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Neesy228
09-16-2008, 08:31 PM
Geesh, I sure don't remember 2nd grade being such high pressure when I was there!!:scared:

Just wondering how much homework your elementary school aged children have? Just checking to make sure my school isn't crazy! ;)

emma'smom
09-16-2008, 08:35 PM
Actually, my dd is in first grade and the teacher has said that there won't be any homework...that he doesn't want busy work. The parents should work with their kids on meaningful projects...and can consult with him as needed if parents are concerned that the children need to feel accountable by having a teaching in on the planning.

imthatgirl
09-16-2008, 08:37 PM
she had to read for 1 /2 hour every night. she would also get a math home work sheet and a spelling homework sheet. it usually took us about an hour.
shes in third this year. we get ready for the MCAS now and will start saturday school. so far she been doing a lot of assesmant tests to find out who her second teacher will be. so there hasnt been overwhelming homework, but once we get through the testing and see where she goes during rainbow grouping i expect them to start piling it on.

swald91
09-16-2008, 08:47 PM
Actually, my kids had more homework in 1st grade than in 2nd!! My son is in 3rd and has an ok amt. I think they have time in school to finish it & if it's not done, then it comes home. My daughter is in 7th & has a decent amt for her age. There is a big discussion about homework & studies show that it doesn't make them any smarter-etc. I don't think it hurts-it definitely reinforces what they cover in class. My son just hates to do it!!!!

LIBLULA
09-16-2008, 09:02 PM
My daughter is in 3rd grade. She had more homework in 1st and 2nd grade. They only have homework if they don't finish their work at school. She hasn't had any homework except to study for weekly spelling test and to read 60 minutes a week. I have her read at least 30 minutes a day and have her do extra stuff at home.

heimlichfan
09-16-2008, 09:04 PM
I teach 4th grade and our school tries (as consistently as possible but not always) to follow the 10 minute rule...

For each grade they are in school, they should have 10 minutes of homework. So 1st graders have 10, 2nd graders have 20, etc...

I know that generally I do not give homework on weekends and over the years have stopped giving assignments over breaks.

Tonight for homework my kids had to do one spelling sheet, one math sheet, and reread part of our social studies book. (Like 5 or 6 pages.)

Luv Bunnies
09-16-2008, 09:30 PM
I love how my son's 2/3 teacher did homework (we have split classes and kids have the same teacher for 2 years in a row). She sent home a packet on Monday that was due on Friday. There were usually 5-6 pages in the packet of math, spelling, grammar, etc. The kids could do all of the pages in one night or do 1 or 2 each night. If we we knew we would be out or busy one night, we would just plan to do extra on another night. In addition to the packet, 2nd graders had to read for 15 minutes and 3rd graders for 20.

This year he's in 4th grade. He's been getting one page of math each night. They also get a spelling packet on Monday with 5 different activities to help them study their spelling words. The packet is due on Friday. They're also doing the recorder right now so they have songs to practice each night. I've never thought the elementary school homework was unreasonable. Our school goes through middle school. When my oldest started 6th grade, that's when I thought the homework was unreasonable!

Erin1700
09-16-2008, 09:31 PM
My second grader gets a page of spelling, a page of math and sometimes reading. It only takes about 15 minutes.

amandaraye
09-16-2008, 09:37 PM
I think a lot of it depends on the teacher. Last yeay when DS was in Kindergarten he had enough homework to sometimes drive him to tears. When he got to that point I told him he didn't have to do it and I spoke to his teacher. That's ridiculous to to that to a child of that age. She just liked to keep the kids busy and out of her hair. He came home with about 4-5 worksheets every day that he completed during school, then more to do at night. Terrible year we had last year. :scared:

This year, he's (obviously) in first grade and his only homework is Mon-Thursday nights for us to read aloud to each other for 20 minutes per night and keep a journal of books we read together. She also "encourages" us to continue to read together over the weekend even though it's not required. Now, seeing as in the last 16 years I've had kids they've never gone to bed without story time this is a breeze. :) :woohoo:

DisneyKT
09-16-2008, 09:45 PM
My DD is in 4th grade and has up to 4 sheets a night. What I don't like about it is that the directions on some of the sheets are so vague. And this year it seems like the teacher is not very helpful. I am reserving judgement until more time goes by. Going to be a fun year.

fortheluvofpooh
09-16-2008, 09:54 PM
we are on the opposite end. I am constantly saying to my kids...."what is that? you mean you only have one page?" I am dissappointed in our school.

KEH113
09-16-2008, 11:51 PM
My DD is in 4th grade, and seems to get a good amount of homework. It's always at least an hours worth. One night she had so much stuff it took her 3 hours. That was only once. They do get weekend homework occasionally. Her teacher is great though and very fair so I don't worry too much.

stormer
09-17-2008, 12:02 AM
I second the 10 minute rule. We generally follow that in my school, too.

ajh88
09-17-2008, 12:29 AM
My second grader gets a page of spelling, a page of math and sometimes reading. It only takes about 15 minutes.

That's about the same for my DDs 2nd grade. They usually get a spelling list once a week and they have to practice words they don't know regularly. There is usually a math sheet and she's had to write two 5 sentence stories. She has to study math facts for 5 minutes a night and read for 15 minutes a night - they turn in their reading logs on Fridays and if they didn't read 75 minutes for the week, they miss morning recess.

She's also in "math intervention" since they do MAP testing in 2nd grade - so she usually has a couple of extra math sheets, but they aren't technically homework to be turned back in - just extra practice.

All in all, she spends 30 to 45 minutes a night on school related work (including the 15 minutes or more of reading).

Karlzmom
09-17-2008, 02:14 AM
I can't get over how much homework kids are given these days...we had none until jr. high, except maybe a book or state report per year. My older DS had homework out his ears! Part of me thinks its because my teacher graded papers after class, where it seems to be "the thing" to have the kids swap and grade...takes twice as long for the coverage and means a bunch comes home.
It seems like literacy and test scores were higher and kids actually had time to be kids. The last thing most adults want to do is more work after a full day and yet that's what we ask of kids on a regular basis. Everyone blames TV and video games for kids not being physically active, but good grief, 20 mins of reading, 30 mins of math, add in the 20-30 mins of band practice, the history, science, health etc. and the daylight hours are gone!

Frankly, the amount of "family time" that the public schools feel comfortable claiming in the form of monitored reading, assignments, etc. is one of the factors that went into our decision to home school. I always respected "school time" with appointments and such, but they seem to have no problem taking over the few waking hours I have with my children. As the mom of a special needs child, we found that we would literally spend the entire evening explaining the concepts, monitoring the work and filling our forms. There were days I wondered who was in school, him or me, with all the "mandatory
stuff that parents are expected to do.....If we have to spend that much time working with our children to keep up with the teacher's expectation, then we may as well just do the lessons here and cut out the garbage that we don't want being fed to our kids....I know homeschooling isn't an option for everyone, but I must say it certainly put some sanity back into our lives.

PollyannaMom
09-17-2008, 05:35 AM
My 2nd grader usually gets one or two worksheets, Monday through Thursday. Spelling words are also given out at the beginning of the week, for a test on Friday. There is no weekend homework.

jfegan
09-17-2008, 05:53 AM
Our school follows the ten minute rule, but my son doesn't. He just talks and talks and it can be over an hour and he hasn't put forth any effort. He really needs to burn off steam, but I just want him in the habit of getting in done right after school. I didn't and I wish I had learned that. It's early in the year yet, I imagine some haven't settled into the 'way' of doing things yet. Our 2nd grade teacher ( I said that as if I returned to second grade) pardon me, his 2nd grade teacher had a method with spelling words that could take a lot of time up one day and none the rest of the week, or just a little everyday. It was self paced and up to the student (or his parents). This year, 3rd grade his teacher is sooo laid back and he is expected to do 30 minutes. If he finishes in 20, he should find something to do work wise to fill the 10. Good Luck!

carj
09-17-2008, 05:57 AM
My second grader has to read for 20 minutes nightly. He gets a math worksheet 2 times a week. These usually take him less than 10 minutes. He has to write his spelling words 3 times as a handwriting grade and to practice. Those are the things that are required.

We also practice his spelling words by spelling them mout loud each night. He has 20 words and there are usually 5-6 that don't follow the rule so those are the ones that we focus on.

He also takes timed fact tests every Friday. You have to make a 100 on the test in order to move to the next test. Each test takes 5 minutes and he practices 2 times each day. (He wants to do this because he is very competitive and wants to move to the next test.)

In all, we probably spend 40 minutes on homework. Since 20 minutes of that is reading, I don't feel like that is excessive.:goodvibes

mjkacmom
09-17-2008, 05:59 AM
Last night, my kindergartener's had 15 minutes, my second grader 45 minutes, my fifth grader 1 1/2 hours, and who knows about my seventh grader - she does homework in her room, on the 3rd floor. Around here, third grade is when it gets crazy.

WantToGoNow
09-17-2008, 06:08 AM
My son's in 2nd grade and he gets a list of spelling words on Friday and has a pre-test on Monday - if he gets them all right (which he hasn't done yet), we don't have to worry about them that week - otherwise the test is on Friday. He gets a short list of vocabulary words that he has to know the meaning and able to put them into a paragraph on Friday. He has to read a book every night (15-20 minutes) and usually a math page but not always. He forgot to put his name on his paper the other day and had to write his name 25 times as homework as well.

My dd4.5 has preschool homework about 1-2x a week - usually cutting out shapes out of a magazine and gluing them into a book.

amandaraye
09-17-2008, 07:39 AM
I think it's hard too, to say '15 minutes per night of homework'. :teacher: Each child is an individual. As someone else said, what little Suzie or Joey in class might be able to do in 15 minutes, maybe it takes my kid 30-45 min. Or vice versa. My son's attention span isn't great so it takes him longer to get these things done. Plus he needs constant encouragement to 'keep working" "ignore your sister" "sit down, you can have a drink later". Believe me, I'm a 100% believer that its not just the school's job to educate my cihld but it's just so difficult, and sometimes impossible. I have two other children and my DH works 2nd shift so it all falls on me. My teenager needs guidance with his homework which can be a couple hours per night. Plus he's in Boy Scouts. plus my younger DS is in Cub Scouts. Plus I have a toddler in the middle of potty training. It's just difficult and frustrating sometimes. :confused:

kinntj
09-17-2008, 08:14 AM
My 1st grader gets homework, but she's not overwhelmed by it. In her Friday folder she gets a spelling list, math sheet, and make words sheet. These are all due any time during the following week. Last week we did get a special Social Studies project to list our 5 traditions we do as a family. We sat down as a family to do that one, so she could discuss one in front of the class easier.

They haven't really started the reading/writing or science stuff yet. They have only been in class 2 weeks. DD's teacher will start testing the students on where they are in reading next week and they will start in October in all areas. Then we'll see what the homework is like.

AUDramaQueen
09-17-2008, 08:23 AM
We get a weekly homework packet for both my 1st and 2nd grader. A few math pages, spelling words, and english. Plus they are supposed to read 20 minutes a night. I like this system a lot. If we have something to do that night, I dont have to worry about their homework. Plus I think it teaches them planning and project management. My 1st grader's packets have been bigger lately than my 2nd grader's though.

My 2nd grader has the spelling and dictation pre-test Monday like a PP and doesn't have to take the test if he gets them all right.

mchames
09-17-2008, 08:44 AM
Last night, my kindergartener's had 15 minutes, my second grader 45 minutes, my fifth grader 1 1/2 hours, and who knows about my seventh grader - she does homework in her room, on the 3rd floor. Around here, third grade is when it gets crazy.

Third grade starts the homework nuttiness here, too. I have a third and fifth grader and they each average 2+ hours a night, not including mandatory instrument practice for their band (DD8) and orchestra (DD10) grades. Fifth grade is completely over the top, they change classes for every subject and usually have a homework assignment in each of math, reading, language arts and science or SS. Science and SS rotate every three weeks so they only have one of them at a time, but there is usually a project due as well. Not to mention all of the weekly quizzes and tests they need to study for.

I was telling a friend the other night, that I need to start buying wine by the case just to get through the homework every night!:lmao:

Mary

poohguys
09-17-2008, 08:57 AM
My DS is in 2nd grade he has maybe 15 mins of home work a night, plus he is supposed to read each night (no set amount of time) Monday -Thursday he has 1 page of math homework and to practice his spelling words for Friday's spelling test (only 6 words). Maybe once a week he also has a vocabulary match sheet. On Friday he brings home a bag with three books that he has to read and log on to a journal by the following Weds. I think so far that his home work level is fine. We will see if there is more as the year progresses.

Last year in 1st grade it seamed like he had more: every night 1 page of math, 1 page of language arts. A story to read and answer questions about that was sent home on Monday and due back on Friday. Also he had to read for 10 mins every night.

Reading was never a big deal-we have read books every night since he was a baby. Just now he reads to me! I never remember reading as well as he does when I was in 2nd grade. :)

disneybell
09-17-2008, 10:04 AM
My daughter's school uses the ten minute rule also. I think it is a great rule of thumb. I am glad our school has this policy. She's in 3rd grade this year and so far she has never spent more than 10 minutes or so on homework.

I would be so angry if she had homework for 2+ hours a night this year. I think kids need to have some time to spend with their family and just be kids.

Fantasmic23
09-17-2008, 10:16 AM
Geesh, I sure don't remember 2nd grade being such high pressure when I was there!!:scared:

Just wondering how much homework your elementary school aged children have? Just checking to make sure my school isn't crazy! ;)

DS (6 years old, 1st Grade) has a math ditto he has to complete every night. He also has to do one page in his spelling book every night. He also has something called "Take Home Reading" (He has to read one "Beginner" book a night - the goal is to read for at least 10 minutes a night).

DD (9 years old, 4th Grade) has to complete the front and back of a math ditto (Her math homework is usually the dreaded word problems or fractions - UGH!). She also has spelling homework each night (One night use each of the spelling words in a sentence, the next night write the words in alphabetical order, etc., etc.). DD has to read for at least 15 minutes every night (Books from the school library).

It's only September and the "projects" haven't begun yet (Both kids haven't started on social studies or science yet in their classrooms. I went to Open House last night and both teachers said that the social studies and science units will be beginning in October).

jodifla
09-17-2008, 10:26 AM
My daughter's school uses the ten minute rule also. I think it is a great rule of thumb. I am glad our school has this policy. She's in 3rd grade this year and so far she has never spent more than 10 minutes or so on homework.

I would be so angry if she had homework for 2+ hours a night this year. I think kids need to have some time to spend with their family and just be kids.

I'm with you. Two hours of homework is nuts. I didn't even do that much homework in high school, and I graduated fifth in my class.

My first-grader has a book to read every night, with a worksheet with a few questions. It takes us less than 10 minutes and we do it right before bedtime.

dis75ney
09-17-2008, 11:48 AM
I love how my son's 2/3 teacher did homework (we have split classes and kids have the same teacher for 2 years in a row). She sent home a packet on Monday that was due on Friday. There were usually 5-6 pages in the packet of math, spelling, grammar, etc. The kids could do all of the pages in one night or do 1 or 2 each night. If we we knew we would be out or busy one night, we would just plan to do extra on another night. In addition to the packet, 2nd graders had to read for 15 minutes and 3rd graders for 20.

This is exactly what my DS (2nd grade) has for homework. He chooses to do two pages per night rather than all at once, and then he reads for 15-20 minutes before bed. I also think he had more homework in 1st grade...

disneyplanningdad
09-17-2008, 12:11 PM
Sorry, but whenever I see one of these threads about homework I can't help but chiming in with my opinion: I feel homework is a good thing and as the saying goes you can never get too much of good thing. The only time it is bad is if the teacher is giving it because he/she is not covering the curriculum in class.

Savsmommy
09-17-2008, 12:13 PM
My DD8 is in 3rd grade. So far she has only had spelling and reading homework. She's been in school since Aug. 18th.

She has 15 spelling words.

Mondays - Spelling words 3x each
Tuesdays - Spelling ABC order
Wednesday - Spelling Sentences
Thursday- Study for Test

Then she has to read 15 minutes a night a write 3 sentences about what she read.

The Moonk's Mom
09-17-2008, 12:20 PM
Sorry, but whenever I see one of these threads about homework I can't help but chiming in with my opinion: I feel homework is a good thing and as the saying goes you can never get too much of good thing. The only time it is bad is if the teacher is giving it because he/she is not covering the curriculum in class.

I'm with you here! I like to see the kids get homework because I can see where the kids are at and I am aware what they are having problems with. Before we moved last year, my kinder came home with homework every night, just as his sister did when she was a kinder. After we moved, one sheet a week! He is now in 1st grade and gets a sheet a night. I am thrilled! I am more aware of where to help him. I know that teachers have a lot going on and they may not always spot where my child needs extra help. So I say, bring it on!

K and K's Mommy
09-17-2008, 12:47 PM
I was telling a friend the other night, that I need to start buying wine by the case just to get through the homework every night!:lmao:

Mary

That would have been me last year with 3rd grade homework! We sometimes had 2-3 hours. I am thankful to say 4th is so much better! He usually only has about 10-20 minutes of written work and then he has to read for 20-30 minutes. Life is much better at my house!

design_mom
09-17-2008, 12:54 PM
I love how my son's 2/3 teacher did homework (we have split classes and kids have the same teacher for 2 years in a row). She sent home a packet on Monday that was due on Friday. There were usually 5-6 pages in the packet of math, spelling, grammar, etc. The kids could do all of the pages in one night or do 1 or 2 each night. If we we knew we would be out or busy one night, we would just plan to do extra on another night. In addition to the packet, 2nd graders had to read for 15 minutes and 3rd graders for 20.


This is how our teacher does it, too (2nd grade). I think it helps the kids budget their time, too. We have 5-6 pages in the packet and 10 spelling words to study during the week. The children also have to read 20+ minutes per night, but that was part of our nighttime routine anyway, so it doesn't really count as homework.

I don't mind the kids having *some* homework because I agree that it helps parents know where the child is struggling/proficient. However, I think a small amount of homework per night is enough. I remember in high school I would come home to 4-5 hours per night -- and I was an A student, not struggling. I wasn't goofing off either. It just seemed like each teacher gave you 30-45 minutes of homework times 7 periods in the day. I do not wish that on my children!

Aristomommy
09-17-2008, 12:55 PM
Geesh, I sure don't remember 2nd grade being such high pressure when I was there!!:scared:

Just wondering how much homework your elementary school aged children have? Just checking to make sure my school isn't crazy! ;)

Our school has a 10 minutes per grade of homework plus reading time. So in 2nd grade that would be 20 min. of homework and 15 min. of reading.

Aristomommy
09-17-2008, 01:04 PM
Sorry, but whenever I see one of these threads about homework I can't help but chiming in with my opinion: I feel homework is a good thing and as the saying goes you can never get too much of good thing. The only time it is bad is if the teacher is giving it because he/she is not covering the curriculum in class.

Homework is a great thing, but there is too much of this "good thing". 2 hours in elementary grades? If it takes 2 hours in addition to 6 hours in school learning, that's excessive. This year DD has 3 teachers and luckily they communicate when each has a big project so they work on one at a time. But other teams at our school don't communicate which creates frustration for many parents and students who try to keep up.

snickerboo
09-17-2008, 01:30 PM
Our board has a recommended guideline of 10 minutes per grade per night (ie: grade 2=20 minutes). My dd is in 3rd grade and has only had one homework assignment + 20 minutes reading per night so far. In the past, our teachers have also done the packet due back Friday with a list of spelling words to be tested on the Friday. I like that because it allows some flexibility.

I'm not into a lot of homework in the primary grades: IMO, if they need 2 hours of homework to fully understand a concept taught in class, then the teacher has done a poor job of teaching the concept. Homework should only be to reinforce classroom lessons. I also believe one of the most important hings a child can take away from the primary grades is a sense that learning can be fun and school is a positive place where that learning takes place. I think it's pretty hard for a child to feel that way when they have two hours of homework per night in the second grade.

EthansMom
09-17-2008, 01:50 PM
DS7 is in 2nd Grade.

He has:

1-2 math worksheets two nights a week
10-15 spelling words (not to be turned in) to practice anytime M-Th for test on Fri.
15 min.+ of reading at least 4 times each week (logsheet turned in monthly)
Monthly projects (pick 3 out of 10 options) -- he's been doing these on weekends (projects turned in monthly)
Individual reading -- one book per week to read several times and then discuss with teacher

What I like about the way this teacher handles homework is that I can choose to shift DS7's homework load to a different day. So, on days when DS has sports, for instance, I might have him do just his math worksheets. Or if DS7 doesn't have any math that night, I could have him do his 15 min. of reading in the car on the way to his sports.

I know that not all parents would do as well with this way of doing things, but it works really well for us. Basically, by shifting the workload, DS7 has 15-20 minutes of homework about 5 days a week.

DawnM
09-17-2008, 02:27 PM
The frustrating thing about homework, from my perspective......is that my 8 year old is in school 7.5 hours a day.....what are you NOT doing in 7.5 hours that would require me to sit with him for over an hour per night and teach him at home?

7.5 hours is plenty of school for an 8 year old.

Ok, whew, just had to get that out!

Dawn

TinaLala
09-17-2008, 03:11 PM
4th grader - has geometry homework almost every night and a spelling paper. Then I do flashcards for her spelling words that she has to spell every night. Then there's 20 mins of reading every night.

1st grader - has easy homework right now, then we do the 20 mins of reading.

It's tough - that's why we don't do anything during the week after school. Well now we're doing Girl Scouts on Monday nights, but it's not until 6pm and homework is done by then.

MaryKLady
09-17-2008, 05:35 PM
My DD just started kindergarten and has had up to 45 minutes of homework every night, except Friday. Some of what she is given is just plain stupid. Today she had 4 pages of "circle the yellow circles and circle the small squares" kinda stuff...you're kidding right?!?! I haven't met a kindergartner yet that couldn't do that in his or her sleep. Some of it is just busy work and I hate that. I keep it upbeat and do it right after school so it is done. But I fear she'll grow to hate doing it at all. My daughter gets off the bus at 3:15, eats a snack, does homework, eats dinner, relaxes and starts getting ready for bed at 6 so she can get up at 6:30 and do it all again. Forget it when she has an activity after school and 45 mins of homework. My SIL warned me about the homework situation but we thought my DD wouldn't get as much because she has full day where her DS had 1/2 day. Sometimes I feel like she doesn't get to play outside or unwind enough. I can't wait for BTS night tomorrow to find out what gives.

DisneyKT
09-17-2008, 06:32 PM
The frustrating thing about homework, from my perspective......is that my 8 year old is in school 7.5 hours a day.....what are you NOT doing in 7.5 hours that would require me to sit with him for over an hour per night and teach him at home?

7.5 hours is plenty of school for an 8 year old.

Ok, whew, just had to get that out!

Dawn

:thumbsup2 :thumbsup2

imthatgirl
09-17-2008, 06:55 PM
The frustrating thing about homework, from my perspective......is that my 8 year old is in school 7.5 hours a day.....what are you NOT doing in 7.5 hours that would require me to sit with him for over an hour per night and teach him at home?

7.5 hours is plenty of school for an 8 year old.

Ok, whew, just had to get that out!

Dawn

what they are not doing is sitting one on one with your child and giving them their undivided attention. they have a whole class, usually 15-30 kids. they lay the ground work, its your job to make sure your child is getting it.
of course you dont have to do it, but your child will thank you when he's older:thumbsup2

DawnM
09-18-2008, 09:12 AM
Well, that says it all doesn't it? I am currently homeschooling for that very reason! :hippie:

BTW: I am a teacher, but I am not working right now.

Dawn

what they are not doing is sitting one on one with your child and giving them their undivided attention. they have a whole class, usually 15-30 kids. they lay the ground work, its your job to make sure your child is getting it.
of course you dont have to do it, but your child will thank you when he's older:thumbsup2

imthatgirl
09-18-2008, 09:31 AM
Well, that says it all doesn't it? I am currently homeschooling for that very reason! :hippie:

BTW: I am a teacher, but I am not working right now.

Dawn

but, a homeschooled child doesnt get class interaction, at all. so there are pros and cons to each.

steelebug
09-18-2008, 11:13 AM
My DD6 is in a 1/2 split. She is in the "first grade". However they only teach the second grade cirriculum in this class. So she basically went from K to 2nd. We have about 2 hours of homework each night. She gets her packet on Mondays. She needs to read 30 minutes per night, 16 spelling words per week, 20 vocabulary words, 2 story maps (which includes reading 2 entire books and then title, author, setting, main characters, what the problem in the story is, what happened 1st,2nd and 3rd, how the problem is solved and what the authors point was). All to be written in sentences, read and memorize one poem (this weeks poem was a John Updike, September) Then one other comprehension paper and a math worksheet sent home a couple of nights a week. The problem is not her reading the books for the story maps it is spelling all the words correctly. She just came out of kindergarten! Does anyone else think this is alot of homework for a 6 year old! She is smart and tested high enough to be in this class but gosh. When my DD8 was in a 1/2 split they did 2nd grade work during the school day but 1st grade homework. I feel like she never gets to play. We have dance and basketball during the week which she will not give up she needs some time away from schoolwork. Sorry I am just not sure what to do.

Karlzmom
09-18-2008, 01:32 PM
what they are not doing is sitting one on one with your child and giving them their undivided attention. they have a whole class, usually 15-30 kids. they lay the ground work, its your job to make sure your child is getting it.
of course you dont have to do it, but your child will thank you when he's older:thumbsup2


Yet, so often its the teachers -through their union- that are the 1st to say that parents aren't qualified to "teach" their kids...but its the parent's job to make sure the child "gets it?":confused3

I think the primary reason the so much is now being handed to the parents is that the schools have taken on a role that has them more concerned about teaching "values" rather than the three Rs. The day is spent learning how alternate lifestyles are OK, sex is taught across the grades and curriculum, children's writing assignments are letters to the editor supporting the teachers perspective on the latest political issue, etc. Don't forget, having the teachers done with their work right at 3, with no extra time spent is paramount.

Our "good" district has the kids turn in their books 2 weeks before the end of school and has the kids watch movies that count towards "insturction minutes." Most of the rest of professionals in the world routinely work a full 8 hour day and still have regular, unpaid overtime and weekends. Teachers want profession pay, but to have "employee" hours and benefits...the result is not enough time during the class hours for all the "pet" issues and still getting the real reason kids are there accomplished....so hand it off to mom and dad. The added bonus is that by handing the "getting it" to mom and dad is that when Johnny can't read its the PARENTS' fault! The folks weren't involved enough/care enough/take enough time, etc. Notice that none of the problems in the school are EVER the teacher's fault.....try it, name one that the teacher's have owned?

Also, the teacher want their evenings off because they've worked their day...but are OK with handing KIDS hours of additional work? Last I checked, the kids were in the class too! If the day is long enough that an adult teacher needs a "break", then certainly the children do, also.

-I'll pull on my flame-proof suit as I know I just made a Big Mac outta some sacred cows....:goodvibes

Karlzmom
09-18-2008, 01:37 PM
but, a homeschooled child doesnt get class interaction, at all. so there are pros and cons to each.

At the risk of overstating, I suspect that parents who are concerned and involved enough with their children to take on homeschooling are probably capable of finding social outlets for their children. The social outlets are probably even positive, no muggings for lunch money, no fear of using the bathrooms, no animal-style gang behavior against the "weird" kids, etc. Homeschool kids are not segragated into artificial groups based on birthday [age level] but learn to interact with a wide variety of ages. Besides, in an age when the schools are crying no time to offer subject mastery, I really have to question how much "good interaction" time kids are getting?:confused3

imthatgirl
09-18-2008, 01:48 PM
At the risk of overstating, I suspect that parents who are concerned and involved enough with their children to take on homeschooling are probably capable of finding social outlets for their children. The social outlets are probably even positive, no muggings for lunch money, no fear of using the bathrooms, no animal-style gang behavior against the "weird" kids, etc. Homeschool kids are not segragated into artificial groups based on birthday [age level] but learn to interact with a wide variety of ages. Besides, in an age when the schools are crying no time to offer subject mastery, I really have to question how much "good interaction" time kids are getting?:confused3

oh my, where do you kids go to school? i suppose i would homeschool as well.
there is a big difference between social outings and classroom interaction where ideas and problem solving bounce from one child to the next.
i have no interest in arguing the pros and cons of homeschooling. people choose what is right for their family. there is no "right" way. like i said there are pros and cons to each. any parent who thinks otherwise is wrong. its just not black and white.
as far as "good interaction"time, its our job as parents to find the proper school for our children. it no longer exsists that one must send their child to a specific school because of the street they live on. so obviously if my childs school was "crying" that there wasnt enough time, i would not send her to that school.
regardless of the type of schooling you choose for your child, school is not a 7 hour a day thing. all practices your child is learning need to be reiterated throughout the day.

imthatgirl
09-18-2008, 02:00 PM
Yet, so often its the teachers -through their union- that are the 1st to say that parents aren't qualified to "teach" their kids...but its the parent's job to make sure the child "gets it?":confused3

I think the primary reason the so much is now being handed to the parents is that the schools have taken on a role that has them more concerned about teaching "values" rather than the three Rs. The day is spent learning how alternate lifestyles are OK, sex is taught across the grades and curriculum, children's writing assignments are letters to the editor supporting the teachers perspective on the latest political issue, etc. Don't forget, having the teachers done with their work right at 3, with no extra time spent is paramount.

Our "good" district has the kids turn in their books 2 weeks before the end of school and has the kids watch movies that count towards "insturction minutes." Most of the rest of professionals in the world routinely work a full 8 hour day and still have regular, unpaid overtime and weekends. Teachers want profession pay, but to have "employee" hours and benefits...the result is not enough time during the class hours for all the "pet" issues and still getting the real reason kids are there accomplished....so hand it off to mom and dad. The added bonus is that by handing the "getting it" to mom and dad is that when Johnny can't read its the PARENTS' fault! The folks weren't involved enough/care enough/take enough time, etc. Notice that none of the problems in the school are EVER the teacher's fault.....try it, name one that the teacher's have owned?

Also, the teacher want their evenings off because they've worked their day...but are OK with handing KIDS hours of additional work? Last I checked, the kids were in the class too! If the day is long enough that an adult teacher needs a "break", then certainly the children do, also.

-I'll pull on my flame-proof suit as I know I just made a Big Mac outta some sacred cows....:goodvibes


wow, how could i have passed by this gem. youve got to be kidding me.
oh where to start....
1.i have no idea what kind of school you have sent your children to, but ours teachs the 3R's. they dont learn values, thats my job. my children have never had a sex ed class and there is 0 time spent on alternate lifestyles, lol. i have no idea what you are talking about with the writing assugnments. they do book reports, like any normal child. they write poems and short stories. this is laughable. its clear you have no idea what youre talking about.
2. teachers are there before your child gets to school and theyre there after. i ahve been to my childs school as late as an hour later and teachers are still there grading papers. i think you have no idea what youre talking about:confused3
3. i dont know where you ahve been emplyeed as a "professional" but, its against the law to work off the clock.
4.you bring up learning to read. i assume you have children. your children learned to read in a classroom type environment? no they learned to read by practice. i for one do not want my child spending her time in the classroom reading, i want her learning the fundemantals, she practices at home. if a homeschooling parent is not having their child read outside of the alloted class time, theyre doing something wrong.


i get the feeling youve never sent your child to school. if you have no experience with it, you really cant comment how it, right? most of your post in based on nothing.

luvsJack
09-18-2008, 03:53 PM
Wow. I started reading about homework time, skipped a few pages and walked right into a discussion about sex ed and animal type behavior and all kinds of stuff! I don't know where you live or what kind of school you are talking about but I have never heard of such, except maybe in movies.

FYI: teachers work much more than an 8 hour day. Those teaching plans don't write themselves and fairies won't grade papers. Working without pay is called slave labor and was outlawed many years back, professionals that are required to work overtime are compensated. Teachers are not expecting anything that is not due them.

I have had issues with the amount of homework in only one grade (dd is in
5th) and that was in 3rd grade. My sons never had the amount of homework she had in 3rd. The teachers kept telling me "its a benchmark year"?? Maybe some of you that are teachers can explain that phrase?? Anyway she had so much work that at 10 pm she would still be working. So I started cutting it off at 8:30 or 9. If anything was not finished, I wrote a note to the teachers letting them know that I was aware she had not finished and why. I tried to make sure she did some work in every subject and did all studying for tests. They never penalized her for not having it.

mjkacmom
09-18-2008, 04:00 PM
Yet, so often its the teachers -through their union- that are the 1st to say that parents aren't qualified to "teach" their kids...but its the parent's job to make sure the child "gets it?":confused3

I think the primary reason the so much is now being handed to the parents is that the schools have taken on a role that has them more concerned about teaching "values" rather than the three Rs. The day is spent learning how alternate lifestyles are OK, sex is taught across the grades and curriculum, children's writing assignments are letters to the editor supporting the teachers perspective on the latest political issue, etc. Don't forget, having the teachers done with their work right at 3, with no extra time spent is paramount.

Our "good" district has the kids turn in their books 2 weeks before the end of school and has the kids watch movies that count towards "insturction minutes." Most of the rest of professionals in the world routinely work a full 8 hour day and still have regular, unpaid overtime and weekends. Teachers want profession pay, but to have "employee" hours and benefits...the result is not enough time during the class hours for all the "pet" issues and still getting the real reason kids are there accomplished....so hand it off to mom and dad. The added bonus is that by handing the "getting it" to mom and dad is that when Johnny can't read its the PARENTS' fault! The folks weren't involved enough/care enough/take enough time, etc. Notice that none of the problems in the school are EVER the teacher's fault.....try it, name one that the teacher's have owned?

Also, the teacher want their evenings off because they've worked their day...but are OK with handing KIDS hours of additional work? Last I checked, the kids were in the class too! If the day is long enough that an adult teacher needs a "break", then certainly the children do, also.

-I'll pull on my flame-proof suit as I know I just made a Big Mac outta some sacred cows....:goodvibes

All I can say is wow! I love our schools, and what they learn. Not much sex talk - an hour in the 5th grade, and then some more in JH, taught by the health teacher (and probably the most important topic they'll learn about!). I know teachers, elementary school teachers, who spend hours every night making lesson plans and grading papers and tests. When do you think that happens? I've never heard of teachers forcing their agendas on students - even last year, when discussing the election, not one teacher even implied who he/she was planning on voting for.

As for homework, my SIL had a Chinese foreign exchange student last year, who was amazed at how little homework we get in the USA - they do homework until bedtime, on weekends, over breaks and summer vacations. She had an easy year here!

DawnM
09-18-2008, 04:02 PM
My statement was about the students, not the teachers. I have taught long enough to know how much teachers work.

Dawn

Wow. I started reading about homework time, skipped a few pages and walked right into a discussion about sex ed and animal type behavior and all kinds of stuff! I don't know where you live or what kind of school you are talking about but I have never heard of such, except maybe in movies.

FYI: teachers work much more than an 8 hour day. Those teaching plans don't write themselves and fairies won't grade papers. Working without pay is called slave labor and was outlawed many years back, professionals that are required to work overtime are compensated. Teachers are not expecting anything that is not due them.

I have had issues with the amount of homework in only one grade (dd is in
5th) and that was in 3rd grade. My sons never had the amount of homework she had in 3rd. The teachers kept telling me "its a benchmark year"?? Maybe some of you that are teachers can explain that phrase?? Anyway she had so much work that at 10 pm she would still be working. So I started cutting it off at 8:30 or 9. If anything was not finished, I wrote a note to the teachers letting them know that I was aware she had not finished and why. I tried to make sure she did some work in every subject and did all studying for tests. They never penalized her for not having it.

DawnM
09-18-2008, 04:05 PM
They are involved in a lot of outside activities and get plenty of large group interaction, problem solving, and such. That doesn't worry me at all.

Sure there are pros and cons. We are homeschooling for now. I don't know if we will do it even past this year. It is a year by year thing.

I taught for 16 years in the public school, so I am well aware of the differences.

Dawn

but, a homeschooled child doesnt get class interaction, at all. so there are pros and cons to each.

imthatgirl
09-18-2008, 07:22 PM
They are involved in a lot of outside activities and get plenty of large group interaction, problem solving, and such. That doesn't worry me at all.

Sure there are pros and cons. We are homeschooling for now. I don't know if we will do it even past this year. It is a year by year thing.

I taught for 16 years in the public school, so I am well aware of the differences.

Dawn

no one cares that you home school. no where did i compare the two. i replied to a post about why children need home work and you decided to turn this into a debate about why homeschooling was better.
like ive said there are pros and cons to both and i dont care to get into a debate about it. no matter now many times you qoute me.

Aristomommy
09-18-2008, 07:37 PM
but, a homeschooled child doesnt get class interaction, at all. so there are pros and cons to each.

no one cares that you home school. no where did i compare the two. i replied to a post about why children need home work and you decided to turn this into a debate about why homeschooling was better.
like ive said there are pros and cons to both and i dont care to get into a debate about it. no matter now many times you qoute me.

I believe that you took this thread into that direction, because another poster mentioned that they homeschool to give their children their undivided attention. There is no obligation to answer any post even if you are quoted. Also it is quite difficult to read your posts because there are only lower case letters.:flower3:

To stay on topic, I would say that some parent equate lots of homework to a good school. Our current science teacher is well known and respected within the community. She does not believe in homework unless it is study for a test. Otherwise very little is sent home, which is wonderful. I read her blog so when we go to the science museum we hit the appropriate exhibits and reinforce the concepts.

luvsJack
09-18-2008, 08:18 PM
My statement was about the students, not the teachers. I have taught long enough to know how much teachers work.

Dawn

And I wasn't responding to you but to another poster, "teachers want professional pay, but employee hours and benefits." Unless you are posting under two names??

Sorry, like I said I read the first couple of pages and then skipped to the last and saw those posts; I am not entirely sure what you said about the teacher's hours.

If you were complaining about homework and the hours spent doing it: Hey, I agree! I had a major problem when dd was in 3rd (see my pp). This year though she mainly has to read and study. She is doing better on tests because she really has time to study for them. And she actually has time to read the entire story from her book every night, so her comprehension test grades have seriously improved.

Just looked back a couple of posts and saw that you homeschool. Hey, more power to you! I don't think that is the best thing for my sanity or my child's; but if thats the choice you made and you and your child are happy with it, GREAT! That doesn't mean you are not educating your child, but it also doesn't mean that those of us who choose to use public or private schools are not educating our children.

mchames
09-18-2008, 10:36 PM
I have had issues with the amount of homework in only one grade (dd is in
5th) and that was in 3rd grade. My sons never had the amount of homework she had in 3rd. The teachers kept telling me "its a benchmark year"?? Maybe some of you that are teachers can explain that phrase?? Anyway she had so much work that at 10 pm she would still be working. So I started cutting it off at 8:30 or 9. If anything was not finished, I wrote a note to the teachers letting them know that I was aware she had not finished and why. I tried to make sure she did some work in every subject and did all studying for tests. They never penalized her for not having it.

I just sent my DD10, fifth grade to bed at 10pm. She was not finished with her homework. She still has to do:

Wordly Wise (vocabulary)- 1 page left out of 12 (was assigned Monday, had 4 pages left to do tonight)
Hatchet (novel study)- has half a chapter left (was assigned 2 chapters)
Social Studies- test tomorrow on the Civil War, needs to study more
Spelling- test tomorrow, needs to study

She completed her Language Arts Homework. Math isn't due until Tuesday, so she will be working on that and a Science project this weekend. Part of her problem is time management, but the volume is still insane.

Mary

robinb
09-18-2008, 10:56 PM
My DD is in 4th grade, and seems to get a good amount of homework. It's always at least an hours worth. One night she had so much stuff it took her 3 hours. That was only once. They do get weekend homework occasionally. Her teacher is great though and very fair so I don't worry too much.Holy cow! I don't know if I should be happy or upset that my 4th grade DD has less than 30 minutes per night. I do think that they are working up to a bit more as she has only been in school for 3 weeks ...

Karlzmom
09-19-2008, 12:10 AM
wow, how could i have passed by this gem. youve got to be kidding me.
oh where to start....
1.i have no idea what kind of school you have sent your children to, but ours teachs the 3R's. they dont learn values, thats my job. my children have never had a sex ed class and there is 0 time spent on alternate lifestyles, lol. i have no idea what you are talking about with the writing assugnments. they do book reports, like any normal child. they write poems and short stories. this is laughable. its clear you have no idea what youre talking about.
2. teachers are there before your child gets to school and theyre there after. i ahve been to my childs school as late as an hour later and teachers are still there grading papers. i think you have no idea what youre talking about:confused3
3. i dont know where you ahve been emplyeed as a "professional" but, its against the law to work off the clock.
4.you bring up learning to read. i assume you have children. your children learned to read in a classroom type environment? no they learned to read by practice. i for one do not want my child spending her time in the classroom reading, i want her learning the fundemantals, she practices at home. if a homeschooling parent is not having their child read outside of the alloted class time, theyre doing something wrong.


i get the feeling youve never sent your child to school. if you have no experience with it, you really cant comment how it, right? most of your post in based on nothing.

OP- sorry the thread went this direction. You asked if the amount of homework was unreasonable for a 2d grader. It appears that you have a lot of support that you are not out of line in questioning the work load you are being handled. I notice that several posters have mentioned that the shift in obligation for the mastery of subjects is a factor in considering if homeschooling is right for you.

As a mom of one 16 year old who has been private schooled, public schooled and homeschooled in his education and a young one who will simply continue the flow of home learning even after meeting "school age" I offered my thoughts on the amount of homework and potential reasons why the volume of homework has appeared to increase to a level that can cause it to interfere with home-life.

Take my free advice for what its worth. At there root, I believe all parents want the best for their own child. Abilities and dedication levels will take parents down different paths to achieve that end. Best of luck to you in dealing with your problem, you have my compassion.


To ImthatGirl: You can think whatever you want about me. I am well aware of my own education and experiences very well versed in the law, thankyou], and really don't need your approval or accolades. Repeatedly telling me that I don't know what I'm talking about doesn't make it true, but maybe it makes you feel better. :confused3 If you care to PM me, I'll send you the links to Boston Globe articles that might be an eye-opener on a number of issues that schools in your neck of the woods are currently experiencing.

mommyof2princesses
09-19-2008, 05:56 AM
We had the homework problem in school, but unfortunately is was no homework in middle school at all! She had more homework in 1st grade. The rule I always went by (when I taught) was 10 min per grade level. My last year I gave math everynight and some reading. I aimed for mastery in class so there was no need for excessive homework at night. I had time to address students with problems by doing quick assesments at that moment to see who needed help. We did a lot of small group work (I taught 4th grade) to help.

I feel bad for kids who have over 45 min of homework a night. Kids who get it don't need it and kids who don't get it don't need it for hours everynight. They need more one on one in school instead.

I don't teach public school anymore, I do homeschool and I will not turn this thread into a debate.

imthatgirl
09-19-2008, 06:52 AM
To ImthatGirl: You can think whatever you want about me. I am well aware of my own education and experiences very well versed in the law, thankyou], and really don't need your approval or accolades. Repeatedly telling me that I don't know what I'm talking about doesn't make it true, but maybe it makes you feel better. :confused3 If you care to PM me, I'll send you the links to Boston Globe articles that might be an eye-opener on a number of issues that schools in your neck of the woods are currently experiencing.

your post was utterly ridiculous and had no relevance in what actually goes on in a school setting. why would i care to pm you? if you want to post something that supports you crazy claims, by all means post it:confused3
btw, you ahve no idea where i live so i dont see how you could possibly know what my schools are facing? im quite aware of whats going on in my own childrens schools and i can assure you that my child is not "scared to use the bathroom" or spending her day learning about "alternative lifestyles":lmao:

luvsJack
09-19-2008, 08:19 AM
I just sent my DD10, fifth grade to bed at 10pm. She was not finished with her homework. She still has to do:

Wordly Wise (vocabulary)- 1 page left out of 12 (was assigned Monday, had 4 pages left to do tonight)
Hatchet (novel study)- has half a chapter left (was assigned 2 chapters)
Social Studies- test tomorrow on the Civil War, needs to study more
Spelling- test tomorrow, needs to study

She completed her Language Arts Homework. Math isn't due until Tuesday, so she will be working on that and a Science project this weekend. Part of her problem is time management, but the volume is still insane.

Mary

That is just waaay too much! Any student should be able to complete their homework and still have time for family and afterschool activities. I used to be a teacher's assistant and I know how much of the homework is just thrown in the garbage; that's why I didn't have any problem picking and choosing what dd finished. I know they can't grade everything and I know the students need practice; but I figure if you can do 5 math problems (all the same) you can do 25. Why not just make them do 5 instead of assigning 25? Same with language-when its picking out the subject or the verb or something similar. 5 sentences is plenty, as long as it covers all the types of verbs or subjects or whatever is being covered.

I think novel study is wonderful and am always excited at the new one being covered, but I think plenty of time should be given to read the material. and that time should include weekends and holidays. The teachers I used to work with would tell me that studying classic novels, book reports and projects were all done to teach the students to love to read. The problem is when they don't have the time to really read the book and enjoy it, it only does the opposite.

DawnM
09-19-2008, 09:15 AM
Oh, sorry. I am not sure why I thought you were responding to me.

My response about teachers was that teachers work much more than the 8 hours they are paid for. It really isn't important to this thread though, just ignore.

Dawn

And I wasn't responding to you but to another poster, "teachers want professional pay, but employee hours and benefits." Unless you are posting under two names??

Sorry, like I said I read the first couple of pages and then skipped to the last and saw those posts; I am not entirely sure what you said about the teacher's hours.

If you were complaining about homework and the hours spent doing it: Hey, I agree! I had a major problem when dd was in 3rd (see my pp). This year though she mainly has to read and study. She is doing better on tests because she really has time to study for them. And she actually has time to read the entire story from her book every night, so her comprehension test grades have seriously improved.

Just looked back a couple of posts and saw that you homeschool. Hey, more power to you! I don't think that is the best thing for my sanity or my child's; but if thats the choice you made and you and your child are happy with it, GREAT! That doesn't mean you are not educating your child, but it also doesn't mean that those of us who choose to use public or private schools are not educating our children.

DawnM
09-19-2008, 09:17 AM
Yeah, our schools here aren't like that either, but the schools i worked in were like that. :thumbsup2 I still loved my job.

Dawn

your post was utterly ridiculous and had no relevance in what actually goes on in a school setting. why would i care to pm you? if you want to post something that supports you crazy claims, by all means post it:confused3
btw, you ahve no idea where i live so i dont see how you could possibly know what my schools are facing? im quite aware of whats going on in my own childrens schools and i can assure you that my child is not "scared to use the bathroom" or spending her day learning about "alternative lifestyles":lmao:

nhl66pens
09-19-2008, 09:27 AM
I spoke to my DD's teacher at the parent - teacher night last week and was told the principal instructed teachers to not provide take home work for any student with a planned absence. I thought that was rather odd personally, but they are trying to dissuade people from taking vacations during the school year. My wife and I went to WDW on our honeymoon and this is the first trip for DD. I didn't want to go for this probably only time (at least while she is young) during a crowded part of the year so I thought it wouldn't be too much for her to catch up on. We'll see if this ruins her 4.0 GPA and any chance at Harvard. Maybe they won't pay too much attention to her 1st grade GPA?

imthatgirl
09-19-2008, 09:40 AM
I spoke to my DD's teacher at the parent - teacher night last week and was told the principal instructed teachers to not provide take home work for any student with a planned absence. I thought that was rather odd personally, but they are trying to dissuade people from taking vacations during the school year. My wife and I went to WDW on our honeymoon and this is the first trip for DD. I didn't want to go for this probably only time (at least while she is young) during a crowded part of the year so I thought it wouldn't be too much for her to catch up on. We'll see if this ruins her 4.0 GPA and any chance at Harvard. Maybe they won't pay too much attention to her 1st grade GPA?

its really all about funding. the better the attendance rate, the better the funding. also i know at our schools if your child isnt meeting a 90% completion of homework they can be considered for being held back. of course it isnt the only factor.
its all good, they want our kids in school. i see nothing wrong with taht. what i dislike is the scare tactics they use to get them there. is your kid going to fail first grade because they go to disney for a week, no. are they going to be behind when they get back, probably slightly. but, as a parent youre aware of this and you make adjustments and catch her up.

imthatgirl
09-19-2008, 09:41 AM
Yeah, our schools here aren't like that either, but the schools i worked in were like that. :thumbsup2 I still loved my job.

Dawn

and we appreciate you for it:flower3: