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My2Girls66
05-17-2011, 02:00 PM
After looking through a bunch of pictures with blue sky I noticed a blob in the same spot on all my pics taken with 2 different lenses. I just took the lens off, lifted the mirror to look at the sensor. I don't see anything on the sensor(the sensor I take it is against the back of the camera when looking inside?). No dust or blobs of anything. I used my blower anyway in case there was something floating around in there. Any other ideas? There won't be any blue skies around here until next Monday to check and see if there is still something showing up.

the 'blob'
http://susancw.smugmug.com/Travel/Paris-2011/i-WqFjT4z/0/M/Paris-April-2011147-M.jpg

ChiSoxKeith
05-17-2011, 02:08 PM
You have a bit of dust on your sensor. Google Sensor Cleaning and you can find a plethora of tips on how to do it. Or you can have your camera sent off to be cleaned.

Gianna'sPapa
05-17-2011, 02:09 PM
First of all be careful "lifting the mirror". Does your camera have a "mirror up" function in the setup menu? That does look like dust on the sensor and it should be located in the lower left quardrant on the sensor. Just the opposite of where it is located on the image. Using the blower usually gets rid of it. Try photographing a white piece of paper.

zackiedawg
05-17-2011, 02:12 PM
Yep - good old sensor dust. You're not going to be able to see it with the naked eye - it's ridiculously small. A good loupe might allow you to notice it. But generally, you took the right approach with the blower first - it's always the first go-to method. When the blower doesn't work, you have to move to the next steps.

I consider the next best option after the blower, a step 2 for me, is to use a sensor brush. These static brushes with very fine bristles can often dislodge non-sticky dust that the blower cannot get to. They range from $20 wood handled brushes with fine bristles to $100 electric specialty brushes that spin and charge.

If THAT step doesn't work, then you're on to step 3 and the final step: wet swabbing. Again, wet swab systems can be cheap, from around $20-30 for some plastic swab wands and pec-pads and a small jar of E2 solution...to up to $70-100 for kits with special wands and multiple pads and fluids for different purposes. Wet swabbing will pretty much get to anything the other two methods couldn't - even sticky spots, sap, spit, water spots, etc. Some people are a little scared taking this last step - it isn't hard, but requires patience, steady hand, and some learned technique. If it scares you too much, almost any camera shop can perform sensor cleanings for you for $20-50.

I have a $40 blower, a $20 brush, and a $20 wet swab kit - I bought them all 3 years ago with my first DSLR, and have used them all extensively over the past 3 years. Certainly the $80 spent has worked out far better than $40 cleanings for the past 3 years, so I'm glad I went this route (those of us who do a lot of outdoor wildlife/biring/nature photography encounter far more dust and dirt and ugly conditions, with in the field lens changes, than most people, so for me I pretty much use a blower weekly, a brush ever 3-4 weeks, and wet swab twice a year).

My2Girls66
05-17-2011, 02:13 PM
Yes, I used the 'mirror up' function from the menu. Should I be able to see the dust? I suppose it is possible it got dislodged between then and now. I will try the white paper. Thanks:)

My2Girls66
05-17-2011, 02:17 PM
Yep - good old sensor dust. You're not going to be able to see it with the naked eye - it's ridiculously small. A good loupe might allow you to notice it. But generally, you took the right approach with the blower first - it's always the first go-to method. When the blower doesn't work, you have to move to the next steps.

I consider the next best option after the blower, a step 2 for me, is to use a sensor brush. These static brushes with very fine bristles can often dislodge non-sticky dust that the blower cannot get to. They range from $20 wood handled brushes with fine bristles to $100 electric specialty brushes that spin and charge.

If THAT step doesn't work, then you're on to step 3 and the final step: wet swabbing. Again, wet swab systems can be cheap, from around $20-30 for some plastic swab wands and pec-pads and a small jar of E2 solution...to up to $70-100 for kits with special wands and multiple pads and fluids for different purposes. Wet swabbing will pretty much get to anything the other two methods couldn't - even sticky spots, sap, spit, water spots, etc. Some people are a little scared taking this last step - it isn't hard, but requires patience, steady hand, and some learned technique. If it scares you too much, almost any camera shop can perform sensor cleanings for you for $20-50.

I have a $40 blower, a $20 brush, and a $20 wet swab kit - I bought them all 3 years ago with my first DSLR, and have used them all extensively over the past 3 years. Certainly the $80 spent has worked out far better than $40 cleanings for the past 3 years, so I'm glad I went this route (those of us who do a lot of outdoor wildlife/biring/nature photography encounter far more dust and dirt and ugly conditions, with in the field lens changes, than most people, so for me I pretty much use a blower weekly, a brush ever 3-4 weeks, and wet swab twice a year).

Thanks. That answers the 'should I be able to see the dust' question:) I spent a bunch of time cloning out that blob last night in photoshop:(

ukcatfan
05-17-2011, 02:50 PM
First of all be careful "lifting the mirror". Does your camera have a "mirror up" function in the setup menu? That does look like dust on the sensor and it should be located in the lower left quardrant on the sensor. Just the opposite of where it is located on the image. Using the blower usually gets rid of it. Try photographing a white piece of paper.

Let me add to the white paper trick. Also set your aperture very small, like f/22, and intentionally make it as far out of focus as possible.

Gianna'sPapa
05-17-2011, 02:53 PM
The "spot healing brush" works real well for removing the "dust bunnies" and takes very little time. You do not need to take a sampling.

Cotton's Parrot
05-17-2011, 04:11 PM
Whatever you do, don't use compressed air. I find the Giottos Rocket blowers work well. Just don't pack one in your carry on! :lmao:

bob100
05-18-2011, 04:56 AM
After looking through a bunch of pictures with blue sky I noticed a blob in the same spot on all my pics taken with 2 different lenses. I just took the lens off, lifted the mirror to look at the sensor. I don't see anything on the sensor(the sensor I take it is against the back of the camera when looking inside?). No dust or blobs of anything. I used my blower anyway in case there was something floating around in there. Any other ideas? There won't be any blue skies around here until next Monday to check and see if there is still something showing up.

the 'blob'


easily cleaned with a swab and eclipse solution

AndrewWG
05-18-2011, 07:44 AM
Wow, I would think that what you have there is a dust monster, not a bunny. At f6.3 is is that noticeable? I usually don't notice mine until at least f11 or f16. All the methods described above are solid advice. I have used the wet cleaning on many occasions when I shot with the Canon 30D but haven't needed anything as of yet with the 7D.

My2Girls66
05-18-2011, 09:10 AM
http://susancw.smugmug.com/Other/2011-Stuff/i-L3qB4H6/0/M/DSC35931099-M.jpg
a picture of the ceiling at f/14- looks like the big blob is gone but I see 2 little ones in a different spot

zackiedawg
05-18-2011, 10:10 AM
You're getting there! First, you might find the very smallest little spots visible at F15-20 to be acceptable - in regular shooting and with bigger apertures, they might not even show up. But if you do still want to get at them, sometimes the cleaning process does require a few run-throughs to get everything. If you've doen only the blower, try again...if it can't get rid of them, try the brush or wet swab again. I find soemtimes with wet swabbing, I might need to do 3 or 4 passes to eventually get everything...always remember not to use the same side of the same swab for more than 1 pass, so you don't scratch the sensor cover or redistribute dust back on the sensor.