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Tandyc
01-24-2012, 05:27 PM
We are fortunate enough to have the problem of geting gifts for my DH's and my Grandmother's birthdays. They will be 90 and 100 both in April. Obviously this is not a time to scrimp but we are not in a position to spend hundreds of dollars on each of them.

Does anyone have gift idea's for the elderly? I would love to personalize the gift in some fashion and thought if I start the process now we will have time to do so. I am not opposed to making something or adding a picture to something. Just have no idea what would work the best.

It is such a special occasion it must be recognized somehow. There will be a big party of each of these ladies, but a nice gift is important too I think.

Thanks for any thoughts.

Tandyc

semo233
01-24-2012, 05:37 PM
How about setting up a scrapbook for each special lady? Since you have some time to work with, each page could be ddicated to someone who is special to them. They can be at the party or not. You could send letters asking each family/person for a picture to include (tell them the size you want) and also include a specific piece of paper for them to write a special memory or message. You could have the book put together in a day or two.


Or, if their eyesight is not too good,

http://www.amazon.com/VoiceQuilt-Rosewood-Keepsake-Recorded-Voices/dp/B002NLO7JO


Good Luck!

Swan4Me
01-24-2012, 05:43 PM
My elderly Mom loves her electronic picture frame-I just wish it was easier to start for her.:)

carymomof3
01-24-2012, 06:06 PM
When my grandma turned 90, my sister and I went to Staples and got a huge foam board and made a sort of family tree/grandma through the years thing. We had pictures of her parents, her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren and, of course, lots of pictures of her. We found pics from her childhood and put them up with captions. We displayed the finished board at her party and it was the highlight! Her siblings and other relatives were fascinated by all that was on it. When the party was over, she took hung it in her home. I don't think she has ever enjoyed a gift more. She has always displayed lots of pictures, but had never seen a "this is your life" kind of thing. :)

Tandyc
01-24-2012, 06:38 PM
You guys are awesome! These are just what I was looking for.

Thanks so so much!

Tandyc

Cheshire Figment
01-24-2012, 08:46 PM
For our mother's 90th, in 2004, my sister and I held a luncheon for 130 people at a local (to her) hotel. It ran about $7,000 inclusive (about $54 per person). Our mother was the only one who knew all the attendees, as it included relatives, friends, co-workers, etc.

Mom did not want any gifts, but many of the people got up and told of events during their lives that she play a key part in. Some people did bring gits, but they were primarily in the nature of photos or newspaper clippings related to her.

One really nice thing was my brother-in-law did a series of interviews with her over a six-month period and published a small history book (about 200 pages) and each person who attended got a copy.

We now have about 2 years to plan the next party.

cey
01-24-2012, 10:50 PM
For my grandmother's 100 birthday, my dh made a beautiful stained glass hummingbird which we had engraved with her name and birthday info. She hung it next to her bed in the nursing home she was in for everyone to enjoy. After she passed, I re-claimed the stained glass piece and it now hangs in a bedroom window. Everytime, I see it, I think of her! :littleangel:

snoopy5386
01-25-2012, 12:01 AM
When my DH's grandpa turned 90, everyone got him 90 of something. For most it was 90 of some item that had meaning in their relationship. It was really sweet.

Plum Pirate
01-25-2012, 12:35 AM
This is not sweet or nostalgic like the great gifts suggested above, but perhaps worth considering depending upon the recipient.

When my DGMIL turned 80, one of the things the grandchildren got her was $80 worth of scrach-off lottery tickets. As she just happened to have 8 grandchildren, each one contributed $10 to the gift. She didn't win much, but she had a great time scratching off all those tickets (I think they were all either $1 or $2 tickets, and we tried to get as many as possible attached so that they formed a long perforated group, if that makes sense - think Santa's good and bad list). It was a lot of fun. Just something to think about if you have a group of people who are willing to chip in.

PebblesMK
01-25-2012, 12:52 AM
A memory box would be semi-simple to make and something that could be hung up for each of them to enjoy. Pictures, trinkets, newspaper clippings, sentimental items (or representation of them), the possibilities are endless.

Or if you're talented enough, a quilt that can be personalized. Dates, names, maybe even fabric from items such as an old tie that was worn, a handkerchief carried at a wedding, a baby outfit that was special....

Neesy228
01-25-2012, 01:15 AM
Things Remembered used to have (as of about a year and a half ago) a family tree photo stand. I bought it and put photos of each family member in the frames and there is a place to engrave...It was really beautiful when it was finished and it didn't cost a ton of money. The time consuming part of finding pictures that fit.

I just recently created a photo wreath for my Grandmother-in-law with photos and names - she's 85 and she loved it. If you're on Pinterest, you can search for "photo wreath" and there is one with a red/black theme with round photos that I modeled mine after. It turned out super cute and I spent less than $30 on materials.

ETA: A photo blanket is also a good idea and those usually run in the $70-100 range. :)

reenie1
01-25-2012, 02:35 AM
Before my grandmother's turned ninety, I sent an email to all of her children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren asking them to tell me things they loved about her. I compiled a list of 90 and framed it- she cherishes this gift!

tinatark
01-25-2012, 11:53 AM
I would compile cards from dignitaries - the white house, state, local government, etc. Possibly even celebrities they enjoy. Maybe have them sent to you and you present them all to her at the same time.

Gnomegirl
01-25-2012, 12:55 PM
Before my grandmother's turned ninety, I sent an email to all of her children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren asking them to tell me things they loved about her. I compiled a list of 90 and framed it- she cherishes this gift!

My sister and I did something similar. We made a book and had each grandchild write down things they loved about Grammie - Lily wrote 5 because she was 5, Hayden 6, etc based on age and put it into a scrapbook.

If they are in a nursing home could I suggest clothing? I know it isn't at all glamorous but I work in a nursing home and people forget that these ladies need clothing. And not just clothing but actual matching outfits. It's a huge pet peeve of mine that yo can have a closet full of clothing and nothing that matches or even fits.

Another thing that I would suggest if in a nursing home would be a bouquet maybe once a month. It makes the room look cheery and everyone admires it. This makes the resident happy because someone admires what they have and stops to say so and because they can brag about who sent it. It would be nice as well if they still live at home.

ktlm
01-25-2012, 02:27 PM
You've been given a bunch of great ideas already. Is there something they really like? My Grandma really loved flowers, so for her 100th birthday I got her a very realistic looking artificial flower arrangement (so realistic that she accidently watered it a couple times!). I thought about real flowers, but I wanted something she could keep and it would remind her of me when she looked at it. I thought about the monthly flowers and I know she would have loved it, but that can get really expensive. My Dad bought her a little gold and diamond heart pendant necklace because she always loved jewelry- pretty, but nothing too fancy or expensive. When she passed away, the pendant was given to me and I can wear it and think of her. My cousin wanted the flowers to remind her of Grandma and how much she loved flowers. So while Grandma loved the gifts, they also have really meant something to my cousin and I since she has been gone. I'd say think about what she really likes and enjoys, and tailor a gift towards that, whether it be a scrapbook of memories, or flowers or anything else you can think of.

Gigi22
01-25-2012, 03:53 PM
For my DH's beloved, and very formidable (she was an officer in WWII) great-aunt, who had to give up her home and move to a retirement facility in her late 80s, we sent her a vase of two dozen long-stemmed roses. It was a huge hit. She had definite boasting rights over the other ladies in the facility as a result.
Even better, we were able to come and see her a couple of months afterwards.

Gigi22
01-25-2012, 03:54 PM
For my DH's beloved, and very formidable (she was an officer in WWII) great-aunt, who had to give up her home and move to a retirement facility in her late 80s, we sent her a vase of two dozen long-stemmed roses. It was a huge hit. She had definite boasting rights over the other ladies in the facility as a result.
Even better, we were able to come and see her a couple of months afterwards. :goodvibes

CoP Luv
01-25-2012, 05:40 PM
What I did for my uncle's 100th birthday was take pictures of the party and put a photobook together for him. The hosts didn't hire a photographer so I took as many pictures as I could of everyone and all of the details of the party. I edited the pictures and created a book to send to my uncle. So many people loved it and asked for copies for themselves.

Plum Pirate
01-25-2012, 08:52 PM
Before my grandmother's turned ninety, I sent an email to all of her children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren asking them to tell me things they loved about her. I compiled a list of 90 and framed it- she cherishes this gift!

I love this idea!