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eeyorefanuk
09-11-2009, 03:07 AM
There will be eight of us going on the free DDP

I have noted that if table of 6 of more then 18% tip will be added !

If for example we booked two tables of four, then how much tip will automatically be added?

Was trying to work out at 18% what it would cost for the 21 days and panicking cost at least thousand maybe two??

wideeyes
09-11-2009, 03:33 AM
between 15-18%, so depends on the cost of your meal. For a meal for 2 adults and 1 child we usually tipped anywhere between $7-$15.

At Disney they actually have on the bill the suggested tip at 15% & 18% .

wayneg
09-11-2009, 03:41 AM
You could book on 2 different reservations but if they know you are together the will deliberately put you as far away from each other as poss. We dined last Easter an a family tried to get around it, no idea what they had said to get seated but they when the server realized what they were trying to do the family were asked to go back outside and wait for the correct sized tables(even though the ones they were at were OK)
Based on our spend last month I would estimate 18% for 8 over 21 days at around $1,000 if you are on regular dining plan with a tables service every evening.
Thankfully as there are only 3 of us we could tip what we wanted, probably was close to 18% (some more, some less) but I hate being told what to add.

iluvtot
09-11-2009, 03:45 AM
between 15-18%, so depends on the cost of your meal. For a meal for 2 adults and 1 child we usually tipped anywhere between $7-$15.

At Disney they actually have on the bill the suggested tip at 15% & 18%
.


Just back, the suggested amounts are now calculated at 18% and 20%!!!
Our last meal at Tutto Italia, us and the kids, (but 5 adult meals), no extra's on DDP, the tip was $45!!!:scared1:

Jules x

wayneg
09-11-2009, 03:45 AM
At Disney they actually have on the bill the suggested tip at 15% & 18% .

They have now increased it to 18% & 20%.

ford family
09-11-2009, 03:49 AM
In the same way that you would expect to add 10% to a restaurant bill in the UK you would be expected to add 20% in Florida.

In WDW we use the TIW card which automatically adds 18% but we add a little extra for really good service

ford family

eeyorefanuk
09-11-2009, 03:50 AM
Do you have to pay the 20%???

Also do you have to pay it at restaurants outside disney??

Have not been florida for 20 years :scared1: so cannot remember.

Did not count this into the cost when working out if free dining was worth it :scared1:

eeyorefanuk
09-11-2009, 03:53 AM
So if for example there was four of us, rather than eight, does that mean you can choose how much you tip???

iluvtot
09-11-2009, 04:00 AM
....Thankfully as there are only 3 of us we could tip what we wanted, probably was close to 18% (some more, some less) but I hate being told what to add.

Although there was 5 of us, we still ended up paying the 20%, regardless of the service! I think it was:-
a) because it was written down, and as the difference was only perhaps at most a couple of dollars, it looked mean not to put the higher amount
b) we took our Fairfx card, and only had a minimal amount of dollars, so everything went on our card. The only problem was that you actually had to write the amount of tip down,they would take the bill away, and then bring back an ammended bill with just the tip amount on it for you to sign! It just looked really tight not to put the full 20%!
In retrospect, we have decided that next time we will take more dollars, and leave tips in cash; then there isn't that pressure, as you can leave immediately!!:)

Jules x

wideeyes
09-11-2009, 04:24 AM
So if for example there was four of us, rather than eight, does that mean you can choose how much you tip???

It is meant to be a "suggested tip" and I wouldn't ever tip under 15% personally unless service is bad though I tip 15% here too so just habit.

TBH I don't do alot of Table service at WDW now as I can't afford to add on loads for tips and the onces I do book I factor in the tip so will book places where they have cheaper items on the menu and skip dessert and get it from a CS on the way back.:rotfl: (I sound so cheap , I don't go with a lot of spending money and every $ counts for me, my DD only got a little teddy for $5 last year as only had money for for food and no extras:rotfl:.)

Elise79
09-11-2009, 05:52 AM
Do you have to pay the 20%???

Also do you have to pay it at restaurants outside disney??

Have not been florida for 20 years :scared1: so cannot remember.

Did not count this into the cost when working out if free dining was worth it :scared1:

You will need to tip wherever you eat not just Disney. It is US custom to tip a minimum of 15% of all meals where you have a server. 20% for good service and this needs to be budgeted for. If you can't afford then stick to counter service meals.

Please remember part of a servers income is from their tips and that they are taxed on assumed tips. They also have a lower minimum wage.

Personally I always tip to the nearest whole dollar and usually around 20%. You tip on the pre-tax amount.

We will be a party of 7 this time so they will add the 18% to the bill and I will just pay to the next dollar in cash.

BTW if your service is REALLY bad and you don't think they have earned their tip you can request to speak to a manager and have it reduced. It is still a gratuity so is optional although expected.

iluvtot
09-11-2009, 06:00 AM
Do you have to pay the 20%???

Also do you have to pay it at restaurants outside disney??

Have not been florida for 20 years :scared1: so cannot remember.

Did not count this into the cost when working out if free dining was worth it :scared1:


As we had the DDP, we only ate outside the once in Celebration, and that was only snacks. However, I didn't feel as pressured as in Disney. Our server was very good. I managed to spill my drink over dd's banana cream pie.:eek: She helped me clear up the spill, and bought me back another drink, and DD another pie,and didn't charge us.It wasn't that expensive either, and 20% came in about $8, so I made it up to $10 Last year though when we were eating offsite more, we would tip 15%

Another factor that affects the tip is the price of the meal! We were trying the more expensive options that we probably wouldn't have gone for had we been paying for the meals, and not on the DDP. eg, at the Sci-fi dine in, we would probably have gone for burgers had we been footing the bill ourselves, but instead we tried the shrimp pasta(at I think $21.99). This pushed the price of the bill up, and subsequently the tip!Didn't particularly like the pasta either, but then it's all experience!
Also, we very rarely have dessert at home, or maybe share,but were having one each because it was included! Bearing in mind the desserts alone were $5+, that was an additional $25 we were having to tip on.

Jules x

wideeyes
09-11-2009, 06:46 AM
Also a glass of wine or a cocktail can cost around $10 and a beer around $6 do this will also add quite abit to the tip.

EvertonCJ
09-11-2009, 07:06 AM
There will be eight of us going on the free DDP

I have noted that if table of 6 of more then 18% tip will be added !

If for example we booked two tables of four, then how much tip will automatically be added?

Was trying to work out at 18% what it would cost for the 21 days and panicking cost at least thousand maybe two??

We recently visited as a party of 6 on the free DDP and automatically had 18% added to our bill regardless of the service. I am with Wayne on this in that I hate being told that you must do this before you even sit down. It was particularly frustrating at the self service buffets such as Chef Mickeys and Crystal Palace where you have to collect your own food. I did ask a waitress at the ESPN bar if they get to keep all of the tip and she did say yes. When we visited the Yachtsman's Steakhouse our 18% tip was 60 dollars. We calculated that the waiter was earning at least 600 dollars a night just in tips. Not bad money if you can get it.

Chilly
09-11-2009, 07:25 AM
We recently visited as a party of 6 on the free DDP and automatically had 18% added to our bill regardless of the service. I am with Wayne on this in that I hate being told that you must do this before you even sit down. It was particularly frustrating at the self service buffets such as Chef Mickeys and Crystal Palace where you have to collect your own food. I did ask a waitress at the ESPN bar if they get to keep all of the tip and she did say yes. When we visited the Yachtsman's Steakhouse our 18% tip was 60 dollars. We calculated that the waiter was earning at least 600 dollars a night just in tips. Not bad money if you can get it.

They do get taxed on their tips.

EvertonCJ
09-11-2009, 07:36 AM
They do get taxed on their tips.

I get taxed on my earnings also.:sad1: But even after tax it is still a pretty good job, particularly at the top restaurants.

OrlandoMagic
09-11-2009, 07:58 AM
They do get taxed on their tips.

Even after tax thats a lot more than I earn!

Im another one who is against suggested tipping. If my server wants a 18-20% tip then I expect 1st class service. If my service is below par then the tip is ajusted accordingly!

Andy, Lou & Meg
09-11-2009, 08:09 AM
We had the same problem when we we there a few weeks ago.

We dined a many restaurants including Yachtsman, Cal Grill right down to Chef Mickeys.

Now we are not poor tippers but think about it, when we went to Yachtsman our suggested "tip" was $39. Now if you were at a restaurant at home would you tip in the region of 23 for a family of 3. No I didnt think so either.

Personally I feel that you should only tip for the items that you actually pay for (if you are on free dining). At the end of the day I work hard for my money and dont feel we should be dictated to by Disney or anybody else how much we tip. Tipping is just that. Its a perk.

Sorry for the rant but I think that $1000 is alot of money to spend on "tipping", especially as previously commented on the buffet meals.

I spoke to my boss who is American and told he this and he was amazed. He said Americans tradtionally tip between 10-15% for excellent service so Disney is trying to take advantage.

I have certainly learnt my lesson and will not tip anywhere near what I was this year - good service or not. Waiters at signature restaurants must be earning a small fortune. Maybe I shoud think about a change in career!!!

Chilly
09-11-2009, 08:21 AM
I only ever tip 15%

iluvtot
09-11-2009, 08:30 AM
We had the same problem when we we there a few weeks ago.

We dined a many restaurants including Yachtsman, Cal Grill right down to Chef Mickeys.

Now we are not poor tippers but think about it, when we went to Yachtsman our suggested "tip" was $39. Now if you were at a restaurant at home would you tip in the region of 23 for a family of 3. No I didnt think so either.

Personally I feel that you should only tip for the items that you actually pay for (if you are on free dining). At the end of the day I work hard for my money and dont feel we should be dictated to by Disney or anybody else how much we tip. Tipping is just that. Its a perk.

Sorry for the rant but I think that $1000 is alot of money to spend on "tipping", especially as previously commented on the buffet meals.

I spoke to my boss who is American and told he this and he was amazed. He said Americans tradtionally tip between 10-15% for excellent service so Disney is trying to take advantage.

I have certainly learnt my lesson and will not tip anywhere near what I was this year - good service or not. Waiters at signature restaurants must be earning a small fortune. Maybe I shoud think about a change in career!!!

I was talking to SIL about this, and she said that the tips are an expected as they make up most of their wages. Also, the tip is not just for the server, but for the person who takes you to your table, and also the person who takes your order! She said Disney only pays them $1 or $2 an hour:confused3
Not sure if this is true, but if so that means we're subbing DISNEY!!

Jules x

Chuck S
09-11-2009, 08:56 AM
Restaurant Server minimum wage in the US is $2.13 an hour. Tips make up the rest of their income. You are not "subsidizing" Disney, that is the norm nation wide.

The normal restaurant gratuity in the US is 15%, 20% for outstanding service. In many restaurants, those tips are shared with the greeter/seater, bus persons and other staff. This is not a new practice.

I'm actualy surprised there isn't a mandatory 18% added to all DDP meals, regardless of the number of diners. Disney does this with the TiW card, even if only one person is dining.

It is also common practice throughout the US to add a mandatory tip to parties of 6 to 8 people of more.

wayneg
09-11-2009, 09:08 AM
Restaurant Server minimum wage in the US is $2.13 an hour. Tips make up the rest of their income. You are not "subsidizing" Disney, that is the norm nation wide.


I understand the national minimum wage for tipped employees is $2.13 but was reading this site that says Florida is $4.23, is Disney exempt from this or am I reading incorrectly? http://www.dol.gov/esa/whd/state/tipped.htm#Florida

Chuck S
09-11-2009, 10:00 AM
I understand the national minimum wage for tipped employees is $2.13 but was reading this site that says Florida is $4.23, is Disney exempt from this or am I reading incorrectly? http://www.dol.gov/esa/whd/state/tipped.htm#Florida

US States can over-ride the US minmimum wage law, if it increases the minimum allowed wage. Apparently, Florida says that tipped employees must be paid a minimum of $4.23, with a $3.02 offset, vs the US law with a $2.13 minimum and $5.12 offset.

Basically, the US law says that the servers are paid $2.13, and the employer assumes that another $5.12 will be made in tips. The Florida law says the employer has to pay $4.23 and assumes another $3.02 will be made in tips.

$4.23 per hour still isn't enough to live on, for a full time server it is just under $8,800 per year in an area where renting or owning a home is expensive, and homeowners insurance is ridiculous.

wayneg
09-11-2009, 10:36 AM
$4.23 per hour still isn't enough to live on, for a full time server it is just under $8,800 per year in an area where renting or owning a home is expensive, and homeowners insurance is ridiculous.

I fully agree and don't mind tipping for good service. Sometimes I wish it was included in the menu price so us that do tip are not subsidizing others that don't, would they need to ask for 18-20% if everyone tipped a fair amount? but then quality of service would no doubt suffer if no tips. So complicated:rotfl:

Lizzybear
09-11-2009, 12:15 PM
We usually tip 15% on the total inc. tax (you can just tip on the pre tax amount) and round it up to the next dollar. If the suggested amount on DDP is 18% we'll just tip that. I suppose tipping does add up but we just factor it into the cost of the meal in the US.

scojos
09-11-2009, 01:27 PM
I fully agree and don't mind tipping for good service. Sometimes I wish it was included in the menu price so us that do tip are not subsidizing others that don't, would they need to ask for 18-20% if everyone tipped a fair amount? but then quality of service would no doubt suffer if no tips. So complicated:rotfl:
i totally agree, however arent all wdw staff (shop, mousekeeping etc) paid the same amount? why then are some staff picking up tips and not others...
i tip what the service was worth and not what is on the sheet, yes sometimes its more, sometimes its less, but thats my choice. i shouldnt have to sub others...
i would also add that why i cant complain about my salary (hey of my local lea are reading this more would be nice:rotfl2:) i also know there are people on here who save for years to pay for a speacial holiday, and i totally agree that id rather spent my $2000 on something else.
could there not just be a "global" cover charge for service with the ddp?
we ll be 5 adults next year, and a grand on tips will not an option, as much as id like to help these people - i apologise in adavnce, next trip i wont be leaving more than $15 for excellent service whatever the meal costs- i just cant afford it.
Tracyxx

wayneg
09-11-2009, 01:33 PM
i totally agree, however arent all wdw staff (shop, mousekeeping etc) paid the same amount? why then are some staff picking up tips and not others...


Servers in restaurants are classes as tipped employees, and as previously said on the minimum wage Disney are allowed to pay. Other positions are not like mousekeeping and shop staff, they get a salary. Some people tip mousekeeping but its not strictly a tipped position.

scojos
09-11-2009, 01:55 PM
Servers in restaurants are classes as tipped employees, and as previously said on the minimum wage Disney are allowed to pay. Other positions are not like mousekeeping and shop staff, they get a salary. Some people tip mousekeeping but its not strictly a tipped position.

so mousekeeping are better off than others?? that said i wouldnt want to do their job....:rolleyes1

Chuck S
09-11-2009, 02:48 PM
so mousekeeping are better off than others?? that said i wouldnt want to do their job....:rolleyes1

The minimum wage for non-tipped positions, including housekeeping, shop personnel, etc., is $7.25 per hour. Some may make more than others if they are in supervisory positions or have a lot of years with the company.

iluvtot
09-11-2009, 02:57 PM
Restaurant Server minimum wage in the US is $2.13 an hour. Tips make up the rest of their income. You are not "subsidizing" Disney, that is the norm nation wide.

The normal restaurant gratuity in the US is 15%, 20% for outstanding service. In many restaurants, those tips are shared with the greeter/seater, bus persons and other staff. This is not a new practice.

I'm actualy surprised there isn't a mandatory 18% added to all DDP meals, regardless of the number of diners. Disney does this with the TiW card, even if only one person is dining.

It is also common practice throughout the US to add a mandatory tip to parties of 6 to 8 people of more.

So sorry, I didn't mean to offend anyone, was meant to be tongue in cheek; but if the restuarant is only paying $2.13ph, then they are expecting diners to make up the salary; and as Disney actually specify an expected figure...... or am I reading this wrong? We did always pay 20%, and usually rounded it up, but I think it's wrong to be made to feel uncomfortable.....
Incidently, I was out with friends on Wed, one of whom works in a Harvester, and she was gobsmacked when I said how much we had been paying in tips!!

Chuck S
09-11-2009, 03:28 PM
So sorry, I didn't mean to offend anyone, was meant to be tongue in cheek; but if the restuarant is only paying $2.13ph, then they are expecting diners to make up the salary; and as Disney actually specify an expected figure...... or am I reading this wrong? We did always pay 20%, and usually rounded it up, but I think it's wrong to be made to feel uncomfortable.....
Incidently, I was out with friends on Wed, one of whom works in a Harvester, and she was gobsmacked when I said how much we had been paying in tips!!
No offense taken.

Disney has always suggested tip amounts, they put them on the receipt now. Before they had cards, in several languages, stating it is customary to tip servers 15% to 20%.

Different cultures around the globe pay their servers differently, and do not rely on tips. Some may not know that tip make up the majority of the servers wage, and they pay taxes on those estimate tips, whether or not they actually receive the estimated amount on tips.

In Canada, for example, tipping is far less, as the servers are paid better.

And it really isn't uncommon to have 18% actually added to the bill for the gratuity in the US, Disney does it for almost all discounted meals, including employee discounts and Tables in Wonderland discounts. Most restaurants nation-wide add an 18% gratuity automatically if you have 6 to 8 persons in your party.

As far as the normal "paid" DDP, I think most International travelers are comparing it to an "all-inclusive" thing, while most Americans try to consider it a discount package. It really is neither. It is a convenience package, it may or may not save you $ based upon your normal dining habits.

As far as the Free DDP, you really kind of have to look at it as a room discount, not an all-inclusive.

Lizzybear
09-12-2009, 02:33 AM
As far as the Free DDP, you really kind of have to look at it as a room discount, not an all-inclusive.

I agree with this. For us it's pretty much how we would eat anyway (2 meals and 1 snack a day) so I can't imagine any of the public room discounts would work out cheaper, though for others this may well be the case. Even with the tip factored in we'd still pay more per night for accomodation, entertainment and food in many other destinations in Europe and even in the US.

virginflyer
09-12-2009, 04:15 AM
When in Rome, do as the Romans do is very apt for this subject.

We are not in the UK when we eat at Disney World, so there is no use comparing how much a server may earn in in both countries, nor would I ever begrudge anyone earning a good wage and being successful. Why do we do that in the UK?

One of the things we always comment on our return to the UK is how good the service industry is in the U.S. and how we wish ours could be like that. Personally I wish the UK would adopt the US way of dining/serving/tipping.

As someone else mentioned, that $600 they may earn on a good night might be $100 on a slow night, then after sharing it with other co-workers you are looking at figures that are more like a regular wage.

Yes, we may be paying over the odds for tips at Disney, but guess what? The whole of Disney and the Orlando area is a tourist trap and a huge profit making machine. We know this before we go.

iluvtot
09-12-2009, 04:59 AM
No offense taken.

Disney has always suggested tip amounts, they put them on the receipt now. Before they had cards, in several languages, stating it is customary to tip servers 15% to 20%.

Different cultures around the globe pay their servers differently, and do not rely on tips. Some may not know that tip make up the majority of the servers wage, and they pay taxes on those estimate tips, whether or not they actually receive the estimated amount on tips.

In Canada, for example, tipping is far less, as the servers are paid better.

And it really isn't uncommon to have 18% actually added to the bill for the gratuity in the US, Disney does it for almost all discounted meals, including employee discounts and Tables in Wonderland discounts. Most restaurants nation-wide add an 18% gratuity automatically if you have 6 to 8 persons in your party.

As far as the normal "paid" DDP, I think most International travelers are comparing it to an "all-inclusive" thing, while most Americans try to consider it a discount package. It really is neither. It is a convenience package, it may or may not save you $ based upon your normal dining habits.

As far as the Free DDP, you really kind of have to look at it as a room discount, not an all-inclusive.

Hi,
That's very interesting to know. We actually found the DDP worked well for us, and we didn't spend as much as we usually do! We have now worked out that our tips were high because we used the DDP to try the more expensive dishes that we probably wouldn't have gone for had we been paying for them! We now have a better idea of what to expect, and have already decided to play it differently (some of the time!) on our next visit. We've never been on an all inclusive hol before, so can't make the comparison.
I really don't object to paying a tip, I expect to pay the 'norm', but it's the fact that Disney actually quote 2 'suggested' amounts and then I feel really uncomfortable, and compelled to pay the higher amount! I know it's only a couple of dollars, but it's the principle! There is the argument that then you don't have to get your calculator out at the table,:) but why don't they just quote 18%, or just add 18% (as you said) and then it's sorted! Most people would just make it up to the highest dollar anyway!
Jules x

eeyorefanuk
09-12-2009, 05:27 AM
Originally we were going to stay in a villa, but then the free dining came up.

We thought great, stay on site and have free dining (even though in effect it came out around the same what we budgeted for eating if staying in a villa).

As Iluvtot says though, we were looking forward to having a few "nice" meals as they were included, but not sure now if will be able to do so, because the cost of meals will be much dearer, therefore making the tip more expensive.

I am beginning to wonder whether I should have stuck to the villa :sad2:

eeyorefanuk
09-12-2009, 05:29 AM
Can I ask then.

Spirit of Aloha Dinner

""Adult Dinner Show Menu - Family Style Feast: Tropical mixed greens with mango poppyseed dressing, pineapple coconut bread, sweet golden pineapple, Islando BBQ pork ribs, Lanoi roasted chicken, Polynesian rice, fresh seasonal veggies and Kilauea Volcano Delight Dessert. Presented in an open air theater, and; therefore may cancel due to inclement weather. - $59.99""

Will that mean we pay 18% tip of the 59.99???

Thanks :goodvibes

wayneg
09-12-2009, 05:34 AM
Will that mean we pay 18% tip of the 59.99???

Thanks :goodvibes

No, For Dinner shows everything is included, food, alcohol and Gratuity. They cost 2 credits if on DDP

howlongtillsummer?
09-12-2009, 05:40 AM
And Cinderalla's Royal Table - we found this out after we had been twice and tipped twice! Whoops.

eeyorefanuk
09-12-2009, 05:50 AM
http://www.wdwinfo.com/disney-dining-plan.htm

the disney dining plan and signature restaurant and show column - would all of these be two TS and free gratuity?? :goodvibes

wayneg
09-12-2009, 05:52 AM
http://www.wdwinfo.com/disney-dining-plan.htm

the disney dining plan and signature restaurant and show column - would all of these be two TS and free gratuity?? :goodvibes

No, Signature restaurants do not include gratuity.

iluvtot
09-12-2009, 05:53 AM
Can I ask then.

Spirit of Aloha Dinner

""Adult Dinner Show Menu - Family Style Feast: Tropical mixed greens with mango poppyseed dressing, pineapple coconut bread, sweet golden pineapple, Islando BBQ pork ribs, Lanoi roasted chicken, Polynesian rice, fresh seasonal veggies and Kilauea Volcano Delight Dessert. Presented in an open air theater, and; therefore may cancel due to inclement weather. - $59.99""

Will that mean we pay 18% tip of the 59.99???

Thanks :goodvibes

Hi,
no, don't panic! Gratuity is included! We did this, as we thought it was something we probably wouldn't pay oop for.
As it happened, the weather was torrential! I was ringing from about 6pm to find out what was going on, as we were at OKW, and we had to make our way by the buses as drinks were included so DH didn't want to drive!
Eventually at 7.30 they decided to go ahead, even though it was still raining. They took our name, as I said we would be late, and when we arrived, we had a really good table! Server was good, so actually left $10 tip, (and he even told me the tip was included).
It was a good night, (food was nice, though kids didn't like the dessert!) but glad we didn't have to pay the $300+ it would've cost us if we weren't on the DP! One tip, the rose wine is horrible!! DH was OK because he had Bud's, but the rose was warm, (even tried adding ice) and very, very dry!
As for you enjoying the meals, go for it! If you book a few of the more expensive ones, then the tips will be high, but balance them with some more reasonable ones. That's what we will do next time. Also, you could just share desserts, instead of having one each, they are $5+ each, so bump up the tip. They are huge anyway!:)

Jules x

wideeyes
09-12-2009, 06:03 AM
I have seen service charge added over here in the UK too for some places for large parties too.

Also a few who add a service charge to the bill and you have to ask them to adjust or remove it if you don't want to pay it, so atleast Dinsey don't do that.

EvertonCJ
09-12-2009, 06:19 AM
When in Rome, do as the Romans do is very apt for this subject.

We are not in the UK when we eat at Disney World, so there is no use comparing how much a server may earn in in both countries, nor would I ever begrudge anyone earning a good wage and being successful. Why do we do that in the UK?

One of the things we always comment on our return to the UK is how good the service industry is in the U.S. and how we wish ours could be like that. Personally I wish the UK would adopt the US way of dining/serving/tipping.

As someone else mentioned, that $600 they may earn on a good night might be $100 on a slow night, then after sharing it with other co-workers you are looking at figures that are more like a regular wage.
Yes, we may be paying over the odds for tips at Disney, but guess what? The whole of Disney and the Orlando area is a tourist trap and a huge profit making machine. We know this before we go.

Do Disney ever have a quiet night? I would imagine the vast majority of the table service restaurants at Disney are fully booked every night of the year. The whole concept of tipping a given %, wherever you are in the world, just seems very strange. If I order a steak at the Yachtsmans Steakhouse I end up paying a bigger tip than if I ordered chicken. Have I really had better service by ordering a steak? To tip a waiter 60 dollars for maybe 90 minutes work, when they have been in contact with you for maybe 10 minutes, just seems very disproportionate to what they have done. If a fixed fee was paid as a tip every time this would be much fairer. This would mean that the staff who worked at the less expensive restaurants would not be penalised by the fact that the food on their menu is cheaper and also larger families would not have to fork out enormous tips all the time.

howlongtillsummer?
09-12-2009, 06:32 AM
That is a well made point.

Chuck S
09-12-2009, 07:56 AM
Do Disney ever have a quiet night? I would imagine the vast majority of the table service restaurants at Disney are fully booked every night of the year. The whole concept of tipping a given %, wherever you are in the world, just seems very strange. If I order a steak at the Yachtsmans Steakhouse I end up paying a bigger tip than if I ordered chicken. Have I really had better service by ordering a steak? To tip a waiter 60 dollars for maybe 90 minutes work, when they have been in contact with you for maybe 10 minutes, just seems very disproportionate to what they have done. If a fixed fee was paid as a tip every time this would be much fairer. This would mean that the staff who worked at the less expensive restaurants would not be penalised by the fact that the food on their menu is cheaper and also larger families would not have to fork out enormous tips all the time.

Well, that is an interesting thought...but tipping here in the US has traditionally always been based upon a percentage of the meal price. Many would say that then there is not reward for providing higher quality service, so ultimately service would decline. In some cases that would likely happen, given human nature, but I think most servers would offer the same service if there was a set price per diner for the gratuity. Yet another way of looking at it, is why should a server make the same per person amount at a table that just orders appetizers or drinks versus a table that orders appetizers, entree, beverages, alcohol, and dessert? More work is involved, so the gratuity shoul be more...basing the gratuity upon the cost of the meal does address that aspect.

EvertonCJ
09-12-2009, 08:32 AM
Well, that is an interesting thought...but tipping here in the US has traditionally always been based upon a percentage of the meal price. Many would say that then there is not reward for providing higher quality service, so ultimately service would decline. In some cases that would likely happen, given human nature, but I think most servers would offer the same service if there was a set price per diner for the gratuity. Yet another way of looking at it, is why should a server make the same per person amount at a table that just orders appetizers or drinks versus a table that orders appetizers, entree, beverages, alcohol, and dessert? More work is involved, so the gratuity shoul be more...basing the gratuity upon the cost of the meal does address that aspect.
Fair point, Chuck. But is it fair for a family that has spent a great deal of money on appetisers, entree, beverages, alcohol and dessert (pudding) to be rewarded by being asked to contribute a further 60 dollars.:confused3 I know there is no fair way of tipping where everybody is happy and we could debate this topic for hours.

Chuck S
09-12-2009, 08:52 AM
Fair point, Chuck. But is it fair for a family that has spent a great deal of money on appetisers, entree, beverages, alcohol and dessert (pudding) to be rewarded by being asked to contribute a further 60 dollars.:confused3 I know there is no fair way of tipping where everybody is happy and we could debate this topic for hours.

It is simply a part of the cost of table service dining in the US, and foreign travelers should plan accordingly. It isn't always fair, it is what it is.

mitchfishguard
09-13-2009, 01:55 AM
i feel that many of us brits cant get past 2 things. the first is, if you order fillet steak, you tip more than if you order sirloin. and if you order chicken you tip a lot less. that is why i and i think many others tip a set cash amount as a thank-you. its because we dont get the above point. the second point is, if you leave NO tip and your pre-tax bill is $100, how much income tax does the server have to pay on that specific transaction? dont give the percentage, give the figure in dollars and cents. if youre very clear about the dollar amount, im sure that it will educate us brits far better than hedging on percentages and suggested tipamounts etc. if we leave a 4 dollar tip on a $100 meal and its costing the server hard money, well we need to be told so we can do the right thing. in dollars and cents. none wants to cost a server money, not intentionally

Pootle
09-13-2009, 02:37 AM
It is simply a part of the cost of table service dining in the US, and foreign travelers should plan accordingly. It isn't always fair, it is what it is.

I totally agree and find these threads depressing. 'When in Rome .....' and all that.

Lizzybear
09-13-2009, 03:41 AM
I totally agree and find these threads depressing. 'When in Rome .....' and all that.

I agree. If people don't agree with tipping 15% or above or can't afford to then don't eat at a table service restaurant every night. Even the terms of free dining say that gratuity isn't included and therefore should be budgeted for.
If someone is a server full-time and supporting a family then why shouldn't they be able to earn a good wage? I think part of the reason service in restaurants is usually better in the US is because serving is a viable career option, more so than over here (I know there are some exceptions, our favourite local restaurant being one of them ;))

Elise79
09-13-2009, 04:25 AM
I totally agree and find these threads depressing. 'When in Rome .....' and all that.
Agree 100% - it really annoys me as we would get upset if someone came over here and didn't follow our customs.

I agree. If people don't agree with tipping 15% or above or can't afford to then don't eat at a table service restaurant every night. Even the terms of free dining say that gratuity isn't included and therefore should be budgeted for.
If someone is a server full-time and supporting a family then why shouldn't they be able to earn a good wage? I think part of the reason service in restaurants is usually better in the US is because serving is a viable career option, more so than over here (I know there are some exceptions, our favourite local restaurant being one of them ;))

Again I agree - wish we had the same level of service.

i feel that many of us brits cant get past 2 things. the first is, if you order fillet steak, you tip more than if you order sirloin. and if you order chicken you tip a lot less. that is why i and i think many others tip a set cash amount as a thank-you. its because we dont get the above point. the second point is, if you leave NO tip and your pre-tax bill is $100, how much income tax does the server have to pay on that specific transaction? dont give the percentage, give the figure in dollars and cents. if youre very clear about the dollar amount, im sure that it will educate us brits far better than hedging on percentages and suggested tipamounts etc. if we leave a 4 dollar tip on a $100 meal and its costing the server hard money, well we need to be told so we can do the right thing. in dollars and cents. none wants to cost a server money, not intentionally
I am sorry but you are visiting another country and their custom is to tip 15-20% of the pre-tax amount. You build it in to your budget or eat counter service - end of story. If you want to eat more expensive items then you just accept you have to tip more.

Over here we always tip around 10% anyway - I never tip per person always a percentage of the bill. Maybe I have just been visiting the US too long :lmao:

Pooh Bear Hugs
09-13-2009, 04:33 AM
No matter where in the world or what their tipping customs may be I will tip on the level of service provided nothing more nothing less. There are some wonderful servers who deserve a great tip and others that bad they should tip you.:scared1:

popsynic
09-13-2009, 05:00 AM
Just back, the suggested amounts are now calculated at 18% and 20%!!!
Our last meal at Tutto Italia, us and the kids, (but 5 adult meals), no extra's on DDP, the tip was $45!!!:scared1:

Jules x


Remember that regardless what 'tip' Disney suggest it should be on your bill, you ultimately decide what to give.

If you think it should only be less then so be it. Just tell them to only charge you want YOU want to pay.

Remember that tipping can also be used to show dissatification in service. For example if you give 10%, that in effect is telling the server and manager that the service was pants. Much more than not tipping at all (which only might mean that as a Brit you just forgot to tip).

Regardeless of what others have said regards the 'importnace of tipping because its the culture' and 'doing as romans do' - well in some countries its the culture to spit on the streets, burp after meals and to eat dogs and cats - but I ain't gonna be doing any of those things just because it's the local culture. (and I am not ridiculing those cultures - they are fine to do whatever they wish to do, just not for me thankyou very much)

I know for a fact that hundreds (in fact millions) of americans DO NOT TIP if they do not think service was up to scratch. That is in fact why the system works so well. Servers HAVE to work hard to get a tip (to get a decent wage). If a server believes they are to be tipped well regardless of effort, the system falls apart.

Its a gratuity based on service levels, and you should judge it on that criteria - the 18% is what Disney believe their staff should get, you may think different - the choice is yours :)

wideeyes
09-13-2009, 05:14 AM
With regard to tipping more in a more expensive restaurant, my Dad is a chef and where he works,a waiter has to be trained to do high end of service which a waiting staff at a pub restaurant wouldn't need that training. I don't think I have ever seen anyone at a beef eater restaurant serve wine the correct way.

mitchfishguard
09-13-2009, 07:15 AM
i had no intention of starting a fire. i simply want to know how much income tax a server pays on a $100 dollar pre-tax bill if you dont tip. in dollars and cents, not a percentage. it will be crystal clear what happens if you dont tip.if others post in without answering in dollars and cents, then i hope you all realise that any heated debates will not be down to me. i find that if a sever just brings me my food and walks away, then im not tipping a cent. if they interact with me then i will tip what i feel , provided i dont cost her any money. im a painter and if i just slap it on i wont get paid. the same applies here. i cant afford to go to high-end restaurants anyway, so big tips arent my concern. i normally tip $5 max in a chain restaurant. tell me using dollars in cents and im all ears and will adjust my amount higher. use a percentage and hedge and i will continue as before, as im sure will a lot of others. this post is not argumentative. not if its read properly. phew!!!!!!

HeresYourEars
09-13-2009, 07:26 AM
As an American, I can tell you that the service would have to be truly horrendous for me not to tip. As has been mentioned before, many people depend on their tips to make a living wage. If they had to be paid the minimum wage (or more), the overall cost would increase accordingly and you'd be paying a lot more for a meal in the US than you do now.

scojos
09-13-2009, 07:31 AM
i had no intention of starting a fire. i simply want to know how much income tax a server pays on a $100 dollar pre-tax bill if you dont tip. in dollars and cents, not a percentage. it will be crystal clear what happens if you dont tip.if others post in without answering in dollars and cents, then i hope you all realise that any heated debates will not be down to me. i find that if a sever just brings me my food and walks away, then im not tipping a cent. if they interact with me then i will tip what i feel , provided i dont cost her any money. im a painter and if i just slap it on i wont get paid. the same applies here. i cant afford to go to high-end restaurants anyway, so big tips arent my concern. i normally tip $5 max in a chain restaurant. tell me using dollars in cents and im all ears and will adjust my amount higher. use a percentage and hedge and i will continue as before, as im sure will a lot of others. this post is not argumentative. not if its read properly. phew!!!!!!

i agree!
i totally disagree with the fact that we MUST tip - as i stated before i cant afford the massive amounts of money you are talking about for tips in some high end restaurants, and no, i will not make my kids eat CS everyday, i have the dining plan and i will use it, but there is no way i am tipping 30-40 for service. each to their own, when in rome, im with all that, i respect any culture, im polite and my kids are too, well behaved and we are not a difficult family, this does not mean im tight, i just cant afford an extra 30 a day in tips!
i also think a kind word, a thank you, a trip in the guest services to compliment staff is just as important as cash...
sorry, shoot me down in flames if you wish, but ill be one of the brits tipping a reasonable amount, not the inflated amount recommended.
i also wouls say i have to work for several hours to earn 30, and im not sat at the table that long....
Tracy

Chuck S
09-13-2009, 08:29 AM
i had no intention of starting a fire. i simply want to know how much income tax a server pays on a $100 dollar pre-tax bill if you dont tip. in dollars and cents, not a percentage. it will be crystal clear what happens if you dont tip.if others post in without answering in dollars and cents, then i hope you all realise that any heated debates will not be down to me. i find that if a sever just brings me my food and walks away, then im not tipping a cent. if they interact with me then i will tip what i feel , provided i dont cost her any money. im a painter and if i just slap it on i wont get paid. the same applies here. i cant afford to go to high-end restaurants anyway, so big tips arent my concern. i normally tip $5 max in a chain restaurant. tell me using dollars in cents and im all ears and will adjust my amount higher. use a percentage and hedge and i will continue as before, as im sure will a lot of others. this post is not argumentative. not if its read properly. phew!!!!!!

The amount of tax is not an easy question to answer, our tax laws are quite complicated, they are not a set percentage. There are deductions depending upon if someone has a mortgaged home, if someone has children, if someone has medical bills, etc. Taxes are figured on "adjusted gross income" and some people get more "adjustments" than others. Single people, with no children, pay more percentage wise than a single person with children. There is a small "marriage penalty" in the taxes, but other deductions that also can offset it.

And, then there are "tax brackets" for instance, you may pay 10% if you earn $15,000. Then you pay and additional percentage on any amount you earn over $15,000, and so on, and then another percentage if you earn more.

Honestly, for all things to be fair, everyone would have to earn the same wage and pay the same percentage of taxes. Then, there are states, most of them actually, that have an income tax of their own. Florida and Texas do not have a state income tax, but our property taxes are higher. So it really isn't a question of just a set dollar amount they pay on a table with a $100 in food. Just like many Europeans think our gasoline prices are cheap here, but just because they don't tax us to death on gas doesn't mean they don't make it up in other places; like state property tax, school tax, sales tax.

They have figured that the "average" American's total income until mid-May goes to taxes of one type or another.

Chuck S
09-13-2009, 08:39 AM
i agree!
i totally disagree with the fact that we MUST tip - as i stated before i cant afford the massive amounts of money you are talking about for tips in some high end restaurants, and no, i will not make my kids eat CS everyday, i have the dining plan and i will use it, but there is no way i am tipping 30-40 for service. each to their own, when in rome, im with all that, i respect any culture, im polite and my kids are too, well behaved and we are not a difficult family, this does not mean im tight, i just cant afford an extra 30 a day in tips!
i also think a kind word, a thank you, a trip in the guest services to compliment staff is just as important as cash...
sorry, shoot me down in flames if you wish, but ill be one of the brits tipping a reasonable amount, not the inflated amount recommended.
i also wouls say i have to work for several hours to earn 30, and im not sat at the table that long....
Tracy

Again, the DDP is not meant to be an all-inclusive package. Tips are not included. I really am surprised that they haven't, as of yet, made the 18% mandatory for the DDP. They could simply add it to your room charges when they deduct the dining credits. I would expect to see that soon, as they have already made an 18% tip mandatory for employee discounts and TiW card holders, whether they can "afford" it or not.

Again, it is not uncommon to have the percentage added directly to your bill nationwide here. In fact, I met friends for dinner in San Antonio last weekend, there were a total of 8 of us at the table, all separate checks, and the 18% was added before we ever received the bill. And this was just a common chain restaurant, not any place fancy.

scojos
09-13-2009, 08:48 AM
Again, the DDP is not meant to be an all-inclusive package. Tips are not included. I really am surprised that they haven't, as of yet, made the 18% mandatory for the DDP. They could simply add it to your room charges when they deduct the dining credits. I would expect to see that soon, as they have already made an 18% tip mandatory for employee discounts and TiW card holders, whether they can "afford" it or not.

Again, it is not uncommon to have the percentage added directly to your bill nationwide here. In fact, I met riends for dinner in San Antonio, there were a total of 8 of us at the table, all separate checks, and the 18% was added before we ever received the bill.

im sorry, i never implied that it was all-inclusive or that i would not be tipping, i will tip, both dh and i are restaurant trained (dh was a head chef, and i was a restaurant manager i now teach food in a high school), i will not however be tipping $40-50 per meal. i appreciate you feel very strongly about this, but its just not an option for the majority of british families who are paying $15,000 for their holidays already.
i genuinely respect your point of view, but my wallet cant follow...
Tracy

Lizzybear
09-13-2009, 09:15 AM
Just a thought, I can't see most families of 4 or 5 tipping 30-40 a day (if we're talking 1 TS meal a day) as a matter of course, that's $45-60 so the bill would have to be $200-300! Unless it was a case of signature meals every day I don't see how it would be that high... For me and the bf it's usually in the $40-70 ballpark inc. tip (depending on the individual place and if we have alcohol or not) for Disney 1 TS credit restaurants or equivalent places offsite. Even doubling that for a family of 4 with children who eat adult meals only makes it $80-140.

wideeyes
09-13-2009, 09:18 AM
my tips for two adults & child were about $7 and about $15 for a signature meal.

scojos
09-13-2009, 09:42 AM
i have no problem with a 10-20 $ tip (obviously if service is good), there are 5 of us (3 kids but adults), and yes we ll probably have the odd glass of alcohol but this holiday (and i know im far from the only one!) is costing alot of money...

wayneg
09-13-2009, 09:44 AM
Just a thought, I can't see most families of 4 or 5 tipping 30-40 a day (if we're talking 1 TS meal a day) as a matter of course, that's $45-60 so the bill would have to be $200-300! Unless it was a case of signature meals every day I don't see how it would be that high... For me and the bf it's usually in the $40-70 ballpark inc. tip (depending on the individual place and if we have alcohol or not) for Disney 1 TS credit restaurants or equivalent places offsite. Even doubling that for a family of 4 with children who eat adult meals only makes it $80-140.

We did DDP in August, 2 adults & 1 teen. Evening TS meals averaged $117/night or $39pp, entree, dessert & soda each (this included 2x 2TS meals)
Offsite usually we avarage around $50 for evening meal so a big difference. I tipped around double what I would offsite but it was worth it to experience what Disney has to offer.

wideeyes
09-13-2009, 09:54 AM
Our meals cost between $40 and $80 and tipped 15%, we didn't have alcholol with meals though as got a drink from pool bar if wanted one as its cheaper and didn't have desserts apart from DD. I am one of those who if I can't afford the tip I don't eat there, and my DD didn't just eat chicken nuggets and chips all holiday.;)

Laurafoster
09-13-2009, 11:26 AM
When we decided to go with the DDP we factored in the cost of tips straight away. As we are a party of 6 i imagine that we will have an automatic 18% added to our bills.

I worked out roughly how much it would be per person at each meal (soda, most exp entree and deserts) and then added it to my budget. We are eating at a few signature restaurants but are also doing HDDR too so that helps.

Not factoring in any alcohol with the meal it will be around $75 a person in tips over the 2 weeks.

champagnegirl26
09-13-2009, 12:00 PM
Could someone please tell me when paying by your keys to the world card can you leave the tip included in the card transaction or is it expected in cash? Thank you!

wayneg
09-13-2009, 12:15 PM
Could someone please tell me when paying by your keys to the world card can you leave the tip included in the card transaction or is it expected in cash? Thank you!

You can pay cash or add it to your KTTW card, when they bring your bill there is option to add tip, I write cash and leave cash but you can add it if you want.

Chuck S
09-13-2009, 12:15 PM
Could someone please tell me when paying by your keys to the world card can you leave the tip included in the card transaction or is it expected in cash? Thank you!

You may use the KTTW and charge the tip to your room.

champagnegirl26
09-13-2009, 12:37 PM
Thank you it will be easier for us to charge to the room as we do not like carrying too much cash thanks!

mitchfishguard
09-16-2009, 01:45 AM
goodness me, do people really go into the tipping plans with such intensity. youre going on holiday! i hear words like customary, expected, tradition, norm, when in rome, poor, hard-working, . not once do you hear compulsary, law, or similar. if you give a cash tip of a few dollars as a thank-you for a pleasant experience, well the server should end up with a good $50 an hour for her tables. what happens after should not concern us. i say this in a non-confrontational way. to already say you intend to tip your servers a good $10-15 before youve even left the uk is bizarre. ive never heard anything so ridiculous. im off to my building site now, i hope my customer notices how ive remembered what she wants, how she wants it, laid the blocks where theyre supposed to go, and painted it neatly so she can tip accordingly. no hang about, thats actually what im being paid to do................

thumper1970
09-16-2009, 06:14 AM
You can pay cash or add it to your KTTW card, when they bring your bill there is option to add tip, I write cash and leave cash but you can add it if you want.

I will certainly use the cash option, which will leave it to our discretion as to the tip. If it has been a good meal, then it may get to the 18%, but if it was not so good (or indeed a buffet) then 10% will be left!

The main point is that on free DDP, you are eating much more expensive options than you would be if you were paying, so it is a bit of a false bill reading IMHO.