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worriednjmom
03-11-2011, 01:16 AM
DD was accepted by a private school, but they didn't offer her any financial aid probably because we have savings...as I am not working...
Will it help if I were to call their financial aid office?

I understand I won't know until I call..but am wondering whether anyone was offered a financial aid when it was initially denied by the school.

cglaura
03-11-2011, 01:54 AM
DD was accepted by a private school, but they didn't offer her any financial aid probably because we have savings...as I am not working...
Will it help if I were to call their financial aid office?

I understand I won't know until I call..but am wondering whether anyone was offered a financial aid when it was initially denied by the school.

Can never hurt to call, or even better follow up with a letter (paper trail).

However, I'm pretty sure they look at total income, including savings. Since, according to them at least, you could use that savings for tuition. Even though you may be saving it for emergency, retirement, or whatever.

java
03-11-2011, 04:41 AM
If it's the school in nj that I am thinking of good luck!

pklein09
03-11-2011, 06:25 AM
If it's the school in nj that I am thinking of good luck!

That's what I was thinking.... DS is just finishing his 8th grade year at the American Boychoir School in Princeton. He was there for 4 years, and no financial aid at all (we're talking college tuition $$$, not Catholic School tuition $$$). We made it work because of the unique experience he received at ABS. Some of the other parents figured out that you have to make less than $75k to qualify for financial aid. That's not a school threshold, that's the formula from SAIS, or whatever the name is of the online program you use to apply for financial aid.

All that said, call the financial aid office. The worse they can tell you is no. Just be prepared that if you receive no finanacial aid this year, you may not receive it in subsequent years unless your financial picture changes considerably.

Congratulations and best of luck to your daughter!

Mickey'snewestfan
03-11-2011, 06:30 AM
I want to be clear that I'm going to explain, and not justify, the financial aid policies around where I live.

Private schools here won't give aid to families where an adult doesn't work by choice, unless there are children below the age of 3. If a parent doesn't work because they're unemployed or disabled or have a child with major medical issues, that's different, but their stance is that every parent needs to do contribute as much as they can and then financial aid will be used to make up the difference.

I think it's worth calling, especially in this economy where they might have other people who don't get enough financial aid and turn them down freeing up money, but that might be the message you hear.

And yes, I totally understand how this sucks. My child was accepted to our first choice for Kindergarten, and we had to turn them down and go to public school because there was no aid for him.

lastminutemom
03-11-2011, 06:42 AM
Around here, financial aid at private schools is generally reserved for the most needy. In addition, you must apply each year and at some schools, there is an expectation that your situation will improve over time. I know families that got enough aid the first year or two, only to have to pull their child after that because the awards got smaller.

worriednjmom
03-12-2011, 12:16 AM
I have to prepare my kid for not attending the private school. Yes, it is NJ, a good private school charges private colleges $$$. I have been unemployed for nearly two years and have another child with learning disabilities.
We have been living below our means but we have to dip into our savings. I think it would be easier for us to be qaulified.

We haven't saved for college, DH told me I should use those $$$ for college instead of middle school. I have talked to my kid, while she likes the private school, she really prefers her current public school. We are not in a bad school district.

Tinker'n'Fun
03-12-2011, 12:24 AM
While I know many posters will not understand, we depleted our savings so our children could go to private school. With it there would have been no aid. You are only allowed a certain amount. DH and I will start building with every extra penny when our youngest starts college. We won't have the "best" retirement, but it will be enough for us.

My children are older now and understand the sacrifice we did. They both claim they will help us once they are on their own. It's sweet to see the offer, we will never take it though.

My advise is to call the school be honest. You may want to let them know the savings is for the disabled child in your home. The financial aid forms all have an extra area for unusual circumstances. Use that area to tell them the truth and or what the school tells you is your best bet.

I wish you luck and hope everything works out for you.

brymolmom
03-12-2011, 10:50 AM
I have to prepare my kid for not attending the private school. Yes, it is NJ, a good private school charges private colleges $$$. I have been unemployed for nearly two years and have another child with learning disabilities.
We have been living below our means but we have to dip into our savings. I think it would be easier for us to be qaulified.

We haven't saved for college, DH told me I should use those $$$ for college instead of middle school. I have talked to my kid, while she likes the private school, she really prefers her current public school. We are not in a bad school district.

I agree - I went to private K - 8 and WISH my parents had instead saved that $$ toward my college! No one every asks you where you went to elementary or middle school after the fact! The only way I would consider paying for middle vs. helping with college costs is if the public school I was near was WAY below average. And in that case I would likely move (or at least try to sell my house in order to do so) to a better district.

Yes, financial aid should be to those most needy. Many people are in some ways needy these days....but not too many of them frequent a board dedicated mostly to planning DisneyWorld visits.

Chelley00
03-12-2011, 02:07 PM
Most private schools have very limited funds available for financial aid since they get no state subsidies and most of their tuition payments go towards utilities, teacher salaries, licensing, insurance etc.

The scholaship funds come from fundraising or maybe from people who offer to sponsor a child through school. Our school does a ton of fundraising for scholarship amounts and offer work study for students, but it mostly goes to people who are single parent households.

prncess674
03-12-2011, 02:19 PM
Why do you feel entitled to a free private education? You stated your daughter enjoys her public school and it is a good school. If you can't afford it why should others be paying for her private education?

Graciesmom77
03-12-2011, 02:43 PM
Usually these boards are great, but sometimes people are mean just to be mean. The OP wants her kid to go to a good school. Your a crap parent if you dont want that. She didn't say she wanted a free private education, she would like some help if available. Sheesh people, pull the stick out and calm down. Be nice and if you have nothing positive or helpful to say, why bother posting? Just to hurt someones feelings? It makes no sense and its mean.

BTW, I have no plans to visit Disney, visit these boards almost daily and have financial problems at times too. Imagine that! People can go to Disney and still not have 10 grand or more to send their kids to a great school.

My kids will be going back to a private school for elementary because our public district is so awful. Can we really afford it? No. Will it be a huge burden on us financially? Yup. Is it worth it, you can bet your bum it is. Everyone has to make the best decision for their family.

I would call the financial aid office and ask what you can do. According to some fin. aid people I have heard, they take different circumstances into consideration. It doesn't hurt to call. Good Luck!

lastminutemom
03-12-2011, 02:48 PM
Gracie, but she didn't say that there was anything wrong with her public school option, in fact she said it was good.

In addition, she isn't looking for an out of public school, I suspect she is looking at the top end, very expensive private school that is out of most folks price range.

collegejunkie
03-12-2011, 02:50 PM
no offense to anyone who wants to send their kids to private k-12, but unless you're sending your child to choate/andover/exeter/top school, i really don't see the point in shelling out tons of money. college is a different story, as that degree will follow them for the rest of their lives. middle school and high school don't really matter.

OP, if your child is happy with the public school and you think she/he can do well there also, then i would really focus on saving for college.

Cheshire Figment
03-12-2011, 02:57 PM
Playing Devils Advocate here.

You pay taxes to support the Public School System

A for-profit Private School pays taxes to support the Public School System.

A Private School needs to take in money to pay the teachers, provide for upkeep of the property, pay property taxes, pay for supplies and utilities, and make a profit for the owners.

Unless it is a not-for-profit with a fair-sized endowment the only source of income for the school is the tuition and fees which are charged to the students.

If the school provides some students with financial assistance, the only source of funding is the other students. This is clearly not fair for the other students, they are not only being asked to pay for their eduction, but also for the eduction of the people receiving assistance.

Unless there is an exceptional situation, if a person cannot afford a private school on their own the Public School System is available.

(This does not apply to colleges, where students can get governmental financial assistance or loans, or grants where the school has an endowment.)

[/rant]

familyoffive
03-12-2011, 02:58 PM
I would question applying at a school if I chose not to pay the tuition. Why entertain the idea if you will not pay the cost if you are accepted? I understand hoping to get financial aid but don't understand why you applied if financial aid was a requirement for you to consider sending your child there. Hope this doesn't appear to be mean.

prncess674
03-12-2011, 03:11 PM
Question to the OP:

Why do you think your daughter deserves a free private eduation above all the parents like you who have to enroll their children in public school? Does your daughter bring some exceptional talent, such as being a star performer of a varsity team? Was she the top student in her public school and hence will bring stellar academic allocades? Will she offer racial diversity to the typical WASPy student body?

I am sure your DD is a good student and she met the minimum requirements for admission, but why should they offer you tuition assistance?

Graciesmom77
03-12-2011, 03:14 PM
If you want your kids to get in a good college, then they had better of had a great education before hand. You can't expect them to go to a mediocre middle and high school and then have the kowledge and experience they will need for a great college. It happens occasionally that a super brilliant kids goes to an ok school and ends up in Harvard, or even whatever school is their top pick, but I say if you can set them up with the tools they need beforehand you are ahead of the game.

It is harder and harder to get in a top school and nowadays even a regular college degree isn't getting people the jobs they want. I think that education is one of the most important things you can give a kid and things are much more tough than when we were kids.

sand&sun2
03-12-2011, 03:22 PM
my kids went private no aid

prncess674
03-12-2011, 03:25 PM
My kids will be going back to a private school for elementary because our public district is so awful. Can we really afford it? No. Will it be a huge burden on us financially? Yup. Is it worth it, you can bet your bum it is. Everyone has to make the best decision for their family.
The difference between you and the OP is you are willing to make the financial sacrifice to send your kids to private school. The OP wants to send her kids to private school, not work and sit on her nest egg. If private school is her priority then she will make the financial sacrifice and do it, if not the state provides a free public education.
If you want your kids to get in a good college, then they had better of had a great education before hand. You can't expect them to go to a mediocre middle and high school and then have the kowledge and experience they will need for a great college. It happens occasionally that a super brilliant kids goes to an ok school and ends up in Harvard, or even whatever school is their top pick, but I say if you can set them up with the tools they need beforehand you are ahead of the game.

It is harder and harder to get in a top school and nowadays even a regular college degree isn't getting people the jobs they want. I think that education is one of the most important things you can give a kid and things are much more tough than when we were kids.I agree parents should do what they need to do to help out there kids, but the OP wants it all with no work on her part.

I wonder if the OP researched and discussed financial aid before applying?

Pea-n-Me
03-12-2011, 03:28 PM
Usually these boards are great, but sometimes people are mean just to be mean. The OP wants her kid to go to a good school. Your a crap parent if you dont want that. She didn't say she wanted a free private education, she would like some help if available. Sheesh people, pull the stick out and calm down. Be nice and if you have nothing positive or helpful to say, why bother posting? Just to hurt someones feelings? It makes no sense and its mean.
Posting "styles" aside, it's good to hear all sides of an argument, isn't it?

It may be the OP who posted, but hundreds, if not thousands, are reading - and presumably learning and thinking about their own situations (public vs private schools, college savings, college choices, retirement savings, SAHM, etc).

I think there have been many good points brought up on all sides thus far.

Carrry on! :teacher:

seashoreCM
03-12-2011, 03:57 PM
Regrettably it has come down to this: Schools pick and choose students whom they would like to have and offer those students financial aid. Schools admit other students according to various qualifications (such as prior grades) in order to collect tuition and keep the school going as well as promote a desired learning atmosphere.

How old is DD? If she is at least 15 (depends on the state) and really wants to go there, she herself can make a special application for admission, going in for a heart to heart talk, stating your financial problems, offering to work for the school or engage in an internship, and possibly entering a year later after spending a year earning some money herself.

mrsklamc
03-12-2011, 04:29 PM
Actually it's getting easier, rather than harder, for a kid that is not from an elite private school to get into a top university. Diversity is the buzzword these days- schools are no longer looking for an entire class of upper middle class private school graduates. And most employers are more concerned with what you did and how you performed at college, than whether or not it was Ivy League.

DisneyScraps
03-12-2011, 08:08 PM
I question why the OP thinks she is entitled to aid? It's not an endless pot of money, her taking it might mean that a family with both parents working as hard as they can with no savings miss out.

I have my DD is private school. I have a very low income....think poverty line. My DD gets no aid, she school is so small they fight to stay open. We live in an area with a terrible school system so it's my only choice.

I cut back everything to make those tuition payments.

Lisa

Handbag Lady
03-12-2011, 10:24 PM
OP, it is possible t call the school and see if you can volunteer there to offset the tuition?

My cousin was a high-level secretary at a college and her three kids were given free and reduced tuition (it depended on their subject of study).

disfan07
03-12-2011, 10:33 PM
You're not going to get aid if you have a large enough savings to pay for it AND you are choosing not to work.

They are going to give aid to those students whose parents have no other means of getting the money. So both parents working, little savings, etc. Things like that.

Plaid Princess
03-13-2011, 01:37 AM
Actually it's getting easier, rather than harder, for a kid that is not from an elite private school to get into a top university. Diversity is the buzzword these days- schools are no longer looking for an entire class of upper middle class private school graduates. And most employers are more concerned with what you did and how you performed at college, than whether or not it was Ivy League.


Ding Ding Ding! I have never gone into an interview where anyone asked where my degree came from. If they ask about it at all, they ask what I studied. More than anything, once you have the degree, employers want work experience. Unless you're doing something with a specific licensing requirement (i.e. Doctor, Lawyer, Teacher) a college degree is just a piece of paper that says "Yes I played the game".

eliza61
03-13-2011, 09:25 AM
I have to prepare my kid for not attending the private school. Yes, it is NJ, a good private school charges private colleges $$$. I have been unemployed for nearly two years and have another child with learning disabilities.
We have been living below our means but we have to dip into our savings. I think it would be easier for us to be qaulified.

We haven't saved for college, DH told me I should use those $$$ for college instead of middle school. I have talked to my kid, while she likes the private school, she really prefers her current public school. We are not in a bad school district.

with middle schools around me (southern NJ) financial aide is really reserved for the very poor, and IMO that's a good thing. clearly this is not you but my mantra is always "can't hurt to ask"


If you want your kids to get in a good college, then they had better of had a great education before hand. You can't expect them to go to a mediocre middle and high school and then have the kowledge and experience they will need for a great college. It happens occasionally that a super brilliant kids goes to an ok school and ends up in Harvard, or even whatever school is their top pick, but I say if you can set them up with the tools they need beforehand you are ahead of the game.

It is harder and harder to get in a top school and nowadays even a regular college degree isn't getting people the jobs they want. I think that education is one of the most important things you can give a kid and things are much more tough than when we were kids.

What do you consider a "top" school. Personally I think my education at Pitt and Carnegie mellon was just as good as the same one at Harvard and Yale. I have taken classes at the University of Penn that were exactly the same at Rutgers except they were 3 times the cost.

I agree with Plaid Princess, I've yet to hear of anyone at my company that was asked during the interview where they went to school.

chisnpeke
03-13-2011, 10:56 AM
with middle schools around me (southern NJ) financial aide is really reserved for the very poor, and IMO that's a good thing. clearly this is not you but my mantra is always "can't hurt to ask"




What do you consider a "top" school. Personally I think my education at Pitt and Carnegie mellon was just as good as the same one at Harvard and Yale. I have taken classes at the University of Penn that were exactly the same at Rutgers except they were 3 times the cost.

I agree with Plaid Princess, I've yet to hear of anyone at my company that was asked during the interview where they went to school.

I completely agree. I am going to a pretty good state school. My boyfriend goes to this same school but he went through private schools. His whole family has the idea that private schools is what should be done because it gets you in the door. I'd hope an employerNow his cousins are studying at Brown and Duke. The one wants to do something where I could see MAYBE a Brown degree helping her out due to the name. The other I think is just at Duke because her mom went there.

Anyway, I guarantee my boyfriend could have gotten into the state school we attend by going to public school. The public school he would have been assigned wasn't the best but the school district itself (Cincinnati) has some excellent magnet schools, one of which he qualified to get in to. I thankfully live in an excellent school district and never had to worry about my education being bad because it was public. And his cousins were apparently excellent students through their private high school and that would have probably allowed them to get a very good scholarship to a state school. It just makes no sense financially to me to spend so much money on private schools.

collegejunkie
03-13-2011, 03:43 PM
What do you consider a "top" school. Personally I think my education at Pitt and Carnegie mellon was just as good as the same one at Harvard and Yale. I have taken classes at the University of Penn that were exactly the same at Rutgers except they were 3 times the cost.

I agree with Plaid Princess, I've yet to hear of anyone at my company that was asked during the interview where they went to school.

i think it depends entirely on your area. i'm heading to dental school and my dbf is going into investment banking (we both go to the same ivy league school). dbf was recruited by top banks who came to campus and then flew him down - these companies are not going to random X state school or X unheard of private. he was given the breakdown of the interns that they know they're getting already this year, and not a single person is from a school you wouldn't consider tops.

if you're going into fields that are not law, medicine, dentistry, investment banking or anything like that, then i agree that it doesn't matter because you're just going to be on the same playing field as everyone else.

winterman
03-13-2011, 04:03 PM
) a college degree is just a piece of paper that says "Yes I played the game".[/QUOTE from Plaid Princess)

I could not agree more with this statement.

The other thing on my mind: If the school system does not meet your standards, what are you doing to improve the school system?

Third thought: When we relocated to central Maine, our first question to the realtor was where are the good schools? Her response (former teacher) directed us to certain MSAD (Maine School Admin. Districts). If you don't desire to become involved in bettering the school system, moved to another better system.

luvthemouse71
03-13-2011, 04:59 PM
Why do you feel entitled to a free private education? You stated your daughter enjoys her public school and it is a good school. If you can't afford it why should others be paying for her private education?

First of all, if you get financial aid, you pay it back if it's a loan. Nothing wrong with scholarships either, if her daughter can get one.And secondly, she pays taxes for public schools as do all parents who have their kid in a private school. People send their kid to private schools for many reasons, none of which should concern you. :confused3 Got a big chip on your shoulder over this, I have to say.

Op, many private schools have payment plans too.Couldn't hurt to ask. Best of luck to your daughter and kudos to you for actually giving a crap about her education. Maybe you could send her to a private high school instead? The one I attended was a private, Catholic high school and I got a great education there. My first couple of years of college were easy, because we had covered most of that stuff in high school. There were plenty of girls there who weren't Catholic either- they didn't force the religious aspect on anyone..Not as expensive as some of the other private schools either.

prncess674
03-13-2011, 05:04 PM
First of all, if you get financial aid, you pay it back if it's a loan. And secondly, she pays taxes for public schools as do all parents who have their kid in a private school. People send their kid to private schools for many reasons, none of which should concern you. :confused3According the OP, she was looking for scholarship money (i.e., money that does not need to be repaid) not once did she say I am looking for a loan.

Her daughter has every right to attend the free public school, but private school costs $$$, why should she get a free private education? What makes her daughter special and deserving of others footing the private education bill? Does her daughter bring some exceptional talent, such as being a star performer of a varsity team? Was she the top student in her public school and hence will bring stellar academic accolades to this private academy? Will she offer racial diversity to the typical WASPy student body?

Allison
03-13-2011, 05:11 PM
Ding Ding Ding! I have never gone into an interview where anyone asked where my degree came from.

Wouldn't that be because most people already have it listed on their resume.

luvthemouse71
03-13-2011, 05:20 PM
According the OP, she was looking for scholarship money (i.e., money that does not need to be repaid) not once did she say I am looking for a loan.

Her daughter has every right to attend the free public school, but private school costs $$$, why should she get a free private education? What makes her daughter special and deserving of others footing the private education bill? Does her daughter bring some exceptional talent, such as being a star performer of a varsity team? Was she the top student in her public school and hence will bring stellar academic allocades to this private academy? Will she offer racial diversity to the typical WASPy student body?
Like I said, you have a chip on your shoulder over this. You don't know her child- maybe she's brilliant. Just because someone else wasn't smart enough to get a scholarship doesn't mean someone else should be denied.:sad2: That's why many public school systems are terrible- let's
drag everyone else down because Timmy can't grasp the material. The way many schools offer scholarships is by looking at past grades, talents and usually how you did on the entrance exam.

You obviously have no idea what you're talking about. My school was very
diverse. We had african- american students, hispanic students, asian students and people of all faiths, including those who were Jewish.

I feel badly for you..you seem very angry and confrontational. What's it to you if someone wants the best for her child?Your kid could apply for scholarships too and if they're smart enough, they'll get one.:rolleyes:

And am I really seeing people claiming that college is just a piece of paper? I suppose for some areas of study, maybe that's true. But there are professions where you need a college degree- that is, unless you want your kid to work at Walmart their whole life.

luvthemouse71
03-13-2011, 05:27 PM
Wouldn't that be because most people already have it listed on their resume.:thumbsup2 Careful with the big words and crazy ideas!! :lmao:Resume? Who needs a resume? You wacky people with their fancy edumacations and snooty ideas.;) The manager at KFC ain't going to ask for no stinkin' resume!

prncess674
03-13-2011, 05:36 PM
Like I said, you have a chip on your shoulder over this. You don't know her child- maybe she's brilliant. Just because someone else wasn't smart enough to get a scholarship doesn't mean someone else should be denied.:sad2: That's why many public school systems are terrible- let's
drag everyone else down because Timmy can't grasp the material. The way many schools offer scholarships is by looking at past grades, talents and usually how you did on the entrance exam.As I keep stating, the OP needs to provide information as to why she believes her daughter is deserving of a scholarship. Is it top academics? Sports? Top scores on the exam? As I have stated, I am sure the OP's DD is a lovely young lady, but at no time has the OP shared that her daughter is a star performer. Schools "accept" many students who meet the minimum academic requirements, but that doesn't mean she has met the requirements for a merit based scholarship.

I also question why the OP didn't discuss with her DD prior to taking the exam that if she didn't receive scholarship funds that the school is out of reach financially for the family.
You obviously have no idea what you're talking about. My school was very
diverse. We had african- american students, hispanic students, asian students and people of all faiths, including those who were Jewish. Private schools are notorious for being WASPy. Sure they have a few token X, Y and Z, but it rarely represents the racial diversity of the larger community.

Danibelle
03-13-2011, 06:01 PM
I would question applying at a school if I chose not to pay the tuition. Why entertain the idea if you will not pay the cost if you are accepted? I understand hoping to get financial aid but don't understand why you applied if financial aid was a requirement for you to consider sending your child there. Hope this doesn't appear to be mean.

And there are many private schools that have required fees that aren't covered by financial aid. It might be hard to keep the student in the school because of all the "little extras." I would try to make sure that a college education is fully funded before I worried about elementary/high school. Just reality.

And as to college, there are literally thousands applying for the selective schools. There are legacies and some exceptional talents being admitted; the rest are for those lucky few with the highest credentials, not necessarily those from private schools. I would also be managing expectations that most hs graduates will be attending their state universities not Harvard or Stanford. Also today's reality.

GinnyEmma
03-13-2011, 06:36 PM
Really, the population of a school can vary greatly due to the population. The local catholic school is far more diverse than the public school, because the doctors, and profs send their kids to it.

I do agree, however, that scholarships are usually given for extraordinary students, or for financial need.

I've also been asked many times about my graduate institution, because different schools have different styles and focus. I received several job interviews due to my undergrad non ivy league school, too. I guess it depends.

luvthemouse71
03-13-2011, 06:56 PM
As I keep stating, the OP needs to provide information as to why she believes her daughter is deserving of a scholarship. Is it top academics? Sports? Top scores on the exam? As I have stated, I am sure the OP's DD is a lovely young lady, but at no time has the OP shared that her daughter is a star performer. Schools "accept" many students who meet the minimum academic requirements, but that doesn't mean she has met the requirements for a merit based scholarship.

I also question why the OP didn't discuss with her DD prior to taking the exam that if she didn't receive scholarship funds that the school is out of reach financially for the family.
Private schools are notorious for being WASPy. Sure they have a few token X, Y and Z, but it rarely represents the racial diversity of the larger community.
She doesnt need to provide information to you, or to anyone else here. :confused3 Im confused as to why you think she has to prove anything to you. That's my main point. As for your WASPY comment, that just proves that you are coming from a place of resentment. Best of luck to you- let the anger go, you'll be better off for it.:rotfl2:

luvthemouse71
03-13-2011, 07:00 PM
Really, the population of a school can vary greatly due to the population. The local catholic school is far more diverse than the public school, because the doctors, and profs send their kids to it.

I do agree, however, that scholarships are usually given for extraordinary students, or for financial need.

I've also been asked many times about my graduate institution, because different schools have different styles and focus. I received several job interviews due to my undergrad non ivy league school, too. I guess it depends.:thumbsup2. I live in a diverse state anyway, so our schools tend to be a pretty good mix.

And the OP still may able to get financial aid in the form of loans. Usually when people use the term "financial aid", they are talking about loans.

GinnyEmma
03-13-2011, 07:00 PM
lol, i did wonder at the "needs" comment, also. the op owes no one anything.

GinnyEmma
03-13-2011, 07:02 PM
:thumbsup2. I live in a diverse state anyway, so our schools tend to be a pretty good mix.

And the OP still may able to get financial aid in the form of loans. Usually when people use the term "financial aid", they are talking about loans.

lol, and I live in a very waspyish area. broadbrush statements really are worthless, imo.

Dsny4fun
03-13-2011, 07:02 PM
According the OP, she was looking for scholarship money (i.e., money that does not need to be repaid) not once did she say I am looking for a loan.

Her daughter has every right to attend the free public school, but private school costs $$$, why should she get a free private education? What makes her daughter special and deserving of others footing the private education bill? Does her daughter bring some exceptional talent, such as being a star performer of a varsity team? Was she the top student in her public school and hence will bring stellar academic accolades to this private academy? Will she offer racial diversity to the typical WASPy student body?

FREE public school ????? Last time I checked I pay over $6000 a year to my FEEE public school and for the record...scholarships at private schools are usually paid by endowments..not by tax payers so you can get rid of the HUGE chip on your shoulder. Who the hell are you to decide if she's deserving..that's up to the school. Why do you feel you need to know her special talents...you sure the hell aren't the one paying for it.

prncess674
03-13-2011, 07:17 PM
She doesnt need to provide information to you, or to anyone else here. :confused3 Im confused as to why you think she has to prove anything to you. That's my main point. You are correct, the OP doesn't owe anyone information, but the OP did come here with an indignant attitude, of "hey my DD applied to X private school, and I can't believe they didn't offer to foot the bill too." Private school is a choice. If the parents choose the private school route, they should be prepared to pay. Schools offer scholarships based on a set of parameters and it appears this child didn't qualify for any "free" money. She met the minimum requirements for entrance, not the requirements for merit based scholarhip.

Private school love to put on heirs about being super selective, but the main requirements for admittance are passing a very basic exam and parents willing to foot the bill for a private school education. Of course being able to exclude low performers is helpful, but no where do most private schools state that they are only admitting the really exceptional students.

As for your WASPY comment, that just proves that you are coming from a place of resentment.
Oh phull-eeze, I am a product of a supposed super selective WASPy school and yes I too am ridiculously WASPy, the majority of minorities were granted scholarship admission based on superior academic performance or athletics. The average Wonder Bread white kid with no superior academics or sporting ability was never offered free tuition, the most they were offered was a payment plan for the year.

dakcp2001
03-13-2011, 07:25 PM
. Who the hell are you to decide if she's deserving..that's up to the school. Why do you feel you need to know her special talents...you sure the hell aren't the one paying for it.

Sounds from the OP that the school has decided she did NOT deserve it.

OP sounds like they determined others may have more financial need than you. If you have savings and are able to work, than you do have a way to make the school work if need be. Otherwise can she start at public for a few years and go to private later on if it isn't working out or if your finances change?

Abbeys_mom
03-13-2011, 11:33 PM
no offense to anyone who wants to send their kids to private k-12, but unless you're sending your child to choate/andover/exeter/top school, i really don't see the point in shelling out tons of money. college is a different story, as that degree will follow them for the rest of their lives. middle school and high school don't really matter.

OP, if your child is happy with the public school and you think she/he can do well there also, then i would really focus on saving for college.

And I have been accused of being judgmental on this board? Geesh!

Yes, it does matter from an early age that we develop the whole child to have an honest love of learning and exploring, not just the child to fill in bubbles on a test sheet. Why wait until college for the quality education to begin? Middle and high school don't matter?! What about those that don't go beyond high school? Let's just forget about them and not teach them employable skill sets? Next you are probably going to suggest cutting auto shop and vocational training at that level.

Parents send their kids to various private schools for so many reasons, how can you possibly suggest I am wasting my money and should just wait until college? I send my child to a Montessori school because I believe in the Montessori Method and have the means to pay for it - and sacrifice to ensure that she continues to attend her school. AND I pay taxes so that there is "FREE" education available to other kids. A number of Montessorians have done quite well for themselves (as have a number of public school kids, touche). Check out this list: http://livingmontessorinow.com/2010/04/22/famous-people-influenced-by-montessori/

The US public education system is failing our kids - look at any number of studies to see how far behind we are compared to the rest of the industrialized world. Getting into to so called dream schools and getting scholarships is getting harder and harder. With all of the cuts to the arts, sports, and ever expanding class sizes, how can you fault a parent for looking for alternatives? Perhaps it aligns with her personal value system. Whatever the reason, I can certainly understand her disappointment in not getting aid, especially given that she is not working.

Leajess99
03-14-2011, 12:59 AM
But there are professions where you need a college degree- that is, unless you want your kid to work at Walmart their whole life.

Okay so no one at Walmart has a college degree?? :rolleyes: Funny how there are people working fast food that have college degrees from some of the best universities but could not find work in their field.

All I can say is, rude much??

Leajess99
03-14-2011, 01:02 AM
:thumbsup2 Careful with the big words and crazy ideas!! :lmao:Resume? Who needs a resume? You wacky people with their fancy edumacations and snooty ideas.;) The manager at KFC ain't going to ask for no stinkin' resume!

Again, rude much?? :rolleyes:

It is one thing for a conversation but to continue to slam certain jobs is ridiculous.

GinnyEmma
03-14-2011, 07:04 AM
FREE public school ????? Last time I checked I pay over $6000 a year to my FEEE public school and for the record...scholarships at private schools are usually paid by endowments..not by tax payers so you can get rid of the HUGE chip on your shoulder. Who the hell are you to decide if she's deserving..that's up to the school. Why do you feel you need to know her special talents...you sure the hell aren't the one paying for it.

If you are talking property tax, only a portion goes to the school system.

No one deserves a scholarship. And most schools don't give them just because someone wants one, in my experience.

There isn't any reason to get so angry over the opinion of a stranger. i wouldn't ever assume that someone was going to gift my child an education, but that is just me.

GinnyEmma
03-14-2011, 07:12 AM
And I have been accused of being judgmental on this board? Geesh!

Yes, it does matter from an early age that we develop the whole child to have an honest love of learning and exploring, not just the child to fill in bubbles on a test sheet. Why wait until college for the quality education to begin? Middle and high school don't matter?! What about those that don't go beyond high school? Let's just forget about them and not teach them employable skill sets? Next you are probably going to suggest cutting auto shop and vocational training at that level.

Parents send their kids to various private schools for so many reasons, how can you possibly suggest I am wasting my money and should just wait until college? I send my child to a Montessori school because I believe in the Montessori Method and have the means to pay for it - and sacrifice to ensure that she continues to attend her school. AND I pay taxes so that there is "FREE" education available to other kids. A number of Montessorians have done quite well for themselves (as have a number of public school kids, touche). Check out this list: http://livingmontessorinow.com/2010/04/22/famous-people-influenced-by-montessori/

The US public education system is failing our kids - look at any number of studies to see how far behind we are compared to the rest of the industrialized world. Getting into to so called dream schools and getting scholarships is getting harder and harder. With all of the cuts to the arts, sports, and ever expanding class sizes, how can you fault a parent for looking for alternatives? Perhaps it aligns with her personal value system. Whatever the reason, I can certainly understand her disappointment in not getting aid, especially given that she is not working.


It isn't up to a school to foster a love of learning in my opinion. That is a family's way of life. I am not knocking your choices, and you choose to pay for it,which is a great. But that is different than assuming that someone else should foot the bill.

The op can expand on whatever education her child receives. Schools are as interested in outside interests/passions and how they play out in the community as they are with art classes taken. And a bright child is going to achieve in the basic courses as well as a bright child in any other international system. Your stats are not in line with this situation.

Kathi OD
03-14-2011, 11:35 AM
Wouldn't that be because most people already have it listed on their resume.

You would be surprised at how many interviewers have not read the resume themselves.

DH had 4 interviews with a company before someone realized that he didn't have experience in the area they needed. He knew it before the 1st interview was over, but those doing the interviewing didn't. All they needed to do was read his resume.

GinnyEmma
03-14-2011, 12:01 PM
You would be surprised at how many interviewers have not read the resume themselves.

DH had 4 interviews with a company before someone realized that he didn't have experience in the area they needed. He knew it before the 1st interview was over, but those doing the interviewing didn't. All they needed to do was read his resume.

Alright, this is just admitted curiosity. Why did he continue the interview process if he knew he wasn't qualified? I hate interviewing!!!! On both sides of the table.

Pea-n-Me
03-14-2011, 12:01 PM
luvthemouse71, you do realize your comments about WalMart and KFC are coming off as very :snooty: right?

If you have such a great education, I'd expect you'd be far better able to present your points without such a harsh put down of people.

You are also very naive if you think that people working in places such as those you mentioned don't necessarily have degrees.

Charley, a new retiree-greeter at Wal-Mart, just couldn't seem to get to work on time.

Every day he was 5, 10, 15 minutes late. But he was a good worker, really
tidy, clean-shaven, sharp minded and a real credit to the company and
obviously demonstrating their "Older Person Friendly" policies. One day the boss called him into the office for a talk.

"Charley, I have to tell you, I like your work ethic, you do a bang up job, but your being late so often is quite bothersome."

"Yes, I know boss, and I am working on it."

''Well good, you are a team player. That's what I like to hear. It's odd though your coming in late. I know you're retired from the Armed Forces. What did they say if you came in late there?"

''They said, "Good morning Admiral, can I get your coffee, sir?

(Go ahead and Snopes it - can't attest that it's true, but I imagine it's true SOMEWHERE. You get the drift.)

JoiseyMom
03-14-2011, 12:25 PM
Ding Ding Ding! I have never gone into an interview where anyone asked where my degree came from. If they ask about it at all, they ask what I studied. More than anything, once you have the degree, employers want work experience. Unless you're doing something with a specific licensing requirement (i.e. Doctor, Lawyer, Teacher) a college degree is just a piece of paper that says "Yes I played the game".

I think it depends on many factors. I got my Degree from a CUNY school, Brooklyn College. I was a CIS major. On an interview for a job, the manager who was interviewing (and I who was supposed to give me my tech interview), said that I see you went to BC, I said like yes. He then asked me about my professors and which classes I took. He was interested in one specific class, and asked me what my grade was. Once I told him he asked me more general interview questions, but never bothered to ask me 1 single technical question. Once he knew I had a specific prof and got a certain grade in that class, he knew he didn't have to tech me out.

NotUrsula
03-14-2011, 02:18 PM
Oh phull-eeze, I am a product of a supposed super selective WASPy school and yes I too am ridiculously WASPy, the majority of minorities were granted scholarship admission based on superior academic performance or athletics. The average Wonder Bread white kid with no superior academics or sporting ability was never offered free tuition, the most they were offered was a payment plan for the year.

But wasn't that what the poster who pointed out that it is easier for minorities to get aid was trying to say? Yes, the schools are wasp-y; because those who can afford that kind of tuition for grade school in most parts of the US just happen to tend to be WASPs. However, every non-denominational "elite" private school that I've ever seen has been more than willing to buy bright minority students with scholarships so that they can claim to be more diverse.

In my area the very toniest private schools tend to give diversity scholarships only to African-American students, because the teaching hospitals in my city happen to have quite a number of other minority physicians on staff who can afford the tuition without any kind of hardship.

OrangeCountyCommuter
03-14-2011, 03:18 PM
I am not reallly getting involved :)

However, I have two friends whose kids applied to the same Ivy League this year.

Kid one went to a good public high school, has good, but not "top of the class grades" and participated a lot in sports etc.

Kid two went to a top rated private school in the area, has about the same grades and not much else. (Long commute to private school, not many funds left after private school meant not a lot of "activiities") Kids two's parents REALLY believed that private school would stand out better and get kid two into the "best" colleges.

Kid one got the Ivy League. Kid two is going to a good school, but not the one Mom/Dad/Kid had thier hearts set on.

The biggest rub.... The Ivy League has a better finanical aide package, but the first set of parents won't get much... they have been putting away funds for years. Kid two's parents were counting on that package and will now have to fund a LOT more of the education cost since they didn't put much away assuming "since we are spending all this money on a great education now" (Trust me I heard Mom tell me how it was going to pay for itself every time she complained about the costs... which was often LOL! She's been wandering around the office for years "complaining" about this....martydom becomes her!)

I have seen this a lot as my friends kids move to the college age... it seems to me it's the "extras" your child bring that are often the deciding factor. (Sports, theatre, music, leadership etc...)

collegejunkie
03-14-2011, 03:25 PM
And I have been accused of being judgmental on this board? Geesh!

i'm not being judgmental. i was sharing my opinion, which i made clear. also, the OP says that there is nothing wrong with the public school in her area. she just does not want to send her child there, which is a choice she is making on her own. you have to pay for the things you want, including private school. all my post suggested was that perhaps it's a better idea to save for college, because, like i said, that degree will follow you around and no one is ever going to care where you went to middle school or high school. i went to public school; i'm doing more than fine. the OP has a school that's available to her and her child, and she thinks she deserves a free ride to a private school for really no reason at all. it is, of course, important to foster learning and provide your kid with a good foundation for later in life, but that's also doable in a public school and within the family. you don't need a private middle school education for that. when you have the money, then hey, yeah, go for it. but no one is entitled to a private school education just because they stomp their feet and say they want it.

you mention that you send your kids to a montessori school. i think that's great, actually. i very much believe in that. however, you also said that you pay for it. this is where the difference is between you and the OP. you are aware of the cost and willingly pay for it. the OP wants the benefits of the private school without paying.

allison443
03-14-2011, 03:48 PM
i'm not being judgmental. i was sharing my opinion, which i made clear. also, the OP says that there is nothing wrong with the public school in her area. she just does not want to send her child there, which is a choice she is making on her own. you have to pay for the things you want, including private school. all my post suggested was that perhaps it's a better idea to save for college, because, like i said, that degree will follow you around and no one is ever going to care where you went to middle school or high school. i went to public school; i'm doing more than fine. the OP has a school that's available to her and her child, and she thinks she deserves a free ride to a private school for really no reason at all. it is, of course, important to foster learning and provide your kid with a good foundation for later in life, but that's also doable in a public school and within the family. you don't need a private middle school education for that. when you have the money, then hey, yeah, go for it. but no one is entitled to a private school education just because they stomp their feet and say they want it.you mention that you send your kids to a montessori school. i think that's great, actually. i very much believe in that. however, you also said that you pay for it. this is where the difference is between you and the OP. you are aware of the cost and willingly pay for it. the OP wants the benefits of the private school without paying.

Well, based on your comments I assume you (or your parents :)) are paying the full costs out of pocket for your college education.

So how do you feel about your many classmates at college who receive financial aid? Do you feel they should go someplace they can afford to pay for themselves? :confused3

GinnyEmma
03-14-2011, 04:00 PM
Eh, no one gets college financial aid for stomping their feet either. You either qualify or not.

prncess674
03-14-2011, 04:05 PM
Well, based on your comments I assume you (or your parents :)) are paying the full costs out of pocket for your college education.

So how do you feel about your many classmates at college who receive financial aid? Do you feel they should go someplace they can afford to pay for themselves? :confused3No one said they had to go someplace else, but private college is the same as private middle/high school, you either need to pay for it yourself, take out loans or qualify for a merit based scholarhip based on sports or academics.

The OP wants free money for no apparent reason other than she thinks her DD is deserving.

allison443
03-14-2011, 04:10 PM
No one said they had to go someplace else, but private college is the same as private middle/high school, you either need to pay for it yourself, take out loans or qualify for a merit based scholarhip based on sports or academics.

The OP wants free money for no apparent reason other than she thinks her DD is deserving.

Actually your generalization about private colleges is incorrect. Colleges give out need-based financial aid (some in the form of grants that does not need to be repaid). This is based solely on family income/assets. Many (most) of the top schools give only need based aid. They do not award merit aid (academic scholarships). :)

prncess674
03-14-2011, 04:17 PM
Actually your generalization about private colleges is incorrect. Colleges give out need-based financial aid (some in the form of grants that does not need to be repaid). This is based solely on family income/assets. Many (most) of the top schools give only need based aid. They do not award merit aid (academic scholarships). :)

Sorry, that bolded is a generalization too. Many (not all) top schools award merit based aid.

To bring this back to the OP, the OP has savings and does not work, hence she does not qualify for need based "free" money in the form of scholarship or grants. If the OP wants her DD to attend this school, she is going to have to pony up the money or take out a private loan.

allison443
03-14-2011, 04:19 PM
No one said they had to go someplace else, but private college is the same as private middle/high school, you either need to pay for it yourself, take out loans or qualify for a merit based scholarhip based on sports or academics.

The OP wants free money for no apparent reason other than she thinks her DD is deserving.

I guess I read the OP's post differently...I thought she meant the school offered need-based financial aid but her dd wasn't awarded any...and she was wondering if she could call and kind of ask for reconsideration based on her unemployment of two years like she said in the OP.
I thought she was saying she thought her dd was "deserving" because of their financial status. I guess I don't see anything wrong with that, if that's what the school offers. :confused:

I am not familiar with the kind of high school she is referring to, though, so I don't know if their aid is need based, or if they are allowed to give athletic scholarships (for high school?)

I know the private Catholic high schools in NJ are absolutely not allowed to give athletic scholarships. However, I think OP is talking about private schools that cost a lot more than that. :)

allison443
03-14-2011, 04:25 PM
Sorry, that bolded is a generalization too. Many (not all) top schools award merit based aid.

To bring this back to the OP, the OP has savings and does not work, hence she does not qualify for need based "free" money in the form of scholarship or grants. If the OP wants her DD to attend this school, she is going to have to pony up the money or take out a private loan.


Well, it's not a generalization since I included the qualifier "many". ;)

Yes, below the Ivy level many top colleges do give merit aid, but the majority of aid at those schools is need-based. You didn't seem to be acknowledging that when you posted that "private college is the same as private middle/high school, you either need to pay for it yourself, take out loans or qualify for a merit based scholarhip based on sports or academics." I was just adding that financial need is a qualifying basis for receiving aid at private colleges.

Sorry for taking the thread off topic. :)

prncess674
03-14-2011, 04:29 PM
Actually your generalization about private colleges is incorrect. Colleges give out need-based financial aid (some in the form of grants that does not need to be repaid). This is based solely on family income/assets. Many (most) of the top schools give only need based aid. They do not award merit aid (academic scholarships). :)

Well, it's not a generalization since I included the qualifier "many". ;)Sorry, I think you need to go read your last statement. You only used the qualifier "many" in the second to last sentence in reference to need based aid. There is no mention in the last sentence that the "many" pertains to the last sentence. You clearly state "They do not award merit aid (academic scholarships)."

RitaE
03-14-2011, 04:36 PM
Well - from the perspective of a parent who pays Private School tuition with no aid.

The way I see it, my tuition and fees bill is however much higher in order to support the Financial Aid for students who otherwise would be unable to attend the school. I have no qualms about that - it promotes diversity and it is charitable. My child benefits by having classmates who aren't all cookie cutter clones of himself.

I can't say I'd be all that psyched to be paying more so that other parents can hold onto their own savings account rather than spend it. I'm sure the OP doesn't see it this way but it is a little like saying "I want the education but really don't want to spend MY money on it. You pay for me."

I have important things to do with my money too. We all do.

allison443
03-14-2011, 04:40 PM
Sorry, I think you need to go read your last statement. You only used the qualifier "many" in the second to last sentence in reference to need based aid. There is no mention in the last sentence that the "many" pertains to the last sentence. You clearly state "They do not award merit aid (academic scholarships)."

Sorry you didn't understand it, but who/what did you think the pronoun "they" in the last sentence referred to? It refers to the subject of the previous sentence ("many" of the top schools) :)


I will change the period to a semi-colon, so it's all one sentence.

Many (most) of the top schools give only need based aid; they do not award merit aid (academic scholarships).

Clear now?

Dsny4fun
03-14-2011, 07:46 PM
If you are talking property tax, only a portion goes to the school system.

No one deserves a scholarship. And most schools don't give them just because someone wants one, in my experience.

There isn't any reason to get so angry over the opinion of a stranger. i wouldn't ever assume that someone was going to gift my child an education, but that is just me.

Yes..I'm talking about property tax....and over $6000 IS the school portion.

ExPirateShopGirl
03-14-2011, 08:12 PM
When interviewing potential law clerks and other employees, panelists have reviewed each resume for precisely that; school, GPA, relative organizations. We know before the applicant sits down with us where he or she attended and what relative experience he or she brings. So while we never ask where an applicant went to school, we always discuss his or her classes there.


I agree with Plaid Princess, I've yet to hear of anyone at my company that was asked during the interview where they went to school.

Kathi OD
03-14-2011, 10:25 PM
Alright, this is just admitted curiosity. Why did he continue the interview process if he knew he wasn't qualified? I hate interviewing!!!! On both sides of the table.

He was unemployed at the time and had 2 thoughts. First, that you can never get too much interviewing experience, especially when you really haven't had to interview in 20 years. Second, he had the basic skills necessary for the position (but not in the direct field this company did business). He figured there must be some reason they kept calling him back. When you're unemployed in a period of high unemployment, you'll take a 1% chance over no chance.

luvthemouse71
03-14-2011, 11:31 PM
Okay so no one at Walmart has a college degree?? :rolleyes: Funny how there are people working fast food that have college degrees from some of the best universities but could not find work in their field.

All I can say is, rude much??But, honestly, would you want that for your child? If you have to work at Walmart to pay bills, nothing wrong with that. But any decent parent is going to want more for their kid than that.

Defensive, much? :)

Granfan
03-14-2011, 11:52 PM
We sent ours to private school which kept us from saving for college. We made just enough to keep us from qualifying for aid in both cases. Now our kids are still struggling to pay off large college debt years after graduation. If your public school is decent at all, save your money for college IMO. Good luck whatever you decide.

hipchickie
03-15-2011, 12:01 AM
Am I missing something?
The OP has all of 2 small posts, but has been accused of a lot of very uncomplimentary things....is this a second account and everyone knows who it really is? Otherwise, I really don't get the harsh treatment

mafibisha
03-15-2011, 12:11 AM
We sent ours to private school which kept us from saving for college. We made just enough to keep us from qualifying for aid in both cases. Now our kids are still struggling to pay off large college debt years after graduation. If your public school is decent at all, save your money for college IMO. Good luck whatever you decide.

Wow, the bolded part could have been written by my brother 's wife! And they almost sent their kids to private schools but now they are so relieved they did not.
For years they've said the kids grow way faster than you'd ever expect and suddently, college is just around the corner...
And suddenly I can totally agree with because my babies are getting so old way too quickly!! :scared1::cloud9::love:

luvthemouse71
03-15-2011, 12:23 AM
Am I missing something?
The OP has all of 2 small posts, but has been accused of a lot of very uncomplimentary things....is this a second account and everyone knows who it really is? Otherwise, I really don't get the harsh treatmentNo, this is the DIS..certain types will rip your face off with very little provocation. FWIW, i just read the OPs first post on this thread and she was not "indignant" like someone accused her of- just goes to show that reading comprehension often takes a back seat to peoples personal beefs and agendas.

collegejunkie
03-15-2011, 02:09 AM
No one said they had to go someplace else, but private college is the same as private middle/high school, you either need to pay for it yourself, take out loans or qualify for a merit based scholarhip based on sports or academics.


100% agree.

Well, based on your comments I assume you (or your parents :)) are paying the full costs out of pocket for your college education.

So how do you feel about your many classmates at college who receive financial aid? Do you feel they should go someplace they can afford to pay for themselves? :confused3

you would be right. we pay for me to go to cornell and my sister to go to yale completely out of pocket. next year, we will also be paying in full for my 2 brothers who will be starting college. oh, and this is my single mother paying for it on her own. yes, i definitely think they should be going somewhere they can actually pay for or if they want to be at a private school, then they should take out loans. college financial aid in the form of grants is ridiculous, but that is a whole other discussion, so if you wish to have it with me, then feel free to send me a PM and we can certainly talk about it (don't want to stray too far off topic).

as for whoever said top schools give merit aid, not the tippy top. ivies do not give merit aid. i believe most of the top 20 does not, however, i have heard of certain cases when they really want people to study in a certain field they will offer some (i'm using my own personal experience. a friend was told he would get a full ride to vanderbilt if he were to lead their hillel group and study something relating to jewish studies). of course, i only really know about the schools i applied to and there are definitely options out there. tulane, for example, gives great merit aid if you apply early enough.

GinnyEmma
03-15-2011, 07:19 AM
He was unemployed at the time and had 2 thoughts. First, that you can never get too much interviewing experience, especially when you really haven't had to interview in 20 years. Second, he had the basic skills necessary for the position (but not in the direct field this company did business). He figured there must be some reason they kept calling him back. When you're unemployed in a period of high unemployment, you'll take a 1% chance over no chance.

That makes sense. I thought originally that he couldn't do the job. Thanks, btw. It truly was a wondering question. I hope that he found something he is happy with.

Lewisc
03-15-2011, 08:02 AM
No, this is the DIS..certain types will rip your face off with very little provocation. FWIW, i just read the OPs first post on this thread and she was not "indignant" like someone accused her of- just goes to show that reading comprehension often takes a back seat to peoples personal beefs and agendas.

I didn't post in this thread. I suspect 100% of parents would prefer financial aid over having to spend savings. The school isn't prepared to give free tuition to every parent who asks.

The OP didn't really give any reason why their child should be singled out for extra aid. Some of the posters may not have been very diplomatic but schools may go "overboard" with aid if a student has something special to add--musical talent.

The tone of the OP kind of opened up the kind of replies that are in this thread.

It sounds like the OP doesn't work. A part time job to help pay is one option.

The OP needs to decide how bad the public schools are. Graduating near the top of the public school, with activities, might be better (in the long run) then graduating near the middle of a private school. Particularly if the child doesn't have any time for activities. Now if the public school is read bad my answer would be different.

kt_mom
03-15-2011, 09:52 AM
I had avoided this thread becasue I thought it might get nasty. But as a parent that pays private school tuition I'd like to throw my 2 cents in.

I'm not sure what kind of cost the OP is looking at, I only know what we pay for DD to go to a private Christian school. I think the school does offer some financial aid to people with lower incomes, but I would say its not much and not often. But I don't really know the specifics. They do offer a discount to families who are tithing members of the church but we go to a different church so we don't qualify for that.

The public schools in our area are pretty good for the most part and if we had to send her there she would be okay. But we CHOOSE to send her to private school and thus we CHOOSE to take on that financial burden. "Burden" isn't really the right word, we are thankful we can do this for her.

Anyway, I am thankful that the school can help some students out financially but at the same time I wouldn't want them to just hand it out to everyone that asks. One of the main reasons I work is so that we can continue to send DD to this school. I would LOVE to be a stay at home mom especially now that we have DS. (I stayed home with DD until she was 3) But sending DD to this school is important to us and so we sacrifice to make that happen and I work.

I mean I guess we could cut out all spending on anything extra (vacations, eating out etc.) but we don't want to do that. We could dip into our savings, but we don't want to do that either. So I work.

OP, I don't mean to sound mean, but it sounds to me like you could make the means to send your child to the private school, but you don't want to. Like I said, I'd love to be a SAHM, but keeping DD in her private school is important to us. I don't think being a SAHM should qualify you for financial aid. Get a job part time or use your savings, but don't put your financial burden on other families who may already be making sacrifices to send their children. there.

NotUrsula
03-15-2011, 12:23 PM
I'm not sure what kind of cost the OP is looking at, I only know what we pay for DD to go to a private Christian school. I think the school does offer some financial aid to people with lower incomes, but I would say its not much and not often. But I don't really know the specifics. They do offer a discount to families who are tithing members of the church but we go to a different church so we don't qualify for that.


If it is the kind of school that most of us think it is, probably between $12-20K per year.

Anthony1971
03-15-2011, 12:36 PM
I am paying for private school and live in a good public school district....
as far as aide we get non and no we would not so no comment but I would like some if I could get it....
We pay for private becuase we want to. I went to private school and most of my friends did not... ONE of my friends that went to public school has a college degree and I am talking a large group... The ones who I went to private school with mostly went to college I know of 2 who did not (I am talking my class not friends) so for those who think private school is or was a waste of money you may want to take a closer look at the percentage of PUBLIC HS graduates who go to college before you say private is a wate... it ain't pretty.
There is a lot of emphasis from teachers in Private school concerning college in all grades.....
I will never say a Private school is better as far as education BUT they are far better at caring about a child and make sure he or she does the school work which gives them a better shot at even going to college.. and yes I am sure this also has to do with the parents of these children being able to pay and likely attending college themselves.
Also take a look at the unemployment numbers again as they do seperate those who have a college degreee and those who do not there is a huge difference....

GinnyEmma
03-15-2011, 12:46 PM
lol, nearly everyone i know went to public school (I went to private), and amazingly enough managed to drag themselves out of the dregs of society and go on to improve their chances with a college degree.

A good teacher, class or school has little to do with public or private. As I have stated before, the broadbrush statements mean little. It all has to do with individuals...parents, students, teachers, and administrators.

allison443
03-15-2011, 12:46 PM
If it is the kind of school that most of us think it is, probably between $12-20K per year.



The OP is in NJ like me. She didn't give the tuition amounts, but here Catholic high school costs $10K a year, and if it is a private school she is looking at, the ones I just looked up cost approximately $30,000 a year for high school. (and it seemed like there would be fees in addition to that).

GinnyEmma
03-15-2011, 12:51 PM
I think your parents got ripped off. You can't even write a coherent thought. Your misuse of grammar, capitalization, punctuation and spelling are atrocious. :eek:

wow, rude!

While i disagree with that poster, i also know that i type the way i think, rather than the way i write professionally. i give others the same benefit of doubt.

NotUrsula
03-15-2011, 01:03 PM
The OP is in NJ like me. She didn't give the tuition amounts, but here Catholic high school costs $10K a year, and if it is a private school she is looking at, the ones I just looked up cost approximately $30,000 a year for high school. (and it seemed like there would be fees in addition to that).

It's middle school rather than high school, so I skewed a bit cheaper because that usually is a little less, but you're absolutely correct; $30K is not at all outside the realm of possibility.

allison443
03-15-2011, 01:12 PM
It's middle school rather than high school, so I skewed a bit cheaper because that usually is a little less, but you're absolutely correct; $30K is not at all outside the realm of possibility.

Ah, sorry, it was so long ago that I read the OP that I forgot she referred to middle school!
The ones I looked up are about $2k less for middle school, so about $28K, one charges the same for grades 7-12 so $30K. Of course these were just private schools I picked in NJ that I know of, so I don't know what the OP is looking at.

MomToOne
03-15-2011, 01:16 PM
Wow, has this thread derailed!

I have to prepare my kid for not attending the private school. Yes, it is NJ, a good private school charges private colleges $$$. I have been unemployed for nearly two years and have another child with learning disabilities.
We have been living below our means but we have to dip into our savings. I think it would be easier for us to be qaulified.

We haven't saved for college, DH told me I should use those $$$ for college instead of middle school. I have talked to my kid, while she likes the private school, she really prefers her current public school. We are not in a bad school district.

1. It can't hurt to call the school and ask about financial aid. But don't expect a miracle - I get "tuition assistance" at my daughter's school (I'm a single parent so even with a decent job I come in low on the income scale compared to the other families), but it's only a 20% break. I still have to pay 80%. It sounds like even if the school gives you some financial aid, you still will not be in the position to comfortably pay the rest. And if you already applied for financial aid but didn't get any, then I think that's probably the answer you are going to get again - but hey, it can't hurt to call and ask!

2. If your child is happy where she is, its not a bad school district, and you haven't saved for college yet, then I think you know what you need to do. Many of us have done just fine in life with a public school education, including getting advanced college degrees. :rolleyes1

RadioFanatic
03-15-2011, 01:19 PM
just read this article and it made me think of this thread:

http://www.leaderpost.com/news/sues+preschool+being+playground/4437771/story.html

chisnpeke
03-15-2011, 01:20 PM
wow, rude!

While i disagree with that poster, i also know that i type the way i think, rather than the way i write professionally. i give others the same benefit of doubt.

I think the comment was deserved. The post by Anthony was equally rude.

Leajess99
03-15-2011, 01:55 PM
But, honestly, would you want that for your child? If you have to work at Walmart to pay bills, nothing wrong with that. But any decent parent is going to want more for their kid than that.

Defensive, much? :)

I'm not defensive but you certainly make rude posts.

Whether or not it is wanted for a child, it happens. Look at some of the people that were oncce making 100,000 or more a year that are now getting food stamps or working low paying jobs just to get by because their company closed or they were laid off and can't find jobs in their job field.

Maybe you should watch being so hateful because Karma is a witch.

GinnyEmma
03-15-2011, 02:00 PM
I think the comment was deserved. The post by Anthony was equally rude.

Eh, whenever someone pulls out grammar or spelling it usually just shows they haven't a better comeback.

maggiew
03-15-2011, 02:05 PM
DD was accepted by a private school, but they didn't offer her any financial aid probably because we have savings...as I am not working...
Will it help if I were to call their financial aid office?

I understand I won't know until I call..but am wondering whether anyone was offered a financial aid when it was initially denied by the school.

I have to prepare my kid for not attending the private school. Yes, it is NJ, a good private school charges private colleges $$$. I have been unemployed for nearly two years and have another child with learning disabilities.
We have been living below our means but we have to dip into our savings. I think it would be easier for us to be qaulified.

We haven't saved for college, DH told me I should use those $$$ for college instead of middle school. I have talked to my kid, while she likes the private school, she really prefers her current public school. We are not in a bad school district.

If your public school district is not bad, your DD prefers her current school, you don't have the money for the private school AND you have not saved for college, why are you even contemplating paying ~$30,000 (approximated by others) on a MIDDLE SCHOOL education. I am totally blown away by that.

And the mom suing the preschool in the article that was posted??? I can't believe that either. Besides the fact that preschool SHOULD be a "big playroom" IMHO, didn't she look at the school before paying $19,000??

Maggie

Leajess99
03-15-2011, 02:07 PM
lol, nearly everyone i know went to public school (I went to private), and amazingly enough managed to drag themselves out of the dregs of society and go on to improve their chances with a college degree.

A good teacher, class or school has little to do with public or private. As I have stated before, the broadbrush statements mean little. It all has to do with individuals...parents, students, teachers, and administrators.

Great Post!!!! My son's teacher is big on encouraging the kids to go to college and she has college recruiters in to talk to the kids.

I also am encouraging my kids and feel that by them seeing me graduate college (I joined the military and started college while on Active duty but finished this past December after being out of the military and not going back to school until the youngest went to preschool). I talk to my kids and encourage my kids and save for my kids. I would have loved to send the younger 2 to private school but financially it is not a possibility. College is way more important for my kids. The kids do attend pretty good schools so I don't stress as much.

Around here only a couple of the private schools offer financial aid and for one you must find a sponsor that attends that church to get any kind of aid. I feel if I can't afford to send my kids to private school than they don't need to go. I am a single parent and I don't expect anyone else to provide for my kids.

GinnyEmma
03-15-2011, 02:12 PM
Great Post!!!! My son's teacher is big on encouraging the kids to go to college and she has college recruiters in to talk to the kids.

I also am encouraging my kids and feel that by them seeing me graduate college (I joined the military and started college while on Active duty but finished this past December after being out of the military and not going back to school until the youngest went to preschool). I talk to my kids and encourage my kids and save for my kids. I would have loved to send the younger 2 to private school but financially it is not a possibility. College is way more important for my kids. The kids do attend pretty good schools so I don't stress as much.

Around here only a couple of the private schools offer financial aid and for one you must find a sponsor that attends that church to get any kind of aid. I feel if I can't afford to send my kids to private school than they don't need to go. I am a single parent and I don't expect anyone else to provide for my kids.

What a great inspiration. My sil graduated with her kids from college. She homeschooled them, and then went on to finish her teaching degree. (She didn't attend the same school or anything!:scared1:)

prncess674
03-15-2011, 02:13 PM
Eh, whenever someone pulls out grammar or spelling it usually just shows they haven't a better comeback.
The grammar and spelling comment was absolutely relevant to the topic. Anthony was touting his superior private school education, but yet he can't follow the basics of sentence and paragraph construction. I can overlook typos and the occasional sentence ending with a preposition, but his post is riddled with ellipses, random capitalization and rampant misspellings. His post shows that not all private education is superior.

The running joke about one of the supposed elite local private schools in my hometown is their motto should be “Pay your fees, get your B’s.”

Leajess99
03-15-2011, 02:18 PM
What a great inspiration. My sil graduated with her kids from college. She homeschooled them, and then went on to finish her teaching degree. (She didn't attend the same school or anything!:scared1:)

That is awesome as well!!! Sometimes life stops the schooling but going back is a huge accomplishment.

My ex has told our middle child that college is not that important which I constantly remind her that it is. While you could get a job in some fields without a college degree, not too many Marine Biologists have no college education. lol

GinnyEmma
03-15-2011, 02:25 PM
That is awesome as well!!! Sometimes life stops the schooling but going back is a huge accomplishment.

My ex has told our middle child that college is not that important which I constantly remind her that it is. While you could get a job in some fields without a college degree, not too many Marine Biologists have no college education. lol


Geez, that stinks! I have one son who may be more of a trade kind of guy. We will see. But even a good trade takes education. It is merely a different form of education.

My niece wanted to be a marine biologist, but has wound up training zoo animals! Good luck to your middle. :)

ctinct
03-15-2011, 03:45 PM
100% agree.



you would be right. we pay for me to go to cornell and my sister to go to yale completely out of pocket. next year, we will also be paying in full for my 2 brothers who will be starting college. oh, and this is my single mother paying for it on her own. yes, i definitely think they should be going somewhere they can actually pay for or if they want to be at a private school, then they should take out loans. college financial aid in the form of grants is ridiculous, but that is a whole other discussion, so if you wish to have it with me, then feel free to send me a PM and we can certainly talk about it (don't want to stray too far off topic).

as for whoever said top schools give merit aid, not the tippy top. ivies do not give merit aid. i believe most of the top 20 does not, however, i have heard of certain cases when they really want people to study in a certain field they will offer some (i'm using my own personal experience. a friend was told he would get a full ride to vanderbilt if he were to lead their hillel group and study something relating to jewish studies). of course, i only really know about the schools i applied to and there are definitely options out there. tulane, for example, gives great merit aid if you apply early enough.

You are correct that the Ivies do not give merit aid; however, the vast majority of them will meet full financial need. I think a few of them try to do it with little or no loans, using grant aid from their endowemnents instead. I'm not quite sure what it is about grant aid that you feel is ridiculous. If your mom is paying for two Ivies completely out of pocket, and will be paying for four college students next year, she must have an extremely high income. You are quite fortunate that she is able to do that for you.

collegejunkie
03-16-2011, 03:46 PM
You are correct that the Ivies do not give merit aid; however, the vast majority of them will meet full financial need. I think a few of them try to do it with little or no loans, using grant aid from their endowemnents instead. I'm not quite sure what it is about grant aid that you feel is ridiculous. If your mom is paying for two Ivies completely out of pocket, and will be paying for four college students next year, she must have an extremely high income. You are quite fortunate that she is able to do that for you.

what i don't like about grant aid is that that means that students like me, who are paying in full, are essentially just giving other kids a cushion to come and then that money isn't going towards better resources, more research, more on-campus housing, activities, events, etc. so i'm paying all this money, but i'm not getting anything extra compared to the students who aren't paying and who aren't contributing money towards the things i just mentioned. that said, dbf is here on full aid and will graduate with only about 6k in debt. while i'm happy for him, i still think the system could be better. for example, lower tuition to say, 20k and just have everyone across the board pay the same amount but then it won't be ridiculously high and then it wouldn't be a huge deal. but i guess it doesn't matter what i think, because my opinion won't be changing how the aid system works. i suppose i can look on the bright side and figure if dbf has very little debt, then when we get married, he/we won't be in a ton of debt.

i consider myself very lucky and try to show my mom that her money is well spent by keeping my grades up and finding lots of positions and doing extracurriculars. it's a mix of good planning and her job. she saved for each of us starting with the year we were born. we had an agreement that we could only go away to school if it was within a certain rank, otherwise we had to go to local publics, which is what one of my brothers is choosing to do. she's my favorite person in the entire world, not just because of how she's letting me grow on my own, but just because she's truly a wonderful person :love: i love my mommy :)

ShanPooh
03-16-2011, 04:16 PM
Funny Graduation Ecard: A Bachelors degree is the new high school diploma.

lillygator
03-16-2011, 04:25 PM
DD was accepted by a private school, but they didn't offer her any financial aid probably because we have savings...as I am not working...
Will it help if I were to call their financial aid office?

I understand I won't know until I call..but am wondering whether anyone was offered a financial aid when it was initially denied by the school.

I have to prepare my kid for not attending the private school. Yes, it is NJ, a good private school charges private colleges $$$. I have been unemployed for nearly two years and have another child with learning disabilities.
We have been living below our means but we have to dip into our savings. I think it would be easier for us to be qaulified.

We haven't saved for college, DH told me I should use those $$$ for college instead of middle school. I have talked to my kid, while she likes the private school, she really prefers her current public school. We are not in a bad school district.

amazing this is a new poster with only 2 posts - bet its someone under a new id!!

sorry but I read this as, I am not working, don't plan to, have savings enough to pay for private school but don't want to, what handout can I get?

karenos
03-16-2011, 04:38 PM
what i don't like about grant aid is that that means that students like me, who are paying in full, are essentially just giving other kids a cushion to come and then that money isn't going towards better resources, more research, more on-campus housing, activities, events, etc. so i'm paying all this money, but i'm not getting anything extra compared to the students who aren't paying and who aren't contributing money towards the things i just mentioned. that said, dbf is here on full aid and will graduate with only about 6k in debt. while i'm happy for him, i still think the system could be better. for example, lower tuition to say, 20k and just have everyone across the board pay the same amount but then it won't be ridiculously high and then it wouldn't be a huge deal. but i guess it doesn't matter what i think, because my opinion won't be changing how the aid system works. i suppose i can look on the bright side and figure if dbf has very little debt, then when we get married, he/we won't be in a ton of debt.

i consider myself very lucky and try to show my mom that her money is well spent by keeping my grades up and finding lots of positions and doing extracurriculars. it's a mix of good planning and her job. she saved for each of us starting with the year we were born. we had an agreement that we could only go away to school if it was within a certain rank, otherwise we had to go to local publics, which is what one of my brothers is choosing to do. she's my favorite person in the entire world, not just because of how she's letting me grow on my own, but just because she's truly a wonderful person :love: i love my mommy :)

I'm trying to figure out what you have against students who accept "grant" aid. I attended a small, private liberal arts college many moons ago - but grants (along with loans) allowed me to attend. If my family had to pay full price (Mom was a teacher, Dad worked for the state as an accountant) I never would have been able to go. It was a top-notch education that allowed me to become the person I am today.

karenos;)

seashoreCM
03-16-2011, 05:41 PM
Eh, whenever someone pulls out grammar or spelling it usually just shows they haven't a better comeback.
Whenever someone picks out grammar or spelling or racism, that definitely means he has lost the argument.

A private school could make limited financial aid resources stretch further by not giving out any scholarships but instead pay the interest on loans extended to students.

A lot of times when the last parent goes out to work, there is not much money left after paying for transportation, day care, more frequent take out as opposed to home cooked meals, etc.

Somehow I don't think that going to private school for grades 1-8 is that important. COme grade 9, spending that year in the public school should be enough to evaluate how good the teaching is. We can't just rank the public school given its college acceptance rate or average test scores. Only after a student feels he can't get enough out of his classes should the parents get concerned about the quality of the public school. And the student has to select the proper courses for college preparation. This may mean not taking sex education or drama or industrial arts (unless required). And not going after "easy" courses for the sole purpose of putting a preponderance of A's on the report card.

janey99
03-16-2011, 08:55 PM
It's middle school rather than high school, so I skewed a bit cheaper because that usually is a little less, but you're absolutely correct; $30K is not at all outside the realm of possibility.

The private school that I went to in northern NJ is now 36k a year. I know at least 10 private schools in NJ with virtually the same pricing structure.

mafibisha
03-16-2011, 10:01 PM
The private school that I went to in northern NJ is now 36k a year. I know at least 10 private schools in NJ with virtually the same pricing structure.

Ok are you really talking middle school here?
Does anyone else think thats just crazy? :scared1:
When a years tuition at a good college is $30K-$36K? :scared1:

maggiew
03-16-2011, 10:04 PM
Ok are you really talking middle school here?
Does anyone else think thats just crazy? :scared1:
When a years tuition at a good college is $30K-$36K? :scared1:

I'm with you! :scared1:

Maggie

Leajess99
03-16-2011, 10:17 PM
Geez, that stinks! I have one son who may be more of a trade kind of guy. We will see. But even a good trade takes education. It is merely a different form of education.

My niece wanted to be a marine biologist, but has wound up training zoo animals! Good luck to your middle. :)

So true on the trade education. Our community college system is inclusive with Technical degrees as well. It is nice to see that they have decided that good training for all job areas is better to have.

Thank you. My youngest wants to be a Dolphin trainer. She is 8 and big into Science and Math as well. I still love the looks we get when people ask her what her favorite subjects are and seh says Science and Math. Many expect it to be reading and some forget that girls can be good at and enjoy science.

disfan07
03-16-2011, 11:45 PM
Ok are you really talking middle school here?
Does anyone else think thats just crazy? :scared1:
When a years tuition at a good college is $30K-$36K? :scared1:


I am at University of California Irvine and tuition, books, room, board, etc comes out to $27,000 at the most....and $10,000 of that is rent. Tuition and fees were about $10,000 or $11,000 this year.

janey99
03-17-2011, 11:21 AM
Ok are you really talking middle school here?
Does anyone else think thats just crazy? :scared1:
When a years tuition at a good college is $30K-$36K? :scared1:

It is what it is, I guess. I don't think any of the schools I'm thinking of are desperately searching for applicants. There's a healthy population of people that send their kids to these schools, in NJ and elsewhere.

PS, budget related tie-in - the fact that I went to one of these schools (as did both my siblings) because my parents felt the school system in our town was lacking, made me hyper aware of the issue as I grew up, had kids and looked for a house - we made sure to pick a house in a stellar school district (in NJ) so we wouldn't have to have the private school spend for 13+ years per kid.

DawnM
03-17-2011, 11:34 AM
Did the OP even come back?

mafibisha
03-17-2011, 05:37 PM
Ok are you really talking middle school here?
Does anyone else think thats just crazy? :scared1:
When a years tuition at a good college is $30K-$36K? :scared1:

I am at University of California Irvine and tuition, books, room, board, etc comes out to $27,000 at the most....and $10,000 of that is rent. Tuition and fees were about $10,000 or $11,000 this year.


Middle school vs. a year at the Univ. of California....
hmmm, lets see... :)
The latter sounds like a great ROI for $27,000!
(return on investment)

And while there are likely many who can afford 27K for a middle school, IMO there aren't any middle schools that are truly *worth it*. There are only so many kinds of available curriculum, text books, classes and extra curricular events. Even after all that ... are they professionally decorated classrooms? Do the teachers get uber high salaries? And there are FABULOUS teachers in all socio-economic areas.

Just wonderin' :) :confused3

luvthemouse71
03-17-2011, 09:06 PM
I'm not defensive but you certainly make rude posts.

Whether or not it is wanted for a child, it happens. Look at some of the people that were oncce making 100,000 or more a year that are now getting food stamps or working low paying jobs just to get by because their company closed or they were laid off and can't find jobs in their job field.

Maybe you should watch being so hateful because Karma is a witch.Lol, if being hateful means I tell it like it is, without worrying about offending the board police here, then guilty as charged. Life comes down to choices, simple as that. Any parent is going to want the best for their child and the best doesn't include working at Walmart.
I will go as far to say that most private schools will give you a better education than your average
public school. Now, if I were the OP, I'd probably get a job, or look into a loan. She shouldn't be slammed for wanting the best for her kid.

And thanks so much for being worried about my karma- but I think I'll be fine. I made the most I've ever made last year and I'm due for two more raises this year. :)

disfan07
03-17-2011, 10:59 PM
Middle school vs. a year at the Univ. of California....
hmmm, lets see... :)
The latter sounds like a great ROI for $27,000!
(return on investment)

And while there are likely many who can afford 27K for a middle school, IMO there aren't any middle schools that are truly *worth it*. There are only so many kinds of available curriculum, text books, classes and extra curricular events. Even after all that ... are they professionally decorated classrooms? Do the teachers get uber high salaries? And there are FABULOUS teachers in all socio-economic areas.

Just wonderin' :) :confused3


My cousin is in 7th grade and goes to a private school that is about $18,000/year. But $18,000 is just a drop in the bucket for her parents. This is also in SoCal. Th emajority of the students at this school live in multi-million dollar houses (including my cousin) except for the few that do go there on financial aid. Her 7th grade class has like 30 kids in it. They also go on trips to DC, Boston, etc. that are all included in tuition.

janey99
03-18-2011, 10:29 AM
My cousin is in 7th grade and goes to a private school that is about $18,000/year. But $18,000 is just a drop in the bucket for her parents. This is also in SoCal. Th emajority of the students at this school live in multi-million dollar houses (including my cousin) except for the few that do go there on financial aid. Her 7th grade class has like 30 kids in it. They also go on trips to DC, Boston, etc. that are all included in tuition.

This, plus many other points. The schools I am familiar with have a multiday trip every school year for each grade starting in 4th grade - various notable US cities, Colonial Williamsburg, outward bound-type trips, each tying in to an overall curriculum theme for that year. Fully realized and integrated language, art, music curriculums (not "art on a cart" or Spanish for half an hour a week). Theatre and orchestra. Multiple sports teams, including golf, ski, sailing, riding, along with the usual soccer, field hockey, lacrosse, etc. AP everything. Class sizes usually between 75-100 kids per grade with only 10 or so kids in each classroom. Connected guidance offices - the year I graduated (admittedly 25+ years ago:scared1:) 3-4 kids from my class went to each Ivy - that's 25% of a class getting into Ivies, with most of the reminder getting into big East Coast schools, like Williams, Colgate, UVa, etc.

Every parent wants what's best for their kids. Does everyone have a different view of "the best," and can "the best" be achieved in different ways? Sure, but these schools are one route and plenty of people take it.

Jane

disfan07
03-18-2011, 08:38 PM
This, plus many other points. The schools I am familiar with have a multiday trip every school year for each grade starting in 4th grade - various notable US cities, Colonial Williamsburg, outward bound-type trips, each tying in to an overall curriculum theme for that year. Fully realized and integrated language, art, music curriculums (not "art on a cart" or Spanish for half an hour a week). Theatre and orchestra. Multiple sports teams, including golf, ski, sailing, riding, along with the usual soccer, field hockey, lacrosse, etc. AP everything. Class sizes usually between 75-100 kids per grade with only 10 or so kids in each classroom. Connected guidance offices - the year I graduated (admittedly 25+ years ago:scared1:) 3-4 kids from my class went to each Ivy - that's 25% of a class getting into Ivies, with most of the reminder getting into big East Coast schools, like Williams, Colgate, UVa, etc.

Every parent wants what's best for their kids. Does everyone have a different view of "the best," and can "the best" be achieved in different ways? Sure, but these schools are one route and plenty of people take it.

Jane

And IMO, unless the school district is really really bad OR you have that money sitting around, it's not worth it. I went to public shcool and I just got a 4.0 at UCI this quarter in all upper division psychology classes. I'd say that public school is just fine.

Leajess99
03-18-2011, 11:26 PM
And IMO, unless the school district is really really bad OR you have that money sitting around, it's not worth it. I went to public shcool and I just got a 4.0 at UCI this quarter in all upper division psychology classes. I'd say that public school is just fine.

:cheer2::cheer2::cheer2: WAY TO GO!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :cheer2::cheer2::cheer2:

karice2
03-19-2011, 08:15 AM
I have been reading the posts on this topic and think that people are not taking enough into consideration. I think what bothers most people is that she is a SAHM and is asking that be taken into consideration for financial aid.

I think that is a bit high handed and presumptious. If you want your child to go to the school then one should be expected to share part of the burden. I call it the cost of raising a child. If you want them to have the best then you must be willing to do your part.

That being said, she lives in Jersy. It is a high cost of living area. While some would consider $30,000 for middle school excessive, in certain parts of the country that is normal. The best schools in the DC area cost that much and more but the education and experiences these schools are offer are far superior to anything that even the best public schools can offer.

I don't have children yet but I am already planning for that cost because I live in an area that is notorious for having a bad public school system. My preference is also that my children attend single sex schools. So yes I know that I will be paying through the nose for my kids to get an education but it is a something that I know I will have to deal with since I chose to have a child and live in an area with bad public schools.

Cheshire Figment
03-19-2011, 08:25 AM
Minor side note - the original post was on March 11 in the small hours of the morning, and the last time the OP was on DisBoards was the very early morning of March 12; that is now more than a week ago.

horseshowmom
03-19-2011, 12:03 PM
So true on the trade education. Our community college system is inclusive with Technical degrees as well. It is nice to see that they have decided that good training for all job areas is better to have.

Thank you. My youngest wants to be a Dolphin trainer. She is 8 and big into Science and Math as well. I still love the looks we get when people ask her what her favorite subjects are and seh says Science and Math. Many expect it to be reading and some forget that girls can be good at and enjoy science.

You may already know this, but just in case you didn't, I thought your daughter might want to look into Sea World's Adventure Camps. At 8 she's a little young for the Resident Camps (4th grade and up), but if you happened to be in the area of one of them, they have Day Camps. :)

http://www.seaworld.org/adventure-camps/index.htm