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View Full Version : Sign of the Tough Economy or A Great New Fundraiser???


sk!mom
03-08-2011, 05:09 PM
Several times in the last couple of years, I have received fundraising letters.

The one I got today, asked for help to go on a Mission Trip. Last year, I got one asking for donations for an Educational Trip to WDW, one for People to People to Europe, and one for a Soccer experience in Australia.

To be honest, I'm bugged by these. To me, you pay your own way to travel.

Am I just cranky? Do others find this an acceptable way to raise funds?

luvmarypoppins
03-08-2011, 05:13 PM
I have only gotten 2 of those. They were both for missions trips. One was for the ds former babysitter and one was the dd of our former tenants, so since I knew them both personally we gave them something.

If I wasnt close to them etc. I probably wouldnt give anything.

Nik's Mom
03-08-2011, 05:15 PM
Yeah, I think it's tacky. We do lots of different travel experiences and expensive experiences for our kids. I'd never send a letter asking for donations. My kids are developmentally disabled and I'm paying $$ for a special camp to teach them to ride bikes. I'd never think to send out such a letter.

Now, if a grandparent wants to help pay to send their grandchild to people to people Europe, or what ever, then I don't think that's a problem. But to send out a mass mailing is definitely tacky.

Marionnette
03-08-2011, 07:00 PM
Several times in the last couple of years, I have received fundraising letters.

The one I got today, asked for help to go on a Mission Trip. Last year, I got one asking for donations for an Educational Trip to WDW, one for People to People to Europe, and one for a Soccer experience in Australia.

To be honest, I'm bugged by these. To me, you pay your own way to travel.

Am I just cranky? Do others find this an acceptable way to raise funds?
Mission trips are acts of charity that I think should be encouraged and supported. It's not as if the kid is asking for money so they can sit on a beach in Cancun all day and drink all night. They're building schools, digging wells, innoculating children, and donating their time off to better the lives of people who have it a lot worse than we do.

As for the "educational trips", well the people who run those trips encourage the kids and their families to fundraise. It's not required but those trips are darned expensive and why not get your aunts, neighbors and second cousin twice removed to help pony up for this once in a lifetime experience? Those are the fundraisers for travel that I have issues with.

RitaE
03-08-2011, 07:09 PM
yes, I think it is really just begging and I really don't think it is doing the kids any favors.

My standard response is that I don't give money but I'm always in need of a babysitter, somebody to help clean the house, yardwork galore etc etc. And if I don't have anything that needs to be done, I have elderly neighbors.

I guess I'm also cranky because I remember when I was a kid nobody would ever dream of just writing a letter begging like those things that get sent out. To say nothing of blocking the door to the Grocery Store selling construction paper flowers (last month's scheme).

tar heel
03-08-2011, 07:39 PM
I don't think it's a sign of the economy. We received our first one of those about 20 years ago. One thing that has changed is that the kind of organizations/project people are asked to fund this way is getting broader. At first it was just mission/church stuff and the "vacations" pretending to be more such as People to People. One of my son's high school soccer coach asked the team members to send letters to their grandparents, aunts and uncles, neighbors, etc. They were supposed to address them after practice. We declined, and let's say it didn't help his position on the team.

I didn't mind getting the first couple of these, but they really annoy me now. The last time I gave something I did it b/c I felt coerced.

sk!mom
03-08-2011, 07:46 PM
Mission trips are acts of charity that I think should be encouraged and supported. It's not as if the kid is asking for money so they can sit on a beach in Cancun all day and drink all night. They're building schools, digging wells, innoculating children, and donating their time off to better the lives of people who have it a lot worse than we do.

As for the "educational trips", well the people who run those trips encourage the kids and their families to fundraise. It's not required but those trips are darned expensive and why not get your aunts, neighbors and second cousin twice removed to help pony up for this once in a lifetime experience? Those are the fundraisers for travel that I have issues with.

Just to clarify, the Mission Trip solicitation that I got today was from an adult and delivered to my work mailbox by a college educated professional (approx. 40 years old).

Maybe it bugs me because I pay for my and my children's experiences. This Summer, I will pay for my DD14 to go on a Mission Trip and then to a 5 week ballet intensive.

Maybe I should change my position. Anyone want to pay my child's way while she helps others and enriches herself?:thumbsup2

powellrj
03-08-2011, 07:49 PM
I hate getting these letters and we seem to be getting more and more of them.

What I hate are "mission trips" that are really more of a vacation type trip than any true mission work. I did send money to a kid who was going to Africa this summer but I have passed on some that were more just fun type trips.

I agree that more and more groups want you to send letters like these to family and friends. There is no way I would ever send out a letter like this. If we can't afford it, you don't go.

MinnieVanMom
03-08-2011, 07:53 PM
My DD is going with P2P to Europe this summer. Her father and I both would die if they asked us to solicit family and friends to pay for this trip. That is just wrong.

eeyorethegreat
03-08-2011, 08:01 PM
I haven't ever gotten a letter like that. At church we have a group of people that go to the Dominican every Feb. There is an announcement made that if anyone would like to note an offering for the missions trip it is appreciated. I can tell you that the folks that go on this mission trip work their rears off so it definitely isn't a vacation type thing. I would have an issue giving money to some offhand kid who wanted to go to WDW or do people to People. I have gone to fund raisers forvarious music groups at the highschool my kids go to in which the money might support a trip to sing/perform say in NYC.

englishteacha
03-08-2011, 10:56 PM
I have friends who do mission work and I know how expensive those trips can be. I've helped with fundraisers and given donations. Stuff like People to People...well unless you are a close relative, I won't help financially. My niece did People to People twice as a "sports ambassador". She sent out the letters, explaining that this was a "once-in-a-lifetime" opportunity and asked for donations or for people to purchase items required for the trip. The first time I bought her first aid kit. The second time I don't think I donated anything. I won't fund two "once-in-a-lifetime" trips in less than 2 years, even if you're my niece and I love you!

I worked my brain off to get good grades to be eligible to study abroad, was selected from a small pool of students to go to university in England, and paid my own way. It was a wonderful trip, hugely educational, and I don't regret going for a moment. I think the experience meant more to me because I had to work for it rather than it being given to me.

As a teacher I'm constantly getting "invitations" to select students for various awards and trips, all that cost the student several thousand dollars to attend. I could write down the names of every student in my school, they would get a letter saying they were "specially chosen" to represent XYZ, and only had to raise $3,000 to attend this educational trip to DC or where ever. It's really quite crazy. I want to recognize my deserving students, but not when it will cost them thousands of dollars!

clh2
03-08-2011, 11:11 PM
I received a letter yesterday, addressed to "The Maiden-name Family", This was a fundraiser for a college I've never heard of before, and the signature was illegible. The football team is raising money for their sports program.

Yeah...whatever...

My husband actually figured it out. This was from the son of an administrative assistant who worked where I did 17 years ago. And then she moved 1/2 way across the company. I've not seen the A.A. for almost 17 years (when my DD was a brand new baby).

Uhmmm...I simply have a fundraising policy. I will not support your fundraising efforts; and I do not expect you to support my fundraising efforts. (I do have a couple of exceptions...but they are pretty firm.)

disneychrista
03-08-2011, 11:23 PM
I am an equal opportunity fundraiser supporter. I don't buy/donate/etc to any of them. Even when it comes to my own childs fundraisers. If they need $200 for a trip tell me and I will send in the check. I will not ask co-workers and family member to buy the crap or "pledge" or donate money.

Julia M
03-08-2011, 11:39 PM
I haven't ever gotten a letter like that. At church we have a group of people that go to the Dominican every Feb. There is an announcement made that if anyone would like to note an offering for the missions trip it is appreciated. I can tell you that the folks that go on this mission trip work their rears off so it definitely isn't a vacation type thing.

I think a church itself asking members if they;d like to donate is different than sending a solicitation letter.

My daughter competes and when she earned a spot on a team going to Australia, we told her she'd have to earn the tour fees.

SHe babysat and taught little kids. Her biggest findraiser was an easy one, though-a garage sale. We asked family, friends and coworkers if they'd be willing to donate items that would ordinarily go to Goodwill for her to sell at a garage sale. We let people know we'd donate whatever didn't sell. It was a HUGE hit and she made $800 at the sale. No one person had alot, but we had probablty 20 people donate.

My friends thought it was great-they were helping dd and had motivation to reduce clutter. DD gave up her Sat/Sun, sold all day, helped pack up the car to drive the items to Goodwill when it was over and baked cookies afterwards for everyone who helped her out.

Julia

princesslily
03-08-2011, 11:48 PM
I for one would donate to all the children! I know a lot of people who are having a very difficult financial time now and have know problem helping! If there is an opportuntity for children to learn and have a great experience, I say go for it!! I am fortunate to be able to provide some experiences for my children!

Maddie2
03-09-2011, 12:00 AM
As a teacher I'm constantly getting "invitations" to select students for various awards and trips, all that cost the student several thousand dollars to attend. I could write down the names of every student in my school, they would get a letter saying they were "specially chosen" to represent XYZ, and only had to raise $3,000 to attend this educational trip to DC or where ever. It's really quite crazy. I want to recognize my deserving students, but not when it will cost them thousands of dollars!


I know that one! My DS16 has rec'd this one a couple of times ... and what made him feel all the more "special" is that his dear dad (DH40+) also rec'd the same letter - twice! All of the letters stated that they had been chosen by their teachers .... um yeah, "specially chosen", yeah sure. :sad2:

NYCDiane
03-09-2011, 12:03 AM
Several times in the last couple of years, I have received fundraising letters.

The one I got today, asked for help to go on a Mission Trip. Last year, I got one asking for donations for an Educational Trip to WDW, one for People to People to Europe, and one for a Soccer experience in Australia.

To be honest, I'm bugged by these. To me, you pay your own way to travel.

Am I just cranky? Do others find this an acceptable way to raise funds?


You're not cranky. If people want to travel, they should pay their own way (or their kids' way )

A couple of years ago, some woman at my job was going around demanding $20 "donations" out of everyone so she could send her child on one of those "People to People" trips. What a crock. I told her no and that I don't have an extra $20 to give away since I was struggling to send my child to camp that year. She had the audacity to tell me to "save up" the $20 and then give it to her. I told her she was out of her mind.

The following year, she did the same thing. She didn't even bother asking me.

disykat
03-09-2011, 01:27 AM
Some years I've been tempted when I receive them to send them a few bucks and then have my child type up a letter to send them. It could be like exchanging gift cards at Christmas. The reality is though, that I won't send those kinds of letters.

ChisJo
03-09-2011, 02:18 AM
I have friends who do multiple mission trips, but they do fundraising through their church. They ask me to help by buying chocolate covered almonds, or by a bake sale, but to me that signifies that they are trying to raise money for a better cause, and at least I am getting something as well.

To get a letter requesting funding for a trip but the requestor is not actually doing anything to get the funds baffles me. Unless they are physically doing something to raise funds, why should I donate? i.e.: bake sale, dunk tank, 10km race, etc. Anyone could ask for money to do a bunch of nothing. Heck, I could ask for money for a trip to better myself, but I know better than that.

ssawka
03-09-2011, 07:18 AM
This thread has really inspired me and I think this would be a great way to raise money for our next trip to WDW. I've drafted a donation request letter to send to our friends and family members. I would love to know what everyone thinks about the wording of this letter. Thank you.

To all Friends and Family,

We are in the midst of planning a pilgrimage to Walt Disney World in October. It has been over a year since we made this trip and our beloved family is in dire need of seeing their favorite Disney characters. Unfortunately, things are a bit tight this year, and with the cost of airfare rising we are finding it difficult to afford this trip. I hope you can find it in your heart to send us a donation so we can make this trip a reality.

Thank you and god bless!

Purseval
03-09-2011, 07:37 AM
My daughter went on a band trip every year she was in High School. We DID pay for the airfare or bus fare and expenses but they also had to pay to transport all of the equipment and a million other little expenses. Plus there were families who simply could not afford it and it helped them out. They had everything from bake sales to car washes to yard sales to rent-a-kid, you name it along with fundraising letters. Amazing that when kids go out and actually try to earn a way to do something people can find a way to mock it.

RitaE
03-09-2011, 07:40 AM
This thread has really inspired me and I think this would be a great way to raise money for our next trip to WDW. I've drafted a donation request letter to send to our friends and family members. I would love to know what everyone thinks about the wording of this letter. Thank you.

you need to include something about the spiritual, intellectual and emotional growth you will all experience in a manner that could never be accomplished around plain and boring old home. Also, mention how you all be in effect "Ambassadors" of your State and Community with the State of Florida and tell how you plan to affect the people and terrain of Orlando in a positive manner with your presence.

bonus phrase points if you can use "Unique and irreplaceable opportunity" in there somewhere.

annsteere
03-09-2011, 07:49 AM
I gladly give to high school/college aged people going on a mission trip.

In fact, DH and I have a budget item to cover such donations.

The overwhelming majority of people who become missionaries or work in NGOs these days got their first experience as part of a missions trip.

We don't generally give for a second trip for any one, passed on sending a Jr. Hi kid to Tahiti, and know the difference between an educational trip to Europe and a mission trip. But, if it is a missions trip, count us in.

nunzia
03-09-2011, 07:55 AM
I've never gotten a letter like that either. My kids did church mission trips and fundraising was done in the church, and they still are. This year instead of a mission trip the youth are raising funds to go to a big rally thing..they've already paid for all registration fees and hotels, now it's just travel money. They do the annual Pumpkin Patch (and have to work it), they remodeled a bathroom, they put on lunches after church. I like that they have to work for things and not have it handed to them.
Our community is pretty active in Education Vacation where kids are flooding everywhere you can think of asking for money to go to DC..the concept is good but really, what do they learn racing from monument to monument in a frantic hurry? I never let my kids do that one..

Gigi22
03-09-2011, 08:05 AM
We have never received one of these solicitations. And, if ever we did--file 13.

Psychodisney
03-09-2011, 08:35 AM
I'm not a big fan of these letters either. The only benefit I see is that the child/organization gets your entire donation. At least you don't have to buy $25 worth of cookie dough and have the child/organization only get $10 or so.
Here's the spin my DS's high school baseball team does. They pledge to do community service(litter pick up, painting etc) in exchange for donations. I get it....but I'm conflicted by the communtity service which I feel should be volunteer! I only allow him to send the "begging" letters to immediate family.

Pigeon
03-09-2011, 08:41 AM
I don't do fundraisers, period. If I want my kid to participate in an activity, I'm happy to pay for it. I don't expect other people to subsidize their activities.

I've gotten a bunch of letters for kids wanting to go on missionary trips. I'm not a believer in the value of missionary work, so these I find offensive. If a family or a congregation wants to do this sort of thing, they should pay for it.

RitaE
03-09-2011, 08:46 AM
Our Church does the Youth Group Mission trip thing and the Church helps by donating supplies and shipping them down ahead of time. We sent down boxes of books this year, and then shoes, and then cleaning and painting supplies.

The kids have to earn their travel money and also the money they contribute to the Organization to help pay for their food etc while they are there. Earning that money is pretty much a year long project for that age group and it's part of the growth process for the kids. I don't think it would be nearly as beneficial to the kids if they money was just given to them.

*disgal*
03-09-2011, 08:51 AM
Mission trips are acts of charity that I think should be encouraged and supported. It's not as if the kid is asking for money so they can sit on a beach in Cancun all day and drink all night. They're building schools, digging wells, innoculating children, and donating their time off to better the lives of people who have it a lot worse than we do.

As for the "educational trips", well the people who run those trips encourage the kids and their families to fundraise. It's not required but those trips are darned expensive and why not get your aunts, neighbors and second cousin twice removed to help pony up for this once in a lifetime experience? Those are the fundraisers for travel that I have issues with.

This is it exactly. I probably get two or three letters(missions) a year and have for about 15 years. I consider contributing to the the mission trip just like the missionaries I support each month. And they are fantastic avenues to teach things that just can't be learned at home. It can't be measured by money. In fact, I think every teenager could use a trip to somewhere where they can see how the rest of the world really lives.

The educational trip I might tell the fam about but the rest of it I would assume my child has to fundraise or he/she/we have to foot the rest.

dizkids
03-09-2011, 08:57 AM
My son gets the people to people letter each year and we ooh and ahh but its $5000 or so. Never ever would ask someone for dime and that include immediate family.

angierae
03-09-2011, 09:11 AM
When DD had her 8th grade trip to D.C. we asked close friends and family if they would donate their pop bottles (Michigan has a .10 refund per bottle) to her fundraising efforts. Some did, some didn't, and she wrote thank you notes to everyone who let us pick up a bag of bottles or dropped some off to us.

I personally wouldn't ask for cash, because with some belt tightening, we could afford it. Although if a family friend or family member had a kid who absolutely was not going to be able to go on a trip like that without help, I would help. My daughter's 8th grade class trip has been one of the highlights of her life and I wouldn't want another kid to miss out on that.

But just peppering letters to everyone you know? I've never received a letter like that and like others have said, unless it's a friend or close family member, no way.

mrsklamc
03-09-2011, 09:29 AM
For true missions work (which could be not religious, but just things like medical care, drilling wells where there's no water, etc.) I have no problem with this. I do think it's annoying if it's for your soccer team, etc. But I would rather have the opportunity to give to something legitimate for someone I know than find out later and not have the chance. If I'm not interested, I just trash it.

mjbaby
03-09-2011, 09:48 AM
I don't think that this form of fundraising is particularly new, although it might be enjoying a surge of popularity lately. I remember when my high school German club took a trip to Germany, Austria and Switzerland - 25 or so years ago - we bandied about the idea of doing something similar.

Raising money via letter doesn't strike me as terribly different than a rent party or shaving one's head for charity (one I received just yesterday). I wouldn't support every request that came down the pike, but they don't bother me, either. In fact, I think I'd rather give money for someone in my community to do something interesting or educational than "sponsor" someone to walk around a track 50 times or whatever.

CandleontheWater
03-09-2011, 10:05 AM
I don't have a problem with kids fundraising, and if I run across a child selling candy or wrapping paper or cookie dough, I will usually buy a little something. I have more than a few boxes of girl scout cookies in my house right now ;)

I remember having to do fundraisers for my marching band back in high school. I always worked very hard at selling the various things (discount cards, blankets etc) and I worked at the big fundraisers (classic car show, antiques show) to support our band and to save for band trips. I appreciated everyone who helped me out, and I intend to help out kids that are in the same position today as I was 20 years ago.

That being said I wouldn't just send money, I feel like that is a little tacky. I worked my tail off going door to door, the least they could do is make the request in person.

DawnM
03-09-2011, 10:53 AM
Missions trips don't usually bother me when asking for donations and here is why:

I come from a missionary family. I hope that through the experience this child or adult has, he/she might become more aware of the needs of the 3rd World and either donate more time or money or both in the future. This is particularly true of those who haven't traveled much before.

So, I do donate.

Now, I got some donation requests for camp and such that I simply will not donate to, I have enough of my own kids' activities I don't solicit funds for to donate to yours.

Dawn

The Pluto People
03-09-2011, 11:23 AM
We were solicited by a niece to contribute to her $3,500 mission trip to Kenya. Fifteen kids were going on the trip. That's over $50,000. Do you think the village they were going to "assist" would prefer 15 high school kids "helping" for a week or a $50,000 donation?

IMALOVNDISNEY
03-09-2011, 12:19 PM
Mission trips are acts of charity that I think should be encouraged and supported. It's not as if the kid is asking for money so they can sit on a beach in Cancun all day and drink all night. They're building schools, digging wells, innoculating children, and donating their time off to better the lives of people who have it a lot worse than we do.

As for the "educational trips", well the people who run those trips encourage the kids and their families to fundraise. It's not required but those trips are darned expensive and why not get your aunts, neighbors and second cousin twice removed to help pony up for this once in a lifetime experience? Those are the fundraisers for travel that I have issues with.

Exactly.....
I am a buisiness manager for a local Drs office. And we have patients and or their children coming in with these "sponsor" letters because their dance studio is going to Disney for a compatition. And they want "us" to pay their way. I have a problem with that. And they go every other year.
One patient came in the first time and asked. We did "sponsor" her child. Never did get a thank you of any kind. But, when they came home from WDW mom came in with pictures and bragged how it only cost her family of 4 less than $500 because their family had "raised" so much sponsor money..
EXCUSE ME:furious: I have to pay for my family to vaction. When the mom asked again the second year. I kindly told her that we would be happy to sponsor her family's vacation, if she would in turn sponsor mine and the Drs next vaction. Of course she didn't. And even tried to ask the Dr. without me knowing. But, he and I were in agreement that no more "sponsorships" would be given out for things like this. So, he too told her that we no longer do that.
BTW...my family is going to WDW next year. So anyone that wants to help pay my way. Please PM me direcly. I accept personal checks, Paypal, Money orders. and of course Disney Dollars. ;) (just kidding by the way);)

stczt
03-09-2011, 12:43 PM
my kids are involved with a church youth organization and a few summers ago oldest ds went on a mission trip. He sent out letters and got his trip paid for by doing that. This summer my other ds is wanting to go on a mission trip to nova scotia with the cost of the trip and full passport its ending up being pretty costly. He will again write letters I don't know if he will receive the help my older son got, but we will find a way for him to go. Dh and I both went on mission trips as teens. We tell people to wright the checks to our church and then we get a church check and the people get a tax deduction.

ceecee
03-09-2011, 01:04 PM
I work in a dental office and we get them all the time as well. I don't mind a fund raiser where they do something (ie car wash) or sell something. But to ask for a donation just because...no, it's tacky. Especially the People to People things which are just vacations that cost $3000-5000. If the parents can afford it, fine. DD started getting letters in 5th grade and every year for the next three years. We could take the family for $5000 and I would know she was supervised. 3 weeks is too much for an 11 yr old in my opinion.
Missions trips are different, our youth group at church does fund raisers for that and we are more than happy to support them. Our 8th grade DC trip had full and partial scholarships for kids that couldn't afford it...the company gave us $ back if a certain # of kids pre-registered and the PTO kicked in $ as well. The kids did several fundraisers as well, selling candles, pizzas and subs.

Marionnette
03-09-2011, 01:13 PM
We were solicited by a niece to contribute to her $3,500 mission trip to Kenya. Fifteen kids were going on the trip. That's over $50,000. Do you think the village they were going to "assist" would prefer 15 high school kids "helping" for a week or a $50,000 donation?
Well, considering that many mission trips are to areas where the governments are totally corrupt and the money would never reach the people it is meant for, I would bet that the village would prefer to see the kids.

Corruption aside, a mission trip is a blessing to both the people being assisted and the missionaries. If you could give the money straight to the village, you will have eliminated to opportunity for the missionary students to receive blessing for their charitable work.

You also have to realize that money means nothing if you have no means to access the things that you need to buy. Small pox vaccines aren't exactly the kind of thing you can buy when you go into the one big city nearest to your village. And if you can, you will pay many times more for it than the missionary would pay to bring it to you.

Lastly, mission work provides a person-to-person experience that opens both the giver and the recipient to new worlds. Whether it's for the purpose of spreading the Word, or enhancing the good will of your country, you can change the way someone thinks about things by showing them that a real person cares enough about them to leave their comfortable life behind in order to make their life better.

So that's why I would rather give to the mission than give directly to the village.

leadfootlevi
03-09-2011, 01:26 PM
I've never gotten a letter like that, but this thread reminded me of this young man knocking on my door, showing me a picture of this adorable baby (saying it was his), talking about how he was from the inner city and doing this program (I forget the name of it) that helps develop business skills in inner-city kids, trying to raise money for college. He was selling magazine subscriptions. Overpriced magazines. When I declined he started talking about how some people just GIVE him money - a one-time donation. Even as little as $5. He was real smooth - a good talker. When I said no to that his whole tone changed. He said "You mean to tell me you can't even afford $5?" What nerve! I can toss a letter, but this guy made me nervous. For a minute I thought "Maybe I should just give him the $5 so he doesn't come back and harm me or my property" It was kind of scary.

*disgal*
03-09-2011, 01:31 PM
Well, considering that many mission trips are to areas where the governments are totally corrupt and the money would never reach the people it is meant for, I would bet that the village would prefer to see the kids.

Corruption aside, a mission trip is a blessing to both the people being assisted and the missionaries. If you could give the money straight to the village, you will have eliminated to opportunity for the missionary students to receive blessing for their charitable work.

You also have to realize that money means nothing if you have no means to access the things that you need to buy. Small pox vaccines aren't exactly the kind of thing you can buy when you go into the one big city nearest to your village. And if you can, you will pay many times more for it than the missionary would pay to bring it to you.

Lastly, mission work provides a person-to-person experience that opens both the giver and the recipient to new worlds. Whether it's for the purpose of spreading the Word, or enhancing the good will of your country, you can change the way someone thinks about things by showing them that a real person cares enough about them to leave their comfortable life behind in order to make their life better.

So that's why I would rather give to the mission than give directly to the village.

thank you, I was trying to say the same but you put it much better. :)

Ephany
03-09-2011, 01:51 PM
If you want to go on a trip, don't beg, find a way to earn the money. DD and I went out to eat at a local restaurant the other night and the bus boys were all 10-12 year olds and were bussing the tables to earn money for an upcoming trip for their youth group. I'm more than happy to help kids who are out there looking for ways to earn the money they need, but have no interest in helping those who want that money to be handed to them.

sk!mom
03-09-2011, 01:53 PM
Whether it's for the purpose of spreading the Word, or enhancing the good will of your country, you can change the way someone thinks about things by showing them that a real person cares enough about them to leave their comfortable life behind in order to make their life better.


I respect your belief and was raised in a religion that believes as you do. However, I still feel that if you want to go on these trips then you should pay your own way.

As I said upthread, my DD15 will go on a Mission Trip in June. I want her to have the experience of helping others who have much less than she does. I want her to continue to develop as a person who cares for others and the world around her. I just don't think that it's right to ask anyone else to pay for her trip.

In my experience, the person who gets the most out these trips is the Missionary, not those that they are helping.

The Pluto People
03-09-2011, 01:56 PM
Well, considering that many mission trips are to areas where the governments are totally corrupt and the money would never reach the people it is meant for, I would bet that the village would prefer to see the kids.

Corruption aside, a mission trip is a blessing to both the people being assisted and the missionaries. If you could give the money straight to the village, you will have eliminated to opportunity for the missionary students to receive blessing for their charitable work.

You also have to realize that money means nothing if you have no means to access the things that you need to buy. Small pox vaccines aren't exactly the kind of thing you can buy when you go into the one big city nearest to your village. And if you can, you will pay many times more for it than the missionary would pay to bring it to you.

Lastly, mission work provides a person-to-person experience that opens both the giver and the recipient to new worlds. Whether it's for the purpose of spreading the Word, or enhancing the good will of your country, you can change the way someone thinks about things by showing them that a real person cares enough about them to leave their comfortable life behind in order to make their life better.

So that's why I would rather give to the mission than give directly to the village.
High school kids are not going to be giving small pox vaccines. I think they are going to be ditch digging for a few hours a day before being bussed back to their hotel. Sight seeing is included. This girl's brother took a "missionary" trip to China. His pictures of the Great Wall were beautiful:laughing:. If you can afford to pad your college application this way then fine. But don't ask others to finance it for you. Perhaps she could give up her I phone and designer purses. :goodvibes

The Pluto People
03-09-2011, 01:57 PM
If you want to go on a trip, don't beg, find a way to earn the money. DD and I went out to eat at a local restaurant the other night and the bus boys were all 10-12 year olds and were bussing the tables to earn money for an upcoming trip for their youth group. I'm more than happy to help kids who are out there looking for ways to earn the money they need, but have no interest in helping those who want that money to be handed to them.

I agree!

RitaE
03-09-2011, 02:06 PM
I agree with the above. I have no problem with those youth mission trips and my son went on one. They did many good things, had a blast, and it was beneficial all around.

I strongly feel though that the entire process where the 15 to 20 kids or whatever came together, made a budget, planned how to earn the money ... and then paid the travel bill themselves was a HUGE part of their spiritual and emotional growth. I could have just wrote a check to pay for his part but I really think that if I had it would have taken something of the experience away from him.

That was HIS trip from start to beginning, at one point he was mowing 4 to 5 lawns a week. He cleaned out an old yucky basement for a Senior Citizen that was moving to a Condo, he served breakfast at the Church Sanctuary on Sunday mornings for tips. He was pretty much doing something to earn trip money every weekend for nearly a year.

There is a huge sense of pride that comes from knowing that not only did he do a Mission trip to help others, he actually did much more than just pack his suitcase, grab his sleeping bag, and show up.

crisi
03-09-2011, 03:47 PM
I'd rather get the letter than the person selling junk I don't want. You can say no to both. We usually do.

1hero2princesses
03-09-2011, 03:52 PM
My DH's cousin, a 23 year old adult, has twice sent out letters in the last 2 years asking for donations for his mission trip. His first time he wasn't even working and living at his parents house. He was literally sitting home, completely able bodied and asking his friends and family to fund his mission trips. Sorry but if you want to do something for charity then get your butt a job and fund it. And no, it was not because he could not get work, he had quit his job as a waiter because he didn't like it. He could have worked in a store, mcdonalds, starbucks somewhere to make money but it was easier to ask others for donations. Sorry totally not appropriate.

*disgal*
03-09-2011, 04:00 PM
I respect your belief and was raised in a religion that believes as you do. However, I still feel that if you want to go on these trips then you should pay your own way.

As I said upthread, my DD15 will go on a Mission Trip in June. I want her to have the experience of helping others who have much less than she does. I want her to continue to develop as a person who cares for others and the world around her. I just don't think that it's right to ask anyone else to pay for her trip.

In my experience, the person who gets the most out these trips is the Missionary, not those that they are helping.

well, I guess I don't understand why the person can't mail them out. You might not want to give and throw it in the trash, which is perfectly fine. The mission trip letters that I get are very well worded as not to give offense to anyone...they just give people the opportunity to give (or just pray) if they want.

But I really want to be mailed these letters, sometimes to have the privilege to give and other times to just be informed and pray.

People have the freedom to give and people have the freedom to throw it away. :)

crisi
03-09-2011, 04:05 PM
Regarding mission trips - our church doesn't do them. We do youth trips and we do service trips. We also do community trips (bike riding, camping). These are funded by church members and/or the participants - I wouldn't dream of raising funds for those sorts of things from people outside my denomination.

*disgal*
03-09-2011, 04:19 PM
Regarding mission trips - our church doesn't do them. We do youth trips and we do service trips. We also do community trips (bike riding, camping). These are funded by church members and/or the participants - I wouldn't dream of raising funds for those sorts of things from people outside my denomination.

yeah, those sort of trips are likely a lot less expensive than going overseas or something. I think that's great that your church does that. Sounds like a great opportunity. And I think sometimes we overlook what needs there are in our own backyard. :thumbsup2

Oh, and I just wanted to say that I in no way think someone shouldn't put some hard effort in if they want to go on a missions trip or whatever. On the contrary, I would require my child to do something to earn some money. I just also like to give since it's not unusual for these trips to be expensive. :)

IMALOVNDISNEY
03-09-2011, 04:36 PM
The teens in our Church have an annual trip they take with Fr. And they raise the money themselves by hosting a pasta supper night, a talent show Sell plants, have a tag sale. My point here is they have to work for this money. And they expect to as well. No one is just handing it to them. In my opinion it builds character. And makes them more appreciative of what has been accomplished.

Just to add to my previous post. Our office does still give to those children that are going on mission trips. Not all groups or Churches think like we do. So when any child/teen is willing to do for others we will always help.

crisi
03-09-2011, 04:42 PM
yeah, those sort of trips are likely a lot less expensive than going overseas or something. I think that's great that your church does that. Sounds like a great opportunity. And I think sometimes we overlook what needs there are in our own backyard. :thumbsup2

Oh, and I just wanted to say that I in no way think someone shouldn't put some hard effort in if they want to go on a missions trip or whatever. On the contrary, I would require my child to do something to earn some money. I just also like to give since it's not unusual for these trips to be expensive. :)

Well, our service trips have been known to be overseas. But they are self funded or funded through a UUSC grant. And the UUSC only raises money from UUs.

And they are service trips, not tours. i.e. I think the one being planned involves building homes in Guatemala. You fly in, you get on a bus, they drive you eight miles into the jungle, you work 14 hour days building better houses while living in a tent and eating corn mush, after eight days, you come back.

snow88
03-09-2011, 06:07 PM
I have friends who do mission work and I know how expensive those trips can be. I've helped with fundraisers and given donations. Stuff like People to People...well unless you are a close relative, I won't help financially. My niece did People to People twice as a "sports ambassador". She sent out the letters, explaining that this was a "once-in-a-lifetime" opportunity and asked for donations or for people to purchase items required for the trip. The first time I bought her first aid kit. The second time I don't think I donated anything. I won't fund two "once-in-a-lifetime" trips in less than 2 years, even if you're my niece and I love you!

I worked my brain off to get good grades to be eligible to study abroad, was selected from a small pool of students to go to university in England, and paid my own way. It was a wonderful trip, hugely educational, and I don't regret going for a moment. I think the experience meant more to me because I had to work for it rather than it being given to me.

As a teacher I'm constantly getting "invitations" to select students for various awards and trips, all that cost the student several thousand dollars to attend. I could write down the names of every student in my school, they would get a letter saying they were "specially chosen" to represent XYZ, and only had to raise $3,000 to attend this educational trip to DC or where ever. It's really quite crazy. I want to recognize my deserving students, but not when it will cost them thousands of dollars!

Both of my sons got these letters about being "specially chosen" with a deadline like 2 weeks away. For my oldest son, I eventually got sponsorship from our local bank but for my other son, the letter was sent to the wrong address and the deadline had passed so I was unable to do anything. It's not only the attendance, the airfare was expensive as well.

snow88
03-09-2011, 06:23 PM
I haven't gotten any letters instead we have fundraisers like talent shows (medical bills), washing cars (church groups), food sales (most popular & everyone does it), etc.

The school has some sponsorships like for walk-a-thons, etc. I really don't like those because the parents have them @ the shops or wherever they work and you feel guilty for not signing up.

MoniqueU
03-09-2011, 06:24 PM
My kids have asked for donations and we donate to others who are rundraising as well. Once my kids are off on their own I hope to be in a far better position to donate even more to friends and family that are raising money for any kind of trip or extracuricular. I am happy when any child gets to have a life changing experience!