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torinsmom
07-25-2011, 07:38 PM
My 15 yo nephew broke his hand at a friend's house Friday. Evidently he was on the treadmill, and the child who lives there(17 yo) turned up the speed and he fell. He went and got an x-ray and they put a cast on. Well, today they went back to the doctor and found out he needs to have surgery to get pins in his hand because it is not healing properly. The friend only knows that he went and got a cast; she doesn't know things have progressed to where it is going to be an expensive accident, even with health insurance. So my question is, if you get hurt at someone's house, do you just suck it up or what? Would home owner's insurance help at all?

Breezy_Carol
07-25-2011, 07:42 PM
When my son's friend broke his arm jumping off a swing in our backyard, somehow our home owners was involved. This has been over 15 years ago so I don't remember the details. I think her health insurance covered it and we picked up the deductible.:confused3

If it is at a person's home, the injured person can sue the homeowner, regardless of fault (I believe.)

scrapquitler
07-25-2011, 07:44 PM
My 15 yo nephew broke his hand at a friend's house Friday. Evidently he was on the treadmill, and the child who lives there(17 yo) turned up the speed and he fell. He went and got an x-ray and they put a cast on. Well, today they went back to the doctor and found out he needs to have surgery to get pins in his hand because it is not healing properly. The friend only knows that he went and got a cast; she doesn't know things have progressed to where it is going to be an expensive accident, even with health insurance. So my question is, if you get hurt at someone's house, do you just suck it up or what? Would home owner's insurance help at all?

Personally, if it were my child at a friends house, I would chalk it up to 'accidents happen' and I would pay the insurance deductible of copayment and get on with my life. I wouldn't file claims with the family's homeowners insurance (that would probably cost them many times the $$$ in the long run when their insurance drops them as a result).

If something happened to my child's friend at my house, I would be mortified. I would call the parents to apologize and I would personally pay their copay or deductible and hope that they would be satisfied with that and not file a claim with my insurance.

Now if it were a MAJOR MAJOR injury (like a child becoming paralyzed in a swimming pool accident) then yes, I would deal with the homeowners insurance regardless of which side I was on, but for something like the OP describes, a non-major thing...no, I wouldn't involve the homeowners insurance.

Just my personal opinon. Discuss among yourselves...

torinsmom
07-25-2011, 07:47 PM
When my son's friend broke his arm jumping off a swing in our backyard, somehow our home owners was involved. This has been over 15 years ago so I don't remember the details. I think her health insurance covered it and we picked up the deductible.:confused3

If it is at a person's home, the injured person can sue the homeowner, regardless of fault (I believe.)

She would definitely not be interested in suing. I'm just wondering if the homeowner could make a claim. If there was a claim due to an accident, would her rates go up? My poor sister just had to replace her well pump for $4200 and her DH has been out of work for over a year. I don't know how she's going to pay for what the insurance doesn't pay.

Obviously, the kids should not have been on the treadmill:sad2:

minniebeth
07-25-2011, 07:47 PM
Sometimes once the insurance company sees the injury report, and where and how the injury occured, they will contact the homeowner's insurance for compensation where the injury took place if you are willing to provide that information when requested. The injured party doesn't have to do the suing, the insurance company will take care of getting the bills covered from the homeowner's insurance where the injury occured.

torinsmom
07-25-2011, 07:51 PM
Personally, if it were my child at a friends house, I would chalk it up to 'accidents happen' and I would pay the insurance deductible of copayment and get on with my life. I wouldn't file claims with the family's homeowners insurance (that would probably cost them many times the $$$ in the long run when their insurance drops them as a result).

If something happened to my child's friend at my house, I would be mortified. I would call the parents to apologize and I would personally pay their copay or deductible and hope that they would be satisfied with that and not file a claim with my insurance.

Now if it were a MAJOR MAJOR injury (like a child becoming paralyzed in a swimming pool accident) then yes, I would deal with the homeowners insurance regardless of which side I was on, but for something like the OP describes, a non-major thing...no, I wouldn't involve the homeowners insurance.

Just my personal opinon. Discuss among yourselves...

Well, my sister and BIL were there, so the responsibility was definitely not all on the friend. I don't know if my sister would even accept if the friend offered to pay part of it. The incident just got me thinking about what the proper etiquette is.

torinsmom
07-25-2011, 07:52 PM
Sometimes once the insurance company sees the injury report, and where and how the injury occured, they will contact the homeowner's insurance for compensation where the injury took place if you are willing to provide that information when requested. The injured party doesn't have to do the suing, the insurance company will take care of getting the bills covered from the homeowner's insurance where the injury occured.

Oh yeah, I remember now having to fill that out on reports.

Poohforyou
07-25-2011, 07:59 PM
She would definitely not be interested in suing. I'm just wondering if the homeowner could make a claim. If there was a claim due to an accident, would her rates go up? My poor sister just had to replace her well pump for $4200 and her DH has been out of work for over a year. I don't know how she's going to pay for what the insurance doesn't pay.

Obviously, the kids should not have been on the treadmill:sad2:

If a 15 yo and 17 yo can't be trusted to use a treadmill without adult supervision I'm worried for both of them. My 11yo uses one on a regular basis without any issue. This is a case of at least one teen who should know better being stupid.

It's possible her health insurance will ask how the accident happened. If they find out it happened at someone else's house they may pursue it on their own. An insurance company isn't going to want to pay if they don't have to.

HsvTeacher
07-25-2011, 08:00 PM
I fell down the stairs at my SIL's house and broke my leg. The recovery took a long time, involved multiple x-rays and casts, rehab, and missed work. I never dreamed of asking my in-laws to pay a penny of the costs, because it was an accident. IMHO, that was the proper etiquette.

mhsjax
07-25-2011, 08:04 PM
If a 15 yo and 17 yo can't be trusted to use a treadmill without adult supervision I'm worried for both of them. My 11yo uses one on a regular basis without any issue. This is a case of at least one teen who should know better being stupid.

It's possible her health insurance will ask how the accident happened. If they find out it happened at someone else's house they may pursue it on their own. An insurance company isn't going to want to pay if they don't have to.

It is probably different for your 11 year old using one. I bet these were 2 kids that were playing around, I bet this isn't about parental over involvement. Kids, including myself, do stupid thing when parents aren't around.My kids use my exercise equipment, but there is no need for their friends to be one there, and if they were, they are probably up to no good.

bumbershoot
07-25-2011, 08:04 PM
In that particular case, if my son were the injured one, I wouldn't go after the family of the older kid. Accidents happen. The 17 year old didn't mean to do it.

And when the insurance company contacted me with their "is anyone else to blame" letters, I would say (as I've said 3 separate times for injuries, twice involving DS, once involving me) "this was an accident, there is no one else to blame" and be done with it.

I can't even imagine asking the family of the 17 year old for money. Accidents happen.


Now...if there were something wrong with the treadmill, if it went from 0-60 in under a second, then I'd have a chat with the treadmill company. But usually with treadmills it increases speed slowly, and the one on the treadmill should have had the opportunity to stop it, tell the 17 year old to stop it, or even get the attention of a parent, before it went up that fast. Or just put feet on the sides of the treadmill. I've watched lots of siblings goofing around on treadmills at the Y (in the "family" workout area, which is nowhere near as well supervised as it should be) and all of them have had time to get themselves out of harm's way as someone else is pressing buttons.

But if the treadmill malfunctioned, it's a different story.

MomofKatie
07-25-2011, 08:08 PM
Nowadays, insurance companies will ask a lot of questions to determine who to contact for payment. DD fell at a friend's house and broke her arm a few years ago. Our health insurance company asked a lot of questions- where was DD when the accident happened? Were there any other people involved in the accident? What were the details of the accident (i e, was there anything that caused the fall that could be considered negligence on the part of the neighbors)? My impression was that my insurance company was investigating for anything they could to use as means to try to collect from the neighbors instead of paying the full claim themselves.

shmoogrrrl
07-25-2011, 08:11 PM
They may not have a choice when the insurance company gets involved. My daughter sprained her ankle at our church and about a week after our ER visit, we got a call from the insurance company asking all sorts of questions about why it happened and what exactly happened. The lady said that if they determined that the church was at fault, they would 'deal with' the Church's insurance company. I was somewhat horrified because we didn't blame the church at all.

Nothing came of it, though. I made it clear that my daughter was acting silly and jumping around in the parking lot on the way to the car when she landed wrong. I suppose the Church's insurance is there for this sort of thing, and I suppose our insurance wants to get it paid by someone else if they could, but still. At least it didn't go any further.

shortbun
07-25-2011, 08:11 PM
If a 15 yo and 17 yo can't be trusted to use a treadmill without adult supervision I'm worried for both of them. My 11yo uses one on a regular basis without any issue. This is a case of at least one teen who should know better being stupid.

It's possible her health insurance will ask how the accident happened. If they find out it happened at someone else's house they may pursue it on their own. An insurance company isn't going to want to pay if they don't have to.

My 13yo son ripped his knees open on our treadmill. He didn't have the off rope attached to himself and tripped, fell and the thing kept running. His injuries were bad and took a long time to heal. Our treadmill, weight bench and other workout pieces are off limits to non family members. They are welcome to the kinect, the basketball court. No one is allowed to play while we are gone. These rules are followed here, or the rule breaker can not come back for a long time.

My insurance agent has made it clear to me that we have liability issues with our gym and sports equipment. I am the gestapo when it comes to safety issues. No guarantees but I''m aware of the possibilities.

minniebeth
07-25-2011, 08:12 PM
A lot of times it depends on how the injury report is taken. If it is known that the accident happened at someone else's home, regardless of fault, if the injuries result in multiple bills, ie surgery, the insurance co. will sue the homeowner's insurance co. to pay the claims regardless if you want them to or not.

torinsmom
07-25-2011, 08:13 PM
If a 15 yo and 17 yo can't be trusted to use a treadmill without adult supervision I'm worried for both of them. My 11yo uses one on a regular basis without any issue. This is a case of at least one teen who should know better being stupid.

It's possible her health insurance will ask how the accident happened. If they find out it happened at someone else's house they may pursue it on their own. An insurance company isn't going to want to pay if they don't have to.

They're all really good kids; I think it was a matter of too many kids and too much going on. There were also 2 12 year old boys present at the time. The story I was told was that DN was on the treadmill walking. One of the 12 yos knocked over a fan and as DN reached over to set it back up, the older girl turned the speed up. Sounds like she did not realize he was going to bend over to get the fan, so it was a stupid accident.

I have a feeling my sister and BIL know enough to not say the accident happened at someone else's house. Like I said, I don't think my sister would accept anything from the friend, even if it was offered.

minniebeth
07-25-2011, 08:16 PM
I have a feeling my sister and BIL know enough to not say the accident happened at someone else's house.

That's the key: but don't be surprised if the drs. and hopital personnel ask your DN on more than one occasion how the injury happened...

*JoGo*
07-25-2011, 11:08 PM
I broke my ankle at my In-Laws May 2010.
Went to ER, was asked what happened, their homeowner's was never contacted, the insurance co. never called me.

My In-Laws paid all my bills.
They also gave me what I would've made at work - I missed the last 3 weeks of school.
And I now totally understand why someone WOULD want pain and suffering. I have never been in so much pain in all my life - including 2 natural child births.

clh2
07-25-2011, 11:30 PM
I fell down the stairs at my SIL's house and broke my leg. The recovery took a long time, involved multiple x-rays and casts, rehab, and missed work. I never dreamed of asking my in-laws to pay a penny of the costs, because it was an accident. IMHO, that was the proper etiquette.

About 13 years ago - my niece slipped on our wood floor. Literally - she was walking down the stairs, in her socks, and when she went from the carpeted stairs to the wood floor - she slipped. She broke one of the bones in her wrist.

YUCH...

My sister and BIL - were of the absolute opinion that THEIR insurance should cover this, since IT WAS AN ACCIDENT. Period.

Otherwise, our homeowner's would have kicked in.

Mandy_in_NC
07-26-2011, 02:57 AM
Insurance companies will ask a lot of questions. I was having a problem with my shoulder. I didn't injure it in anyway. I went to see an ortho dr and they finally figured out that I had a defect from birth that was causing the problem. I had surgery to fix it and it has been fine ever sense. But after every visit to the ortho dr I was getting a letter from my insurance company wanting to know how I hurt it, was I involved in an accident, did it happen on some one else's property. And I replied everytime that I did not injure it that it just started hurting all of a sudden. I finally got fed up and the next letter I got I wrote on it that it was a birth defect and that if they wanted to hold anybody responsible then they either needed to contact God or my Mother and both of them could be found at the same place. Funny thing is I had 3 more follow up visits and I never got another letter from the insurance company.

kellydizfan
07-26-2011, 04:57 AM
If they have home insurance, their medical payments will pay for the medical bills. Then if they are sued, then their liability will come into play.

aprilgail2
07-26-2011, 06:12 AM
Personally, if it were my child at a friends house, I would chalk it up to 'accidents happen' and I would pay the insurance deductible of copayment and get on with my life. I wouldn't file claims with the family's homeowners insurance (that would probably cost them many times the $$$ in the long run when their insurance drops them as a result).

.

I agree

Sometimes once the insurance company sees the injury report, and where and how the injury occured, they will contact the homeowner's insurance for compensation where the injury took place if you are willing to provide that information when requested. The injured party doesn't have to do the suing, the insurance company will take care of getting the bills covered from the homeowner's insurance where the injury occured.

Nowadays, insurance companies will ask a lot of questions to determine who to contact for payment. DD fell at a friend's house and broke her arm a few years ago. Our health insurance company asked a lot of questions- where was DD when the accident happened? Were there any other people involved in the accident? What were the details of the accident (i e, was there anything that caused the fall that could be considered negligence on the part of the neighbors)? My impression was that my insurance company was investigating for anything they could to use as means to try to collect from the neighbors instead of paying the full claim themselves.

They may not have a choice when the insurance company gets involved. My daughter sprained her ankle at our church and about a week after our ER visit, we got a call from the insurance company asking all sorts of questions about why it happened and what exactly happened. The lady said that if they determined that the church was at fault, they would 'deal with' the Church's insurance company. I was somewhat horrified because we didn't blame the church at all.
.

My daughter hurt herself at a girl scout function at a school-she did something stupid (jumped off the bleachers)-- when I took her in and they asked me what happened I just said she jumpd off the couch at home. No way was I getting anyplace involved in something stupid that she did. If it was the fault of the school or something then I would have but not if its my own kids fault doing something stupid.

ilovemk76
07-26-2011, 07:49 AM
If I was the homeowner I would expect their insurance to pay their normal share but I would offer to pay half or more of the out of packet expenses. Accidents happen and that is what insurance is for but, in this case, my child contributed and it happened in my house.

Now if they start asking about where this injury occurred, the health insurance will most likely sue my homeowners insurance for their share back.

miralys
07-26-2011, 08:52 AM
If I were injured at another person's house, I would chalk it up as an accident. If I had trouble paying the OOP expenses, I would set up a payment plan with the doctor/hospital (I have been there and done that).

If my child contributed to an accident, I would work with the injured party and their family to come to an agreement everyone can live with. Then I would have that signed, witnessed and followed through on.

The only time I would ever consider taking action against their homeowner's insurance is if the injury was intentional. (in which case police reports would be filed.)

dngnb8
07-26-2011, 08:57 AM
My 15 yo nephew broke his hand at a friend's house Friday. Evidently he was on the treadmill, and the child who lives there(17 yo) turned up the speed and he fell. He went and got an x-ray and they put a cast on. Well, today they went back to the doctor and found out he needs to have surgery to get pins in his hand because it is not healing properly. The friend only knows that he went and got a cast; she doesn't know things have progressed to where it is going to be an expensive accident, even with health insurance. So my question is, if you get hurt at someone's house, do you just suck it up or what? Would home owner's insurance help at all?

If you have health insurance, it will subrogate *sp* the homeowners plan of the friends house.

HM
07-26-2011, 08:57 AM
My DD broke her arm falling off a slide a friend's house that necessitated surgery and an overnight stay in the hospital (since surgery was at 2am). It never would have occured to me to ask the friend to pay anything. It wasn't their fault.

tlbwriter
07-26-2011, 09:08 AM
A lot of people seem to assume that the homeowner's insurance will only get involved if you make a request or even sue them, but that's not the case. It can be completely out of your hands.

dngnb8
07-26-2011, 09:11 AM
It can be completely out of your hands.

The only way they can exclude the Homeowners plan it to pay all med bills in cash.

If they submit to insurance, it is out of their hands.

Wishing on a star
07-26-2011, 09:57 AM
Stoopid teenager/pet tricks.....

Could happen anywhere....

If you do file on Homeowners, there is a good chance that they could get hit with a higher premium.

If the info that your health insurance receives indicates an accident or negligence at another insured property, then they can subrogate.
But, they would have to know where and how it happened, and be able to know the homeowners insurance company.

Proceed with caution.

PUZZLDY5
07-26-2011, 11:10 AM
My son has been stitched from head to toe for one reason or another. Most of his injuries being at a friends house doing something stupid that they knew better. Anyway, I personaly have never asked for any compensation from the other families insurance company or from them. Stuff happens. Most of the time it happens to teenage boys.:)

dngnb8
07-26-2011, 11:17 AM
Stoopid teenager/pet tricks.....

Could happen anywhere....

If you do file on Homeowners, there is a good chance that they could get hit with a higher premium.

If the info that your health insurance receives indicates an accident or negligence at another insured property, then they can subrogate.
But, they would have to know where and how it happened, and be able to know the homeowners insurance company.

Proceed with caution.

Young child, broken wrist. Theyre gonna ask.

Note to OP, if youre asked (standard form sent from your carrier) and you dont give the correct info, you could be held liable under fraud

End of the story is, it just isnt worth it.

msjprincess
07-26-2011, 11:20 AM
Young child, broken wrist. Theyre gonna ask.

Note to OP, if youre asked (standard form sent from your carrier) and you dont give the correct info, you could be held liable under fraud

End of the story is, it just isnt worth it.

17 is a young child?

golfgal
07-26-2011, 11:22 AM
She would definitely not be interested in suing. I'm just wondering if the homeowner could make a claim. If there was a claim due to an accident, would her rates go up? My poor sister just had to replace her well pump for $4200 and her DH has been out of work for over a year. I don't know how she's going to pay for what the insurance doesn't pay.

Obviously, the kids should not have been on the treadmill:sad2:

The answer is yes, the homeowner's insurance will pay and yes, their rates could go up. If she doesn't have the money to pay, she should file a claim against the friend. Insurance polices typically have a small "medical pay" portion to cover small expenses like these--our's is $5000 but that number varies. The hospital intake person will ask a lot of questions and they will most likely get a form in the mail from their insurance company asking if this was due to an accident or happened at work. The insurance companies will then duke it out to see who pays what. It won't be up to your sister at all really. When those forms come she should notify the family and just tell them they will probably be getting a call from the insurance company.

This is why you carry high liability on your homeowners--most people don't realize this process.

golfgal
07-26-2011, 11:26 AM
My son has been stitched from head to toe for one reason or another. Most of his injuries being at a friends house doing something stupid that they knew better. Anyway, I personaly have never asked for any compensation from the other families insurance company or from them. Stuff happens. Most of the time it happens to teenage boys.:)

YOU may not have asked but your insurance company most likely sought reimbursement from their homeowners--especially if any of them were "expensive". Now, if they were a couple thousand dollars, it isn't worth the time an effort to subrogate, but if you are into the 10,000+ range for surgeries, etc., they will do this--behind the scenes and you many never know it happened.

coinkc
07-26-2011, 11:43 AM
A few years ago my daughter fell off a scooter at her friend's house and broke both arms. Her friend's dad turned it into their homewowner's insurance and they paid all the deductibles for the medical bills.

I told him he didn't need to do it as it was an accident but he insisted. It ended up only costing him about $10 in his homeowner's rates and saved me several hundred dollars.

dngnb8
07-26-2011, 11:49 AM
17 is a young child?

Let me rephrase that, Minor.

Chances are, a broken wrist of someone 17 is due to an accident, and any Health Insurance Plan worth its salt has a subrogation division.

My wife (51) broke her wrist when our dog bolted and dragged her down an embankment. She has a collies fracture of her wrist. We got the letter.

In our case, there was no subrogation to be considered.

Its SOP and misrepresentation of information is considered fraud

torinsmom
07-26-2011, 11:54 AM
17 is a young child?

Actually, my nephew is 15. The girl who turned the treadmill up was 17. Either one would be considered a child to me, as they are not adults and responsible for their own finances.

daisax
07-26-2011, 03:46 PM
I've gotten the letter, too, after getting physical therapy for my rotator cuff. There was no accident or specific injury, just wear and tear.

If your kid jumps off Grandma's couch, and you go to the emergency room and say she jumped off the couch, you don't have to volunteer that it was Grandma's couch. If the insurance company calls and specifically asks where it happened, you could say "the living room." Obviously your conscience has to be your guide. But use your brains, too, because if an ambulance call was involved, or you live out of state and the ER you go to is in Grandma's town, duh!

When I was a kid and we played all over the neighborhood, we'd limp home with an injury and nobody's insurance company went looking to collect from somebody else unless you fell through a roof or something.

Now you get old and need some PT and they're salivating at the chance of getting another company to pay for it.

DizBelle
07-26-2011, 04:07 PM
Note to self: NEVER invite anyone into my home because I could be sent to the poorhouse if they do something stupid.

tink_n_pooh
07-26-2011, 07:45 PM
Personally, if it were my child at a friends house, I would chalk it up to 'accidents happen' and I would pay the insurance deductible of copayment and get on with my life. I wouldn't file claims with the family's homeowners insurance (that would probably cost them many times the $$$ in the long run when their insurance drops them as a result).

If something happened to my child's friend at my house, I would be mortified. I would call the parents to apologize and I would personally pay their copay or deductible and hope that they would be satisfied with that and not file a claim with my insurance.

Now if it were a MAJOR MAJOR injury (like a child becoming paralyzed in a swimming pool accident) then yes, I would deal with the homeowners insurance regardless of which side I was on, but for something like the OP describes, a non-major thing...no, I wouldn't involve the homeowners insurance.

Just my personal opinon. Discuss among yourselves...



Exactly how I feel as well

torinsmom
07-26-2011, 08:50 PM
Well, it sounds like unless they lie when the insurance company asks how the accident occurs, the health insurance will go after the homeowners' insurance. So, my sister still pays all the deductible and coinsurance, because she doesn't want to file a claim with the friend's homeowners' insurance, but the friend still has her insurance go up, because the health insurance will pursue a claim for themselves:confused3. That kinda sucks, if you ask me. I will remind my sister that they need to be vague in their answers, like someone said--he fell when he was using the treadmill in the bonus room. I don't think they will outright lie(especially in the presence of their kids) if asked directly if it happened in their home.

Just to reiterate, my sister never wanted to file a claim. They will just go on a payment plan for the hospital bill. She actually thought she had added them to her accidental injury policy, but when she looked at it, it is just for her:headache: The whole incident just got me thinking, you know?

YodaGirl
07-26-2011, 09:00 PM
We've had one experience with an ER visit due to an accident on someone else's property. This was our experience:

Any time that we have a visit to the ER (has only happened once or twice), our insurance sends out a letter asking for more specific details. One of those details is if the accident occurred on someone else's property.

When DD was 2, she tripped on a rug at my parent's house. Her teeth dug deep into her lip, but thankfully they didn't go through her lip. The insurance company did contact my parent's home owner's insurance, but I don't remember what the outcome was.

ETA: I believe that not only did they ask specifically if it happened in someone's home, but they also asked for the insurance company name and policy number. There was no way around it.

a1tinkfans
07-26-2011, 09:02 PM
My 15 yo nephew broke his hand at a friend's house Friday. Evidently he was on the treadmill, and the child who lives there(17 yo) turned up the speed and he fell. He went and got an x-ray and they put a cast on. Well, today they went back to the doctor and found out he needs to have surgery to get pins in his hand because it is not healing properly. The friend only knows that he went and got a cast; she doesn't know things have progressed to where it is going to be an expensive accident, even with health insurance. So my question is, if you get hurt at someone's house, do you just suck it up or what? Would home owner's insurance help at all?

HO insurance has different parts...there is med pay to others (regardless of negligence) and then there is liability to cover the other instances...It is simple to do, you let the homeowner know that you would like them to let their carrier know. The carrier will request info from their policyholder and also investigate the circumstances (usually thru various contacts, interviews, pictures, etc).
Some feel is it bad/wrong to "make a claim" I however am of the mindset that it is WHY I pay that premium....take the risk away from you and place it with the carrier to handle....so, its ALWAYS vital to notify an incident to your carrier asap to avoid possible denial (for failure/delayed reporting) And remember that the coverage follows you....so if your kid breaks a window, if someone falls inside/outside, etc, if your dog has an incident, the list is long and varied..HO ins is NOT medical coverage however, there are limits, etc.... Many do not read their policy....the most important thing you can do is Just read the EXclusions, if it is NOT there, you're covered. ;) Hope this helped a bit....


I just read thru the thread....some addl info
IF someone does not fill in the paperwork correctly by purposely NOT telling the facts, its INSURANCE fraud, plain and simple. This is not about etiquette its about insurance carriers being able to mitigate damages paid out. Your sis will get forms, she should not lie,... seriously!
As far as the future goes with your nephew....if they do not want to "sue" I get that, and agree to whatever she is okay with.......but the bills for surgery, pins, etc and follow ups can be years here with younger people, if a growth plate is involved, it can be very very involved and very costly. This is not a joke and not a simple scrape we're talking.
It is silly to "worry" about a possible increased premium, or loss of a policy which generally does Not happen. I can only say that some of the comments about whats "proper" are astounding to me....each and every person pays a premium exactly for this type of scenario, and its not an educated decision to lie or deny or be a martyr and get stuck with thousands of dollars of bills for an unfortunate accident. Those bills can be very expensive and then if its too late, its a terrible situation to be in...There will likely be rehab as well. I hope your nephew recovers fully and that your sis fills out the paperwork accurately and lets the carriers deal with the rest of it. An informed decision is the best one. Good Luck OP and best wishes to your nephew!

RLccweems
07-26-2011, 10:48 PM
My 15 yo nephew broke his hand at a friend's house Friday. Evidently he was on the treadmill, and the child who lives there(17 yo) turned up the speed and he fell. He went and got an x-ray and they put a cast on. Well, today they went back to the doctor and found out he needs to have surgery to get pins in his hand because it is not healing properly. The friend only knows that he went and got a cast; she doesn't know things have progressed to where it is going to be an expensive accident, even with health insurance. So my question is, if you get hurt at someone's house, do you just suck it up or what? Would home owner's insurance help at all?

I just suck it up....boys play rough and it's a hard lesson learned for both my child and myself. Something like this happened to us as well but it was at a friend's church. I just told my son...no more use your head!

aprilgail2
07-27-2011, 06:52 AM
Note to self: NEVER invite anyone into my home because I could be sent to the poorhouse if they do something stupid.

Your not kidding- this thread sure doesn't make me want to have anyone over!! If someone put in a claim against my insurance company oer something stupid their kid did at my house that would bethe last time their kid was over my house and the lasat time I spoke to those people!

golfgal
07-27-2011, 07:27 AM
Note to self: NEVER invite anyone into my home because I could be sent to the poorhouse if they do something stupid.

OK, over reaction but in the OP's case, it wasn't the visitor that did something stupid, it was the daughter of the homeowner.

Well, it sounds like unless they lie when the insurance company asks how the accident occurs, the health insurance will go after the homeowners' insurance. So, my sister still pays all the deductible and coinsurance, because she doesn't want to file a claim with the friend's homeowners' insurance, but the friend still has her insurance go up, because the health insurance will pursue a claim for themselves:confused3. That kinda sucks, if you ask me. I will remind my sister that they need to be vague in their answers, like someone said--he fell when he was using the treadmill in the bonus room. I don't think they will outright lie(especially in the presence of their kids) if asked directly if it happened in their home.

Just to reiterate, my sister never wanted to file a claim. They will just go on a payment plan for the hospital bill. She actually thought she had added them to her accidental injury policy, but when she looked at it, it is just for her:headache: The whole incident just got me thinking, you know?

Honestly, why should she have to pay anything out of pocket for this. The DD was stupid. I can't believe that the homeowners didn't offer to pay at least. Their rates will not go up all THAT much-way less then what your sister will end up paying in co-pays etc.

Wall-E1
07-27-2011, 08:29 AM
My son broke his knee at a friend's house. He did it at the kid's birthday party while playing on a trampoline. We went to the emergency room, used our personal health insurance plan and had it taken care of. My health insurance company did not(and has never in any situation) asked for more info about the incident. They simply payed their responsibility.

Maybe I could have gone through their homeowners, but since it was an accident, I felt that taking care of it myself was the proper thing to do.

MUFFYCAT
07-27-2011, 08:42 AM
Note to self: NEVER invite anyone into my home because I could be sent to the poorhouse if they do something stupid.

That's for sure! I'm lost for words, I wouldn't dream of going to the owner for any claim. Kids will be kids and will get hurt anywhere.

The homeowner should sue and say the teen was on the treadmill without her permission and thought he was was stealing it.
Stupid- yes just as stupid as going to the parents for any claim.:rotfl:

tlbwriter
07-27-2011, 08:46 AM
Your not kidding- this thread sure doesn't make me want to have anyone over!! If someone put in a claim against my insurance company oer something stupid their kid did at my house that would bethe last time their kid was over my house and the lasat time I spoke to those people!

What if YOUR kid was the one who did something stupid that resulted in their child being hurt and having lots of medical expenses? Like, for example, in the OP's case? Would you still cut them off?

What if the injured kid's insurer was the one who charged a claim to your insurance, and the kid and his parents had nothing to do with it? Would you still cut them off?

torinsmom
07-27-2011, 09:26 AM
Your not kidding- this thread sure doesn't make me want to have anyone over!! If someone put in a claim against my insurance company oer something stupid their kid did at my house that would bethe last time their kid was over my house and the lasat time I spoke to those people!

All the kids were doing something stupid, and the parents all knew they were on the treadmill and didn't make them get off it. As I said before, my sister does not plan on asking the friend to file a claim, but the health insurance may do so if they find out the truth. So would you never speak to a friend if the insurance did that? I don't think that will be my sister's fault and they wouldn't even benefit if that's how the claim happens.

OK, over reaction but in the OP's case, it wasn't the visitor that did something stupid, it was the daughter of the homeowner.

Honestly, why should she have to pay anything out of pocket for this. The DD was stupid. I can't believe that the homeowners didn't offer to pay at least. Their rates will not go up all THAT much-way less then what your sister will end up paying in co-pays etc.

She was the one who turned up the treadmill, but the other child(homeowner's other child) knocked over the fan, and my nephew was on the treadmill when he probably should have known better. I am sure my other nephew and the homeowner's kids had been on there too, so there were all being irresponsible IMHO(I don't know about stupid)

Again, my sister has no plans to file a claim. She is just upset at another expense, as it has been a really bad year for them financially. She said she wonders what she did to p*ss God off:rotfl:

That's for sure! I'm lost for words, I wouldn't dream of going to the owner for any claim. Kids will be kids and will get hurt anywhere.

The homeowner should sue and say the teen was on the treadmill without her permission and thought he was was stealing it.
Stupid- yes just as stupid as going to the parents for any claim.:rotfl:

All the adults knew the kids were on the treadmill.

I have said over and over that she has no plans to file a claim over this. This was a hypothetical question brought on by real life event. It's really not necessary to call my sister stupid:sad2:. She doesn't even know I asked this question.

And for the record, if someone got hurt on my property to the point that they needed surgery, I would be calling my insurance agent to ask his advice. If the insurance was only going to go up $100 or less per year, I would definitely offer to file a claim to help the person with their uncovered expenses.

mjkacmom
07-27-2011, 09:48 AM
It's usually not the parents that sue, but their insurance company. I have a friend who accidently blinded another child with a bb gun, and the parents of the child assured them that they understood it was an accident, and would not sue. However, their insurance company sued my friend's insurance company for the money.

I have another friend who's dd is in a cast due to an accident on another friend's trampoline. She would never sue her friend, but who is to say that her insurance company doesn't want to sue her friend's insurance company. Someone has to pay.

Butwhyistherumgone?
07-27-2011, 11:31 AM
We are in the same boat here :)
DD was at a friends house and had a scooter wreck ( just a foot powdered on, not motorized)
Broke her arm and had to have surgery to fix it correctly.
We have insurance and will still be out lots of money but never considered filing a claim against the homeowners insurance. It was an accident and no fault of anyone.

goofy!
07-27-2011, 11:58 AM
She would definitely not be interested in suing. I'm just wondering if the homeowner could make a claim. If there was a claim due to an accident, would her rates go up? My poor sister just had to replace her well pump for $4200 and her DH has been out of work for over a year. I don't know how she's going to pay for what the insurance doesn't pay.

Obviously, the kids should not have been on the treadmill:sad2:
I know your sister is not planning to go after the homeowners.

As for what I would do, unless I knew 100% that my child was the total angel and was not horsing around before, during or after the accident, I am not going to cause somebody else's insurance to go up due to my kid's lack of common sense. Just because I am short of money would not justify raising somebody else's rates and possibly cause them financial hardship too. And regardless of what others have said here, I have seen people's rates go up significantly or completely dropped when a single claim is made.

My kid, my responsibility, regardless of where they decided to have an accident.

Now, if there was gross negligence on the other homeowner that caused my child to become hurt without any doing on his part, that would be a different story. But I don't consider boys goofing off on a treadmill gross negligence. Stupid teen boys - yes. Negligence - not so much.

However, if my insurance decided to go after their homeowners, I would not be able to stop them. However, I would (and have) argued with our insurance that it was my kid's fault and not the fault of the homeowner.

Anna_Marie
07-27-2011, 12:03 PM
When DS fell out of our tree and broke his arm, I got a call from our insurance company asking if it happened at home, or somewhere else. I am sure if I had said a neighbors house, etc. that the insurance company would have gone after their insurance company.

Same as when DD broke her arm at school, the insurance company called and asked where it happened.

JaneBanks
07-27-2011, 12:08 PM
My brother was jumping on a neighbors trampoline, broke an ankle and almost died. No joke. He was in the hospital for weeks after the surgery from a really bad infection. He even had to have IV antibiotics at home.


The neighbors didn't pay a thing, but my mother is just not the type to ask for money.

goofy!
07-27-2011, 12:14 PM
YOU may not have asked but your insurance company most likely sought reimbursement from their homeowners--especially if any of them were "expensive". Now, if they were a couple thousand dollars, it isn't worth the time an effort to subrogate, but if you are into the 10,000+ range for surgeries, etc., they will do this--behind the scenes and you many never know it happened.
The patient will always know as they will see the bills and the balance they owe. It doesn't take rocket science to figure out that if your balance owed is way less than what the hospital billed minus what your insurance covered, that the other homeowners insurance kicked in.

Upon recommendation of a dear friend, who happens to be a prominent insurance lawyer, we carry a $2 million liability umbrella policy to cover such accidents in our home or car. While I would never ask somebody else to cover my kid's stupidity, there are plenty of insurance companies representing people that would. The policy is less than $200 a year and gives us peace of mind that we could handle anything that happens in our house or property.

tlbwriter
07-27-2011, 12:18 PM
The patient will always know as they will see the bills and the balance they owe. It doesn't take rocket science to figure out that if your balance owed is way less than what the hospital billed minus what your insurance covered, that the other homeowners insurance kicked in.

I don't think it works that way. The amount you owe won't be affected at all. Your insurance will simply get back what they paid from the homeowner's insurance. They're not going to sue to reduce your copay.

Upon recommendation of a dear friend, who happens to be a prominent insurance lawyer, we carry a $2 million liability umbrella policy to cover such accidents in our home or car. While I would never ask somebody else to cover my kid's stupidity, there are plenty of insurance companies representing people that would. The policy is less than $200 a year and gives us peace of mind that we could handle anything that happens in our house or property.

We have this as well. It ended up saving us money, because we were able to lower the liability coverage on our cars. :thumbsup2

goofy!
07-27-2011, 12:28 PM
I don't think it works that way. The amount you owe won't be affected at all. Your insurance will simply get back what they paid from the homeowner's insurance. They're not going to sue to reduce your copay.



We have this as well. It ended up saving us money, because we were able to lower the liability coverage on our cars. :thumbsup2

My daughter has had over a million dollars of hospital bills (congenital, not due to an accident) and we have always gotten a full disclosure of what was billed, what was paid and what was the remaining balance.

At one time, we caught an over-payment of $40,000 to the hospital due to two insurance companies paying the full bill rather than each their share.

Same with having two boys in sports and just being daredevils. We have always had a full bill sent to us by both the hospital and our insurance that details what was billed and who paid what.

I would be floored if somebody did not realize that another insurance company was paying their hospital bills.

tlbwriter
07-27-2011, 12:34 PM
My daughter has had over a million dollars of hospital bills (congenital, not due to an accident) and we have always gotten a full disclosure of what was billed, what was paid and what was the remaining balance.

Yes, I get this too, but if HealthInsurance pays the bill and then sues HomeInsurance for that money, it's never going to be disclosed on your statement.

allison443
07-27-2011, 12:39 PM
My daughter has had over a million dollars of hospital bills (congenital, not due to an accident) and we have always gotten a full disclosure of what was billed, what was paid and what was the remaining balance.

At one time, we caught an over-payment of $40,000 to the hospital due to two insurance companies paying the full bill rather than each their share.

Same with having two boys in sports and just being daredevils. We have always had a full bill sent to us by both the hospital and our insurance that details what was billed and who paid what.

I would be floored if somebody did not realize that another insurance company was paying their hospital bills.

No, the injured person's insurance company would pay the hospital. Then after that, they turn around and get reimbursed from the other insurance company. The hospital has already been paid and isn't involved anymore. The two insurance companies handle that procedure between themselves. The second insurance company doesn't get involved with paying the hospital directly.

allison443
07-27-2011, 12:44 PM
It's usually not the parents that sue, but their insurance company. I have a friend who accidently blinded another child with a bb gun, and the parents of the child assured them that they understood it was an accident, and would not sue. However, their insurance company sued my friend's insurance company for the money.


The child's insurance company sued for reimbursement of medical/hospital expenses. The child/his parents may also have had a claim for pain and suffering, loss of sight, etc. That is separate and if they choose not to pursue that, it is their choice. Believe me, from an economic point of view, the homeowner's insurance company would rather pay the medical costs than pay the value of loss of sight in a young child. That is a serious situation.

Also saying "we won't sue, because it was an accident" is fine. However "an accident" just means you didn't intend for something to happen. It could still have been caused because you were negligent. Not saying that was the case in your friend's situation.

In fact that is the whole point of having liability insurance-to cover damages that you cause by your negligence. They normally don't cover intentional acts such as an assault, etc.

allison443
07-27-2011, 12:52 PM
Upon recommendation of a dear friend, who happens to be a prominent insurance lawyer, we carry a $2 million liability umbrella policy to cover such accidents in our home or car. While I would never ask somebody else to cover my kid's stupidity, there are plenty of insurance companies representing people that would. The policy is less than $200 a year and gives us peace of mind that we could handle anything that happens in our house or property.

I totally agree with you about the umbrella policy. We often drove a minivan full of girl scouts, teammates, friends etc. and if there was ever an accident I would want there to be enough funds to protect us in a lawsuit as well as to compensate anyone that was injured. Even a second of distraction/inattention, or a simple mistake/misjudgment, can result in an accident.

It is an umbrella policy so it applies over and above our auto insurance policies as well as our homeowners. And I think the cost is only a few hundred a year. Well worth it for peace of mind. :)

golfgal
07-27-2011, 03:50 PM
The patient will always know as they will see the bills and the balance they owe. It doesn't take rocket science to figure out that if your balance owed is way less than what the hospital billed minus what your insurance covered, that the other homeowners insurance kicked in.

Upon recommendation of a dear friend, who happens to be a prominent insurance lawyer, we carry a $2 million liability umbrella policy to cover such accidents in our home or car. While I would never ask somebody else to cover my kid's stupidity, there are plenty of insurance companies representing people that would. The policy is less than $200 a year and gives us peace of mind that we could handle anything that happens in our house or property.

The health insurance would cover the bills and then after the fact, go after the homeowners for reimbursement of those bills. It would not change one penny on any bills they receive. It happens all the time, it's just how the companies work. It also takes time and effort to do this so if it isn't financially reasonable to subrogate, they won't.

We also have a 2,000,000 umbrella.

Here is an example-two boys were playing golf and one kid swings his club hitting another kid in the eye. The boy's medical bills come to just shy of $1,000,000. The family of the boy that hurt the other boy told them to file a claim against their homeowners insurance--why, because that family had a 1,000,000 max on their health insurance and this boy would not be eligible for more care in the future. If my kids did something like that, I would be at the door with my insurance information before they even knew what had happened.

golfgal
07-27-2011, 03:53 PM
I totally agree with you about the umbrella policy. We often drove a minivan full of girl scouts, teammates, friends etc. and if there was ever an accident I would want there to be enough funds to protect us in a lawsuit as well as to compensate anyone that was injured. Even a second of distraction/inattention, or a simple mistake/misjudgment, can result in an accident.

It is an umbrella policy so it applies over and above our auto insurance policies as well as our homeowners. And I think the cost is only a few hundred a year. Well worth it for peace of mind. :)

There was a girl in a neighboring town that had 6 of her friends in the family minivan and rolled it. Just the first DAY for all the injuries was over $100,000 in medical bills. This family had state minimums and that didn't last for 5 minutes in the ER. They have since had to file bankruptcy, their wages will be garnished for life paying off their debts. One of the girls was in the hospital for over 6 months. It's SO worth the $20/month :thumbsup2.