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battymum
06-02-2011, 04:52 PM
I am in the market for a new camera, I was considering a Canon 1100d or similar entry level dslr. I went to the shop ready to buy and the guy showed me the Olympus.
Does anyone have one of these? I love the more compact size.

I am definitley no expert, but want to take nice shots when we are at Disney. I think I will need to get an additional fast lens for low light shots. Looking at a Panasonic 20 1.7.

Pugrpooh
06-02-2011, 09:28 PM
I've had the E-PL2 for around 3 months now and I've really enjoyed using it. It's small enough that I can fit it with the 14-42, 40-150, and 20mm into my backpack, which is what I did when we went to London in April. I had it around my neck most of the time but hardly felt it, not like with my DSLR.

I was happy with the quality of the pictures and the form factor of the camera. It takes less noisy photos at higher ISO's than my DSLR. One thing I'm not crazy about though is the wheel on the back - it seems a bit fiddly and sometimes the settings are changed without me realizing it. I've seen references on other forums about disabling the wheel, but it hasn't bothered me enough to figure out if that can actually be done.

Here are some photos taken with the 20 f1/7, all wide open.

http://lynn59.smugmug.com/Vacation/London-April-2011/Stonehenge-Old-Sarum-Salisbury/Salisbury-4020994/1251724023_BJiai-L.jpg

http://lynn59.smugmug.com/Vacation/London-April-2011/Stonehenge-Old-Sarum-Salisbury/Salisbury-4020977/1251722084_9nWWX-L.jpg

http://lynn59.smugmug.com/Vacation/London-April-2011/Hampton-Court/HamptonCourt-4031103/1247126748_YTxqN-L.jpg

The E-PL2 also has filters that process the jpegs in camera. The only one I've made any use of is the dramatic tone filter. It gives the photo sort of a Topazy, pseudo HDR look, if that makes any sense.

Here are a couple taken using this filter.

http://lynn59.smugmug.com/Vacation/London-April-2011/Stonehenge-Old-Sarum-Salisbury/Stonehenge-047/1248212742_fD8g5-L.jpg

http://lynn59.smugmug.com/Vacation/London-April-2011/Out-and-about-in-London/i-W35wkFj/0/L/AroundLondon-4061521-L.jpg

There are some things that I like the DSLR better for, but the E-PL2 is going with me to Disneyland later this month. :thumbsup2

zackiedawg
06-03-2011, 10:14 AM
Mirrorless interchangeable cameras like the Olympus Pen and Sony NEX can pretty much equal DSLRs for image quality, given good lenses and a good photographer - so if image quality is the main goal or need, they are a worthy option instead of a DSLR. There are still many types of shooting, and occasionally some types of subjects/photography that a DSLR can do and a mirrorless interchangeable camera cannot - or would struggle mightily to try. So there is still the basic fact that a mirrorless camera cannot replace a DSLR for people who need a DSLR. However, a vast majority of camera users, and even DSLR owners, don't actually need a DSLR. Many people who buy DSLRs never come close to using the DSLR's full abilities, or the specific functions and abilities that make them superior to mirrorless cameras - namely focus speed, burst speed, and tracking focus. Those needing to shoot action, sports, or moving wildlife, or shoot frequently in low light of moving subjects or briefly still subjects, will find a mirrorless camera a poorer tool for the job, and require both skill and luck to get the shots they need, if at all. But those who shoot normal travel, scenic, architecture, portrait, vacation, indoor, etc scenery will most likely never tax a DSLR, and a large-sensor mirrorless interchangeable lens camera can either come close or equal a DSLR's images.

I've not shot with one of the Olympus or Panasonic micro4:3 sensor cameras, but I know in daylight they can match the output of an APS-C sensor DSLR...in low light, they might fall slightly behind at the highest ISOs, but few really venture into those territories. I bought a Sony NEX3 myself a few months ago as a second body to my DSLR, and the NEX with its APS-C sensor is identical across the board with a DSLR for image quality in any lighting situation, including superb high ISO. SO I know what mirrorless interchangeable cameras can do, and I love mine. I still do need a DSLR myself, because I do shoot those types of photography that only a DSLR can do...but if I'm wandering casually around Disney or on vacation and want to travel lighter, I have full confidence I can grab my NEX and get the same quality from it as my DSLR (in fact, I did that just yesterday through Hollywood studios, shooting until almost 11pm with only my NEX with me!).

Pea-n-Me
06-05-2011, 08:52 AM
I am planning to buy one.

A few thoughts. Micro four thirds refers to the mount, not the sensor, just for clarification. The sensor in the PEN is the exact same sensor in my Olympus E30 dSLR. A four thirds sensor is slightly smaller than an APS-C sensor, but eight times as large as a sensor in a point and shoot camera. This particular sensor has improved low light performance over the early Olympus four third sensors.

There are tons of fun features in the PEN. Rather than list them, I'll post them so others can read them.

Overview http://olympusamerica.com/cpg_section/product.asp?product=1552&page=overview

Features, including In Body Image Stabilization http://olympusamerica.com/cpg_section/product.asp?product=1552&page=features

Specs http://olympusamerica.com/cpg_section/product.asp?product=1552&page=specs

Reviews http://olympusamerica.com/cpg_section/product.asp?product=1552&page=reviews

Accessories, including Bluetooth unit for image storage and communication http://olympusamerica.com/cpg_section/cpg_pen_accessories.asp

Sample Photos http://olympusamerica.com/cpg_section/product.asp?product=1552&page=specs#/samplePhotoAlbums

You can use a variety other lenses on it, not only Olympus http://www.mu-43.com/f40/show-us-what-your-adapted-lens-looks-like-your-camera-473/

BTW, four thirds digital lenses will all auto focus with an Olympus adaptor. Olympus glass is one of its strong suits - Olympus is a world leader in medical glass (scopes).

Four thirds was developed in order to make a smaller, yet capable dSLR. Olympus' history (since 1919) includes decades of experience making smaller, more portable cameras, so the development of this type of this type of camera (micro four thirds) is typical of Olympus' innovations. We will no doubt be seeing more from them in this regard as time goes on. My personal feeling is that it will be nice to be a part of it in terms of ease of use and compatability.

Good luck with your decision!

battymum
06-06-2011, 05:27 PM
So I bought it :cool1:
I havent had too much of a play with it yet.. but I have been reading a lot of people use a Panasonic 20mm 1.7 pancake lens for low light shots.

I am particularly wanting to get some Disney night shots - we are also heading to New York City - so some cityscape night shots - I dont particularly want to carry a tripod around - The EPL2 has in camera image stabilisation.

Is it necessary to invest in the Panny or will the kit lens be sufficient?

Pea-n-Me
06-06-2011, 05:42 PM
I would definitely pick up the pancake. I have the 4/3 version and it's a great lens that does well with night shots and is extremely portable.

Congratulations on your purchase!

boBQuincy
06-06-2011, 06:55 PM
Not to hijack the thread, but I am seriously thinking of trading in my Canon dSLR setup for a micro 4/3. With the introduction of Panasonic's G3 it appears the format has really come of age: small size; great images; big camera handling and features. Focus speed is reported to be on par with mid-level dSLRs as does the viewfinder. I am always looking for smaller and lighter but not at the expense of image quality (understood there is some loss with the smaller sensor but not much for any print size we can print at home).

Canon, Nikon, and others do not seem interested in the smaller format but micro 4/3 market share looks like it is continuing to increase.
Maybe it is time...

Pugrpooh
06-06-2011, 09:13 PM
So I bought it :cool1:
I havent had too much of a play with it yet.. but I have been reading a lot of people use a Panasonic 20mm 1.7 pancake lens for low light shots.

I am particularly wanting to get some Disney night shots - we are also heading to New York City - so some cityscape night shots - I dont particularly want to carry a tripod around - The EPL2 has in camera image stabilisation.

Is it necessary to invest in the Panny or will the kit lens be sufficient?

Congratulations! It's a great camera.

You can certainly take nighttime cityscape shots and nighttime shots at WDW with the kit lens. You just need to stabilize it (I've used benches, fences and trash cans) and use a longer shutter speed. The 20mm f/1.7 would be good for low light indoor shots such as dark rides. I used mine quite a bit in London at the British Museum, Harrods, Salisbury Cathedral and Hampton Court, all hand held. In a little over two weeks, I'll try it out on the dark rides at Disneyland!

Not to hijack the thread, but I am seriously thinking of trading in my Canon dSLR setup for a micro 4/3. With the introduction of Panasonic's G3 it appears the format has really come of age: small size; great images; big camera handling and features. Focus speed is reported to be on par with mid-level dSLRs as does the viewfinder. I am always looking for smaller and lighter but not at the expense of image quality (understood there is some loss with the smaller sensor but not much for any print size we can print at home).

Canon, Nikon, and others do not seem interested in the smaller format but micro 4/3 market share looks like it is continuing to increase.
Maybe it is time...

Olympus is rumored to be releasing a couple more PEN's at the end of this month, along with some more lenses. I have an Oly E-600 which is a relatively small DSLR and I debated on whether or not to pick up a PEN because I didn't think the size advantage would be that great, but I was pleasantly surprised. It made a HUGE difference.

My E-PL2 with the kit lens and two extra m4/3 lenses all fit into my backpack purse and I can even throw in my flash if I need it. The built-in flash on the PEN can also be bounced, which is a nice feature, although it is weak as one would expect.

That being said, I'm not giving up my DSLR. I usually reach for it at home over the PEN.

With an adapter, you can use your Canon lenses on a m4/3 body.