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View Full Version : How secure are kids clubs? Is ID required for pick up?


ShyMiss
01-15-2011, 01:44 PM
Our kids will be 9 & 12 but I am a bit of an overprotective parent. :rolleyes:
So I am wondering how secure the clubs are. Will the CMs make sure the kids stay in their clubs until DH & I come to pick them up? Do we have to show ID or KTW card to pick them up? Despite their ages, I don't want my kiddos randomly coming and going or being picked up by a stranger :scared1:. I know I am over the top (I could see myself sneaking in their luggage when they go off to college lol JK) but I appreciate any info you can give.
TIA

mom2brooke76
01-15-2011, 01:46 PM
They require a password that you give them when you register your child that you must give them to pick your child up.:thumbsup2

ShyMiss
01-15-2011, 01:51 PM
Thanks for your response. Do you know if they require the password for picking up the tweens from the edge as well?
Thanks again. :)

stephent92
01-15-2011, 01:54 PM
As far as I am aware the Tween areas are supervised but not 'secure'. This means that there is no sign in/ out - the kids just come and go as they wish.

drparoo
01-15-2011, 02:04 PM
If you want to have someone securely sign your 9 year old out, say so. That age is old enough, though, for you to "allow" them to sign themselves out, which it doesn't sound like you're comfortable with anyway and that's fine. If they do sign themselves out, though, you can request the CM's to send you a message telling you your child has left the club. Your 12 year old will have the freedom to come and go from the tween club. If you don't like that, you're going to have to set rules with him/her yourself.....like that she has to message you where she's going or message you to come pick her up. Now might be a good time to work at letting him/her have that freedom. It's safe, and it would make him/her feel more independent. Chances are that all of their friends will have that freedom.

scootch
01-15-2011, 02:10 PM
It's safe, and it would make him/her feel more independent. Chances are that all of their friends will have that freedom.

While is a fairly safe environment, it is not foolproof, there are 4000 people on this cruise and while we would all like to believe nothing can happen, it can. A kid could get taken to someones stateroom and it has happened on cruises. With the wave phones, I would set up that your 12 year old has to call you when they leave. That is what we are doing. You could even have them stay there till you arrive.

Your 9 year old you can feel very safe. You can mark that they cannot sign themselves out and each time you pick them up you have to give your code word.

drparoo
01-15-2011, 02:20 PM
While is a fairly safe environment, it is not foolproof, there are 4000 people on this cruise and while we would all like to believe nothing can happen, it can. A kid could get taken to someones stateroom and it has happened on cruises. With the wave phones, I would set up that your 12 year old has to call you when they leave. That is what we are doing. You could even have them stay there till you arrive.

Your 9 year old you can feel very safe. You can mark that they cannot sign themselves out and each time you pick them up you have to give your code word.

I never said it was foolproof, of course, and I would never be so naive to think nothing can happen. It's an individual decision. Years ago, my 12 year old asked to sign himself out because the other kids his age could and he felt like he should be able to, too. Our rules were that he was never to go into anyone's cabin. Ever. This past cruise my daughter was 12 and we had the same rules. It's safer than letting them walk to the bus stop, really, where a car can grab them and drive off. On the boat, if anyone sees a child struggling to be pulled into a room, someone will see and hear and there is no getting away.

Of course, the world has risks. Only we can decide what is best for our kids. I'm not judging either way, just speaking from experience when my first son felt that at 12 he was old enough to sign himself out.

It's nice to have the wave phones now to help communication.

2infinityandbeyond
01-15-2011, 03:57 PM
I don't want my kiddos randomly coming and going or being picked up by a stranger

Hopefully, 9 and 12 year olds are able to recognize the difference between their parent and a stranger, and would know not to leave with someone they don't know.

stephent92
01-15-2011, 04:28 PM
This is not a reply to the OP, but a general IMO! :cool1:

Controlled risk is a very important part in child development. Children must be free to make choices and assess risk on their own. If they don't, cognitive development will be hindered.

There is countless theory out there that demonstrates this,from the very basic 'scaffolding approach' to the more modern 'assessment of danger' theory. Bottom line is, if you don't give children elements of freedom when growing up, their will be problems.

I have been a long time visitor of this website, and I have visited many others regarding child education (I am a teacher). The one thing that gets me more than anything is our fear of strangers and/ or paedophiles. Now, don't get me wrong we should be aware of the danger but we must assess how big a danger this is. Your child is more likely to suffer a major injury leading to death or permanent disfigurement/ injury during play than be abducted by a paedophile.

What I am trying to say is we need to balance risk. Children need to have the opportunity to make choices and be with peers - but we don't want them hanging around street corners at midnight doing this. IMO, a cruise ship is a good place to give a child freedom, perhaps test their ability to make choices.

One of the funny things we hear a lot is "the world was a much safer place when I was a child!" Erm, no it wasn't! The major difference is we hear so much more nowadays through constant media coverage, 'shock' stories and all. There are no more Paedophiles about today than when you were a child!

I think parents can become a bit blinded to the world too - and I completely understand why. Your child is the most important thing ever to you - you will do anything to protect them. What you shouldn't do is take away their childhood whilst doing it. You read so much on here about children being 'mature', 'advanced for their age' etc. I am sure if you asked every parent, at least every other would say that this is the case about their child. Almost every parent of every child I have taught, coached or looked after has said this. It is sad to say, however, that so many of these "advanced" children have so much trouble being a child....

Sorry, rant over!