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4Pluto
03-20-2012, 08:58 AM
Hoping there are some Orbitz experts out there.

DSIL bought tickets for herself and my Dad on Orbitz. Returning from Orlando they are on 2 different airlines with a stopover in NY. They were unable to select seats and, with less than 2 weeks before the flights, there are no seats shown as available online. If the unthinkable happens and they don't get seats on the first flight but are sent on a later flight to NY, does the second airline get them seats on a later flight back home?

I fly alot but I've never used two different airlines on one leg o a trip. Thanks.

ccgirl
03-20-2012, 09:15 AM
Hoping there are some Orbitz experts out there.

DSIL bought tickets for herself and my Dad on Orbitz. Returning from Orlando they are on 2 different airlines with a stopover in NY. They were unable to select seats and, with less than 2 weeks before the flights, there are no seats shown as available online. If the unthinkable happens and they don't get seats on the first flight but are sent on a later flight to NY, does the second airline get them seats on a later flight back home?

I fly alot but I've never used two different airlines on one leg o a trip. Thanks.

Are the airlines owned by the same company? The second airline is under no obligation to get them on a later flight. It would be just like if you showed up at the airport 1 hour late for your flight and it had already left. They *may* put you on a later flight and *may* charge you a fee for doing so.

winthropf
03-20-2012, 09:19 AM
Orbitz does not always have access to the full seat map for many airlines. Look at the Orbitz record of the trip and get the airlines record locator code. Then go to the actual airline's website and look up the flight and the seat map. You should be able to select seats there if in fact any are available.

4Pluto
03-20-2012, 09:30 AM
Thanks for the replies. The airlines are not owned by the same company (delta and american). I tried the airline websites using Dad's reservation number and it shows no seats available. Sounds like we need to have a plan B in mind.

pr surfer
03-20-2012, 09:52 AM
Using your names and flight details, you can call the airlines and get their reservation numbers, and then via the individual airline websites you should be able to assign your seats (provided the airlines don't charge for that).

Next question, which airport do you have your layover in, and how long is it? Depending on the airport, AA and DL operate out of different terminals, and you may need to factor in the time it takes to get from one to the other.

snesguy
03-20-2012, 11:44 PM
I wouldn't panic. Airlines sometimes oversell seats. They know a certain percentage of people will not show up for the flight. If they get close to the limit they will block seats so that even if seats are not available for assignment now, there are some seats in reserve that can be assigned at the airport and if people don't show up they will release those seats too. Try to check in online as soon as you can and hopefully you'll be able to get a seat assignment then. Get to the airport early. If there is a competition for seats assigned at the airport the earlier you check in at the airport the better.

If they are so oversold that they don't have enough seats on the day of travel they will attempt to offer compensation to passengers to entice them to voluntarily give up their seats. This could be in the form of a travel voucher worth a few hundred dollars for travel on the airline as compensation for giving up their current seat and letting the airline book them on another flight to their destination. It is extremely rare that it gets down to not enough passengers taking their offer of voluntary bumping that you get to the point where they have to involuntarily bump someone off the flight. This might happen in the case of bad weather earlier in the day causing cancelations, but the airlines really don't want to IDB (Involuntarily Denied Boarding) anyone because not only are they required by federal regulations to pay some serious compensation for that (up to $1300 in addition to getting you on some other flight later), they also lose passenger goodwill, so you almost never hear of this happening. They will up their voluntary compensation very high to entice people to change to a later flight before they will IDB somebody. So, don't worry too much.

snesguy
03-21-2012, 12:16 AM
Are the airlines owned by the same company? The second airline is under no obligation to get them on a later flight. It would be just like if you showed up at the airport 1 hour late for your flight and it had already left. They *may* put you on a later flight and *may* charge you a fee for doing so.

Right. If you show up late the same day most airlines will let you standby for the next flight, sometimes with a fee.

Using your names and flight details, you can call the airlines and get their reservation numbers, and then via the individual airline websites you should be able to assign your seats (provided the airlines don't charge for that).


Excellent advice.

Also, OP, in the future, if you have a situation where you need to book two legs on different carriers, try to get them put on the same ticket. If they are on the same ticket then you are protected. The airline that gets you in late will have to re-accommodate you. If you really need to force this then Orbitz and many other travel sites should allow it by booking a multi-city itinerary. This is usually done if you want or need to stop in a specific intermediate city to or from your destination. If you don't explicitly need a stop somewhere just ticket from A to B and let the travel site pick any stops needed and they will go on the same ticket and you will be protected. Actually, maybe this applies to you. Your DSIL probably didn't buy two separate tickets for each person from Orbitz, right? If you bought through Orbitz roundtrip and Orbitz booked you on these two different airlines for one trip (one booking session) then the flights should be on the same ticket and you will have protection. If the first airline doesn't get you in on time then they are responsible to get you to your destination.