearing gloves? Maybe. But neither of those things would have prevented the reaction due to the circumstances.

Spend about six months purchasing, making and carrying around turkey sandwiches...and bags of frozen peas...and then come back to tell us that it is so easy.

I think you'll find it easier, cheaper and less wasteful to toss some crackers in your purse and forget about them until you need them.

It isn't just pb, either.

If you want to stop using thing that trigger allergies, there are many things that need to be changed. And the entire world has to change with you or it is no use at all.
6 months??? Really?? Where does that number come from??? It's one flight. Try traveling with a teen who is allergic to almost everything...diet consists of white boiled rice, sweet potatoes, kale and bacon. Yeah, seriously. I'm sure she would be thrilled to be able to put together a turkey sandwich and a bag of frozen peas.

It is a lot bigger, takes up more room. And if you are short on space can be a big difference.

Adds weight to carry

It is wet, the condensation can get on everything

Only stays cold so long, my Peanut butter will last a very long time.

You now have a bag of peas to throw away and deal with
it is wasteful, why should I waste a bag of peas for no good reason? wasteful for the cost and just the idea of throwing away good food for no good reason.

I will do what I need to do and can do to help people when the request is reasonable and scientifically based. If not I won't, I don't live my life making decisions based solely on emotions.
Again...seriously??? Weight?? Yeah, about 8oz. You put it in something that isn't going to be affected by condensation. And yeah, you just slow down at a trash bin and toss the bag of peas out.
You keep harping on airborne, but that isn't the only issue. It is a touchable issue that is probably more serious.

I'm really glad Danny moved this thread over here. Much easier to deal with. So, having said that....you want to keep eating pb/j sandwiches? Have at it. But don't come here, going on about the 'emotional' responses of the moms of allergic kids. It's those of you who refuse to give up that one sandwich that seem to be the most emotional.
My dd lives on pb.....but we no longer take it along on flights. Yes, we always have packaged p/b crackers with us. But, we don't eat them on the plane. Of course, that may be due to dd's watching her best friend almost die from an allergic reaction last spring. So she is probably a lot more empathetic than most.

The lack of empathy here is overwhelming to me. :confused3 It's very sad.

goofy4tink
04-06-2012, 02:34 PM
Of course if its my child I would do everything that you suggested , and I do. If my kids forgets their Epi-pens they get seriously grounded . If my kid didnt want to wear that mask I would hold it in place intil the danger was gone. But not all moms are comfortable with that. Each mom has to make hard choices between providing safety and alowing their child a sense of normalacy . Thankfully my kids are good about dong what they need to to stay safe , but I dont judge others who may not use masks or gloves when needed.

I also remember what its like to be a " I know more than everyone else" teenager. Even though my kid knows better and was raised to respect his allergy and take safety seriously, not everyones kid is.

Would I want some one elses teenager to have a reaction just because they were stupid enough to not carry that Epi ? Nope.You said they should deal with the consequences, but you do know those consequences are death right ? Most of us know that at that age most kids have this false sense of immortality . They do stupid crazy things sometimes.

If I see some kid skateboarding down a hill with headphones on and car coming toward him do I say " Stupid kid should know better." and let him get hit ? Or do I jump in and try to save the kid ? I would try to help him even if he was irresponsible. Its called compassion and love for others. But I think some people are to concerned with self entitlement to see what its really all about.

Do you think a smoker is entitled to smoke in a enclosed enviorment next to someone with a oxygen tank also? No one says anyone should not eat Pb or smoke or anything else. But a couple hours of refrain and consideration for others should not infringe upon your personal being to greatly.
I have to tell you...when my dd heads to WDW in June, with her two best friends, for their high school graduation trip??? You better know that my dd is going to know how to administer that Epi-pen for her friend. Her friend had an almost fatal reaction last year in NYC....she told the Jamba Juice people she needed her drink made in a perfectly clean machine, one that hadn't been used for dairy since she has a huge dairy allergy. All her friends heard exactly what she said....and repeated it me later. But, the Jamba Juice employee made a mistake..not only didn't she make the drink in a 'clean' machine, she added dairy to it!!! Seems she was chatting with her buddies and not paying attention even though dd's friend repeated what she needed. Well... about 4 mins later, she reacted. She reacted so quickly that she wasn't able to administer the Epi herself. Thank God there was a Verizon store right there, with a manager who had just been at the hospital with his brother the day before...with a major allergic reaction. So, he knew exactly what to do. The ambulance EMTs came and got her to the hospital. The doctor told her and her dad that she had come within about 15 mins of dying!!
You know that the other two girls will know exactly what to do in WDW...just in case!!!

cinderella73
04-06-2012, 02:53 PM
I have to tell you...when my dd heads to WDW in June, with her two best friends, for their high school graduation trip??? You better know that my dd is going to know how to administer that Epi-pen for her friend. Her friend had an almost fatal reaction last year in NYC....she told the Jamba Juice people she needed her drink made in a perfectly clean machine, one that hadn't been used for dairy since she has a huge dairy allergy. All her friends heard exactly what she said....and repeated it me later. But, the Jamba Juice employee made a mistake..not only didn't she make the drink in a 'clean' machine, she added dairy to it!!! Seems she was chatting with her buddies and not paying attention even though dd's friend repeated what she needed. Well... about 4 mins later, she reacted. She reacted so quickly that she wasn't able to administer the Epi herself. Thank God there was a Verizon store right there, with a manager who had just been at the hospital with his brother the day before...with a major allergic reaction. So, he knew exactly what to do. The ambulance EMTs came and got her to the hospital. The doctor told her and her dad that she had come within about 15 mins of dying!!
You know that the other two girls will know exactly what to do in WDW...just in case!!!

Your daughter sounds like a awesome kid and great friend. I always tell my kids when we have a refresher class on using the epi ( about once a year) that its not just them. They never know when they might need one to save someone else also. I think it gives them a sense of purpose and importance to know what they are learning is important on so many levels.

Scary about your DD's friend! Thank God she had her Epi on her ! Disney is one of the better places to be with food allergies . I hope they have a wonderful and safe trip !

kaytieeldr
04-06-2012, 09:31 PM
Outside a hospital, the masks draw attention and are embarrassing. They make a kid different. It's a stupid reason not to wear it, but a powerful one.Is it enough more embarrassing than altering the entire food service plan of a flight (or classroom, or school) on the chance that exposure to the allergen could cause a possibly dangerous physiological reaction in an allergic person? I'm not doubting the seriousness of food allergies*, but again, I can't find any report of a fatality from exposure to peanut product on planes.

You have to understand how frightening it is to know your child can die. Of course it's frightening. No parent should outlive their child. According to the information I found online very early this morning - so I don't have the sites saved, but if I can find it anyone can - there are between 100 and 200 deaths annually from all food allergies. Only 5%-10% of those appear to be peanut-related.

Many people don't believe that allergies like this exist and those folks are beyond reason.Fortunately, most people DO believe food allergies like these exist. More than twice as many people in this country are allergic to shellfish - yet there isn't the fanaticism over that allergy that there is with peanuts... despite the exposure reactions being equally severe.

While understanding that peanut protien exposure could be fatal, it's less than reasonable to expect the world to adapt to the allergic persons. Would it surprise you to know that only about 1.1% of Americans of all ages have peanut allergies - yet entire planes, even schools (three in my mid-size city, including the only middle school) are entirely peanut-free?

It's not going anywhere. Even the ones who yell and scream and pretend to make it about other people being bad for eating nuts know its not going anywhere. But it is hard for them.
Lighten up on the moms.I'm an adult, but I'm really reluctant to "lighten up on" people who fake concern for my occasional food choices (the HFCS/wrong about trans-fats poster) or call me a horrible person because I'm capable of eating a sandwich that offends them without disseminating any of the offending product. Just like they're standing up for their kids, I'm standing up for me.


*

kaytieeldr
04-06-2012, 09:39 PM
It is easy to freeze a bag a peas, and use that to keep your turkey sandwhich cold. :thumbsup2 So I'm not dismissing someone else's medical need. It is easy enough to pack a food that isn't such a known allergen. There is no reason why someone has to have peanut butter (or peanut products) and only peanut butter.
Sure it's easy. Let's take my trip again. I'm up at five, out of the house by 6:30 or so. I work all day. My flight leaves at 7:30 PM.

Unless it's winter and I parked on the street (which I didn't, because I'm leaving my car in the garage at work ;)), the peas are melted and mooshy and the turkey's warm and I'm NOT eating it. No, it's not going to kill me - but I'm not spending the whole flight in the bathroom, either.

Lisa71
04-06-2012, 09:47 PM
I have tremendous sympathy to anyone with peanut allergies as peanuts are in so many areas. We have been on many flights where the pilot announces not to use or open any peanut products due to a severely allergic person on board. We always have "back up" food and my kids and I wash our hands anytime we touch peanuts. My friend's spouse almost died from his allergy. If your child is allergic be sure you have emergency meds on hand at all times.

aubriee
04-07-2012, 01:36 AM
A vegatarian child cannot eat turkey.
A child with sensory issues cannot eat turkey.

Let's not oversimplfy this ok? Not every solution works for everyone. For example for years I worked with a disabled student who everyday ate the same lunch. Changing his lunch was not an option. He ate 1/2 of a peanut butter sandwich(on white bread).

Throwing a bag of peas in with a turkey sandwich was not "easy" for him.

In my mom's case it would not be easy either. She can be difficult to deal with anyway: she is 78, slightly senile, very stubborn, and very resistive to change in the best of circumstances. Don't get me wrong, most people that meet her, consider her the epitomy of the classic 'sweet old lady'. She is one of the nicest people you would ever want to meet and kids automatically are drawn to her and adore her. When she's thinking clearly, she would always put a kid's safety first and hers last. However, she is also very set in her ways and to her thinking, if her blood sugar is dropping the only thing that will keep her from passing out is peanut butter and a starch. Yes, I've tried to teach her that a meat and cheese sandwich with fruit would be a better option, but as I stated previously, she attended a diabetic seminar 25 years ago and their instructer told them if their blood sugar is low, to eat a peanut butter sandwich, so that is stuck permanently in her mind and won't budge. I don't know if you've ever dealt with a diabetic who is having low blood sugar, but they get very confused, can be combative if you try to force food on them, and will usually have one single thought on their mind that won't budge. In my 78 yo mom's case it's going to be "I have to eat a peanut butter sandwich or I'm going to pass out and round up in the hospital in ICU again". She's been in ICU in a coma three different times for high blood sugar, but when her sugar is low she gets very confused, she has it in her mind that she's going to round up in the hospital and would fight you for a peanut butter sandwich.:confused3 What's worse is she is such a brittle diabetic that her blood sugar will frequently drop (or go sky high) for absolutely no reason, even if she's just eaten a good meal, so there is no way to predict what her sugar is going to do.

If parents would just have the gate agent announce that the flight needs to be nut free in time for: #1. allow us time to get a different snack and #2. allow me time to get through to her why she needs to settle for a different snack, there wouldn't be a problem. I think it is very inconsiderate of parents not to have the gate agent make that announcement prior to boarding though. Every single nut free flight I've ever been on, the parent has waited until after boarding to have the FA make the announcement. We would never want to put a child in danger, but at the same time, is it right to allow my mom to pass out if her blood sugar is low. When her sugar starts dropping, it gets really low, really quick. The OJ that is served on the plane will shoot it up, but will not keep it up. She has to have a protein and a starch quickly, but unless the thought is already planted in her mind that she's going to have eat a meat/cheese s/w this particular flight, she would fight any other option than a peanut butter s/w.

For that matter, I too am a diabetic, just not a brittle one like her. I too take injections, but take Victoza shots (instead of insulin four times a day like she does) which pretty much keeps my blood sugars regulated. Even so, I do still have occasional low blood sugars though. I always carry a bag of granola with me. If the FA announces the flight is nut free, I'd never open that bag, but would get a little irriatated that the announcement wasn't made prior to boarding, so I could have bought something else. In fact, I've started carrying a snack size zip lock bag of frozen grapes on every flight now, just in case.

maxiesmom
04-07-2012, 04:25 AM
Sure it's easy. Let's take my trip again. I'm up at five, out of the house by 6:30 or so. I work all day. My flight leaves at 7:30 PM.

Unless it's winter and I parked on the street (which I didn't, because I'm leaving my car in the garage at work ;)), the peas are melted and mooshy and the turkey's warm and I'm NOT eating it. No, it's not going to kill me - but I'm not spending the whole flight in the bathroom, either.

A small cooler would keep those peas cold until you got to the airport. Do you guys really not have a fridge and freezer at work? I thought they were pretty much standard at all work places. I wouldn't eat a warm turkey sandwich either, but I only said turkey because that is what the person I was responding to referenced.

If someone has a parent or child who is so stubborn that only PB will do, I'm not sure how announcing at the gate is a help. Wouldn't it be easier and cheaper to find a substitute before going to the airport? Not once you are by the gate with very limited choices.

aubriee
04-07-2012, 05:33 AM
A small cooler would keep those peas cold until you got to the airport. Do you guys really not have a fridge and freezer at work? I thought they were pretty much standard at all work places. I wouldn't eat a warm turkey sandwich either, but I only said turkey because that is what the person I was responding to referenced.

If someone has a parent or child who is so stubborn that only PB will do, I'm not sure how announcing at the gate is a help. Wouldn't it be easier and cheaper to find a substitute before going to the airport? Not once you are by the gate with very limited choices.

I never leave from my job to go straight to the airport, but no we do not have freezer section in the little dorm size fridge we have a work, so would not be able to freeze anything at work.

As far as my mom, you'd have to understand her and her preconceived ideas. If I tell her before leaving home that we need to take something besides peanut butter, just in case it's a peanut free flight, she would not believe me and argue she couldn't do without it. On the other hand, she is from the old school where authority is not questioned. If an announcement came over a loud speaker from the gate agent, she might panic for a minute, until I could convince her she'd be OK with another snack, but she would comply because the gate agent is to her mind an official. It may not make sense to you or me, but it does to her.:headache:

goofy4tink
04-07-2012, 07:15 AM
And again...no one solution is going to work for everyone. We give out suggestions that seem to work for others, and if it works for you, terrific. If not, no problem. It's merely a suggestion.

Peanut allergies are hugely prevalent now...not sure what we have done, as a society, to our kids. But, something has changed in 20 years. And the issue is that peanut is found in a ton more products than shellfish!!! And that's an issue. It's actually almost hidden in a lot of foods as an additive, for some reason.
And it is a staple of many children's diets. This is why it's such a huge issue.

Long story short???? Yes, the gate agents should have some way of notifying passengers, at the gate, that peanuts could cause an issue on that specific flight. Maybe it's time they get a big old sign and put it up at that gate....."WARNING......PEANUT ALLERGY ON BOARD THIS FLIGHT. PLEASE, NO PEANUT PRODUCTS WHILE IN FLIGHT!!!"
At least passengers would be able to go off and get something else to eat prior to boarding.

And if you feel that you want to eat your peanut butter sandwich, then fine. But, please, just be careful and tidy. Try not to get peanut butter on surfaces around your seat. That shouldn't negatively impact your flight. And that's pretty much all we can ask. It's common courtesy.

kaytieeldr
04-07-2012, 08:37 AM
Peanut allergies are hugely prevalent now
Interestingly, they're not. Peanut allergies may seem hugely prevalent because people are so vocal about them but... would it surprise you to know almost twice as many Americans suffer from dairy allergies as from peanut allergies http://foodallergies.about.com/od/foodallergybasics/a/big_eight_fa.htm? It shocked me, given this thread and your daughter's friend's experience.

And if you feel that you want to eat your peanut butter sandwich, then fine. But, please, just be careful and tidy.As the quoted poster knows I am ;), having dined and drunk with me - although never on a flight. I shouldn't HAVE to explain why I eat what I do or how I eat and dispose, and aubriee shouldn't HAVE to justify her mother's emergency snack.

amarberry
04-07-2012, 08:57 AM
A vegatarian child cannot eat turkey.
A child with sensory issues cannot eat turkey.

Let's not oversimplfy this ok? Not every solution works for everyone. For example for years I worked with a disabled student who everyday ate the same lunch. Changing his lunch was not an option. He ate 1/2 of a peanut butter sandwich(on white bread).

Throwing a bag of peas in with a turkey sandwich was not "easy" for him.

I posted several pages ago. To recap, my daughter has a severe, life threatening, non-peanut food allergy. She was administered her epipen and taken away from her school in an ambulance a little over a month ago after have a reaction that was most likely caused by using shared math tools in class. Despite my kids not being allergic peanuts, we do not bring peanut products on planes because I am concerned about peanut oils being left behind on the plane. A plane 10,000 feet in the air and away from medical professionals is different than the lunchroom at school where an EMT can be there within minutes.

Guess what...we are vegetarians, my 4 yo son has sensory issues, my kids love PB&J (eat it several times a week), and we still manage to find alternatives to PB on a plane. It's not impossible.

Here are some ideas:

1. Pack a yogurt. Have your kids eat it after you check your bags and just before you go through security. We've done this many, many times. Bring along some fruit, crackers, cheese to eat on the plane. My kids can easily make the 2-3 hour flight doing this.

2. Splurge and buy your turkey and cheese sandwich after you get through security at the airport. I can't think of an airport that doesn't sell some sort of sandwiches once you get through security.

3. I have never had this, but what about the foil packets of tuna? Seems like a good portable, high protein meal if you eat meat.

4. If you absolutely have to eat PB, why does it need to be eaten on a plane? Why can't it be eaten before getting on the plane? Of course, it would be most helpful if hand were washed afterwards.

amarberry
04-07-2012, 09:02 AM
In my mom's case it would not be easy either. She can be difficult to deal with anyway: she is 78, slightly senile, very stubborn, and very resistive to change in the best of circumstances. Don't get me wrong, most people that meet her, consider her the epitomy of the classic 'sweet old lady'. She is one of the nicest people you would ever want to meet and kids automatically are drawn to her and adore her. When she's thinking clearly, she would always put a kid's safety first and hers last. However, she is also very set in her ways and to her thinking, if her blood sugar is dropping the only thing that will keep her from passing out is peanut butter and a starch. Yes, I've tried to teach her that a meat and cheese sandwich with fruit would be a better option, but as I stated previously, she attended a diabetic seminar 25 years ago and their instructer told them if their blood sugar is low, to eat a peanut butter sandwich, so that is stuck permanently in her mind and won't budge. I don't know if you've ever dealt with a diabetic who is having low blood sugar, but they get very confused, can be combative if you try to force food on them, and will usually have one single thought on their mind that won't budge. In my 78 yo mom's case it's going to be "I have to eat a peanut butter sandwich or I'm going to pass out and round up in the hospital in ICU again". She's been in ICU in a coma three different times for high blood sugar, but when her sugar is low she gets very confused, she has it in her mind that she's going to round up in the hospital and would fight you for a peanut butter sandwich.:confused3 What's worse is she is such a brittle diabetic that her blood sugar will frequently drop (or go sky high) for absolutely no reason, even if she's just eaten a good meal, so there is no way to predict what her sugar is going to do.
.

Have you tried having her physician tell her that there are other options than peanut butter? :confused3 It sounds like she does not want to deviate from the advice of the instructor from 25 years ago, but maybe if her doctor explained that there are other options and why peanut butter is sometimes banned on flights, she would respond better?

Hannathy
04-07-2012, 09:50 AM
Have you tried having her physician tell her that there are other options than peanut butter? :confused3 It sounds like she does not want to deviate from the advice of the instructor from 25 years ago, but maybe if her doctor explained that there are other options and why peanut butter is sometimes banned on flights, she would respond better?

But why should an elderly woman have to do this when eating a peanut butter sandwich isn't going to hurt anyone?

This is where the expressiveness come into play and what makes people not want to cooperate.

amarberry
04-07-2012, 10:06 AM
But why should an elderly woman have to do this when eating a peanut butter sandwich isn't going to hurt anyone?

This is where the expressiveness come into play and what makes people not want to cooperate.

If she is on a flight and they have asked for no peanut products to be consumed, it can hurt the person with the allergy (and I would argue it could hurt a person with a peanut allergy on a later flight, if they were to sit in that row and there was oil residue on the seat).

It also hurts the elderly woman who gets upset thinking that she is not allowed to eat the food that she has been told will help her. Why not try getting her to understand that there are other alternatives so she won't get upset? As the daughter of the elderly woman has stated, she still lives by the guidelines provided to her by an instructor 25 years ago. I stated that perhaps a physician could explain alternatives and why peanut products may occassionally be banned.

Hannathy
04-07-2012, 10:17 AM
If she is on a flight and they have asked for no peanut products to be consumed, it can hurt the person with the allergy (and I would argue it could hurt a person with a peanut allergy on a later flight, if they were to sit in that row and there was oil residue on the seat).



Here we go again, unless they allergy person plans on sharing her sandwich , her eating it isn't going to hurt them. The announcement shouldn't be ALL peanut products, that is just going overboard and the main problem.

disneyshakeygirl
04-07-2012, 10:26 AM
But why should an elderly woman have to do this when eating a peanut butter sandwich isn't going to hurt anyone?

This is where the expressiveness come into play and what makes people not want to cooperate.

I believe this is what The View would call a Hot Topic.

Let's look at this logically:
The smell of peanut butter may not hurt anyone. We know this. The smell can cause discomfort and extreme distress. However, not everyone is caring/observant etc. If someone is not careful, and gets some of it on their hands, then wipes it on their pants or on the seat, then that means there are traces.

If some of the pb leaks and the person doesn't wipe it because they haven't noticed (it's happened), then that means there are traces. All of which can cause life threatening reactions. So, yes, there are big chances that a pb&j sandwich could hurt someone.

Unless you have extreme medical needs (like aubriee's mother), for the few hours that you are travelling, have some consideration. Let me put it this way: your life isn't endangered, but someone else's may be.

Hannathy
04-07-2012, 10:51 AM
I believe this is what The View would call a Hot Topic.

Let's look at this logically:
The smell of peanut butter may not hurt anyone. We know this. The smell can cause discomfort and extreme distress. However, not everyone is caring/observant etc. If someone is not careful, and gets some of it on their hands, then wipes it on their pants or on the seat, then that means there are traces.

If some of the pb leaks and the person doesn't wipe it because they haven't noticed (it's happened), then that means there are traces. All of which can cause life threatening reactions. So, yes, there are big chances that a pb&j sandwich could hurt someone.

Unless you have extreme medical needs (like aubriee's mother), for the few hours that you are travelling, have some consideration. Let me put it this way: your life isn't endangered, but someone else's may be.

It will only hurt them if they ingest the peanut butter. Easily solved by wearing gloves when out of their seat. So why inconvenience a lot of people for something so easily solved by the 1 person directly involved?

That is what I don't understand, 1 person doesn't want to be inconvenienced but they can inconvenience a whole planeful of strangers.

disneyshakeygirl
04-07-2012, 11:37 AM
It will only hurt them if they ingest the peanut butter. Easily solved by wearing gloves when out of their seat. So why inconvenience a lot of people for something so easily solved by the 1 person directly involved?

That is what I don't understand, 1 person doesn't want to be inconvenienced but they can inconvenience a whole planeful of strangers.


See, I am one of those allergy sufferers who pb will hurt if I touch it, taste it etc. So yes, it does not only hurt people if they ingest it. Please check before you say something like that. I wear gloves - no inconvenience.

I always say that it wasn't my choice to have these. If I could get rid of them, I would. Please, try to look at this from other's point of views. And often, it's not an inconvenience. To you it may be, but you cannot speak on behalf of all the passengers on the plane - have you ever met and talked to every single one of them? You do not know what they are thinking.

goofy4tink
04-07-2012, 12:11 PM
Interestingly, they're not. Peanut allergies may seem hugely prevalent because people are so vocal about them but... would it surprise you to know almost twice as many Americans suffer from dairy allergies as from peanut allergies http://foodallergies.about.com/od/foodallergybasics/a/big_eight_fa.htm? It shocked me, given this thread and your daughter's friend's experience.

As the quoted poster knows I am ;), having dined and drunk with me - although never on a flight. I shouldn't HAVE to explain why I eat what I do or how I eat and dispose, and aubriee shouldn't HAVE to justify her mother's emergency snack.
But.....while dairy continues to be a huge offender, peanut residue is still a huge deal. It's when you can't see it. Now, I have eaten with you, and you don't seem to be a particularly messy eater. I doubt that you leave peanut butter residue on your seat or the immediate area, on the plane.


It will only hurt them if they ingest the peanut butter. Easily solved by wearing gloves when out of their seat. So why inconvenience a lot of people for something so easily solved by the 1 person directly involved?

That is what I don't understand, 1 person doesn't want to be inconvenienced but they can inconvenience a whole planeful of strangers.
And yet AGAIN.....if a child's gloved hand touches peanut butter, or oil, residue, and that gloved finger touches their eyes, nose, mouth...then there will be a reaction. What is it about that that you are having so much trouble understanding??

Basically, the vast majority of fliers will have no issue whatsoever. As I said earlier, but it seems to be continually ignored, is to please be careful with peanut butter out in public. If you choose to give your child peanut butter, on a plane, at the gate, in the parks, please try to be sure that peanut residue is not left behind. And that, people, is called common courtesy. I am not asking you to forgo peanut butter...but I am asking that you are careful with it. If you give that 4 y/o a pb sandwich, on the plane, please be sure to clean up after him. Don't expect the airline to clean...that doesn't happen.

It is up to each one of us to decide what works best for our family. But it would be nice if we could count on the courtesy of strangers to keep the surroundings free of allergens. Wipe down trays and arm rests after eating pb. Is that so hard to do??? Then, if someone boards on the next flight, with an allergy, it won't be so hard for the mom, or dad, to clean up the area..which I imagine they are going to do in any case.

If this thread continues to be a back and forth, debating who should get their particular rights, it will be closed down.

amarberry
04-07-2012, 12:20 PM
Here we go again, unless they allergy person plans on sharing her sandwich , her eating it isn't going to hurt them. The announcement shouldn't be ALL peanut products, that is just going overboard and the main problem.

And this where we are going to continue to disagree. I do not agree that the only way a person can get hurt from a peanut butter sandwich is by eating it. Residue can remain and can hurt someone with a peanut allergy on a subsequent flight. This is a particular problem with peanuts because of the oil, and while I wouldn't advocate a ban on peanut products on ground, I don't think it is a good idea on an airplane that is isolated from medical care.

I hope you or a loved one never develop a life threatening food allergy. Our family has lived with this for over 7 years and it is not easy. I feel fortunate that my daughter is not allergic to peanuts, but she is extremely allergic to eggs to the point that casual contact on school equipment caused a severe reaction. Do you have any idea what it is like to get a call from your child's school principal to tell you that your daughter is saying her throat is closing up and that they are going to administer her epipen? She didn't knowingly injest anything with egg. She was just doing her math assignment at school and probably rubbed her face or put her hand in her mouth. EMT's were at her school within 5 minutes of having her epipen administered. That would not be the case if that happened on an airplane.

So even though my kids can safely eat peanut butter, you'd better believe we will happily refrain from doing so on a flight. I do feel that there is a risk, a minimal risk, but I'm not willing to take it.

I doubt I will make you see this issue any differently than you are choosing to see it, but as you can see, you won't be changing the way I view it either. I will continue to error on the side of caution with this. We will not die from not eating peanut butter for 2-3 hours.

kaytieeldr
04-07-2012, 09:34 PM
Nobody is doubting or diminishing the seriousness of peanut allergies. Completely understood that, depending on the severity of the allergy and the type of contact, it could be fatal. Wasn't there a teenager a few years ago who died after kissing her boyfriend, an hour or so after he'd eaten a peanut butter sandwich?

But reading some of the posts in this thread, it sounds like people with food allergies or kids with food allergies think those of us who plan/prepare to eat pbj sandwiches on an airplane are ill-mannered, inconsiderate heathens who smear our hair and exposed skin with the allergen just before boarding, then try to hug everyone on the plane.

While futilely trying to find even one instance of a fatality in-flight ascribed to a reaction to peanuts, peanut dust, peanut oil, peanut products, etc., I did find this http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/12/10/nut_allergy_hysteria/ rather interesting article. In part, "The facts are these, Christakis insists: "About 3.3 million Americans are allergic to nuts, and even more - 6.9 million - are allergic to seafood. However, all told, serious allergic reactions to foods cause just 2,000 hospitalisations a year (out of more than 30 million hospitalisations nationwide). And only 150 people (children and adults) die each year from all food allergies combined." and "There are no doubt thousands of parents who rid their cupboards of peanut butter but not of guns. And more children assuredly die walking or being driven to school each year than die from nut allergies."

eta: I'm not saying anyone here is misrepresenting personal food allergies (own, kids', friends') and sincerely hope my posts aren't taken that way. But comparing figures like what I quoted (and I've seen the same number elsewhere, with the percentage of affected Americans between 1.1% and 1.4%) to third-party experiences like those of the poster who's been on "many" - again, not doubting the poster - flights where the pilot made a 'no-peanuts due to allergies' announcement, well, it doesn't add up.

I found another site - http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_many_people_travel_by_air_per_day_in_u.s - that conservatively estimates 1,500,000 domestic passengers daily. Three million airline passengers each day vs 3.3 million Americans with peanut allergies? Yet 'many' flights in just one person's experience (and undetermined numbers in other poaters' experiences) have peanut allergies?
Something doesn't add up.

Hannathy
04-07-2012, 10:22 PM
Nobody is doubting or diminishing the seriousness of peanut allergies. Completely understood that, depending on the severity of the allergy and the type of contact, it could be fatal. Wasn't there a teenager a few years ago who died after kissing her boyfriend, an hour or so after he'd eaten a peanut butter sandwich?



Nope she didn't die from the peanut butter! Totally disproved but you don't see that pointed out do you?


I love your description of a traveler. Wonder if peanut butter would make a good mohawk gel?

laughinplace199
04-08-2012, 07:20 AM
OP, you can certainly bring the PB sandwiches on your flight and you will most likely be able to eat them. However, I would bring some back-up food, just in case. Occasionally, an allergic person may ask the FA to make an announcement asking passengers not to eat peanut products, so it would be good to have another option for your family if that happens.

Even if there is no announcement made, there could still be allergic people on your flight, so it would be nice if you had some hand wipes to use after eating the PB sandwich - that way you reduce the chance of peanut oil being transeferred from your hands to other surfaces on the plane.

My DD is one of those kids who is severely allergic to nuts. When we fly, we preboard to wipe down every surface in her area and also inspect the floor for nuts that the previous passanger may have dropped. We also use a sheet or a towel to cover her seat. We do not ask the FA to make an announcement, but we do let them know about her allergy. We usually fly JetBlue and they create a buffer zone a couple of rows before and after ours where they will ask people to not eat nuts. This is JB's policy, not our request, but we've never heard anyone complain about it.

I have no problems with people eating nuts on planes when it's just a few people here and there. We choose not to fly Delta or Southwest because those airlines typically serve peanuts to the whole plane. We do feel that an entire plane of people opening packages of nuts at the same time poses a risk for DD. That peanut dust contains peanut protein, which is then released into the recirculated air. So, we just don't fly those airlines, even though they often have cheaper fares.

I think that often, people who don't deal with food allergies don't really get it. I know I didn't until DD was diagnosed. I thought the Epi Pen cured the reaction. I didn't realize that it only bought you 15 min to get to an ER. This is why people do worry so much about nut exposure in the air. On the ground, EMT's can get to you in 10 min, but that's not possible in the air.

What it comes down to is that I take responsibility for my DD's safety, but I'm always so appreciative when other people make the effort to be considerate (using wipes to clean hands after eating PB, for example). Flying with a nut allergic child can be stressful because of the fact that you're so far away from medical care, and when people offer to wipe their hands or not complain when they can't eat nuts because they are seated in the buffer zone, it makes things a lot less stressful for this mom. :thumbsup2 And when I travel without my DD, I choose not to eat nuts on a plane, just in case.

Music City Mama
04-08-2012, 10:41 AM
OP, you can certainly bring the PB sandwiches on your flight and you will most likely be able to eat them. However, I would bring some back-up food, just in case. Occasionally, an allergic person may ask the FA to make an announcement asking passengers not to eat peanut products, so it would be good to have another option for your family if that happens.

Even if there is no announcement made, there could still be allergic people on your flight, so it would be nice if you had some hand wipes to use after eating the PB sandwich - that way you reduce the chance of peanut oil being transeferred from your hands to other surfaces on the plane.

My DD is one of those kids who is severely allergic to nuts. When we fly, we preboard to wipe down every surface in her area and also inspect the floor for nuts that the previous passanger may have dropped. We also use a sheet or a towel to cover her seat. We do not ask the FA to make an announcement, but we do let them know about her allergy. We usually fly JetBlue and they create a buffer zone a couple of rows before and after ours where they will ask people to not eat nuts. This is JB's policy, not our request, but we've never heard anyone complain about it.

I have no problems with people eating nuts on planes when it's just a few people here and there. We choose not to fly Delta or Southwest because those airlines typically serve peanuts to the whole plane. We do feel that an entire plane of people opening packages of nuts at the same time poses a risk for DD. That peanut dust contains peanut protein, which is then released into the recirculated air. So, we just don't fly those airlines, even though they often have cheaper fares.

I think that often, people who don't deal with food allergies don't really get it. I know I didn't until DD was diagnosed. I thought the Epi Pen cured the reaction. I didn't realize that it only bought you 15 min to get to an ER. This is why people do worry so much about nut exposure in the air. On the ground, EMT's can get to you in 10 min, but that's not possible in the air.

What it comes down to is that I take responsibility for my DD's safety, but I'm always so appreciative when other people make the effort to be considerate (using wipes to clean hands after eating PB, for example). Flying with a nut allergic child can be stressful because of the fact that you're so far away from medical care, and when people offer to wipe their hands or not complain when they can't eat nuts because they are seated in the buffer zone, it makes things a lot less stressful for this mom. :thumbsup2 And when I travel without my DD, I choose not to eat nuts on a plane, just in case.

This is pretty much how I feel. I wouldn't demand that people couldn't eat peanuts or peanut butter, but I wouldn't necessarily feel comfortable with the majority of the plane eating peanuts either, so I wouldn't want them handed out for everyone. The fear, as you say, is because the Epipen only buys you some time, and up in the air, you don't have access to emergency medical care. People who understand and refrain from nuts or at least make a genuine effort to clean up their areas, just makes it less stressful. :goodvibes

But reading some of the posts in this thread, it sounds like people with food allergies or kids with food allergies think those of us who plan/prepare to eat pbj sandwiches on an airplane are ill-mannered, inconsiderate heathens who smear our hair and exposed skin with the allergen just before boarding, then try to hug everyone on the plane.


No, you don't come across that way.

However, this poster, on the other hand . . .

Nope she didn't die from the peanut butter! Totally disproved but you don't see that pointed out do you?

I love your description of a traveler. Wonder if peanut butter would make a good mohawk gel?

I'm sorry, but you come across like you'd actually enjoy seeing someone have a reaction. I'm not saying this is how you really are, but maybe you should take a step back and look at your posts. You're probably the most quoted poster on this thread not because of your opinion, but because of your attitude. The tone of your posts either sound very angry or said with an evil cackle. You, ma'am/sir are beyond rude. :sad2:

goofy4tink
04-08-2012, 12:25 PM
And, we are done. This is not serving any purpose.