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Star Wars mom
03-14-2011, 08:04 PM
This past summer I took a job doing clerical work at a local university. I was immediately given the option of enrolling in classes there tuition-free. Thanks to that benefit I'm now working on my Master's Degree -- FOR FREE! After being employed there five years my spouse and children will also be allowed to take classes there tuition-free. That means my children can get their college degrees from this prestigious college (that costs about $44,000/year in tuition) for free.

I share this because most colleges offer this benefit. Sometimes you have to work at a college for a year before getting free tuition, and sometimes you have to wait longer than five years to get the free tuition benefit for your kids and spouse. But it may be worth looking into. Colleges hire people will all sorts of backgrounds. The college I work at was recently hiring a mechanic, cleaning people, secretaries, grounds keepers, food servers, etc, as well as the traditional need for professors and administrators. All those folks get the same free tuition benefit that I got. My kids have already toured the college and are excited about getting to go there. The college also has a tuition exchange program. So if my children decide to attend a different college, the university I work for will pay 75% of their tuition at another college.

Hoping this may help someone else who is thinking long-term about college for themselves or their family.

juliebean
03-14-2011, 08:14 PM
I worked for a public university, administering scholarships, and we could take up to 4 credits a semester for $5 a piece - which was great! Unfortunately, that benefit was not available to spouses or children. But, it's a great benefit if a college near you offers it. I'm not sure how widespread it is, I only worked for the one university. Good luck with your masters!

RachaelA
03-14-2011, 08:16 PM
RIT?

I went to Boston University and one of my friend's moms got a job there so he could go there tuition free. It was awesome!

ExPirateShopGirl
03-14-2011, 08:16 PM
You bring up an excellent point. It's a fantastic benefit and keeps employee turn-over low. Certainly something to think about when entering or reentering the workforce, especially for moms who stayed home for a number of years to raise young children.


This past summer I took a job doing clerical work at a local university. I was immediately given the option of enrolling in classes there tuition-free. Thanks to that benefit I'm now working on my Master's Degree -- FOR FREE! After being employed there five years my spouse and children will also be allowed to take classes there tuition-free. That means my children can get their college degrees from this prestigious college (that costs about $44,000/year in tuition) for free.

I share this because most colleges offer this benefit. Sometimes you have to work at a college for a year before getting free tuition, and sometimes you have to wait longer than five years to get the free tuition benefit for your kids and spouse. But it may be worth looking into. Colleges hire people will all sorts of backgrounds. The college I work at was recently hiring a mechanic, cleaning people, secretaries, grounds keepers, food servers, etc, as well as the traditional need for professors and administrators. All those folks get the same free tuition benefit that I got. My kids have already toured the college and are excited about getting to go there. The college also has a tuition exchange program. So if my children decide to attend a different college, the university I work for will pay 75% of their tuition at another college.

Hoping this may help someone else who is thinking long-term about college for themselves or their family.

Star Wars mom
03-14-2011, 08:43 PM
Yes - RIT!

And I was a mom who stayed home to raise kids and just re-entered the workforce last year. A lot of my co-workers are in my situation. Several have children enrolled in the college right now or are working on their own degrees.

RIT is the fourth college I have worked for (I was an academic advisor before taking time off to have kids) and I believe all of them offered some sort of free or drastically reduced tuition benefit to employees. I took some free classes at another college I worked for about 10 years ago to get a travel agent certificate...which helped me learn how to find good vacation deals, of course :)

Leader of the Club
03-14-2011, 08:49 PM
My hubby works for a University. He gets free tuition and our boys will get free tuition after he is employed there for three years--as long as he is still working there.

I believe the only thing waived is the tuition. We will still be responsible for fees, books, etc. and this Univ requires all Freshman/Sophomore students to live on campus for the first two years.

In our case, I think it will actually be cheaper for them to attended the local community college for the first two years and then transfer in for the Bachelor's degree.

MickeyManiac
03-14-2011, 08:53 PM
That's a great benefit. I work for a state University and get 50% tuition reduction. After 3 years my spouse and dependents were eligible for the 50% reduction.

RangerPooh
03-14-2011, 08:58 PM
The university that I attend does this too. Yet I have heard that this perk might be cut/reduced due to the current state of the economy.

disykat
03-14-2011, 09:33 PM
My friends and I have often discussed this - if only there were a college close enough!

When I was in college I had a friend who was student freshman year (she lived in my dorm) who got married over the summer, dropped out and became a full time cafeteria lady so they could afford for her new dh to keep going there.

DIS_MERI
03-14-2011, 09:47 PM
That is an excellent benefit, as long as classes you can use are offered (or it won't impact your family life to take classes you don't *need* but want. There can be many surprising ways to get a college education paid for. My kids are eligible for 124 hours of full tuition remission at any state college/university in Indiana because one of their parents has a service connected disability of at least 10% and wartime service (that would be me, XH was too lazy to get evaluated by the VA to find out if had any service connected disability)....so, I just need to make sure that we can cover room and board (and I live 20 miles from IU and XH lives 20 miles from IUPUI, so shouldn't be too difficult to cover that if they choose one of those 2, lol).

MickeyHereWeCome!
03-14-2011, 10:05 PM
I earned my BA degree tuition free because my mother worked at the college. It was an awesome benefit, especially because it is a rather pricey, private, women's college. I opted to live on campus, so we only had to pay for room and board. Any employee at the college was offered the same benefit (custodians, clerical, professors). I may look into similar options once my kids get older. Can you imagine the savings for four kids!!?? Of course, what are the odds they would all choose to attend that school, but it could be worth a try!

js
03-14-2011, 11:05 PM
I work in a private college and my children can both go there for free or there are about 300 other schools on our list that there is a possibility of getting tuition remission from them. While it is not always guaranteed, some schools are more generous than others.

I have a junior in HS that will not attend the college where I work but we have only looked at colleges where I get the remission (fingers crossed).

I went from working part time in the city to full time at my current job (only 10 minutes away) for the benefit of college. While we don't get paid nearly as much as I did in the city, I still get paid well for my area but again, I didn't take it for the pay.

Tuition and dorms come to a little over $42K a year :scared1: We are responsible for the dorms if they stay but not tuition. :banana:

SleepyatDVC
03-15-2011, 12:14 AM
Lol. DH worked at an IVY before we got married. He quit the year we had our first child even though the benefits (besides the future tuition for our kids) was GREAT!!! :confused3

He really hated that job. He had to deal with the parents of the students daily. :rolleyes1. And the thought of having to stick with that job for the next 20+ years just so our kids could benefit tuition wise would have killed him.

He's much happier now in a field totally different from what he did at the university. The benefits aren't as good as before but he's making alot more $$$ :goodvibes and happier.

collegejunkie
03-15-2011, 02:13 AM
Lol. DH worked at an IVY before we got married. He quit the year we had our first child even though the benefits (besides the future tuition for our kids) was GREAT!!! :confused3

He really hated that job. He had to deal with the parents of the students daily. :rolleyes1. And the thought of having to stick with that job for the next 20+ years just so our kids could benefit tuition wise would have killed him.

He's much happier now in a field totally different from what he did at the university. The benefits aren't as good as before but he's making alot more $$$ :goodvibes and happier.

really? would you mind sharing which ivy? i can't imagine that parents would be involved, seeing how schools do not release information or even talk to parents without their kid's consent.

as for free tuition, my question about which school still stands. and, again, that's assuming they get in, right?

ExPirateShopGirl
03-15-2011, 02:23 AM
The only time I talk to anyone involved with my daughter's college is when they call me to ask for another donation. :lmao:



really? would you mind sharing which ivy? i can't imagine that parents would be involved, seeing how schools do not release information or even talk to parents without their kid's consent.

as for free tuition, my question about which school still stands. and, again, that's assuming they get in, right?

RangerPooh
03-15-2011, 01:13 PM
really? would you mind sharing which ivy? i can't imagine that parents would be involved, seeing how schools do not release information or even talk to parents without their kid's consent.

as for free tuition, my question about which school still stands. and, again, that's assuming they get in, right?

You wouldn't believe how often parents try contacting the teacher of record/department to try to get the instructor to change their policy for their child. A few years ago DH was teaching undergrads in a teacher preparation program, towards the end of each semester he would start getting phone calls and emails form parents regarding their child's grade in the class. Students who complained to their mommy's and daddy's because the teacher would not extend a deadline (that they had a month to work on) or for similar issues.

The office that I work for on campus experiences this too. We start receiving calls from parents at the end of the semester because their child procrastinated until the very last minute to complete the community service components of their class projects and we have no projects to offer them (this past fall we filled over 4k volunteer positions). They dn't care that their child has had since the first day of class to complete the requirement, as it's in someway our fault.

And yes, there is the privacy issue to contend with; but parents will still try to solve their child's problem for them regardless.

Spacepest
03-15-2011, 01:37 PM
I've looked into this as well, but there are a few problems.

Some of the other posters mentioned they didn't want to work at their university for years longer than they had to, because they didn't like their position. Some of the colleges require you to work full time to qualify for waived or reduced tuition. I don't know about some of the other posters, but there is no way I could work a full time food service or janitorial position for years just to get free tuition for my entire family. Ditto for any of the other high stress jobs on campus.

Second is finding time to go--you can't go to a class when you're scheduled to work. I've know a few people who have gotten full time positions at universities, who could never take the required classes for a wanted degree because it would conflict with their university work schedule.

collegejunkie
03-15-2011, 02:11 PM
You wouldn't believe how often parents try contacting the teacher of record/department to try to get the instructor to change their policy for their child. A few years ago DH was teaching undergrads in a teacher preparation program, towards the end of each semester he would start getting phone calls and emails form parents regarding their child's grade in the class. Students who complained to their mommy's and daddy's because the teacher would not extend a deadline (that they had a month to work on) or for similar issues.

The office that I work for on campus experiences this too. We start receiving calls from parents at the end of the semester because their child procrastinated until the very last minute to complete the community service components of their class projects and we have no projects to offer them (this past fall we filled over 4k volunteer positions). They dn't care that their child has had since the first day of class to complete the requirement, as it's in someway our fault.

And yes, there is the privacy issue to contend with; but parents will still try to solve their child's problem for them regardless.

oh, wow! i didn't realize that parents still got involved. for us, it was always once you're in college, you're on your own (in terms of getting your work done, making sure you get enough sleep, etc). i guess i always just thought everyone was like that. so strange, but i can see how/why it happens.

SleepyatDVC
03-15-2011, 03:59 PM
really? would you mind sharing which ivy? i can't imagine that parents would be involved, seeing how schools do not release information or even talk to parents without their kid's consent.

as for free tuition, my question about which school still stands. and, again, that's assuming they get in, right?


DH is very strict on following the rules. He's just that type of person. He was a supervisor so I know that the squeekiest wheels got bumped up to him. I'm sure he had the privacy issue to deal with.

All I know is that he use to always complain about the parents that thought their little darlings (and they) were entitled to special treatment because of all the $$$$$$ they pay for tuition, etc. :rolleyes1 "You're just the hired help, here to serve me" attitude. :rolleyes:

Always reminded me of the irate Disney guests screaming at the front desk of the resorts because they were entitled to an upgrade or to have all their requests met because of all the $$$$ they paid. LOL.

Yes, the kids would actually have to get in. There were reciprocal deals with other universities like someone else mentioned.

I "think" they were changing the benefits for new employers when DH was still there (over 10 years ago) where either only the employee was tuition-free or there was a minimum number of years where you had to work, etc. They were making cutbacks even then. Although, DH would probably have been grandfathered into the older policies.

Details of the exact policies are fuzzy because it was so long ago and we weren't going to take advantage of the benefits.

I still miss his 3-4 weeks of vacation days plus all school holidays. But his pay would have been limited if he stayed and there was no guarantee the kids would have been able to benefit. It was the right decision to leave for him and our family.

MrsPete
03-15-2011, 05:29 PM
This isn't quite the same, but the single best thing I did for myself -- financially speaking -- in college was to work as a Resident Adviser.

My responsibilities:
- Come to school a week early for training & various physical tasks to open the dorms
- Work very hard giving out keys, helping new students on move-in days
- Work very hard first couple weeks getting to know everyone, encouraging new people to go to dinner with a big group . . . just building positive atmosphere on our house
- Plan/implement two social events each semester for the dorm
- Be on call for emergencies one night a week and every 5th weekend
- Work very hard the last week of school (which conflicted with exams) checking students out of their rooms as they left for home

As you can see, once we did the hard work of opening the dorms, it wasn't tremendously difficult work. It was the kind of thing that suited my personality.

The benefits:
- Single dorm room (or room in a suite or apartment) paid
- 1/2 in-state tuition paid
- 1/2 meal plan paid
- Phone paid (this was back when we had phones on the wall)
- A beach retreat every fall, a mountain retreat every spring, nice outings about once a month (for example, sometimes they'd take us all out to LazerTag)

And this was big: We never received a direct paycheck, so no taxes on any of it.

For a kid like me who had NO financial help with college, it was a really great job. Some of my high school friends who went to other schools said it was a terrible job at their schools, so I think the pay /responsibilities vary widely.

MrsPete
03-15-2011, 05:31 PM
oh, wow! i didn't realize that parents still got involved. for us, it was always once you're in college, you're on your own (in terms of getting your work done, making sure you get enough sleep, etc). i guess i always just thought everyone was like that. so strange, but i can see how/why it happens.I don't have any problem believing it. I certainly get enough of that attitude in high school. Why would the parents stop just because their babies have moved on to the next level of education?

extremesoccermom
03-15-2011, 06:43 PM
One of the biggest reasons I decided to work at St. Louis University was the tuition program. I always wanted to go back to school to finish my degree. I have been with them 21 years. DS now 21 started at another college throught the tuition exchange program. (Someone from the other school needs to go to my school inorder for the exchange to take place) DS is now a junior at a great college I have only paid for parking, books (Amazon and half.com), and lab fees.
Last year I finally made the jump myself. I am allowed to take 18 credit hours per calendar year. I have a $75.00 per credit hour fee and books that's it for a great education. And I am having fun. I will graduate next year unless I change my major then I have another semester. I just recently decided I want to continue after getting my BS to get a Masters in Environmental Science.

NotUrsula
03-15-2011, 06:44 PM
I've looked into this as well, but there are a few problems.

Some of the other posters mentioned they didn't want to work at their university for years longer than they had to, because they didn't like their position. Some of the colleges require you to work full time to qualify for waived or reduced tuition. I don't know about some of the other posters, but there is no way I could work a full time food service or janitorial position for years just to get free tuition for my entire family. Ditto for any of the other high stress jobs on campus.

Second is finding time to go--you can't go to a class when you're scheduled to work. I've know a few people who have gotten full time positions at universities, who could never take the required classes for a wanted degree because it would conflict with their university work schedule.

IME, when the student *is* the employee, the employee will usually be allowed release time for a certain number of hours to attend classes. In my case, I took two classes per semester, one during the day on release time, and a second one at night.

In recent years, many universities have started to put limits on dependent tuition benefits. At several universities I know of, the dependent benefit does not kick in until you have worked there at least 10 years, and sometimes some positions are not eligible; most often the sort of custodial or food service positions that you mentioned.

No one has addressed the REAL biggest drawback: educating yourself right out of a job. (Can you tell that I did that, LOL?) Most universities bar their own graduates from holding faculty-level jobs there, and may not allow underemployment, either. When I finished my advanced degree I was overqualified for my technician position, but not eligible to apply for a faculty-level position there: I finished the degree in December, and I was given until June 1 before I would be required to resign. (I did find another job, in April.) Normally this phenomenon is not a problem if you are only seeking a Bachelor's degree, but it can be an issue when graduate-level studies are involved.

PS: SLU still has a very generous dependent benefit; one of the most generous in the country. An acquaintance of mine put six children through school on it. Most moms with six kids close in age will SAH at some point, but she wasn't about to let go of that job.

ExPirateShopGirl
03-15-2011, 07:05 PM
Congratulations. SLU is a great school!

One of the biggest reasons I decided to work at St. Louis University was the tuition program. I always wanted to go back to school to finish my degree. I have been with them 21 years. DS now 21 started at another college throught the tuition exchange program. (Someone from the other school needs to go to my school inorder for the exchange to take place) DS is now a junior at a great college I have only paid for parking, books (Amazon and half.com), and lab fees.
Last year I finally made the jump myself. I am allowed to take 18 credit hours per calendar year. I have a $75.00 per credit hour fee and books that's it for a great education. And I am having fun. I will graduate next year unless I change my major then I have another semester. I just recently decided I want to continue after getting my BS to get a Masters in Environmental Science.

MrsPete
03-15-2011, 07:06 PM
IME, when the student *is* the employee, the employee will usually be allowed release time for a certain number of hours to attend classes. In my case, I took two classes per semester, one during the day on release time, and a second one at night.Yes, I've seen this in action.

When I was in college I had a work study job working in one of the academic departments. The secretary for whom I worked was working towards a degree, and she was allowed time away from the office to take classes. It was very convenient for her because it just meant walking over to another building. I worked there several semesters, and every semester she and I'd coordinate -- she'd schedule my work hours (and there was another girl too) to match her classes so the office'd be covered.

College jobs tend to be very flexible, and since full-time workers tend to take 1-2 classes a semester, it's very do-able.

PigletsPal2
03-15-2011, 07:41 PM
I worked for a college after DH was discharged from the army, so he not only got tuition reimbursement (but not fees or books), he also got Veterans' Benefits, before active duty personnel were required to contribute. With a spouse and two children, his VA benefit paid his tuition AND our mortgage! I stayed until he earned his AA, at which time the State Dept. sent him overseas off and on for the next 35 years!

Queen Colleen

MickeyP
03-15-2011, 08:09 PM
Anyone know anything about adjunct benefits? I know every college is different, but just curious about the differences.

js
03-15-2011, 09:59 PM
really? would you mind sharing which ivy? i can't imagine that parents would be involved, seeing how schools do not release information or even talk to parents without their kid's consent.

as for free tuition, my question about which school still stands. and, again, that's assuming they get in, right?

I work in the President's and Provost's office and I can tell you we get calls from parents ALL THE TIME! Grades, questions, some we can answer and help, others have to be sent somewhere else.

The WORST case of interferring was about a month or so ago when a parent called to complain that their dd did not make her sorority and her roommate did??? She said it wasn't fair. What could we do? AND, if we really did have the "power" to let the girl into the sorority that she didn't make, did the parent actually think she would be welcome? From speaking the to Dean of Campus Life, the two girls were actually good friends and roommates but once the other girl made it in and pledged, the MOTHER, not the child requested they be moved from the room (her dd).

At the beginning of the semester, we also got a call from a mom saying her son had not be cast in the musical and he is wonderful and should be lead (yes, this is for real). The mother asked that we please do not tell the child or the teacher she called but wanted to know how will this help him in the real world if his feelings keep getting hurt??? HELLO, if he is in the theatre program, he is in for LOADS of disappointment for casting calls, auditions, etc in the REAL WORLD! Is his mother going to call the director????

We have parents call and complain about ANYTHING. And, while I can understand having a say when you are paying $42K+, some calls, like above, just SHOULD NOT be made.

OK, sorry, I guess I am venting. Getting ready for commencement and in about a month or so, angry parents will begin calling to find out why the heck their child isn't graduating since they haven't been aware that they are short credits????

So yes, parents, mostly mothers, call ALL THE TIME!

aprilfoolwed
03-15-2011, 10:34 PM
I work part-time at our local community college and my DH works full-time at a private 4-year college. We both love our jobs, and both get tuition benefits.

I am taking classes at another local college tuition-free (2 per semester) through the tuition program. It's a super benefit!

However, it's far from free for us. Books are expensive, and our tuition does not cover any online classes (there is at least one in the education dept that is ONLY offered online), and does not cover student teaching/lessons/internships (which are required in a lot of programs). And I can only take 2 classes per semester (for our children, they could be full-time students - employees and spouses are limited to 2 classes). I will still owe a lot in loans when I am done with school, but far less than if we didn't have the tuition exchange!

coastiewifern
03-15-2011, 11:09 PM
I work for a major state university and they offer no discounts for children.

dhardawa
03-16-2011, 08:38 AM
I worked for a university for awhile and we had this benefit, but you could only take two classes per semester and they taxed you on the value of the classes. It would have taken forever to get a degree for free.

DawnM
03-16-2011, 09:02 AM
If it works for you, great!

The only way it would work for me is if I loved the job and got a decent income as well as free schooling. For us, it would be better to just have me go back to my job and pay for the schooling in most cases.

Dawn

aprilfoolwed
03-16-2011, 11:13 AM
If it works for you, great!

The only way it would work for me is if I loved the job and got a decent income as well as free schooling. For us, it would be better to just have me go back to my job and pay for the schooling in most cases.

Dawn

Yes, in many cases, pay in Higher Ed stinks. The tuition benefit exists to counter the lower paycheck. So if you can get a higher paying job, it may be better for you.

But, for a SAHM who wasn't making any money, a part-time gig at a school with tuition benefits could be a real lifesaver!

It's just important to really know exactly what tuition benefit program the school offers. Many require years of service before you can take advantage of it. Some allow you to take classes at various collegs - others, it's just home institution. Some graduate class, others are just undergrad.

It can be a very valuable benefit - but you have to be careful (and there are tax issues too).

jmpellet
03-16-2011, 01:04 PM
Hubby and I both work for state schools although the benefit in his state (RI) is better than mine as the fees in MA are more than the tuition. I used to work at a college that had the tuition exchange program that was previously mentioned. Now that's a great deal as you can try to get into other small private colleges around the country. And ones looking for more "trades" even throw in room and board sometimes. I have three kiddos to educate and I hope we'll be able to use our benefit someday.

Green Tea
03-16-2011, 01:42 PM
tuitionex*********** is what many schools belong to. The child has to apply as a TE student and it is up to the receiving school to accept them as TE, or not. Some schools have a lot of kids to send, but don't take many in, thus it is harder for those kids to get spots. If the parents work for a great, highly sought after TE member, it is easier for them to go to another school as a participant.

Anthony1971
03-16-2011, 01:50 PM
One could also get a divorce and get a lot of financial aid :lmao:
Please make sure the other person doe not really want one before considering this option

mamilovesdisney
03-16-2011, 01:57 PM
Tuition remission as I call it is wonderful but a friend of mine stayed at her job at my university so her girls could go tuition free but the problem is that you still have to go through the regular admission process and be accepted to have access to the benefit. In my friend's case, her daughter was not accepted into the university. It was a huge blow for them. My friend thought admission requirements would be more lenient for her daughter but they were not ;-(

disneymom3
03-16-2011, 02:12 PM
Another way that I have just found out about is to look into the CLEP and DANTES exams. I have figured out that DD can take the literature one and the world religions ones this summer. There are LOTS of places online where your child can take the practice tests. The tests themselves are about $90 each which is far less than 3 college credits. A woman I know has a son graduating with a double major in economics and history ALL from taking the tests. There are several colleges that for a fee will prep your transcript and give you a diploma without you actually attending. Real schools too!

I wouldn't go that far and don't plan to for DD but getting some of the general ed done ahead of time is def something we are doing.

collegejunkie
03-16-2011, 03:31 PM
I work in the President's and Provost's office and I can tell you we get calls from parents ALL THE TIME! Grades, questions, some we can answer and help, others have to be sent somewhere else.

The WORST case of interferring was about a month or so ago when a parent called to complain that their dd did not make her sorority and her roommate did??? She said it wasn't fair. What could we do? AND, if we really did have the "power" to let the girl into the sorority that she didn't make, did the parent actually think she would be welcome? From speaking the to Dean of Campus Life, the two girls were actually good friends and roommates but once the other girl made it in and pledged, the MOTHER, not the child requested they be moved from the room (her dd).

At the beginning of the semester, we also got a call from a mom saying her son had not be cast in the musical and he is wonderful and should be lead (yes, this is for real). The mother asked that we please do not tell the child or the teacher she called but wanted to know how will this help him in the real world if his feelings keep getting hurt??? HELLO, if he is in the theatre program, he is in for LOADS of disappointment for casting calls, auditions, etc in the REAL WORLD! Is his mother going to call the director????

We have parents call and complain about ANYTHING. And, while I can understand having a say when you are paying $42K+, some calls, like above, just SHOULD NOT be made.

OK, sorry, I guess I am venting. Getting ready for commencement and in about a month or so, angry parents will begin calling to find out why the heck their child isn't graduating since they haven't been aware that they are short credits????

So yes, parents, mostly mothers, call ALL THE TIME!

wow, i had no idea! my mom won't even call ME at school because she doesn't want to bother me. i think she'd have a heart attack if she ever had to call any office about anything haha

shaylahc1
03-16-2011, 04:00 PM
My mom is a college prof at OSU and all that got me was half tuition:rotfl: Thankfully I had grants, and I worked full time to put myself through school and graduated debt free.:thumbsup2

DawnM
03-16-2011, 04:34 PM
Can you point me to some info on this?

Dawn

Another way that I have just found out about is to look into the CLEP and DANTES exams. I have figured out that DD can take the literature one and the world religions ones this summer. There are LOTS of places online where your child can take the practice tests. The tests themselves are about $90 each which is far less than 3 college credits. A woman I know has a son graduating with a double major in economics and history ALL from taking the tests. There are several colleges that for a fee will prep your transcript and give you a diploma without you actually attending. Real schools too!

I wouldn't go that far and don't plan to for DD but getting some of the general ed done ahead of time is def something we are doing.

js
03-16-2011, 07:52 PM
Can you point me to some info on this?

Dawn

Dawn:
If you are not already registered, go to collegeboard.com and collegeconfidential.com

Collegeboard is where you sign up for the SAT and SATII and there is loads of information on the site.

DawnM
03-16-2011, 09:10 PM
I am familiar with collegeboard.com and CLEP testing, however, I do not see where you can not attend a college class ever and still get a college to give you a double major through 100% CLEP testing. I am questioning this.

Dawn

Dawn:
If you are not already registered, go to collegeboard.com and collegeconfidential.com

Collegeboard is where you sign up for the SAT and SATII and there is loads of information on the site.

js
03-16-2011, 10:54 PM
I am familiar with collegeboard.com and CLEP testing, however, I do not see where you can not attend a college class ever and still get a college to give you a double major through 100% CLEP testing. I am questioning this.

Dawn

LOL.

Can't help you there :laughing:

DawnM
03-16-2011, 11:04 PM
:goodvibes

LOL.

Can't help you there :laughing:

disneymom3
03-18-2011, 12:06 AM
Can you point me to some info on this?

Dawn

www.creditsbeforecollege.com

There is some state specific info on there as far as our PSEO program but most of it is general and she has links to many study sites. I have been to one of her workshops and it was excellent.

disneymom3
03-18-2011, 12:09 AM
I am familiar with collegeboard.com and CLEP testing, however, I do not see where you can not attend a college class ever and still get a college to give you a double major through 100% CLEP testing. I am questioning this.

Dawn

It does seem crazy doesn't it? I would not believe it myself if I didn't know this woman. She used to be my tester for my kids' PIATs before her kids started high school classes. (she homeschools too.) Like I said, not something I want for my kids as far as getting a whole degree but whatever general ed classes we can cut back on for cost purposes, we'll do.

DawnM
03-18-2011, 09:00 AM
Yes, I am well aware of WHAT Clep is and how to use it, I am also aware of what this article says, you can earn up to your first two years of college (general eds) through CLEP if the college accepts CLEP.

However, I would like to know HOW this student you are talking about:

A. Got classes specific to his major through CLEP
B. Was able to find ALL the classes necessary for his major through CLEP
C. Was able to find a University to take 100% of his college requirements without him ever attending the school and give him a necessary degree.

Dawn

www.creditsbeforecollege.com

There is some state specific info on there as far as our PSEO program but most of it is general and she has links to many study sites. I have been to one of her workshops and it was excellent.

DawnM
03-18-2011, 09:01 AM
Yes, general eds, but you implied a full college degree.....please explain.

Dawn

It does seem crazy doesn't it? I would not believe it myself if I didn't know this woman. She used to be my tester for my kids' PIATs before her kids started high school classes. (she homeschools too.) Like I said, not something I want for my kids as far as getting a whole degree but whatever general ed classes we can cut back on for cost purposes, we'll do.

LiloH
03-18-2011, 01:43 PM
I worked for a university for awhile and we had this benefit, but you could only take two classes per semester and they taxed you on the value of the classes. It would have taken forever to get a degree for free.

Graduate tuition is taxed (after a $5500/year exemption) but undergrad is not. That is federal law which can, of course, change at any time.

I am on my third college/University job. (Actually, my third job period!) I made my most recent jump to an ivy league university because I was accepted to a masters program there. I was able to defer for a semester, I got a job there and I can start in the summer and have it fully covered. I think even paying the taxes on the tuition still is a huge, huge bargain for an ivy league masters degree, but that's just my opinion.

I think working in higher education is a well kept secret, particularly private colleges and universities. The three I've worked for have had spectacular benefits. I get five weeks of vacation, two classes per semester for me, full load for my kids (someday) and they put in 9% of my salary into my retirement account if I put in 5%. That's not a match, it's literally a flat 9% of my salary!!
I work in IT and while the salary is lower than I could make in private industry I find the quality of life to be that much better than others I know and the benefits are just too good to pass up.

I am sure benefits vary but again, in my case it's been all private colleges and universities and the benefits have been basically the same between all three and they're just unbelievably generous. I'm not sure I could ever work anywhere else. :goodvibes

ExPirateShopGirl
03-18-2011, 02:11 PM
Smart gal you are! :goodvibes

Graduate tuition is taxed (after a $5500/year exemption) but undergrad is not. That is federal law which can, of course, change at any time.

I am on my third college/University job. (Actually, my third job period!) I made my most recent jump to an ivy league university because I was accepted to a masters program there. I was able to defer for a semester, I got a job there and I can start in the summer and have it fully covered. I think even paying the taxes on the tuition still is a huge, huge bargain for an ivy league masters degree, but that's just my opinion.

I think working in higher education is a well kept secret, particularly private colleges and universities. The three I've worked for have had spectacular benefits. I get five weeks of vacation, two classes per semester for me, full load for my kids (someday) and they put in 9% of my salary into my retirement account if I put in 5%. That's not a match, it's literally a flat 9% of my salary!!
I work in IT and while the salary is lower than I could make in private industry I find the quality of life to be that much better than others I know and the benefits are just too good to pass up.

I am sure benefits vary but again, in my case it's been all private colleges and universities and the benefits have been basically the same between all three and they're just unbelievably generous. I'm not sure I could ever work anywhere else. :goodvibes

disneymom3
03-19-2011, 03:31 PM
Yes, general eds, but you implied a full college degree.....please explain.

Dawn

Not even implied, that is what he's doing. It's not just clep tests though it is also the DANTES (I think I might be spelling that wrong. They were test originally designed for military personnel but are open to all now.)

Okay I checked and the accronym is DSST.

Here is her layout for the tests her son took to qualify for the degree. The university is Thomas Edison University. The other colleges she lists that will do this are Escelsior College, Charty Oak State College and Verity Institute in Indianapolis. (That's the only one with a location listed, sorry.)

http://www.creditsbeforecollege.com/resources/BA%20History.xls

there is more info about earning a degree here
http://www.creditsbeforecollege.com/degree-options-for-adults.php And it has links to a few more of the colleges/universities.