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mirmartinez
09-03-2008, 07:17 PM
Please help
Being the genius I am, I messed around with banana peppers for dinner without gloves.
This was an hour ago
my hands really really burn.
I googled and yahooed remedies but none are working
anyone

bigdisneydaddy
09-03-2008, 07:19 PM
wash them in milk then ice them

mirmartinez
09-03-2008, 07:22 PM
the right hand has beem in a bucket of icey milk for the past 15 minutes,
how long should I continue

PolynesianPixie
09-03-2008, 07:30 PM
try rubbing alcohol

mirmartinez
09-03-2008, 07:37 PM
try rubbing alcohol

dh went to get alcohol, lemons, and baking soda

I hope it works they it hurt so bad

Rhonda
09-03-2008, 09:01 PM
Anything with Aloe in it will help too! Do you have any sunburn lotion or gel?

Isi
09-03-2008, 09:18 PM
Vinegar works good for sunburns..so its worth the try..

Shan-man
09-03-2008, 09:21 PM
wash them in milk then ice them

Scott is right, milk is one of the few things you can use that will actually carry the capsaicin (the hot stuff) from the peppers away. Capsaicin does not dissolve in water, soap or alcohol, but there are proteins in milk that the capsaicin will cling to, allowing it to be carried away. Once it has been rinsed away the residual burn is probably due to damage already done, not the presence of pepper juice, so treat it like you would any burn: aloe, solarcaine, ice, etc.

BTW: if you are eating peppers and need relief, the last thing you want to do is drink alcohol, as it will help to disperse the capsaicin throughout your mouth increasing the pain. Drink milk, as gross as it sounds with peppers!

mamaloya
09-03-2008, 10:32 PM
I have always used milk to help with pepper burns. Zapp's makes an awesome chip, but fairly hot. I actually drink milk with those chips. Too much cayenne in the crawfish, milk.

BTW, this fact was actually proven on Mythbusters, who btw, should not even get payed for what they do.

edcrbnsoul
09-03-2008, 10:49 PM
Be careful. If the burn is on your skin, i.e. you scratch your nose, vegetable or olive oil will stop the area burning immediately. Soaking the skin in vinegar for half an hour will also kill the burn. If using oil, soak for a full hour for guaranteed effect.
If your hands are burning, try pouring Pepto Bismol on them. It will stop the burn immediately.

BTW: if you are eating peppers and need relief, the last thing you want to do is drink alcohol, as it will help to disperse the capsaicin throughout your mouth increasing the pain. Drink milk, as gross as it sounds with peppers!

Recognize that Capsaicin is fat-soluble, as well as alcohol soluble, which means that fatty foods or beverages such as milk, yogurt, cheese, ice cream, or avocados will release the pain-causing chemical, or a shot of your favorite tequila will do the job as well .



Capsaicin is a nonpolar molecule, and is therefore hydrophobic. Consequently, drinking water to reduce the burning caused by the molecule is ineffective, as the nonpolar capsaicin is unable to dissolve in the polar water molecules, and is instead spread across the surface of the mouth. This works by the same principle that causes oil and water to separate.

Instead, consuming foods high in fats and oils, such as milk or bread and butter, will help alleviate the burning. The lipophilic capsaicin is able to mix freely with the fats in the food and is removed from the surface of the mouth. Alcohol and alcoholic beverages also dissolve capsaicin due to the solvent characteristics of ethanol. Of course, over time the capsaicin will dissipate on its own.

Gatordad
09-03-2008, 11:22 PM
too complicated for me.

des1954
09-04-2008, 05:57 AM
Be careful. If the burn is on your skin, i.e. you scratch your nose, vegetable or olive oil will stop the area burning immediately. Soaking the skin in vinegar for half an hour will also kill the burn. If using oil, soak for a full hour for guaranteed effect.
If your hands are burning, try pouring Pepto Bismol on them. It will stop the burn immediately.



Recognize that Capsaicin is fat-soluble, as well as alcohol soluble, which means that fatty foods or beverages such as milk, yogurt, cheese, ice cream, or avocados will release the pain-causing chemical, or a shot of your favorite tequila will do the job as well .



Capsaicin is a nonpolar molecule, and is therefore hydrophobic. Consequently, drinking water to reduce the burning caused by the molecule is ineffective, as the nonpolar capsaicin is unable to dissolve in the polar water molecules, and is instead spread across the surface of the mouth. This works by the same principle that causes oil and water to separate.

Instead, consuming foods high in fats and oils, such as milk or bread and butter, will help alleviate the burning. The lipophilic capsaicin is able to mix freely with the fats in the food and is removed from the surface of the mouth. Alcohol and alcoholic beverages also dissolve capsaicin due to the solvent characteristics of ethanol. Of course, over time the capsaicin will dissipate on its own.

Holy Cow!!! Are you Alton Brown in disguise?? Very informative!:thumbsup2

Us3
09-04-2008, 08:48 AM
BTW, this fact was actually proven on Mythbusters, who btw, should not even get payed for what they do.
I love this show Sandra...they really crack me up sometimes!



I hope you're all better this morning and the burning is gone!!!

mirmartinez
09-04-2008, 08:57 AM
Much Better this morning, :cool1:

I do not know if it was the time that passed or every suggestion that I tried but the burning was greatly reduced by the time I went to bed.

Thanks for any and all suggestions.

Gatordad
09-04-2008, 10:16 AM
next time use crushed redpeppers.

Shannone1
09-04-2008, 11:38 AM
Much Better this morning, :cool1:

I do not know if it was the time that passed or every suggestion that I tried but the burning was greatly reduced by the time I went to bed.

Thanks for any and all suggestions.


Maybe you could pass on what you tried to Rog...sounds like he has some "burning" issues too !! :rotfl:

fistofmickey
09-04-2008, 12:25 PM
Burning painful hands or not, those were some excellent Stuffed Banana Peppers.

:thumbsup2

Rhonda
09-04-2008, 01:22 PM
you guys are too cute. :lovestruc


Now do you want to share that recipe?? :goodvibes

loveDmouse
09-04-2008, 04:20 PM
Seems like there is some burning going on round here! Hope everyone can cool down soon!

LarryJ
09-04-2008, 06:18 PM
Wow you would never last in our house where I put up Jalapeno peppers which are like 10X the hotness of the Bananna peppers in vinegar that we use in bean and bacon soup, brown beans, on tacos/burritos/chimachungas and I often eat straight instead of pickles with a sandswich. I guess some folks could have an allergy or are super sensitive to peppers.

Below is a guide of how hot the various peppers are and the numbers are the Scoville heat units that might not relate to just handling them:

Anaheim Chile; California Green Chile; Long Green Pepper; Chile Verde; (When Mature And Red - Chile Colorado; California Red Chile)

These large (5 to 8 inches long, 1 1/2 to 2 inches wide, tapering to a point), mild chiles have a thick skin, and are usually a bright, shiny green. Available year-round in most supermarkets, they're best in the summer. The flavor ranges from mild and sweet to moderate hot,they can vary greatly from pepper to pepper. They are perfect for chiles rellenos, dice or purée them for sauces, soups, and casseroles. Substitute: New Mexico green chile (very close, but hotter) OR poblano chilies.

2,500
___________________________

Banana Pepper, Banana Chile, Sweet Banana Pepper, Pimento

A banana-shaped pepper that changes from pale to deep yellow or orange as they mature. These are easily confused with hotter yellow wax peppers. Sample before using. Sweet banana peppers are sweet, long, tapered, yellow and banana-shaped, hence the name. Sweet Banana peppers may be fried or sautéed, used raw on relish platters, in salads, sandwiches or stuffed.

500
___________________________
Cascabel:

This is a medium hot Mexican pepper that is almost never found fresh in this country. When dried the pepper is round like a cherry pepper with a translucent skin. It has a dark reddish_brown color and the seeds rattle around inside, hence its name cascabel-or jingle bell. When toasted this pepper develops a rich nutty flavor.

5,000
___________________________
Cayenne Pepper = Finger Chili = Ginnie Pepper = Bird Pepper

A wrinkled, very pungent thick fleshed fruit, 6 inches long and 1-1/4 inches in diameter, they are often used in Cajun recipes. . Very pungent, even when small. The Cayenne derived its name from the Cayenne district of French Guiana. Used for sauces, dried, pickled or in salsas. Green cayennes appear in the summer, while hotter red cayennes come out in the fall. Substitutes: chile de arbol OR Thai pepper OR habanero OR jalapeno OR serrano.

60,000
________________________
Cherry Pepper, Hungarian Cherry Pepper, Bird Cherry Pepper, Creole Cherry Pepper

Cherry peppers measure about 1 3/4 inch in diameter. The heat ranges from moderately mild to medium heat with traces of sweetness. Peppers are fleshy and heavily seeded. It matures from green to red.

100 - 500
_____________________

Chipotal, Dried Jalapeno Peppers
Chipotle

Chipotal is not actually a name for any particular pepper, but it applies to a smoking process to dry them. Usually mature jalapenos are selected to be smoked-dried, making them significantly hotter than the immature green pepper. Chipotals enhance and impart a wonderful smoky flavor.

8,000
________________________

Fresno Pepper

Bright green, changing to orange and red when fully matured, Fresno chilies have a conical shape - about 2 inches long and 1 inch in diameter at the stem end. Similar to jalapeno peppers, but with thinner walls, they're great in salsas. Fresnos are available in the summer. the hotter red ones come out in the fall.

5,000
____________________

Habanero Pepper

For the uninitiated even a tiny piece of Habanero would cause intense and prolonged oral suffering. Underneath the heat is a delicate plum-tomato apple-like flavour. close relatives are Scotch Bonnet and Rocoto.

325,000 to 570,000
___________________

Jalapeno Pepper

These popular chiles have a good amount of heat and rich flavor. Green jalapenos are best in the late summer, while red jalapenos appear in the fall. Canned jalapenos aren't as fiery as fresh. Substitutes: cuaresmeno (very similar) OR Fresno chile OR guero chile OR malagueta (hotter) OR serrano pepper OR yellow wax chile pepper OR fresh cayenne pepper

5,000
_______________________

Mirasol Pepper

This thin-skinned pepper can vary more than any other chile in looks, and therefore may be hard to recognize. Sometimes small, sometimes large, smooth or wrinkled, it is quite inconsistent. Known for its distinct berry like, fruity flavor that enhances potatoes chicken, and pork. Spices up hot salsas, stews, and mole sauces.

2,500 - 5,000
_____________________

New Mexico

The darling pepper of New Mexican chili lovers, it is a light green when young, matures to a medium green, and finally a deep red when left on the bush. In the fall, chili pepper fanatics throughout the Southwest crowd roadside roasting stands to stock their freezers with the new fall crop. I am most familiar with the dried mature version of this pepper but depending on where you live, it is also available fresh and smoked dried while still green. Its heat range is from medium to hot, depending on the cultivar, and it has a very distinctive flavor.

5,000
______________________

Pasilla

The pasilla pepper is a long, thin pepper 7 to 12 inches long by 1 inch in diameter. Pasillas turn from dark green to dark brown as they mature.

Poblano Pepper (Fresh), Ancho Chile(Dried Version)

When fresh it is called chili poblano, a large (about 4 inches long and 2½ inches wide) mild, heart-shaped pepper that has thick walls, which make them great for stuffing. Because it is a rather mild pepper, it can be used in quantity to add a deep rich flavor to any chili creation. They're best in the summer. Substitutes: Anaheim. Ancho is the dried version, and it has a brownish-red to chocolate color with a rich chili flavor.


2,000
________________________

Rocotillo Chile

These chiles look like tiny bell peppers and have black seeds. They have an interesting fruity flavor. Substitutes: manzana chile (very similar) OR habanero (similar heat)


2,500
_________________________

Scotch Bonnet Chile

This chile is almost indistinguishable from the habanero, except that it's a bit smaller. It's popular in the Caribbean. Substitutes: habañero chile OR Serrano chilies (use twice as many) OR jalapeno peppers (use twice as many)

325,000
___________________________

Serrano Pepper

A small, rich, waxy green peppers change to orange and red as they mature. They are about 1 ½” long with thin walls and the smaller they are, the more kick they have. Substitutes: jalapeno (not as hot).)

25,000
___________________

Thai Chile = Bird Pepper = Thai Bird Chile = Pick Chi A = Thai Jalapeno

For such a small chile, it packs an incredibly fiery punch. Thai chiles range in color from red to green when fully mature. They are often used in Asian curries. Thai peppers should be used sparingly. Substitutes: chile de Arbol OR fresh cayenne pepper OR jalapeno peppers (not as hot) OR Serrano peppers (not as hot)

150,000
_______________


Even for me I eat Habanero or Scotch Bonnets very carefully and have made pepper juice out of them, but didn't like them as well as the flavor of the Jalapenos.

I also use dried Cayenne to spice up my fried chicken to "kick it up a notch".

Larry

mirmartinez
09-04-2008, 06:44 PM
My skin is extremely sensitive. There are little blisters on them from yesterday.
I normally wear gloves, but I picked up latex ones by mistake.
It would not of been so bad, but I was trying to stuff the sausage in real deep, so both sides of my hands were exposed to the oil.

I have no problem eating the stuff, just handling it.

LarryJ
09-04-2008, 06:50 PM
My skin is extremely sensitive. There are little blisters on them from yesterday.
I normally wear gloves, but I picked up latex ones by mistake.
It would not of been so bad, but I was trying to stuff the sausage in real deep, so both sides of my hands were exposed to the oil.

I have no problem eating the stuff, just handling it.

Learn something new every day, just had never heard of that kind of skin sensitivity. Next time you're faced with that unusual situation you might try using either a baggie from the supermarket or a plastic bag like the Washington Post comes in up here as a temp glove.

I have done that with a rubber band when I had a boo-boo on like a finger and had to take a bath/shower or bath the dogs, etc. and wanted to keep that area dry. Of course I'm one that when working on a vehicle and greasy and get a cut/scrape that is bleeding I will semi clean it off, slap some antibotic on it and then wrap it in tissue and "duct tape" it until I finish when I can do a proper cleaning and dressing.:rotfl: :woohoo: :scared1:

Larry

mirmartinez
09-04-2008, 07:01 PM
My skin is extremely sensitive. There are little blisters on them from yesterday.
I normally wear gloves, but I picked up latex ones by mistake.
It would not of been so bad, but I was trying to stuff the sausage in real deep, so both sides of my hands were exposed to the oil.

I have no problem eating the stuff, just handling it.

This stupidty of mine with peppers reminds me of a party we thru.
It was another incident that proves my lack of common sense.

The party was an all day event and by evening it was beyond rowdy.
First a bride who got cold feet at the church across the street ends up crashing the party, as well as some elderly hitchhiker.
Me, the bride, and a few padres are siiting on the roof when a girl comes out holding all these dried peppers on some twine :confused3 , we dare one another to eat them.
While needless to say the elderly hitchhiker had to drive several extremely ill people to the ER.

I still can not figure out what kind of peppers they were or where they came from.

Shan-man
09-04-2008, 07:08 PM
OMG, you are perfect for this board!!! Welcome

:welcome: :welcome: :welcome: :welcome:

VACAMPER
09-04-2008, 08:58 PM
Glad your hands are better!

fistofmickey
09-04-2008, 10:11 PM
This stupidty of mine with peppers reminds me of a party we thru.
It was another incident that proves my lack of common sense.

The party was an all day event and by evening it was beyond rowdy.
First a bride who got cold feet at the church across the street ends up crashing the party, as well as some elderly hitchhiker.
Me, the bride, and a few padres are siiting on the roof when a girl comes out holding all these dried peppers on some twine :confused3 , we dare one another to eat them.
While needless to say the elderly hitchhiker had to drive several extremely ill people to the ER.

I still can not figure out what kind of peppers they were or where they came from.

The funniest part of that night was our buddy getting cited for a DWI
........................................ on a big wheel

HappyCamper87
09-04-2008, 10:36 PM
Once upon a time when I was a very young, 19 year old newlywed, I was canning peppers for my wonderful DH when he came home to show me just how thankful he was...

I forgot to wash my hands...

And, there were some very private places that were burning very badly and we only had one bathroom! There was quite a fight for a cold shower and I would have never thought of bringing milk into the picture...

Ahh... Memories..:cloud9:

auntie
09-05-2008, 09:08 AM
Now THAT'S Funny! :rotfl2:

BigDaddyRog
09-05-2008, 12:17 PM
Once upon a time when I was a very young, 19 year old newlywed, I was canning peppers for my wonderful DH when he came home to show me just how thankful he was...

I forgot to wash my hands...

And, there were some very private places that were burning very badly and we only had one bathroom! There was quite a fight for a cold shower and I would have never thought of bringing milk into the picture...

Ahh... Memories..:cloud9:

well, great balls of fire...Im udderly speechless....this may be a first.:scared:

mamaloya
09-05-2008, 01:53 PM
well, great balls of fire...Im udderly speechless....this may be a first.:scared:

:lmao: :lmao: :lmao: :lmao: :lmao: :lmao: :lmao: :lmao:
:rotfl2: :rotfl2: :rotfl2: :rotfl2: :rotfl2: :rotfl2: :rotfl2: :rotfl2:

I am crying!!!!!!!!

BTW Larry, I LOVE cayenne (I am from NO after all) and never would have guessed they were that hot. I do know that when sauteeing with it, DO NOT burn it. I wound up gassing us all out of the house one night, even the dogs. I burned the cayenne in the bottom of the skillet. Our eyes were burning so bad I thought we were going to need to go to the ER. I had the vent on and all the windows open. The dogs were crying and I was lauging and crying, poor neighbors thought I was nuts. (well, I am, but that is not the point). Needless to say, I think I know how it feels to get pepper sprayed, and so do my kids and one of their friends. Funniest thing is that I will probably do it again!!!!!!!!!:rolleyes1

TxTink :)
09-05-2008, 02:29 PM
Once upon a time when I was a very young, 19 year old newlywed, I was canning peppers for my wonderful DH when he came home to show me just how thankful he was...

I forgot to wash my hands...

And, there were some very private places that were burning very badly and we only had one bathroom! There was quite a fight for a cold shower and I would have never thought of bringing milk into the picture...

Ahh... Memories..:cloud9:

:lmao: :rotfl2: OMG- that's terribly funny!!!

mirmartinez
09-05-2008, 02:43 PM
Once upon a time when I was a very young, 19 year old newlywed, I was canning peppers for my wonderful DH when he came home to show me just how thankful he was...

I forgot to wash my hands...

And, there were some very private places that were burning very badly and we only had one bathroom! There was quite a fight for a cold shower and I would have never thought of bringing milk into the picture...

Ahh... Memories..:cloud9:

That is way way way worse then my hands.
The burning was so intense just with hands, I could not imagine how awful that must of been.

VACAMPER
09-05-2008, 04:21 PM
Once upon a time when I was a very young, 19 year old newlywed, I was canning peppers for my wonderful DH when he came home to show me just how thankful he was...

I forgot to wash my hands...

And, there were some very private places that were burning very badly and we only had one bathroom! There was quite a fight for a cold shower and I would have never thought of bringing milk into the picture...

Ahh... Memories..:cloud9:

Didn't your momma ever teach you to keep your hands to yourself?:lmao:

wildfan1473
09-05-2008, 05:42 PM
well, great balls of fire...Im udderly speechless....this may be a first.:scared:


:rotfl2: :rotfl2: :rotfl2: :rotfl2: :rotfl2:

Now can you please tell me how to clean all the coke I just sputtered off of my screen and keyboard? And explain to my co-workers why I'm in tears laughing :lmao:

HappyCamper87
09-05-2008, 06:15 PM
well, great balls of fire...Im udderly speechless....this may be a first.:scared:

Yeah! I win, I made Rog speechless! :banana:

See there is no limit to what I will do to make fellow Fort Lover feel better.

Well, almost anything... I almost forgot where I was. :)

DisneyBishops
09-05-2008, 08:04 PM
Once upon a time when I was a very young, 19 year old newlywed, I was canning peppers for my wonderful DH when he came home to show me just how thankful he was...

I forgot to wash my hands...

And, there were some very private places that were burning very badly and we only had one bathroom! There was quite a fight for a cold shower and I would have never thought of bringing milk into the picture...

Ahh... Memories..:cloud9:

This is so funny I almost spit my beer all over the computer screen