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cap'njack.
02-13-2009, 02:51 AM
Has anyone studied through the Open University?

I'm thinking of doing a course or two through them but would like others experiences.

wideeyes
02-13-2009, 02:57 AM
I have just enrolled to start a unit in October.
I am thinking about doing a Masters degree with them next year however would like to see what they are like first as a Masters is very expensive. It looks like it can be very expensive if you are not entitled to funding which I won't be as I will have a Degree already.

Bolanette87
02-13-2009, 03:05 AM
Robert's Dad did.... He's now a teacher as a result! :thumbsup2

Bob xoxoxox

emily1982
02-13-2009, 03:07 AM
When i was offered my funding i could choose where to study,in the end i chose Worcester as i felt i needed to be going regulary somewhere and being taught face to face. For me it has worked well. I do know people who have families though and couldn't go out in the evenings and do it through open uni and worked out ok. I think it depends what kind of learner you are.

cap'njack.
02-13-2009, 03:30 AM
Thanks for the replies.

I'm interested in doing a Law degree. I'm a little concerned that potential employers may see that it was an OU course and treat it a bit like a Mickey Mouse degree (pardon the pun!)

madmumof2
02-13-2009, 03:39 AM
I'm starting a photogfraphy course with them in May. I was entitled to funding so am very happy lol.

You get recognised qualifications/degrees/diplomas etc from these courses. There's no reason why an employer would look at it any differently.

oceanscape
02-13-2009, 03:45 AM
Thanks for the replies.

I'm interested in doing a Law degree. I'm a little concerned that potential employers may see that it was an OU course and treat it a bit like a Mickey Mouse degree (pardon the pun!)
Well it very much depends what you are planning to do with your degree when you've finished. If you're aiming to be a solicitor for a top firm in the City then it is very, very unlikely you'll be successful with an OU degree. The same for being a barrister at a top chambers. If you're going for a high street firm then chances are a bit better, but it's not particularly highly regarded compared to a a degree from a more prestigious institution. If you're not planning law as a career anyway, then it's less of an issue.

wideeyes
02-13-2009, 04:02 AM
Well it very much depends what you are planning to do with your degree when you've finished. If you're aiming to be a solicitor for a top firm in the City then it is very, very unlikely you'll be successful with an OU degree. The same for being a barrister at a top chambers. If you're going for a high street firm then chances are a bit better, but it's not particularly highly regarded compared to a a degree from a more prestigious institution. If you're not planning law as a career anyway, then it's less of an issue.

Its the same for other universities though, especially with all the new colleges getting university status, their degrees are not going to be as highly regarded as the older more established universities like Durham. My degree is going to be less regarded than my sisters just because of the universities we attended

wideeyes
02-13-2009, 04:06 AM
Just to add I think an OU degree will be more highly regarded than one of the new universities. I know people who have gotten in to new universities after failing their courses at school or college.

Netty
02-13-2009, 08:40 AM
I am currently in my 3rd year of studies with the OU, i'm doing a bsc(hons)psychology degree. I would highly recommend them!
I have just started my next course on child development, which is very apt with having Charlie(grandson) staying with us at the moment:)
The Ou degrees are highly regarded these days

katiec
02-13-2009, 03:06 PM
I would agree that an OU degree could be worth more to an employer than a standard university degree.
If you have held down a job/family etc, whilst completing your degree it shows that you are dedicated and passionate, and that you have not spent 3 years in the SU bar! ( A friend of mine completed her pure maths and statistics OU degree in 3 years, while working full time, moving house, having a miscarriage and getting married - not all in that order!)

Now before you all purists shout, of course degrees from some uni's are "worth" more to employers in some professions, and i know not ALL student life revolves around beer and parties, but at the end of the day the other qualities that you bring to an interview/workplace can be just as important.

In this current climate, just "having a degree" isnt enough, no matter where it is from. (How many super intelligent 1:1 graduates have any common sense?:rotfl2: sorry dont mean to offend and my son is at uni doing a degree)

I did the 1st year of an OU degree and really enjoyed it - and the support was great too.

Go for it and see how you get on.

Katie

carolfoy
02-14-2009, 07:56 AM
In my second year of criminal psychology, its hard work but the study calendars and online forums as well as support from personal tutors are a great help.
I'd highly recommend it

higgy66
02-14-2009, 08:10 AM
I'd say go for it - I agree that they are thought highly of as previous poster's have said - most people do them while working and/or bringing up a family - employers recognise the dedication required with OU degrees.

I'd love to do one but find them quite pricey!