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XrayChicken
02-12-2012, 09:54 PM
Hello all! I just returned today from a wonderful trip on the Dream. (Feb. 9-12)

I have sailed the Wonder and the Magic in the past and saw something on the Dream that I never thought I'd see......a small dog.

I thought I was seeing things so I had my husband look to. There was a large man standing outside of the Walt Disney Theatre holding a small terrier in his arms. He was complaining about a problem he was having in the theatre to one of the employees.

Since I don't see how this could be a service dog, how did it get on board? I thought pets weren't allowed?:confused3


And I just wanted to say that the Dream was wonderful! I've seen some negative reports on here but we had a totally positive experience and booked the Fantasy for 2013 while on board! :banana:

zealandsmom
02-12-2012, 09:57 PM
Hello all! I just returned today from a wonderful trip on the Dream. (Feb. 9-12)

I have sailed the Wonder and the Magic in the past and saw something on the Dream that I never thought I'd see......a small dog.

I thought I was seeing things so I had my husband look to. There was a large man standing outside of the Walt Disney Theatre holding a small terrier in his arms. He was complaining about a problem he was having in the theatre to one of the employees.

Since I don't see how this could be a service dog, how did it get on board? I thought pets weren't allowed?:confused3


And I just wanted to say that the Dream was wonderful! I've seen some negative reports on here but we had a totally positive experience and booked the Fantasy for 2013 while on board! :banana:

A guy at my church has a min-pin as his service dog. And when I was a flight attendant I saw many "service" dogs.

vwlizard
02-12-2012, 09:58 PM
I very well could have been a service dog. I've seen posts on Dis about people with small service dogs for things like anxiety, PTSD, seizures, etc.

ElenaRN
02-12-2012, 10:00 PM
Even though it didn't look like a "typical service dog", it may have been.
I know we all probably think of labs or retriever type dogs being the most common breeds for seeing eye/serivce dogs.
There are also dogs who can sense pending seizure activity and stuff like that.

Otherwise the only other reason I can think of would be if it was part of some show but I don't recall any live animals in any of the entertainment.

:confused3

kcashner
02-12-2012, 10:02 PM
If you so a search, there was a LONG thread about "service animals."

Most animals are totally legit--trained and appropriately certified. However, it is relatively easy to have a pet certified as a service animal, and DCL is only able to verify that the animal is certified and appropriately vaccinated.

XrayChicken
02-12-2012, 10:02 PM
Never even thought that a small dog could be a service dog but I guess they can. Learn something new everyday. :)

How would they accomodate the dog's restroom needs? Puppie pads? Seems that a dog on board would open up all sorts of problems.

It just took me by surprise.

kcashner
02-12-2012, 10:06 PM
Never even thought that a small dog could be a service dog but I guess they can. Learn something new everyday. :)

How would they accomodate the dog's restroom needs? Puppie pads? Seems that a dog on board would open up all sorts of problems.

.

Some service animals prefer grass, others will us a gravelly sort of mix (similar to cat litter). If the guest has a verandah, the container (for a larger dog it looks like a toddler pool) is placed on their verandah and tended to at least daily by the statroom host. If the guest doesn't have a verandah, they use deck 7 aft on the Magic and Wonder.

A properly trained service animal is really no trouble. Yes, there have been issues on board with some animals of questionable provenance.

mmouse37
02-12-2012, 10:08 PM
this topic comes up every so often.....and I too wondered about dogs on DCL. This thread provides a good discussion on the subject.

http://www.disboards.com/showthread.php?t=2481534&highlight=dog

And another thread that I know has pics of how they handle service dogs "bathroom" needs.

http://www.disboards.com/showthread.php?t=1844298&page=2

MJ

starwood
02-13-2012, 06:35 AM
On our West Coast cruise there was someone with a small Sheltie service dog. This dog was so well behaved. They brought it into Parrot Cay and it just sat under the table while they ate. If it was my Beagle he would have been going from table to table begging.

kjd469
02-13-2012, 07:03 AM
My sister requires a service dog - while her last service dog was a labrador retriever, her current service dog is a silky terrier - yes, he looks small and cute and often rides on the tray of her wheelchair...some people may assume that he is her "pet". While he is her companion, he also provides a valuable service to her, as she is not able to pick things up, etc. etc. that most people can do and he does that for her. Many people automatically assume that every small, cute dog that doesn't fit the stereotypical "service dog" look is undeserving of being on board the ship - instead they should be thankful that neither they nor a member of their family is in need of one of these dogs.

HappyGilmore
02-13-2012, 07:48 AM
We also saw that dog in the same spot the last night after the show. The dog looked like a Yorkshire terrier with long hair that was not well groomed. The dog also looked VERY uncomfortable because it was shaking terribly. I felt sorry for it... The seas were a little bumpy at that tikme and it made me wonder if the dog was feeling what a person could feel like (seasick feeling).

TDC Nala
02-13-2012, 08:01 AM
Pets are not allowed aboard, so this dog had to be some form of service animal (or at least its owner claims it as some form of service animal). Small dogs can also be service animals.

fredgirls
02-13-2012, 08:18 AM
If a service dog can help the quality of someone's life then that is a wonderful thing and I have no problem with them being aboard. Just curious if Disney assigns certain staterooms for animals.
I have read links from the other thread, and don't want to start another long allergy discussion, but just wondered whether anyone knew if there are specific pet rooms like there are in hotels.

MomsOf2boys
02-13-2012, 08:26 AM
We had a sheltie and she was not a trained service dog by any means. We did start realizing that she could actually sense when my mother was going to have a seizure. She would bark and bark and block my mother from walking. My mom would sit down and pet her and would then not fall when the seizure hit. Dogs are far smarter than we give them credit for. :thumbsup2

jpeka65844
02-13-2012, 08:59 AM
We had a sheltie and she was not a trained service dog by any means. We did start realizing that she could actually sense when my mother was going to have a seizure. She would bark and bark and block my mother from walking. My mom would sit down and pet her and would then not fall when the seizure hit. Dogs are far smarter than we give them credit for. :thumbsup2

I am a music teacher and we have a student who, for a short time, had a black lab "seizure dog". The dog was not the best trained dog in the world, especially by service animal standards bit o well......

So one day, I'm leading the kids in a movement activity and the dog runs up to me and licks my leg, which is his signal that he senses a seizure. When I told his classroom teacher about this she laughed and said "Exactly how bad was your dancing??"

Piper
02-13-2012, 09:17 AM
My Lucy is a Diabetes Alert dog. She lets me know when my sugar is out of the normal range. She is also very small (about an inch shorter and half the weight of our cat!) She is very well-behaved......never barks at either people or other animals. She is very focused on me. She does bark when someone knocks on our door. She will not get far away from me unless I tell her to "go play" when we are at my apartment's dog park (then she keeps coming back and checking on me.)

She also does some other jobs such as alerting me whenever the coffee pot, microwave, dryer etc. beeps. She touches my leg and then goes to sit in front of whatever beeped. If I don't get right up, she alerts me again! She also picks up things that I drop. Lucy rides in the basket of my ECV when we are out and about.

She does have service dog identification and a vest that she wears whenever she is working (and we are in public.) She doesn't wear it all the time in our apartment, but she actually never goes "off-duty" unless she is sleeping!

finnaddict98
02-13-2012, 09:53 AM
I have seen these "service animals" too on my 20 cruises, I have no idea how/why they are allowed. There is a "artificial grass" area on the running track that smells just wonderful as I have done my runs on the deck. And you can spare me the "my dog can sence a seizure" thats why we have it. If you are that prone to seizures, being on an isolated cruise ship probably isnt the best palce for you to be....again, flame on...I know its coming.

I just dont know why everyone else must be subjected to the needs of a very few when it impacts the many...OK, granted, maybe it does not impact many on the ship, but it does on planes. Ive seen people have to exit a plane becasue they are allergic to a cat and someone has a brought on board. The person who was allergic had to leave, not the person carrying the cat?!

I know Ill get flamed for this, but why should I have to smell dog poo and pee and hear dog barking (which we have) while on vacation?

Eliza32
02-13-2012, 10:04 AM
Know what finnaddict...I hope to God you and your family never need the services of such an animal...have a little feeling for those who do please.

Silverfox97
02-13-2012, 10:09 AM
Hello all! I just returned today from a wonderful trip on the Dream. (Feb. 9-12) I thought I was seeing things so I had my husband look to. There was a large man standing outside of the Walt Disney Theatre holding a small terrier in his arms. He was complaining about a problem he was having in the theatre to one of the employees.:confused3

And I just wanted to say that the Dream was wonderful! I've seen some negative reports on here but we had a totally positive experience and booked the Fantasy for 2013 while on board! :banana:

Saw the same dog (was on your cruise) and also had a great time!

We also saw that dog in the same spot the last night after the show. The dog looked like a Yorkshire terrier with long hair that was not well groomed. The dog also looked VERY uncomfortable because it was shaking terribly. I felt sorry for it... The seas were a little bumpy at that tikme and it made me wonder if the dog was feeling what a person could feel like (seasick feeling).

We saw the dog while going upstairs from Deck 3 to 4. DH & I did a double take!!

kcashner
02-13-2012, 10:23 AM
Why not use this as a teaching situation for your child? They need to know about service animals--this is a good time to remind them that this is a working dog and we cannot pet/approach the animal without talking to the owner first. They can politely ask the owner whether they can pet the dog--the answer WILL vary based on the person and the dog. Some are horrified--NO, he is on duty. Others are very friendly and will talk with you about what the dog does, praise the child for asking, etc.

We have to assume that the dog is a legit service animal--that's what DCL has to do also. I've been on cruises where there were people with an animal--DCL cleans up as thoroughly after that dog as they do after the guests--spotlessly. I've never noticed any smells in public areas. I don't know whether they restrict service animals to particular cabins, but they do have a procedure called an "allergy clean." If you or a family member has allergy issues, you should probably be asking for this before you enter the cabin regardless of whether there might have been an animal there.

WeLoveDisneyAlways
02-13-2012, 10:37 AM
There was a dog on our Jan 22nd Dream cruise a small terrier it did not have a vest or anything to mark it as a service dog, the woman carried it around. We were curious how a dog was allowed now we know :)

sissy_ib
02-13-2012, 11:05 AM
I have seen these "service animals" too on my 20 cruises, I have no idea how/why they are allowed. There is a "artificial grass" area on the running track that smells just wonderful as I have done my runs on the deck. And you can spare me the "my dog can sence a seizure" thats why we have it. If you are that prone to seizures, being on an isolated cruise ship probably isnt the best palce for you to be....again, flame on...I know its coming.

I just dont know why everyone else must be subjected to the needs of a very few when it impacts the many...OK, granted, maybe it does not impact many on the ship, but it does on planes. Ive seen people have to exit a plane becasue they are allergic to a cat and someone has a brought on board. The person who was allergic had to leave, not the person carrying the cat?!

I know Ill get flamed for this, but why should I have to smell dog poo and pee and hear dog barking (which we have) while on vacation?

I think you don't understand what seizures really are. In most cases what is so dangerous is the fall, not the actually seizure. What if the service dog was a seeing eye dog, societies view of a traditional service dog. Would you be be saying blind people should not go on vacation? Or a dog for a person with a hearing impairment. Should deaf people have to stay home?

Brumbie13
02-13-2012, 11:30 AM
Would you be be saying blind people should not go on vacation? Or a dog for a person with a hearing impairment. Should deaf people have to stay home?
He probably would.

I think this person doesn't have a good understanding of the concept of "other people's needs" being more important than "my own desires."

It's frightening how some people will come online and proudly admit to being openly discriminatory. :sad2:

MomsOf2boys
02-13-2012, 11:39 AM
I am a music teacher and we have a student who, for a short time, had a black lab "seizure dog". The dog was not the best trained dog in the world, especially by service animal standards bit o well......

So one day, I'm leading the kids in a movement activity and the dog runs up to me and licks my leg, which is his signal that he senses a seizure. When I told his classroom teacher about this she laughed and said "Exactly how bad was your dancing??"

Hahaha You have some jerky kind of dancing do you? I love this.

kjd469
02-13-2012, 12:14 PM
Hahaha You have some jerky kind of dancing do you? I love this.

I'm picturing Elaine from Seinfeld, lol!

finnaddict98
02-13-2012, 01:00 PM
He probably would.

I think this person doesn't have a good understanding of the concept of "other people's needs" being more important than "my own desires."

It's frightening how some people will come online and proudly admit to being openly discriminatory. :sad2:

I am certainly not discriminatory. I just feel that I have every right to my vacation as does anyone else. I do not encroach on anyones ability to enjoy every aspect of their vacation and I expect the same courtesy, that is all. I knew this would be a "flame on" issue.

sissy_ib
02-13-2012, 01:07 PM
I am certainly not discriminatory. I just feel that I have every right to my vacation as does anyone else. I do not encroach on anyones ability to enjoy every aspect of their vacation and I expect the same courtesy, that is all. I knew this would be a "flame on" issue.

But "everyone" does not include those with service dogs?

ranidayz
02-13-2012, 01:57 PM
Never even thought that a small dog could be a service dog but I guess they can. Learn something new everyday. :)

How would they accomodate the dog's restroom needs? Puppie pads? Seems that a dog on board would open up all sorts of problems.

It just took me by surprise.

I was on a flight to London one time and looked over at a woman in the center rows as she was pulling something from the bag under the chair in front of her. What did she pull out - a tiny dog! What she did next stunned and amazed me. She took down her tray and changed that dog's diaper - right there in the plane. To this day, I will never forget that scene. Service animal - i have no idea - it stayed in the bag under the chair the whole time....:confused3

aberrydisneygirl
02-13-2012, 02:01 PM
I can understand both sides of this. I understand the need for service animals, and think they are great for those that need them. But also being someone that is slightly allergic to animals, and have known people that can have severe asthma attacks just being around animals I can understand that side as well. I don't think it is a bad thing for service animals to be on a cruise ship, but would think it would be helpful to let everyone on the cruise know that there is a service animal on board (in the navigators or something) and have a special area for dining, shows etc, for people with service animals so that those that do have allergies do not have to be near the animal. Both should be able to have a good time and those with severe allergies should not have to suffer just so someone else can bring an animal in the dining room, shows etc. Just my thoughts.

TDC Nala
02-13-2012, 02:05 PM
It's rather rare to have a service animal aboard the ships. Even then it's only one or two aboard at a time. If a lot of guests boarding the ship were to start bringing dogs, they'd have to do something. It's not a large percentage of the population that needs a service dog and most of them are not obstrusive and do not ruin other people's vacations.

Although there isn't any way to determine if the lap dog is a service dog or someone's pet the owner can't bear to be parted from so they bring it aboard posing as a service dog, there aren't enough of them for their presence to be even minimally cruise-ruining, as far as I'm concerned.

On the rare occasion where the owner of a service dog's right to have the dog clashes with someone who has a severe allergy to the animal, something has to be determined, but can't see it happening all that often. On a large ship like the Dream, the allergic person can be put in a stateroom far away from the dog (assuming one is available) and on a different dining rotation, but what do you do if they meet in common areas like the theater or a lounge? One will have to go elsewhere.

Brumbie13
02-13-2012, 02:14 PM
I knew this would be a "flame on" issue.
Of course you did, that's why you mentioned it twice in your original post.

You made an extremely incendiary, ignorant, and insulting post, and then followed it up with "I know I'll get flamed for this."

Prior acknowledgment of the fact that your controversial post is likely to be met with resistance doesn't justify your bigoted post.

Minnie Monellen
02-13-2012, 02:15 PM
I can understand both sides of this. I understand the need for service animals, and think they are great for those that need them. But also being someone that is slightly allergic to animals, and have known people that can have severe asthma attacks just being around animals I can understand that side as well. I don't think it is a bad thing for service animals to be on a cruise ship, but would think it would be helpful to let everyone on the cruise know that there is a service animal on board (in the navigators or something) and have a special area for dining, shows etc, for people with service animals so that those that do have allergies do not have to be near the animal. Both should be able to have a good time and those with severe allergies should not have to suffer just so someone else can bring an animal in the dining room, shows etc. Just my thoughts.

It's rather rare to have a service animal aboard the ships. Even then it's only one or two aboard at a time. If a lot of guests boarding the ship were to start bringing dogs, they'd have to do something. It's not a large percentage of the population that needs a service dog and most of them are not obstrusive and do not ruin other people's vacations.

Although there isn't any way to determine if the lap dog is a service dog or someone's pet the owner can't bear to be parted from so they bring it aboard posing as a service dog, there aren't enough of them for their presence to be even minimally cruise-ruining, as far as I'm concerned.

On the rare occasion where the owner of a service dog's right to have the dog clashes with someone who has a severe allergy to the animal, something has to be determined, but can't see it happening all that often. On a large ship like the Dream, the allergic person can be put in a stateroom far away from the dog (assuming one is available) and on a different dining rotation, but what do you do if they meet in common areas like the theater or a lounge? One will have to go elsewhere.

These comments assume that the service dog is a certain breed for which people with allergies would have an allergic reaction. For example, Yorkies, which are often service dogs, are a very popular breed because they do not present with allergens due to the type of hair (not fur) they have.

Alexander
02-13-2012, 02:36 PM
I absolutely do not have a problem with true service animals. It is the people that abuse the system and easily get their dog "certified". A true service dog has extensive training and generally would not be agitated and shaking as a PP mentioned this Yorkie was unless the owner was in a dire situation (diabetic shock, seizure, etc) but since he was complaining to a CM, I have my doubts he was in a dire health situation. Those that abuse the system get a piece of paper claiming their dog is a service animal by having completed minimal requirements. I think this is where those of us are extremely skeptical of service dogs unless it is clear that the animal is providing a service. I completely understand that there are hidden disabilities, and we have no way of knowing a stranger;s condition, however, an unkempt dog that is shaking and agitated does not say legit service dog to me. JMHO

jiminyC_fan
02-13-2012, 02:38 PM
I have seen these "service animals" too on my 20 cruises, I have no idea how/why they are allowed. There is a "artificial grass" area on the running track that smells just wonderful as I have done my runs on the deck. And you can spare me the "my dog can sence a seizure" thats why we have it. If you are that prone to seizures, being on an isolated cruise ship probably isnt the best palce for you to be....again, flame on...I know its coming.

I just dont know why everyone else must be subjected to the needs of a very few when it impacts the many...OK, granted, maybe it does not impact many on the ship, but it does on planes. Ive seen people have to exit a plane becasue they are allergic to a cat and someone has a brought on board. The person who was allergic had to leave, not the person carrying the cat?!

I know Ill get flamed for this, but why should I have to smell dog poo and pee and hear dog barking (which we have) while on vacation?

You are totally insensitive and that is uncalled for. My daughter, my grandson, my brother and a few friends have/had seizures. Should their life STOP because they have seizures? Maybe you should educate yourself on epilepsy. You don't understand it until you live with it. My grandson just got back on Wednesday from WDW. He took his seizure response dog with him. They carry her service certification with them at all times and she has to wear a vest while on duty. Should he not experience WDW because you don't want to be around his dog? He's six years old. How do you tell him that there are people in the world that think he shouldn't experience life? I'm sorry but I am appalled at your post. If you have epilepsy around you then maybe you would/could understand. Open your arms to an epileptic. They are people too.

My apologies for my post to all the other posters.

TDluvsDaisy
02-13-2012, 02:52 PM
You are totally insensitive and that is uncalled for. My daughter, my grandson, my brother and a few friends have/had seizures. Should their life STOP because they have seizures? Maybe you should educate yourself on epilepsy. You don't understand it until you live with it. My grandson just got back on Wednesday from WDW. He took his seizure response dog with him. They carry her service certification with them at all times and she has to wear a vest while on duty. Should he not experience WDW because you don't want to be around his dog? He's six years old. How do you tell him that there are people in the world that think he shouldn't experience life? I'm sorry but I am appalled at your post. If you have epilepsy around you then maybe you would/could understand. Open your arms to an epileptic. They are people too.

My apologies for my post to all the other posters.

No apologies needed from you. :grouphug: In my opinion, you are correct and that other poster is incredibly wrong and should be ashamed.

jiminyC_fan
02-13-2012, 03:02 PM
:hug: Thank you, tdluvsDisney.

TDluvsDaisy
02-13-2012, 03:09 PM
You're welcome. :)

PizzieDuster
02-13-2012, 03:15 PM
While saying good bye to my baby, my lab, before leaving on our cruise, my DH joked that I could probably take him with me, he's so good. I said, "ya, I can say he keeps me calm and will stop me from bickering with DD13".

Thank you for reminding me that I am lucky to not need one. But I do understand the need for them. Wouldn't bother me a bit. Would only probably make me miss my baby though ;) :love:

I've seen the pics of the baby pools they put out on the decks for the service dogs. I thought that was a wonderful idea!

finnaddict98
02-13-2012, 03:29 PM
Of course you did, that's why you mentioned it twice in your original post.

You made an extremely incendiary, ignorant, and insulting post, and then followed it up with "I know I'll get flamed for this."

Prior acknowledgment of the fact that your controversial post is likely to be met with resistance doesn't justify your bigoted post.

So, I cant have an opinion if I know it will cause a reaction? It is not a bigoted post, it is my opinion, as this is your opinion. I do not show disdain for your opinion as it contrasts with my own. I openly acknowledged my position as controversial as to illustrate my comprehension of the emotions involved in this topic. My post was neither insulting or or ignorant, rather they are well informed. In point of fact:

-If a person is prone to seizures, the proper course of action is to take specific medication to prevent the seizure from occuring in the first place, medication including dilatin or phenobarb and some new meds are particulary good at controlling seizues. A previous poster stated that the seizure itself is not the problem, the fall is...thats incorrect. Few people who suffer seizures actually fall, most become aware of the impending seizure (they report having an aura) and "generally" they can get someplace safe before the seizure reaches the "clonic" stage. The siezure patient is, however prone to injury during the seizre from impacting objects around them, a service animal can hardly help here. The diabetic is best monitored by an aggressive blood glucose monitoring regiment, testing and management to keep the levels (between 60-120 are considered) optimal. The use of a "dog" to tell you your blood sugar is high or low shouldnt be your best course of action. Effective blood glucose monitoring is, and no I didnt consult google for these facts.

What some of the people have "missed" is that my intention has nothing at all to do with "service dogs" and everything to do with people who bring their pets on vacation with them. Im sorry if that message was lost, but that was my point entirely, it appears that some people have taken advantage of the "service animal" provision and are taking their pets on vacation under the guise of it being a service animal, nothing more nothing less. Apologies to those "offended", or is my preemptory apology also considered bigoted commentary as well?

mmouse37
02-13-2012, 03:36 PM
Ok...everyone has stated their opinions (and everyone is entitled to their own).

Enough said on that. Anyone arguing going forward will get an infraction.

MJ

jiminyC_fan
02-13-2012, 04:00 PM
sorry, I posted the same time as MJ.