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View Full Version : Police Chief Indicted in Westfield, Ma child Uzi Tragedy.


DawnCt1
12-04-2008, 04:01 PM
I have to say that I am shocked that the Police Chief owns the business that co sponsored this event. Those who have experience with firearms, are involved in training, etc, should know the limitations of a child and weapon of that size.



http://www.boston.com/news/local/breaking_news/2008/12/police_chief_in.html?p1=Well_MostPop_Emailed6

Police chief indicted after Uzi death of boy, 8

By Michael Levenson and Andrew Ryan, Globe Staff

The longtime police chief of a small Western Massachusetts town was one of three people indicted today on involuntary manslaughter charges for the death of an 8-year-old boy who fatally shot himself with a machine gun at a weapons exposition in Westfield.

Pelham Police Chief Edward B. Fleury owns COP Firearms & Training, which cosponsored the Machine Gun Shoot on Oct. 26 at the Westfield Sportsman's Club. Christopher Bizilj died while firing a 9mm Micro Uzi that recoiled and fatally shot him in the head.

The grand jury also indicted the club and two men who supplied the Uzi that killed the boy. The men were identified as Carl Guiffre of Hartford and Domenico Spano of New Milford, Conn.

Prosecutors did not seek an indictment against the boy's father, Dr. Charles Bizilj, who brought his son to the gun show and was standing with a camera 10 feet behind his son as he fired the weapon that afternoon. Bizilj, an emergency room physician from Ashford, Conn., "will be punished every day of the rest of his life," Hampden District Attorney William M. Bennett said this afternoon at a press conference, according to a story on the website of the Springfield Republican.

Fleury and the club also were indicted on four counts each of furnishing a machine gun to a minor. Bennett said prosecutors know of at least four children, including Christopher, who fired the automatic weapons. The club faces a fine of up to $10,000 for each violation.


"Obviously, we're very disappointed with the indictment," said Fleury's lawyer, David C. Kuzmeski. "And we, of course, have great sympathy for the family involved in the tragic accident. And as to the indictments, we will defend them and feel confident that when it’s all over, Chief Fleury will be exonerated."

Fleury has been police chief in Pelham for 20 years. The bucolic town of 1,400 outside Amherst also has one part-time police officer and another full-time officer, Gary Thomann, who has been serving as chief since Fleury went on a sick leave immediately after the fatal shooting.

Fleury was well-known in Pelham for his personal zeal for gun safety. He regularly visited the schools to teach the National Rifle Association's "Eddie Eagle Gun Safety Program" to children as young as 5 and 6. He also taught gun safety courses for adults.

Town officials had no immediate comment.

c4a
12-04-2008, 04:02 PM
Idiots like that are the reason people are pushing for stronger gun laws.

John Smith1
12-04-2008, 04:06 PM
:sad2: Just dealing with the child's mother should be punishment enough.
The father was the one at fault. How dumb was it to take a 8yo to a show like that? Machine guns? What is so interesting about machine guns that you have to share with yoru kid? :confused:

DizBelle
12-04-2008, 04:17 PM
I'm not sure I understand how he got shot in he head. Can someone explain it to me? How did a recoil cause this?

John Smith1
12-04-2008, 04:31 PM
I'm not sure I understand how he got shot in he head. Can someone explain it to me? How did a recoil cause this?

http://www.boston.com/news/local/breaking_news/2008/10/police_identify_6.html

DawnCt1
12-04-2008, 04:40 PM
:sad2: Just dealing with the child's mother should be punishment enough.
The father was the one at fault. How dumb was it to take a 8yo to a show like that? Machine guns? What is so interesting about machine guns that you have to share with yoru kid? :confused:

The event was advertised as safe for all ages. He trusted the instructor who assured him it was safe. His kid was interested in guns like a lot of little boys.

TomLovesBecky
12-04-2008, 04:42 PM
I have to say that I am shocked that the Police Chief owns the business that co sponsored this event. Those who have experience with firearms, are involved in training, etc, should know the limitations of a child and weapon of that size.


But his ER-physician father shouldn't? Plenty of blame to go around.

DawnCt1
12-04-2008, 04:46 PM
But his ER-physician father shouldn't? Plenty of blame to go around.

Being an expert in treating patients doesn't make one an expert in the capability of firearms. It was a huge misjudgment but someone who handles these type of weapons and is involved in training others to handle them, should really be the one who exercises better and informed judgment.

DizBelle
12-04-2008, 04:46 PM
http://www.boston.com/news/local/breaking_news/2008/10/police_identify_6.html

I'm still not sure I get it. Was the boy's finger still pulling the trigger as it flipped over? Or does an automatic weapon continue firing after you stop pulling the trigger?

It's a tragedy but it appears that it was an accident. The same thing could have happened to an adult.

John Smith1
12-04-2008, 04:47 PM
The event was advertised as safe for all ages. He trusted the instructor who assured him it was safe. His kid was interested in guns like a lot of little boys.

you know what? There are LOTS of things that can hurt children, swimming pools, parking lots, heck, amusement parks can hurt kids. It is the parent who has to be in charge of what that child does, deals with or picks up.

Heck, my kid likes guns, too, but would I let him hold an a real loaded uzi at 8? Heck, kids like CARS too, but I wouldn't hand them the keys! I'd be a fool to just like that Dad who has to deal with the loss of his kid forever. You make a choice to endanger a child or to protect them. I'd rather err to the protect part.

DawnCt1
12-04-2008, 04:49 PM
I'm still not sure I get it. Was the boy's finger still pulling the trigger as it flipped over? Or does an automatic weapon continue firing after you stop pulling the trigger?

It's a tragedy but it appears that it was an accident. The same thing could have happened to an adult.

DH says that it has a very short barrel, its powerful and when you pull back on the trigger it continues to fire. If its recoiling, it recoils up and he probably panicked at the force and continued to squeeze it. DH has seen soldiers on the firing range have difficulty handling the recoil and not letting go of the trigger.
It seems that a police officer who trains others in the use of this weapon would understand it more than anyone.

DawnCt1
12-04-2008, 04:53 PM
you know what? There are LOTS of things that can hurt children, swimming pools, parking lots, heck, amusement parks can hurt kids. It is the parent who has to be in charge of what that child does, deals with or picks up.

Heck, my kid likes guns, too, but would I let him hold an a real loaded uzi at 8? Heck, kids like CARS too, but I wouldn't hand them the keys! I'd be a fool to just like that Dad who has to deal with the loss of his kid forever. You make a choice to endanger a child or to protect them. I'd rather err to the protect part.

I don't disagree with you. I would never have made that decision. DH would have never made that decision. It was a terrible decision but I think it was an uninformed decision made by the father of a family that are hunters and campers, and outdoors men. I think that the fact that an event like this existed and that was opened to all ages and children were encouraged to participate is where the problem began. This has been going on for years. Apparently one of the members of the board of this particular gun club quit over this event....before this happened. He felt that it should have been closed to children and he lost the argument. Too bad. :sad2:

TimeforMe
12-04-2008, 05:13 PM
They're ALL responsible, IMO. Not a rational mind in the bunch, if you ask me. And that poor little boy paid for their bad judgment. Grown-ups are supposed to protect children, keep them out of harm's way. They did the opposite.:guilty:

GeorgeG
12-04-2008, 06:12 PM
Common sense took a major holiday that day. Everyone involved should have known better.

SHAYMARAYSMOM
12-04-2008, 06:18 PM
The event was advertised as safe for all ages. He trusted the instructor who assured him it was safe. His kid was interested in guns like a lot of little boys.
My nephews like guns also but my brother knows it is not safe for them to handle guns like that.

Being an expert in treating patients doesn't make one an expert in the capability of firearms. It was a huge misjudgment but someone who handles these type of weapons and is involved in training others to handle them, should really be the one who exercises better and informed judgment.

You would think he would have some common sense.
It is a sad thing that happened but they should also be chargeing the dad with at least child endanerment

SHAYMARAYSMOM
12-04-2008, 06:18 PM
you know what? There are LOTS of things that can hurt children, swimming pools, parking lots, heck, amusement parks can hurt kids. It is the parent who has to be in charge of what that child does, deals with or picks up.

Heck, my kid likes guns, too, but would I let him hold an a real loaded uzi at 8? Heck, kids like CARS too, but I wouldn't hand them the keys! I'd be a fool to just like that Dad who has to deal with the loss of his kid forever. You make a choice to endanger a child or to protect them. I'd rather err to the protect part.

:thumbsup2

Kteacher
12-05-2008, 05:21 AM
I live right next to Pelham, and my DH grew up there. We've all been wondering what took the DA so long ....... Fleury has always been thought of as an odd bird. He was involved in an incident some years ago where he was demonstrating gun safety and his gun went off accidently:sad2: Residents are getting upset because somehow Fleury has miraculously accumulated tons of vacation and sick time-he has been out on paid leave since the incident:sad2:

disneyjunkie
12-05-2008, 06:43 AM
you know what? There are LOTS of things that can hurt children, swimming pools, parking lots, heck, amusement parks can hurt kids. It is the parent who has to be in charge of what that child does, deals with or picks up.

Heck, my kid likes guns, too, but would I let him hold an a real loaded uzi at 8? Heck, kids like CARS too, but I wouldn't hand them the keys! I'd be a fool to just like that Dad who has to deal with the loss of his kid forever. You make a choice to endanger a child or to protect them. I'd rather err to the protect part.

:worship: :worship: :worship:

Charade
12-05-2008, 06:57 AM
That's really sad and bizarre at the same time. It's a miracle no one else was shot.

java
12-05-2008, 06:59 AM
Sorry but a FATHER should be the one protecting his son. I know nothing about guns and I would NEVER think to put an uzi in his hands. He made a choice taking his son to a show like that. And then putting an uzi into his hands that is beyond stupid and irresponsible. Would you trust an "instructor" that is putting a gun in your child's hand?
My son was really into sharks at a very young age- I wasn't taking him to swim with them though.

Common sense could have prevented this tragedy.

allison443
12-05-2008, 07:38 AM
DH says that it has a very short barrel, its powerful and when you pull back on the trigger it continues to fire. If its recoiling, it recoils up and he probably panicked at the force and continued to squeeze it. DH has seen soldiers on the firing range have difficulty handling the recoil and not letting go of the trigger.
It seems that a police officer who trains others in the use of this weapon would understand it more than anyone.

Does the police force in Westfield Massachusetts get trained in the use of Uzis?? Or do you mean he trains people at the gun club to use Uzis?

TomLovesBecky
12-05-2008, 10:25 PM
Being an expert in treating patients doesn't make one an expert in the capability of firearms. It was a huge misjudgment but someone who handles these type of weapons and is involved in training others to handle them, should really be the one who exercises better and informed judgment.

I think the parent is ultimately responsible. I guess we just disagree.

momrek06
12-05-2008, 11:21 PM
How horrible for the little boy's family...how horrible. :sad1: I saw the child's photo on another website and he is absolutely a doll. :sad1:

JR6ooo4
12-06-2008, 12:03 AM
So was the chief right there handing the gun to the child? Or was he just a producer of the event?

MIkeeee

SHAYMARAYSMOM
12-06-2008, 08:00 AM
So was the chief right there handing the gun to the child? Or was he just a producer of the event?

MIkeeee

From what I understand the Chief was not. I understand it as the dad was one of them that handed him the gun.
The dad turned to get his camera just as it happened.
But I still think should charge the dad.

Planogirl
12-06-2008, 08:58 AM
Was the Chief actually there? I imagine that that will have a bearing.

I'm another that feels the father is at least partially responsible. At the same time, I agree that he will in a way pay for this for the rest of his life. It's just horrible.

DawnCt1
12-06-2008, 09:01 AM
From what I understand the Chief was not. I understand it as the dad was one of them that handed him the gun.
The dad turned to get his camera just as it happened.
But I still think should charge the dad.

Then you misunderstood the articles that have been published.
Furthermore, it is doubtful that anyone not directly supervising or shooting would have been allowed in near the firing area.
http://www.courant.com/news/local/hc-uzideath1205.artdec05,0,1671869.story

Excerpts from the above article that are notable:

As Christopher fired at a pumpkin, the Uzi's rapid rate of fire — 1,700 rounds per minute — caused the gun's barrel to climb and the boy lost control of the weapon, said William M. Bennett, the Hampden, Mass., district attorney who announced the indictments Thursday.

A flier advertising the event read: "No age limit or licenses required to shoot machine guns, hand guns, rifles or shotguns," and "It's all legal & fun — No permits or licenses required."



The grand jury did not indict Christopher's father, Dr. Charles Bizilj, who was standing nearby preparing to snap a photo of his son when the accident occurred. Bennett said Bizilj will be punished each day for the rest of his life.

Bennett said Bizilj selected the small weapon for his 4-foot-3, 66-pound son to fire after being assured it was safe. Bennett said the father was not charged because he was a layman and based his decision on information from others who should have known it was too dangerous.

The district attorney said a 15-year-old familiar with guns, but not a certified instructor, accompanied Christopher to the firing line and was there when he shot himself. The boy will not be charged, Bennett said.

luvmy3
12-06-2008, 09:10 AM
[QUOTE=DawnCt1;29057595]Then you misunderstood the articles that have been published.
Furthermore, it is doubtful that anyone not directly supervising or shooting would have been allowed in near the firing area.
QUOTE]


I find that ironic since after all they were letting a CHILD shoot the gun. I know its for safety reasons, hence the irony. They are well aware of the dangers and the accidents they may happen, why on earth would an 8 year old be allowed to handle such a weapon is beyond me.
JMHO but I do think the father should have been charged with something. Ultimately it was his responsibility to keep his child safe, and it was him who gave permisiion for his son to shoot that gun.

DawnCt1
12-06-2008, 09:13 AM
[QUOTE=DawnCt1;29057595]Then you misunderstood the articles that have been published.
Furthermore, it is doubtful that anyone not directly supervising or shooting would have been allowed in near the firing area.
QUOTE]


I find that ironic since after all they were letting a CHILD shoot the gun. I know its for safety reasons, hence the irony. They are well aware of the dangers and the accidents they may happen, why on earth would an 8 year old be allowed to handle such a weapon is beyond me.
JMHO but I do think the father should have been charged with something. Ultimately it was his responsibility to keep his child safe, and it was him who gave permisiion for his son to shoot that gun.

I think the DA answered your question when he said;

"Bennett said Bizilj selected the small weapon for his 4-foot-3, 66-pound son to fire after being assured it was safe. Bennett said the father was not charged because he was a layman and based his decision on information from others who should have known it was too dangerous.

Planogirl
12-06-2008, 09:22 AM
I don't know. I'm a layman too but I would never allow a child to handle such a gun. It just doesn't seem sensible.

SHAYMARAYSMOM
12-06-2008, 09:24 AM
[QUOTE=luvmy3;29057673]

I think the DA answered your question when he said;

"Bennett said Bizilj selected the small weapon for his 4-foot-3, 66-pound son to fire after being assured it was safe. Bennett said the father was not charged because he was a layman and based his decision on information from others who should have known it was too dangerous.

Well I think the DA missed the boat on not charging the dad. He should have known better.
If the father drove drunk with the child in the car and the boy was killed he would have been charged.
I

luvmy3
12-06-2008, 09:26 AM
[QUOTE=luvmy3;29057673]

I think the DA answered your question when he said;

"Bennett said Bizilj selected the small weapon for his 4-foot-3, 66-pound son to fire after being assured it was safe. Bennett said the father was not charged because he was a layman and based his decision on information from others who should have known it was too dangerous.

Like I said it is my opinion. As a parent I am responsible for teh safety of my child. If it had been me and someone told me that was a safe weapon for my child to shoot, I still would not have let him do it. My instinct and common sense will never come second to someone else's assurance when it comes to MY child. Unfortunately for that child, and his family the father didn't use either in this case :sad1:

luvmy3
12-06-2008, 09:27 AM
[QUOTE=DawnCt1;29057695]

Well I think the DA missed the boat on not charging the dad. He should have known better.
If the father drove drunk with the child in the car and the boy was killed he would have been charged.
I

For some reason what you are quoting shows it was posted by myself :confused3 but that isn't correct. I believe that your quote was originally posted by Dawn

luvmy3
12-06-2008, 09:28 AM
WTH is going on with the quotes :confused3

SHAYMARAYSMOM
12-06-2008, 09:37 AM
WTH is going on with the quotes :confused3

I am not sure. Something must be up with the Dis:confused3

Colleen27
12-06-2008, 10:31 AM
DH says that it has a very short barrel, its powerful and when you pull back on the trigger it continues to fire. If its recoiling, it recoils up and he probably panicked at the force and continued to squeeze it. DH has seen soldiers on the firing range have difficulty handling the recoil and not letting go of the trigger.


A friend of mine who is in the service said the same thing. Apparently it is a common reaction even among adult men. I can't imagine handing an 8 yo a weapon like that!

Colleen27
12-06-2008, 10:41 AM
I have to say that I am shocked that the Police Chief owns the business that co sponsored this event. Those who have experience with firearms, are involved in training, etc, should know the limitations of a child and weapon of that size.


I agree! I can understand an uninformed parent who doesn't really understand the difference between a gun like that and the hunting rifles and handguns that he's probably more familiar with making a bad decision. I can't understand trained, experienced people making the same bad decision.

Judy Judy Judy
12-06-2008, 11:14 AM
I also feel the dad should have been charged. Of course I bet the mom will just take care of that, I know I would. ;)

TheDisneyGirl02
12-06-2008, 11:27 AM
A flier advertising the event read: "No age limit or licenses required to shoot machine guns, hand guns, rifles or shotguns," and "It's all legal & fun — No permits or licenses required."


Since it was completely legal for that child to hold the gun, I'm kind of confused why that man was indicted? :confused3 Yes, a young boy was tragically killed, but he was allowed to hold that gun, anybody could, even a toddler since there wasn't an age limit. (I know a toddler would never be able to handle a gun, but it's just an example.) Should a little boy have been holding an Uzi, no but that was the father's decision to let him hold that, not the vendors. I know that that father will live with this horrible event everyday for the rest of his life and I'm sure he wishes he could go back and change it.

I'm also wondering if there was a disclaimer on the fliers, like saying that the organization who runs the event and the vendors aren't responsible if there is an accident?

TomLovesBecky
12-06-2008, 11:28 AM
I don't know. I'm a layman too but I would never allow a child to handle such a gun. It just doesn't seem sensible.

Dawn is clearly on the side of the father, no matter what. Poor, ignorant man (a doctor, no less!) who had no clue an UZI was dangerous for his, what, 3rd grader? Who probably wasn't allowed to walk to school alone or ride his bike more than a couple blocks by himself. I said it on the first thread, and I'll say it again...this was STUPID and horribly negligent. I don't care how many people tell me something is safe for my children, I am supposed to know better and protect them. Of course they aren't going to find him criminally negligent, but he is proximately responsible for this accident, in my opinion. I can't imagine what the poor mother is going through. I love my husband with all of my heart, but I don't know that I could ever look him in the face again if he had let this happen to one of our children. YES I would blame him. It's pure stupidity. And now a little boy is dead.

SHAYMARAYSMOM
12-06-2008, 11:54 AM
Dawn is clearly on the side of the father, no matter what. Poor, ignorant man (a doctor, no less!) who had no clue an UZI was dangerous for his, what, 3rd grader? Who probably wasn't allowed to walk to school alone or ride his bike more than a couple blocks by himself. I said it on the first thread, and I'll say it again...this was STUPID and horribly negligent. I don't care how many people tell me something is safe for my children, I am supposed to know better and protect them. Of course they aren't going to find him criminally negligent, but he is proximately responsible for this accident, in my opinion. I can't imagine what the poor mother is going through. I love my husband with all of my heart, but I don't know that I could ever look him in the face again if he had let this happen to one of our children. YES I would blame him. It's pure stupidity. And now a little boy is dead.

:thumbsup2

PrincessKitty1
12-06-2008, 12:10 PM
I agree! I can understand an uninformed parent who doesn't really understand the difference between a gun like that and the hunting rifles and handguns that he's probably more familiar with making a bad decision. I can't understand trained, experienced people making the same bad decision.

I agree with this to some extent. I've taken shooting lessons, know how to shoot, and own a gun for self-protection, and I have a really good idea how much kick a gun has. I can't imagine letting an untrained 8 year old shoot a gun without somebody else holding on to it for him.Even a little .22 would have kick to an 8 year old. I think Dad should have known that, but it's always easy to second-guess people's decisions when a tragic accident happens.

I do believe the folks who ran the gun show were criminally negligent.

SeeVee
12-06-2008, 12:13 PM
I'm still not sure I get it. Was the boy's finger still pulling the trigger as it flipped over? Or does an automatic weapon continue firing after you stop pulling the trigger?

It's a tragedy but it appears that it was an accident. The same thing could have happened to an adult.

It is actually so simple, some people miss the danger. (I am not calling you simple!)


When startled, people tend to tense up and anything in their hands gets gripped tighter. When the gun startled the child, he gripped tighter causing his fingers to pull harder/longer on the trigger in an attempt to "hang on" to a situation that was quickly getting out of control.

I saw the same thing happen to a young child on a jetski. Grandpa hopped off to make an adjustment and left the engine running. Before hopping off, he told the child (4 years old) not to touch the throttle which functions just like a trigger. The child grabbed it, the jetski took off, and as it speed up, he gripped tighter on the trigger to hang on. Everyone was yelling for the child to let go at the top of their lungs. I imagine in his poor little mind he was opting not to let go so as not to lose control and fall off.

Some four hundred yards later down the San Jacinto river, the jetski/child met a low hanging branch.

Tradgedy for everyone involved.

DawnCt1
12-06-2008, 02:49 PM
Since it was completely legal for that child to hold the gun, I'm kind of confused why that man was indicted? :confused3 Yes, a young boy was tragically killed, but he was allowed to hold that gun, anybody could, even a toddler since there wasn't an age limit. (I know a toddler would never be able to handle a gun, but it's just an example.) Should a little boy have been holding an Uzi, no but that was the father's decision to let him hold that, not the vendors. I know that that father will live with this horrible event everyday for the rest of his life and I'm sure he wishes he could go back and change it.

I'm also wondering if there was a disclaimer on the fliers, like saying that the organization who runs the event and the vendors aren't responsible if there is an accident?

Apparently the law was actually researched by the DA and it wasn't legal at all.

mom2rb
12-06-2008, 03:04 PM
I think if my child had an interest in guns, I would take him somewhere safe to look and/or use them. My dad took me to a firing range when I was eight. I shot a handgun, got it out of my system and was over it. If the father was trying to let his son do something he was interested in, in a safe manner, then I do not blame the father for trusting the professionals.

DawnCt1
12-06-2008, 03:31 PM
I think if my child had an interest in guns, I would take him somewhere safe to look and/or use them. My dad took me to a firing range when I was eight. I shot a handgun, got it out of my system and was over it. If the father was trying to let his son do something he was interested in, in a safe manner, then I do not blame the father for trusting the professionals.

My dad used to take me to the town dump and we would line up the bottles and shoot them with his handgun, rifle and shot gun. I think that guns were a part of this family's experience but the father knew nothing about automatic weapons. The thing is small, weighs less than 5 pounds and very, very misleading for someone who has no idea. It was a terrible tragedy. It was horrible judgement but it wasn't criminal on his part. A police chief should have known, particularly if he had handled that weapon. The trainers should have known. Why a 15 year old boy was put in charge of supervising anyone is beyond me. There was a member of the board of that gun association who quit in protest over this event.

yeartolate
12-06-2008, 03:34 PM
Although I do not think the father should be charged, I clearly do not think it was a smart thing for him to allow his son to do.

Yeah, I understand that in different areas of the country, kids are more accustomed to handling firearms at a young age....but a flipping UZI!!!????
Good grief. I do not care how safe it portrayed to be, it is still an UZI! We are not talking hunting or target practice here. :sad1:

I don't think he should be charged, but my guess is that the dad knows deep down he failed his son and will live with that knowlege for the rest of his life.

Loves Disney
12-06-2008, 03:47 PM
This is an absolutely horrible tragedy. It's extremely unfortunate that this happened :sad2:

I think we could on and on pointing fingers at those who we feel are at fault and it's easy for us to sit here and go through a list of mistakes made by all who were involved. It's hard to say who should be under the most blame considering it really is an argument over morals and laws. My personal opinion is that no one, regardless of age, should have the permission to use any lethal weapon without knowledge of how to use it properly and how to avoid accidents like these from happening.

Aside from what I think is right or wrong, I am horror-struck that this happened...especially since it happened extremely close by to me. I could hear the guns firing from where I live and I know a couple people who even went to this event. It's very scary for me to think that this happened...that one of those shots I heard was a fatal shot...of an 8 year old boy...

sha_lyn
12-06-2008, 04:59 PM
I agree! I can understand an uninformed parent who doesn't really understand the difference between a gun like that and the hunting rifles and handguns that he's probably more familiar with making a bad decision. I can't understand trained, experienced people making the same bad decision.

I think if my child had an interest in guns, I would take him somewhere safe to look and/or use them. My dad took me to a firing range when I was eight. I shot a handgun, got it out of my system and was over it. If the father was trying to let his son do something he was interested in, in a safe manner, then I do not blame the father for trusting the professionals.

ITA with both of the above

It is actually so simple, some people miss the danger. (I am not calling you simple!)


When startled, people tend to tense up and anything in their hands gets gripped tighter. When the gun startled the child, he gripped tighter causing his fingers to pull harder/longer on the trigger in an attempt to "hang on" to a situation that was quickly getting out of control.

I saw the same thing happen to a young child on a jetski. Grandpa hopped off to make an adjustment and left the engine running. Before hopping off, he told the child (4 years old) not to touch the throttle which functions just like a trigger. The child grabbed it, the jetski took off, and as it speed up, he gripped tighter on the trigger to hang on. Everyone was yelling for the child to let go at the top of their lungs. I imagine in his poor little mind he was opting not to let go so as not to lose control and fall off.

Some four hundred yards later down the San Jacinto river, the jetski/child met a low hanging branch.

Tradgedy for everyone involved.

Oh my, how horrible for all involved