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Dominus
05-23-2009, 03:38 PM
Non-wdw question. I know the brits call red-heds gingers. Where did it come from? Was it from Ginger on Gilligan's Island? Or was she called Ginger because the brits called red-heads gingers? Was it from Ginger Rogers?

PoppyAnna
05-23-2009, 03:54 PM
Oh, good question, I really don't know - and I have a ginger daughter:lmao:

Hope you get an answer:thumbsup2

Goofyish
05-23-2009, 05:18 PM
I don't think it was named after anyone it's just a name for the colour - ginger.

Ware Bears
05-23-2009, 05:57 PM
Interesting question but I'm afraid I don't know the answer!

I don't think we had Gilligan's Island on TV in the UK :confused3 although it may be that I just don't remember it.

Perhaps it's called ginger after Ginger Rogers as her hair was the pale red colour that I think of as ginger rather than brighter/deeper shades that I would call red/auburn.

My brother-in-law has emigrated to Australia and when he was over last he told me that over there red heads are called blue or bluey. Where's the logic in that? :confused3 :rotfl:

Ware Bears
05-23-2009, 06:06 PM
Another thought ~ maybe it's called ginger after the cat in Beatrix Potter's story Ginger and Pickles.

Aisling
05-23-2009, 07:52 PM
I'm not a Brit, but an Irish friend of mine told me that since redheads were "lively", they call them gingers because the spice ginger is used to "liven" up a meal. He's 74 years old, so this goes way back, according to him.



Not to hijack, but I also have an Ask a Brit question:

What do you mean when you ask someone "what are you having for tea"? Is it lunch??

#1MMFan
05-23-2009, 09:46 PM
No, normally "tea" would be referring to your evening dinner but I guess it varies depending on the part of the UK. I would say "what are you having for lunch?" if it was simply for lunch.

Ask an American: Why do you say "Do you got the time?" instead of saying "Do you have the time?". It sounds so ungrammatical! ;)

Dominus
05-23-2009, 10:01 PM
Don't sweat the hijack. Maybe we need an official "ask a brit" thread. That'd be sweat. Anyway, some of us do say "do you have the time", I think most in fact. However, we aren't too keen on the king's english. We butcher it with revel. In the south especially. We say thing like your "moms" instead of mom. "I loves me some..." etc.

natalielongstaff
05-24-2009, 02:40 AM
great thread, Tea is definatly the evening meal....or if referring to afternoon tea then its a small snack and drink mid afternoon :)

Dimplenose
05-24-2009, 02:48 AM
Tea is always in the evening (unless it's afternoon tea) but dinner can be used to refer to tea or lunch depending which part of the country you're from.

joolz1910
05-24-2009, 03:14 AM
Doesn't everyone call it ginger?:rotfl: two thirds of my children have ginger hair and it had never occurred to me that it wasn't called 'ginger' in other countries.

Having said that, when I was out with youngest DD a few weeks ago, a group of Japanese tourists started taking photos of her like she was a celebrity baby. There were about 20 of them! She loved the attention, and I asked my friend why they were so intrigued by her - apparently it's the novelty of the ginger hair!

At home we call the evening meal 'dinner' but at school the 'dinner bell' rings at lunch time in the afternoon. :confused3

Pegasus928
05-24-2009, 03:22 AM
We have dinner and tea at the same time of day other people might have lunch and dinner.
When we go out for a meal we also go for starters and main course as opposed to appetisers and entrees. Oh and we also sometimes have a pudding - not a dessert :lmao:

comingtodisney
05-24-2009, 04:47 AM
in our house we say dinner for our lunch, and tea for our evening meal, we also say pudding for dessert.

Dimplenose
05-24-2009, 05:59 AM
I always get confused because I'm sure an entree should be a starter.

wideeyes
05-24-2009, 06:03 AM
We don't say tea, we say dinner.

gemmybear83
05-24-2009, 06:12 AM
I always get confused because I'm sure an entree should be a starter.

I always think that too!

Dominus
05-24-2009, 07:15 AM
Mostly here it's dinner. Although some people call dinner, supper. Not sure where that came from, or the logic behind it. It's kind of a Texas/Southern thing. I'm not sure you'd hear it up north. We also park in our driveway, and drive on our parkway.:confused3

Clare D
05-24-2009, 11:43 AM
I think it depends where you are in the UK sometimes to how you phrase things. I live right in the middle of the country and here we call the meal in the evening teatime. However if I was going out for a posh meal it wouldn't be tea and I wouldn't say dinner either as dinner is whet I have at midday.

Could the term ginger come from the colour of a ginger tabby cat? I have no idea on this one sorry.

Dominus
05-24-2009, 02:48 PM
I think it depends where you are in the UK sometimes to how you phrase things. I live right in the middle of the country and here we call the meal in the evening teatime. However if I was going out for a posh meal it wouldn't be tea and I wouldn't say dinner either as dinner is whet I have at midday.

Could the term ginger come from the colour of a ginger tabby cat? I have no idea on this one sorry.

Ah, the saga continues. In the states we call the cat an orange-taggy. I've never heard them called a ginger-tabby.

Dimplenose
05-24-2009, 04:22 PM
I've always assumed that the orange hair/fur colour was referred to as ginger because it is a similar colour to ginger and all the nicknames came from that.

Ware Bears
05-24-2009, 05:26 PM
We eat lunch in the middle of the day and call our evening meal dinner. Yet, if any of my DDs have a friend round for dinner we always say "so and so is coming round for tea"!! Totally illogical! :rotfl:

Shagley
05-24-2009, 09:29 PM
Ah, the saga continues. In the states we call the cat an orange-taggy. I've never heard them called a ginger-tabby.

Okay, now I am from the states, and I have never heard of a cat called a "taggy". I would call it an orange tabby. Just to add to the confusion :goodvibes

Edited to add: I also call my meals lunch and dinner, but some areas where I live have dinner for their mid day meal and supper for their evening meal.

hotfudgesundae
05-25-2009, 03:38 AM
I have checked on Wikpedia about ginger hair and there is a lot of information there but, I just glanced through it and cant find out why they call it ginger.
We call lunch either lunch or dinner, tea is tea at home and dinner when we eat out, just to add to the confusion my DH takes lunch to work but he calls it bait . :confused3

Dominus
05-25-2009, 07:32 AM
Okay, now I am from the states, and I have never heard of a cat called a "taggy". I would call it an orange tabby. Just to add to the confusion :goodvibes

Edited to add: I also call my meals lunch and dinner, but some areas where I live have dinner for their mid day meal and supper for their evening meal.

Sorry for the typo. It is tabby. There's sometimes a lack of communication between my brain and my digits.

More ask a brit. Do you guys have "jumbo shrimp" at the market? One of my fave oxymorons.

Dimplenose
05-25-2009, 08:24 AM
"jumbo shrimp"

That would be a prawn or king prawn.

Aardvarks
05-25-2009, 12:18 PM
That would be a prawn or king prawn.

Or a Langostine?

In order of Time of day

Breakfast (early)
Brunch (mid morning)
Lunch (mid day)
Tea (afternoon Tea)
Dinner (evening)
Supper (late evening)

In the north we working class types refer to lunch as dinner and we refer to dinner as tea. In mining areas luch can aslo be known as snap which I think refers to the tins used to keep food safe down the pit. Another term for food at any time is scran which I believe may be naval in origin. I have heard many friends use it in the north, again especially in the north east.

As for pudding and desert, the working class name is 'afters'

Ginger as name for the colour is old english in its first use and therefore dates back a long time.

At school we had a lot of 'gingers' and sometimes a few 'carrot tops'

Guiligans Island was broadcast here in around 1968 and I remember watching it.

For you america readers, beware the use of the cockney rhyming slang 'ginger beer', this is a derogatory term for a gay person.

Dominus
05-26-2009, 02:37 PM
Or a Langostine?

In order of Time of day

Breakfast (early)
Brunch (mid morning)
Lunch (mid day)
Tea (afternoon Tea)
Dinner (evening)
Supper (late evening)

In the north we working class types refer to lunch as dinner and we refer to dinner as tea. In mining areas luch can aslo be known as snap which I think refers to the tins used to keep food safe down the pit. Another term for food at any time is scran which I believe may be naval in origin. I have heard many friends use it in the north, again especially in the north east.

As for pudding and desert, the working class name is 'afters'

Ginger as name for the colour is old english in its first use and therefore dates back a long time.

At school we had a lot of 'gingers' and sometimes a few 'carrot tops'

Guiligans Island was broadcast here in around 1968 and I remember watching it.

For you america readers, beware the use of the cockney rhyming slang 'ginger beer', this is a derogatory term for a gay person.

I've had ginger beer in Jamaica. How did that get turned into a gay slur?

Dimplenose
05-27-2009, 02:13 AM
I've had ginger beer in Jamaica. How did that get turned into a gay slur?

It's in the rhyme.

torsie24
05-27-2009, 02:34 AM
I have lunch at midday and dinner in the evening. But if some asked me what I was having for tea I'd tell them what I was eating that night.

Earstou
05-28-2009, 10:11 AM
People here in the states call my dd a strawberry blonde, because her hair is a lighter red (she naturally went from blonde as a child to a red-blonde as a teen). Would this be the same as ginger, a lighter red?


We say "Do you have the time?" and everyone I know would say that, but you do occasionally run into people whose grammar is atrocious!

Dimplenose
05-28-2009, 10:26 AM
The Weasley family in Harry Potter films are ginger - if that helps.

lisalisalisa
05-29-2009, 04:20 AM
We eat lunch in the middle of the day and call our evening meal dinner. Yet, if any of my DDs have a friend round for dinner we always say "so and so is coming round for tea"!! Totally illogical! :rotfl:

Same here - Children are always invited for tea :)

Trilli-magic
05-29-2009, 07:13 AM
At our house we have used both tea and dinner to refer to our evening meal.
When I was little we had our main meal at Lunch time and for our evening meal we would say tea (we would normaly have a light snack like sandwich etc). Then we started taking packed lunches to school with sandwiches and had our main meal in the evening so we started saying dinner!!!
We normally use either pudding or afters for desert!! :)
If someone comes round for our evening meal we say "they are coming to tea" too lol
Being invited round for tea can also mean afternoon tea :)

Ok question: why in America do you reply "this is she/he" instead of "speaking" if someones calls you and asks if it's you? ;)

Liberty Belle
05-29-2009, 09:17 PM
At our house we have used both tea and dinner to refer to our evening meal.
When I was little we had our main meal at Lunch time and for our evening meal we would say tea (we would normaly have a light snack like sandwich etc). Then we started taking packed lunches to school with sandwiches and had our main meal in the evening so we started saying dinner!!!
We normally use either pudding or afters for desert!! :)
If someone comes round for our evening meal we say "they are coming to tea" too lol
Being invited round for tea can also mean afternoon tea :)

Ok question: why in America do you reply "this is she/he" instead of "speaking" if someones calls you and asks if it's you? ;)

I'd say we say both, but probably "This is she" most often.