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View Full Version : Will we ever get a new resort for Couples Only?


thepoohguy
04-28-2011, 11:20 AM
Why doesn't Disney jump on this? Every room has only one king bed and it is for couples only. It could have a spa, a nice restaurant, and hot tub suites.

I mean they have a wedding pavilion, why not a couples only resort?

wezee
04-28-2011, 11:26 AM
Why doesn't Disney jump on this? Every room has only one king bed and it is for couples only. It could have a spa, a nice restaurant, and hot tub suites.

I mean they have a wedding pavilion, why not a couples only resort?

:thumbsup2

JimmyV
04-28-2011, 11:31 AM
Won't happen. For the same reason that you won't see an R rated movie coming out of Walt Disney Pictures (as opposed to Touchstone or Hollywood Pictures). To Disney, the "F" word is "Family". I think they expect couples who want to escape the family environment to find solace at the Four Seasons.

thepoohguy
04-28-2011, 11:35 AM
Won't happen. For the same reason that you won't see an R rated movie coming out of Walt Disney Pictures (as opposed to Touchstone or Hollywood Pictures). To Disney, the "F" word is "Family". I think they expect couples who want to escape the family environment to find solace at the Four Seasons.

Some couples are a Family.

Not to mention, on DCL, they have an adults only beach, and restaurant, and areas on the ship. What would be the difference?

JimmyV
04-28-2011, 11:45 AM
Yeah. I get that. And two 17 year olds can be a "couple". But Disney isn't going to build an entire resort and then put a "Children not welcome" sign on it. Even V&A has a cut-off at 10 years old. The Disney Cruise ships have 'adult only" dining options, but that is a very small part of very large ships. I can see having "adult only" pools, spas or lounges. But a 1,000 room resort? You won't see it.

"Adult only" is a very tough thing to manage and why would Disney want the headaches. For example, Disney put in the "adult only" restaurants on the cruise ships, but that is not always a good fit. I can understand wanting a restaurant with no kid's menu and screaming 5 year olds. But why can't a family with two parents and a 17 year old and a 15 year old dine there? The teenage children are far closer to being adults than they are to being 5. Issues like this are a constant cause of strife and Disney doesn't need the headache.

One of the differences between WDW and the cruise ships is that adults can, if they want to, go a whole day and hardly ever see a kid. Pool, spa, restaurant, nightclub. You can occupy a whole day child-free. But you can't do that at WDW. As soon as you leave your bubble, there are kids everywhere. You can't go to the parks without seeing kids. And Disney expects that when you visit, you are going to go to the parks. So Disney just doesn't view making a "child-free" environment a priority. As I said, they can throw you a bone and give you a child-free pool, spa, lounge, or restaurant. But the clientele of people who don't want to be in the presence of kids just doesn't exist at WDW in numbers great enough to warrant a whole resort. If people feel that strongly about avoiding kids, they would go some place else. Kind of like someone wanting to go to Paris without encountering any French people. And as I said above, I think the Four Seasons will serve as a largely "adult" community. Ask Disney how the whole adult "Disney Institute" (and Pleasure Island) worked out. Both shuttered.

bookgirl
04-28-2011, 11:55 AM
I think that fiscally it would be a no go.


Even couples like the resort themming and would stay at the existing resorts regardless of a 'couples only' option.

Plus percentage wise I think most people at disney are families with kids, and any resort would have to be able to be close too or at capacity to make money. So a resort that excludes most of your clientelle would not go over well.


Now if Disney offered a few areas (pools, resturants, etc) at existing resorts that were adult only that could be profitable, but there is never going to be any kind of large scale conversion.


I might go visit an kid free area, but there are too many things I like at the regular resorts to give up for that perk on a whole vacation.

moviegirl11
04-28-2011, 12:02 PM
Yeah. I get that. And two 17 year olds can be a "couple". But Disney isn't going to build an entire resort and then put a "Children not welcome" sign on it. Even V&A has a cut-off at 10 years old. The Disney Cruise ships have 'adult only" dining options, but that is a very small part of very large ships. I can see having "adult only" pools, spas or lounges. But a 1,000 room resort? You won't see it.

"Adult only" is a very tough thing to manage and why would Disney want the headaches. For example, Disney put in the "adult only" restaurants on the cruise ships, but that is not always a good fit. I can understand wanting a restaurant with no kid's menu and screaming 5 year olds. But why can't a family with two parents and a 17 year old and a 15 year old dine there? The teenage children are far closer to being adults than they are to being 5. Issues like this are a constant cause of strife and Disney doesn't need the headache.

Just curious if you're paraphrasing from something Disney has said on this idea or if you're just speculating that this would be the reason they wouldn't do it. If that's the case, my own speculation would be that it is less about the "headache" of enforcing the age restrictions and more about setting up a resort that eliminates families/kids (and their business) entirely. My guess (and that's all it is, really) is that there are other options like Saratoga Springs that lure adults looking for a more serene experience well enough that WDW wouldn't invest money in a resort that will limit the kinds of guests that can stay there.

It'd be interesting if they experimented by taking one resort and trying it out for a little while to see how business does.

Poohguy, I like your comment that some couples are a family. I agree.

sassyredhead
04-28-2011, 12:02 PM
Now if Disney offered a few areas (pools, resturants, etc) at existing resorts that were adult only that could be profitable, but there is never going to be any kind of large scale conversion.


I might go visit an kid free area, but there are too many things I like at the regular resorts to give up for that perk on a whole vacation.

I agree. Take it one step further . . . devote one building at a moderate resort to king-only rooms and designate that building's quiet pool to adult only. I could see this at, say, CSR, which some folks feel is a more "mature" resort anyway. I could see this being popular with couples celebrating an anniversary, newlyweds, etc. I know I would book once our bird leaves the nest! :thumbsup2

cluvsdisney
04-28-2011, 12:04 PM
It's never going to happen. It's not very realistic any where but especially not at Disney. Except for a handful of things, the entire property is set up for kids. Off the top of my head: there are a couple of tours with age requirements, Jelly Rolls, Atlantic Dance Hall, Rix and V&A if you are under 10. I am not sure where else kids can't go when they are Disney. I'd settle for maybe an adult floor or section knowing it's going to be the most inconvenient location, a couple of later seatings at restaurants on a rotating basis, one hot tub by the pool without kids swimming & splashing and maybe a resort lounge here or there to have a drink without sitting next to a 10 year old.

2010_Bride
04-28-2011, 12:07 PM
I agree. Take it one step further . . . devote one building at a moderate resort to king-only rooms and designate that building's quiet pool to adult only. I could see this at, say, CSR, which some folks feel is a more "mature" resort anyway. I could see this being popular with couples celebrating an anniversary, newlyweds, etc. I know I would book once our bird leaves the nest! :thumbsup2

DH and I would book there :thumbsup2
I also agree with the PP who mentioned that couples ARE families :goodvibes

JimmyV
04-28-2011, 12:17 PM
...my own speculation would be that it is less about the "headache" of enforcing the age restrictions and more about setting up a resort that eliminates families/kids (and their business) entirely.

I'm not sure I see the difference. Once you decide to go "adult only", you have to decide what constitutes and adult and what constitutes a "kid". There would be all sorts of grief if Disney tried to tell parents that they could stay at a resort with their 19 year old daughter, but that thier 17 year old son is not welcome. Or maybe they would tell the parents that neither of their kids are welcome. And when they get to the resort, they see a couple at the check-in counter and the husband is 19 and the wife is 17. In order to have an "adult only" or "couples only" resort, you have to draw lines. This is not the type of family hospitality that makes Disney famous.

moviegirl11
04-28-2011, 12:18 PM
On a related note, in this hypothetical (unlikely) adult-only resort, I'd love it if the pool were Neverland themed, with a water slide and a bar that sells icy, fruity drinks for those of us grown-ups who won't grow up. :)

jakeybake
04-28-2011, 12:27 PM
Would never happen.

They would never limit an entire resorts room availability to just couples, when couples will stay at any resort on property already.

As it stands now Disney World is the number one honeymoon destination in the world and you can't get more "couples" than a new bride and groom.

J

moviegirl11
04-28-2011, 12:29 PM
I'm not sure I see the difference. Once you decide to go "adult only", you have to decide what constitutes and adult and what constitutes a "kid". There would be all sorts of grief if Disney tried to tell parents that they could stay at a resort with their 19 year old daughter, but that thier 17 year old son is not welcome. Or maybe they would tell the parents that neither of their kids are welcome. And when they get to the resort, they see a couple at the check-in counter and the husband is 19 and the wife is 17. In order to have an "adult only" or "couples only" resort, you have to draw lines. This is not the type of family hospitality that makes Disney famous.

The difference is in the parenthesis and the rest of what I said, which you didn't quote. It's about eliminating business. Creating a place that specifically keeps certain people and their money out might not make sense for a place like WDW. Enforcing the rules is as simple as every other adults-only vacation resort (See Sandals). The lines would be drawn at reservation, not at check in, whether it be no kids under twelve or eighteen or whatever.

I think it's more likely that Disney would weigh the pros and cons from a business/financial end before anything else. Hospitality is important to them but so is maintaining and increasing their business. I believe that if they thought they stood to gain a lot of adult business by setting up a resort made entirely for grown-ups and pitched to couples looking for a romantic escape, I think they would do it. The fact that they haven't suggests to me that they don't see it as a smart investment.

As for family hospitality, there are adult families out there. Parents with grown kids or, as mentioned, couples who are a completed family of two. So family hospitality applies, it would just be age restricted. That might rub people the wrong way though, which I do see as being a factor somewhat but not as much as the business/financial aspect.

Lewisc
04-28-2011, 12:38 PM
I'm not sure I see the difference. Once you decide to go "adult only", you have to decide what constitutes and adult and what constitutes a "kid". There would be all sorts of grief if Disney tried to tell parents that they could stay at a resort with their 19 year old daughter, but that thier 17 year old son is not welcome. Or maybe they would tell the parents that neither of their kids are welcome. And when they get to the resort, they see a couple at the check-in counter and the husband is 19 and the wife is 17. In order to have an "adult only" or "couples only" resort, you have to draw lines. This is not the type of family hospitality that makes Disney famous.

The OP is talking about a couples resort. King bedded rooms. That suggests an occupancy limit of 2. Minimum age of 18 (21?) Parents would be allowed to include their 19 year old daughter or 17 year old son.

I don't think there would be enough demand to limit an entire resort to adults.

Disney is adding family suites (AoA), added pirate rooms (CBR) and is rumored to be adding Royal (Princess themed) at Port Orleans.

Disney could devote a building to adults/couples. Logistically you'd probably limit occupancy to double and have a minimum age of 21. I don't think Disney would want to have a block of rooms that have those kinds of limits. I don't think a dedicated building in a moderate resort is the kind of experience the OP is looking for.

AndreaDM
04-28-2011, 12:43 PM
I think a wing or a building is a great idea! They could do it in such a way that wouldn't scream "no kids allowed" but like a pp said, have ALL the rooms in that wing be one king bed only. I guess you'd get the occassional single parent with one child staying there, but I'd bet mostly adults would be booking those rooms.

roomthreeseventeen
04-28-2011, 12:44 PM
popcorn::

Seriously, I love the idea of an "adult only" resort. A couples only resort, not so much. What would be the purpose of discriminating against single adults?

I think it might well happen in the next 10 years. Several surveys that Disney has put out have mentioned the possibility.

hannahdrewmom
04-28-2011, 12:48 PM
The problem I see with this is that it isn't that big of a draw. For DH and myself when we go by ourselves we like a certain hotel. We would not change our hotel choice just based on the fact that one building at a random hotel was for couples. I definitely would not give up BWI for CSR even if it was for a king bed. I think it would just limit the people who could and would want to book there.

yarlenna
04-28-2011, 12:59 PM
I would LOVE a couples only resort at Disney. I do think it would work. I would pay IF it is very nice and not kiddy. Sign me up

bumbershoot
04-28-2011, 01:43 PM
The OP is talking about a couples resort. King bedded rooms. That suggests an occupancy limit of 2.

King rooms everywhere I've ever booked have an occupancy of 3. Which until recently has worked well for our co-sleeping family of 3!

kaffinito
04-28-2011, 01:57 PM
There is a new something or other going up by GF and the Wedding Pavilion. I still think it's going to be the Honeymoon Resort that was rumored about two years ago.

It's in the right place for a Honeymoon Resort, that's for sure :goodvibes

roomthreeseventeen
04-28-2011, 01:57 PM
There is a new something or over going up by GF and the Wedding Pavilion. I still think it's going to be the Honeymoon Resort that was rumored about two years ago.

It's in the right place for a Honeymoon Resort, that's for sure :goodvibes

It's a DVC property.

JimmyV
04-28-2011, 02:03 PM
The difference is in the parenthesis and the rest of what I said, which you didn't quote. It's about eliminating business.... That might rub people the wrong way though, which I do see as being a factor somewhat but not as much as the business/financial aspect.

I think we are saying the same thing, but in different ways. It doesn't really matter if you look at this as line drawing and rule making, or carving out a segment of potential business. Any time a company draws lines, it risks losing buiness. Both because it has scaled back the number of potential customers and becasue it has potentially offended people. Sandals can afford to draw lines because it is so small. It will fill its rooms regardless. Disney is nothing if not inclusive so I just can't see it bucking its own model by discriminating based on age, even on a small scale. Again, it can do it on the ships because the adult only areas are so small. It will fill them regardless.

With respect to the issue of whether we are talking about "adults" or "couples", the OP mentioned couples, but I think the implication is that these couples would be adults. Since "adults" is the broader term, then I think it is safe to go with that. Can you really envision Disney ever opening a resort for "couples" and then telling an adult woman that she and her mother can not stay there on a mother/daughter trip? I took the original post to be more about "child-free" than the social status of the two people sharing the room. So I think that a discussion of "couples" will naturally shift back and forth between couples and adults.

As for "child-free" wings (or floors) of resorts--this is a terrific idea and one that can probably be implemented, but only in the Moderates or Deluxes. I can't see Disney cordoning off a section of POP to keep kids out. Many families traveling with children can only afford to go to WDW by staying at the Values. It wouldn't make sense to use up those rooms for smaller groups of adults. Don't forget. Room rates are a small fraction of the overall vacation expense. Disney wants to sell park tickets, food and souveniers. A family of 4 occupying one room spends a lot more than a family of 2 occupying the same room.

Lewisc
04-28-2011, 02:07 PM
King rooms everywhere I've ever booked have an occupancy of 3. Which until recently has worked well for our co-sleeping family of 3!

The OP is looking for a couples resort. That suggests limiting rooms to double occupancy.

I understand a king room could accommodate 3 guests. The question is if a king room in a resort intended for adult couples would allow a third guest.

JimmyV
04-28-2011, 02:10 PM
The OP is looking for a couples resort. That suggests limiting rooms to double occupancy.

I understand a king room could accommodate 3 guests. The question is if a king room in a resort intended for adult couples would allow a third guest.

So now we're going to start discriminating against Charlie Sheen and his goddesses?:rotfl2:

FireDancer
04-28-2011, 02:12 PM
I don't think you will ever see a couple or adult only resort. If anything you'll see an adult only section of a resort with an adult pool. Keep in mind that even at an adult only resort guests with kids would be able to visit, eat at the restaurants, shop at the gift stores, and everything else. Any Disney guest can visit the lobby and common areas of any resort. I can stay at POP and still go visit the GF and walk around.

They would most likely just make all occupants in rooms be adults which would make the pools defacto adult only, at least in that section of the resort.

The majority of the time I go to WDW I go either solo or with only adults and really I don't care if they have an adult only resort or not.

moviegirl11
04-28-2011, 02:29 PM
I think we are saying the same thing, but in different ways. It doesn't really matter if you look at this as line drawing and rule making, or carving out a segment of potential business. Any time a company draws lines, it risks losing buiness. Both because it has scaled back the number of potential customers and becasue it has potentially offended people. Sandals can afford to draw lines because it is so small. It will fill its rooms regardless. Disney is nothing if not inclusive so I just can't see it bucking its own model by discriminating based on age, even on a small scale. Again, it can do it on the ships because the adult only areas are so small. It will fill them regardless.

With respect to the issue of whether we are talking about "adults" or "couples", the OP mentioned couples, but I think the implication is that these couples would be adults. Since "adults" is the broader term, then I think it is safe to go with that. Can you really envision Disney ever opening a resort for "couples" and then telling an adult woman that she and her mother can not stay there on a mother/daughter trip? I took the original post to be more about "child-free" than the social status of the two people sharing the room. So I think that a discussion of "couples" will naturally shift back and forth between couples and adults.

As for "child-free" wings (or floors) of resorts--this is a terrific idea and one that can probably be implemented, but only in the Moderates or Deluxes. I can't see Disney cordoning off a section of POP to keep kids out. Many families traveling with children can only afford to go to WDW by staying at the Values. It wouldn't make sense to use up those rooms for smaller groups of adults. Don't forget. Room rates are a small fraction of the overall vacation expense. Disney wants to sell park tickets, food and souveniers. A family of 4 occupying one room spends a lot more than a family of 2 occupying the same room.

The bolded part is pretty much what I was saying too. It limits business and money. As for offending people, Disney's island Castaway Cay has an adults only beach. I don't think it offends people that it's there. Adults without kids or who are looking for a break away from kids have that as an option. In that case though, Disney's not losing money by having it there. As long as there are plenty of options for everyone, it should be fine.

The OP did say couples but I took it to mean adults. If not, I disagree on a "Couples" thing as I don't see the point in requiring everyone who books there to be with their significant other.

JimmyV
04-28-2011, 02:39 PM
As for offending people, Disney's island Castaway Cay has an adults only beach. I don't think it offends people that it's there. Adults without kids or who are looking for a break away from kids have that as an option. In that case though, Disney's not losing money by having it there. As long as there are plenty of options for everyone, it should be fine.

This is exactly the right point. Disney can do it on Castaway Cay becasue they already have your money. They neither make, nor lose money because of this feature. In fact, one could argue that they do make money because of this feature, as there might be passengers who would not have booked a Disney cruise without the "adult only" option. So the question then becomes, is Disney losing any customers who are not going to WDW because there is no "adult only" resort option. I seriously doubt it. And if there are any hold-outs who will not go to WDW without such an option, they number so few as to not matter to the Disney accountants.

On the flip side, might Disney lose money with an adults only resort? Maybe. If every other room is booked except for 50 rooms at the adult only resort, Disney would have to turn away any family with children calling for a reservation as they would not be eligible for those rooms. And the adult only (or couples only) resort would, by the definition of the OP, have an average occupancy rate of 2 per room. That means 2 park passes per room. 6 meals per day. 2 sets of Mickey ears. When the average occupancy is closer to 4 per room for every other resort, this would be a tremendous loss of revenue. I suppose Disney could make up for it by charging $600 per room or more. But that would further limit the number of potential guests.

TDC Nala
04-28-2011, 02:41 PM
Why for couples? Why not an adult only, since not everyone is a couple. Not understanding why an adult resort at a place like WDW would exclude those that aren't coupled. (The all king beds thing goes by the wayside if you do this though). Either way it most likely won't happen. Disney doesn't want to tick off its core demographic, and plenty of adults go and stay at the existing resorts right alongside the families.

Not to mention, on DCL, they have an adults only beach, and restaurant, and areas on the ship. What would be the difference?

They're adult areas, not couple areas (and thank goodness, can't imagine not being allowed to use the adult pool or go to Palo because I'm not "attached")

moviegirl11
04-28-2011, 02:56 PM
This is exactly the right point. Disney can do it on Castaway Cay becasue they already have your money. They neither make, nor lose money because of this feature. In fact, one could argue that they do make money because of this feature, as there might be passengers who would not have booked a Disney cruise without the "adult only" option. So the question then becomes, is Disney losing any customers who are not going to WDW because there is no "adult only" resort option. I seriously doubt it. And if there are any hold-outs who will not go to WDW without such an option, they number so few as to not matter to the Disney accountants.

On the flip side, might Disney lose money with an adults only resort? Maybe. If every other room is booked except for 50 rooms at the adult only resort, Disney would have to turn away any family with children calling for a reservation as they would not be eligible for those rooms. And the adult only (or couples only) resort would, by the definition of the OP, have an average occupancy rate of 2 per room. That means 2 park passes per room. 6 meals per day. 2 sets of Mickey ears. When the average occupancy is closer to 4 per room for every other resort, this would be a tremendous loss of revenue. I suppose Disney could make up for it by charging $600 per room or more. But that would further limit the number of potential guests.

Exactly. But it would be interesting if Disney tried to do a big advertising campaign to entice adults to choose Disney for their next adult vacation as opposed to some place like Sandals or another adult-only resort, either by offering an adult only resort or else, like others have suggested, adult-only sections to resorts.

On the other hand, it seems like they'd be fixing something that wasn't really broken. I'd stay at an adult-only resort if the price was reasonable and I liked the theme but the lack of that option won't stop me from going there for a vacation (or daydreaming about my next one). I love WDW way too much. :goodvibes

thepoohguy
04-28-2011, 03:13 PM
OK. Just to clarify, yes I meant adults, but a room limit of 2 max. No issue with "all the single ladies" and men for that matter.

I guess with the issue of "discriminating" against people with children, I'm not talking about that. There are PLENTY of places for people with children to go, but if I want to relax at my room, and not deal with kids running around and such, couldn't they have a "retreat" resort for something like that? It doesn't have to be 1000 room resort.

I'm more looking at this as a niche area of business that currently "DOESN'T" spend their money at WDW. If WDW is the top destination for Honeymooners, where do they go the year after their Honeymoon?

To give some perspective, my wife and I have been married for 12 years. We don't have kids, and unless God works a miracle (according to doctors) we will probably never have any on our own. That being said, we go to WDW almost every year for our anniversary. In doing so, there have been times where it would be nice at the end of the day to go back to a nice quiet resort where there were no crying, screaming, running around kids [I'm not saying they are all like that].

The bottom line is, that Disney is not about ONLY kids, it's about giving a family a great experience, and MAKE MONEY at the same time. If there are adults every year who visit the park and stay off property because they don't want to be around the kids at the resort, then it is safe to say there is a "demographic" in which they are missing out on.

C&G'sMama
04-28-2011, 03:19 PM
I'll start with I have 2 children and I think it's a great idea.

I don't feel discriminated against. And I can see where people without kids (and some of us with :goodvibes) might like a resort within Disney that's adult only.

I can absolutely see that being an untapped market. As many of said there are plenty of places for families with children but what about those without that want some grown up time?

If it didn't work, it's not like Disney couldn't convert it back.

I'm for it.

twooley2
04-28-2011, 03:26 PM
there are plenty of other options elsewhere for adults only but I do not think Disney nor or history of Disney trademark is an adults only place by far.

maxiesmom
04-28-2011, 03:28 PM
OK. Just to clarify, yes I meant adults, but a room limit of 2 max. No issue with "all the single ladies" and men for that matter.



I think it is a very small demographic that they are missing out on. How many couples travel to Disney, without kids along? Not many. And your further exclude single adults, because apparently if you are single you have no need of peace and quiet away from kids.:rotfl2:

And what if you are traveling with friends? Who can guarantee that 2 couples together on a getaway will be quiet?

Not to mention, the problem of getting Disney to actually enforce the couples only rule. We all know that they basically stink at enforcing their own rules and regulations. DSAs anyone? No flash photography on certain rides? These are just the first 2 rules that pop to mind that Disney can't be bothered to enforce. I think trying to have a couples only resort wouldn't be worth the headaches it would cause.

roomthreeseventeen
04-28-2011, 03:29 PM
How many couples travel to Disney, without kids along?

A ton.

twooley2
04-28-2011, 03:33 PM
there may be a ton but Disney is about getting a couple, their kids and their kids and generations upon generations going. Kind of reminds me of the marketing many companies use

Sxofus
04-28-2011, 03:35 PM
A resort on Disney property that caters to people who don't want kids around. That would be a sad day.

twooley2
04-28-2011, 03:38 PM
A resort on Disney property that caters to people who don't want kids around. That would be a sad day.

I agree... and do not care who does not agree. Disney is about childhood and dreaming and to restrict from the very essence of that would be an oxymoron

GinnyEmma
04-28-2011, 03:43 PM
A ton.

:confused3So if there are a ton they would have to prove that a ton more would come. I suspect that can't be done and thus they haven't done it. Disney has a goal to make money. Either an idea can make it worthwhile or not.

ftr, I am not against the idea, and I have kids.

JimmyV
04-28-2011, 03:44 PM
...but if I want to relax at my room, and not deal with kids running around and such, couldn't they have a "retreat" resort for something like that? It doesn't have to be 1000 room resort.

...there have been times where it would be nice at the end of the day to go back to a nice quiet resort where there were no crying, screaming, running around kids [I'm not saying they are all like that].

If there are adults every year who visit the park and stay off property because they don't want to be around the kids at the resort, then it is safe to say there is a "demographic" in which they are missing out on.

Quite honestly, I think the Bonnet Creek Resorts and the Four Seasons are what you are talking about. Those places were not built with the idea that they would serve parents with "no neck monsters" (sorry...just had to get in a Tennessee Williams reference here) running around causing a stir. They are not exclusive to adults, but the demographic is certainly going to trend that way. Especially at the Four Seasons. It is not cost effective to build a 200 room retreat. And even if Disney did, it would be out in the wilderness like Bonnet Creek and the Four Seasons anyway. So Disney has probably filled this niche without spending a buck of its own.

maxiesmom
04-28-2011, 03:47 PM
A ton.

Maybe. But even if it is true, it would be 1 ton of couples compared to 1 million tons of non-couples. So a rather small number of those who vacation at WDW.

JimmyV
04-28-2011, 03:49 PM
I think it is a very small demographic that they are missing out on. How many couples travel to Disney, without kids along? Not many.

I couldn't disagree more with this. There are many, many such couples. But to put it into the reference point of this thread, the relevant question is: "How many couples travel to Disney without kids along who want to keep a fair distance from kids at all times?" Stated this way, I would agree that the answer is "Not many". Again, you can't go to Paris without running in to some French people, and you can't go to Disney without running into kids. If either idea upsets you, then pick another vacation spot. Disney has no obligation to try to create a kid-free bubble in the heartland of a kids' paradise.

GinnyEmma
04-28-2011, 03:51 PM
I couldn't disagree more with this. There are many, many such couples. But to put it into the reference point of this thread, the relevant question is: "How many couples travel to Disney without kids along who want to keep a fair distance from kids at all times?" Stated this way, I would agree that the answer is "Not many". Again, you can't go to Paris without running in to some French people, and you can't go to Disney without running into kids. If either idea upsets you, then pick another vacation spot. Disney has no obligation to try to create a kid-free bubble in the heartland of a kids' paradise.

That is an interesting distintion. It makes sense to me.

Lillian Gracey
04-28-2011, 03:55 PM
A ton.

Agreed. My parents went twice without my siblings and I. Once when they were on their honeymoon (before any of us were born) and once when my brother and I were infants. If my boyfriend and I go, which we plan on doing some time in the future, we will be going without children because we don't have any. Disney isn't restricted to families.

Regarding adults, my gramma and I are going together and we aren't bringing any children.

princesspeach
04-28-2011, 04:30 PM
If I wan't a adult only resort there are plenty outside of disney. I love seeing all the happy families at Disney. This is what makes disney special IMO.

thepoohguy
04-28-2011, 04:34 PM
If I want a adult only resort there are plenty outside of disney.

This is part of my point. If that is the case, aren't they missing out on that market?

moviegirl11
04-28-2011, 04:50 PM
To give some perspective, my wife and I have been married for 12 years. We don't have kids, and unless God works a miracle (according to doctors) we will probably never have any on our own. That being said, we go to WDW almost every year for our anniversary. In doing so, there have been times where it would be nice at the end of the day to go back to a nice quiet resort where there were no crying, screaming, running around kids [I'm not saying they are all like that].



This is pretty much how I feel. My situation's not completely the same but I'm a married adult without kids and DH and I love Disney World. We go there knowing we'll be surrounded by children and we're obviously fine with that but not having kids, I certainly wouldn't mind the option to stay some place that was sort of an oasis from the hectic-ness of the parks while also being on property.

princesspeach
04-28-2011, 05:18 PM
This is part of my point. If that is the case, aren't they missing out on that market?

I don't know. The only adult only resorts I know of are very expensive spas. There are resorts that aren't family friendly, but I don't think there are many resorts in this country that don't allow kids.

jazzgirl
04-28-2011, 05:22 PM
Just thought I'd pipe in and say that I've seen plenty of child-less adults running around making more noise than 3 kids put together. Not sure how enthused I'd be rooming next to some of those at my adults only oasis ;)

moviegirl11
04-28-2011, 05:30 PM
Just thought I'd pipe in and say that I've seen plenty of child-less adults running around making more noise than 3 kids put together. Not sure how enthused I'd be rooming next to some of those at my adults only oasis ;)

Agreed, but I see a difference between inconsiderate adults vs. kids being kids and playing, singing, crying, or making noise. That's what kids do.

catra121
04-28-2011, 05:33 PM
I think a couples resort is an interesting idea and that Disney could do it very well. I don't know how profitable it would be for them though. I mean, they could build a smaller 'couples resort' or invest in building a large resort for families and I think hands down the family resort would be a better investment of their money.

But just to throw in a different perspective aside from the couples wanting to be away from kids idea...what about the families that would prefer couples be away from them? I can't tell you how many times I have read/heard comments from parents who don't like couples being affectionate at Disney (even in their own rooms). Lots of couples like Disney...but they don't want to alter their behavior for other guests.

That said...I think there are certain resorts that are more 'adult' even if they aren't kid free. And there are a lot of couples who aren't looking for anything that is more 'adult'...they like to immerse themselves in the childhood themes at Disney.

Still an interesting idea. I wouldn't be surprised if somewhere down the road they tested something like it...but not until they have maxed out on their family resort ideas and space.

papamouse1
04-28-2011, 05:35 PM
I really am not trying to stir the pot here, but here's a little more perspective.

I don't see any way Disney will build an adults only resort for the very same reason I don't think they will build a resort for families with toddlers only, or one for families with tweens only, etc. I mean, think about it.. if you specialized the whole resort for toddlers, you could focus so much more for them. I mean DCL does that right? They have special clubs just for kids, pools for kids, water play areas just for little ones, so that's the same thing, right? I think we can all see the holes in using DCL's model to defend a customized resort.

As soon as you "specialize" an entire resort, you now limit your support base. Limited qualifying customers = empty rooms. Much easier to build a resort and try to accomodate all different types of family scenarios.
It would be an interesting study to see just how many "couples" go to WDW on a consistent week by week basis, but I just have a sneaky suspicion the numbers wouldn't reflect enough support for a whole resort year round.


Now, if the OP asked when is Poly going to remodel a boathouse just for adult couples, now I think we have a viable discussion... but a whole resort just for a small defined clientelle? Don't see it happening.

moviegirl11
04-28-2011, 05:50 PM
I really am not trying to stir the pot here, but here's a little more perspective.

As soon as you "specialize" an entire resort, you now limit your support base. Limited qualifying customers = empty rooms.


We were discussing this earlier in the thread. I pretty much agree that the reason it hasn't happened already is probably for that reason. The only way I could see Disney doing a full-on adults-only resort is if they thought there were enough people out who might be swayed toward WDW if only there were an adult-only resort option. As it is right now, there are plenty of adult parties and couples who go to WDW and are content to stay at any one of the many resorts they have on property.

cm8
04-28-2011, 05:50 PM
I really am not trying to stir the pot here, but here's a little more perspective.

I don't see any way Disney will build an adults only resort for the very same reason I don't think they will build a resort for families with toddlers only, or one for families with tweens only, etc. I mean, think about it.. if you specialized the whole resort for toddlers, you could focus so much more for them. I mean DCL does that right? They have special clubs just for kids, pools for kids, water play areas just for little ones, so that's the same thing, right? I think we can all see the holes in using DCL's model to defend a customized resort.

As soon as you "specialize" an entire resort, you now limit your support base. Limited qualifying customers = empty rooms. Much easier to build a resort and try to accomodate all different types of family scenarios.
It would be an interesting study to see just how many "couples" go to WDW on a consistent week by week basis, but I just have a sneaky suspicion the numbers wouldn't reflect enough support for a whole resort year round.


Now, if the OP asked when is Poly going to remodel a boathouse just for adult couples, now I think we have a viable discussion... but a whole resort just for a small defined clientelle? Don't see it happening.


I'm pretty sure we have enough Disers that would fill that baby right on up and bounce back time after time:lmao:. We'd book it in a heartbeat too:rolleyes1

di19
04-28-2011, 06:06 PM
I have wanted for some time now to see an adult only hot tub at the resort pools - we have raised our 4 kids at Disney but they have not been in and do not belong in a public hot tub - our feeling is that should be an adult oasis - anyone else feel the same way? I mean there are young kids jumping in and out of hot tubs as if they were small pools - just my opinion

papamouse1
04-28-2011, 06:11 PM
... As it is right now, there are plenty of adult parties and couples who go to WDW and are content to stay at any one of the many resorts they have on property.

Good point. Even if there were ...say 500 couples per day at WDW... how many of them would stay at other resorts just because they love the resort. Personally, if my DW came out, I think I would pick the variety of themes (we love AKV) over an adult-only resort.. I am sure others feel differently, and that in itself would be the problem, wouldn't it. People like variety.

I do think it might make sense if they picked a certain resort and then converted a group of rooms for couples only... kind of like hotels have honeymoon suites. :)

thepoohguy
04-28-2011, 06:13 PM
As soon as you "specialize" an entire resort, you now limit your support base.

But you are limiting your base of your already existing resorts. This is creating a whole new base for a whole new resort. That would be like saying opening a new deluxe resort would be eliminating your value and moderate resort base. No, it's a whole new market.

And just because I'm suggesting an adult only resort doesn't mean you have to tone down the Disney themes. Adults love Disney, sometimes more than the kids! I'm 39 and still love to ride the Winnie the Pooh ride!

wendypooh
04-28-2011, 06:27 PM
The "idea" is interesting, however, seeing it come to fruition, I'd bet never. Where would Disney draw the line at who is considered an "adult" - 18? 21? 25? - I have kids that are 25 and 23 - and I can tell you - on occassion they are NOT adult enough for me to want to spend my "oasis" time with.
I know that most of us "older" adults, don't want to spend time with a bunch of 18 - 19 - 20 - year olds who believe they are "adults" on vacation............ yeah, give me all the crying, screaming, bouncing, "kids" you can find, anyday. I'm just saying.............. Also, Disney has TONS of "adults" or "couples" only already coming to disney - staying in EXISTING accomodations, I highly doubt they feel they are "missing" any untapped market. Just my 2 cents! :goodvibes

Lumiere Lover
04-28-2011, 06:38 PM
Even though I think this is a great idea (I love the adults only beach at Castaway Cay), I don't think this is a good financial idea.

It would be hard to keep an adults only/couples only resort filled close to capacity on a regular basis.

queenofhartz
04-28-2011, 07:05 PM
I have a four year old son, but I could understand the attraction. Honestly, I went to Disney with DH before we had children, and we enjoyed being around other people's kids (hope that doesn't sound creepy - we just think kids are fun for the most part.) But, I can still see why someone would find this option attractive. Wonder if they could do an adult only "wing" of a resort instead of a whole resort? I know there would still be kids in the lobby, etc. They could do an adult only pool/hottub as well as some have mentioned here.

C&G'sMama
04-28-2011, 08:46 PM
.

goodferry
04-28-2011, 08:59 PM
I don't think that an adults only resort will every come to fruition, but as a mother of four I would LOVE to see maybe an adults only building or section in a few of the resorts. DH and I occasionally visit without the kiddos and a section that was all king beds without screaming kids running down the halls at all hours would be lovely.