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View Full Version : those without dental Ins~how/what do you do??


myprincessgirlisa
09-03-2008, 10:09 AM
my job WONT offer dental cause they say its too expensive & you dont get any coverage......

but IMHO ANY help i can get is better than none even if it is just 2 cleanings a year!!!

but since i dont have it I have to pay out of pocket & that has NOT been cheap
I had a waverunner accidnet where i slammed my mouth on the handle bars & now i need extensive work done...ive already sunk $10k into them & they need more..its ridiculous & from what the dentist says, i NEED to get it done cause things will only get worse in time!!!!

Ive tried those dental clubs...didnt think that saved me a dime
I try to pay the balance off asap so i can get a discount & the dentist does offer financing, but i am trying to avoid MORE bills & dental work can be $2k a pop!

so my question is....HOW do you afford dental work if you DONT have dental insurance??
is there an insurance company out there i can get privately that wont cost an arm & a leg & exclude pre existing??
Im not comfortable with a dental school..UNLESS someone has been to THE one in my area & has rave reviews....(chicago suburbs)
ANY help, tips, advice would be appreciated!!

kmvand1
09-03-2008, 10:27 AM
I don't know how people do it personally, and especially with children. I had a tooth removed last week in the very back, my co-pay alone was $177.00:eek: My daughter's first phase of her braces were $3200, after delta dental kicked in their $1000.00, which is the lifetime cap for her. I just don't know what people do with dental emergencies.

spima3
09-03-2008, 10:40 AM
Wow, sorry to hear about your dental issues, that's a tough one.

We would have to pay $48 a month for dental insurance. On top of that, it has a yearly cap, $1500(?), and only covers 50% for major issues, such as caps, etc., and 80% on fillings.
It really didn't pay to get it, and on another message boards, about finances, most people post that dental insurance is only good if it's free from the company, otherwise you're better off paying as you go. Doing our numbers, I came to the same conclusion.

Now, in our case, I put money in a "dental" account. When there isn't enough, I put it on a credit card, or try to spread the work out as much as possible.
I have a back tooth that is going to need to be capped. Just talked to dentist and he can still fix it, but knowing it's only a matter of time, I have started putting more money aside to cover it. I will let it go as long as possible.

I feel badly for you. My DH's aunt spent about $15K on her teeth, and then ended up getting all of them pulled and getting false teeth. It was all out of pocket. They had the money, but still, it was a lot.

HM
09-03-2008, 10:42 AM
If you have a dental school near you, check them out. They would have students do work under the eye of professionals and you pay only a small price. They particularly like to have people with unusual things to do. Sounds like you might be a good candidate.

sbaldasare
09-03-2008, 10:47 AM
Check out your major medical coverage, if it was an accident. Our Anthem for instance states does provide coverage if an accident within certain criteria. We had a son who wrecked on a motorcycle and needed dental work done and Anthem covered it. Good luck.

addicted2dizney
09-03-2008, 10:49 AM
sorry to hear about your accident. they only thing I can tell you to make you feel better is that if you had dental insurance it would have only paid up to 2K max. And that is for a good plan. Some employers only have a max of 1 or 1.5K. Ask your dentist if they offer Carecredit. My husband does and it does help with the financing. You can even get part of it interest free depending on the length of time you need. As a hygienist I have so many people without insurance. It stinks but you have to just put it in a category of things that need to be paid for. just like a car or new appliances etc.. Being we are in the category of having our own business I pay thousands a month for medical insurance and still have to pay out a ton in copays.

If you have any questions about treatment, please let me know! :)
good luck to you! :)

jakenjess
09-03-2008, 10:50 AM
We would have to pay $48 a month for dental insurance. On top of that, it has a yearly cap, $1500(?), and only covers 50% for major issues, such as caps, etc., and 80% on fillings.
It really didn't pay to get it, and on another message boards, about finances, most people post that dental insurance is only good if it's free from the company, otherwise you're better off paying as you go. Doing our numbers, I came to the same conclusion.


I'm in pretty much the same situation, it's not worth the premium for what you get. I use the flexible spending account to set aside pre-tax money and use it to pay dental expenses and medical co-pays. I don't know if this is an option for you, but you should check into it. Good luck!

chicagodisneyfan
09-03-2008, 10:53 AM
I would try University of Illinois Chicago - sounds like for extensive issues you get a dentist who wants to specialize

Specialty Clinics
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Orthodontic, Endodontic, Periodontic, Prosthodontic and Oral Surgery treatment are available in our post-doctoral clinics. Treatment is provided by dentists and faculty who have chosen to specialize in one of the above areas. Patients may call the main number at (312) 996-7555 and listen for the appropriate prompt



Good luck

addicted2dizney
09-03-2008, 10:56 AM
[QUOTE=spima3;27330935]Wow, sorry to hear about your dental issues, that's a tough one.

We would have to pay $48 a month for dental insurance. On top of that, it has a yearly cap, $1500(?), and only covers 50% for major issues, such as caps, etc., and 80% on fillings.
It really didn't pay to get it, and on another message boards, about finances, most people post that dental insurance is only good if it's free from the company, otherwise you're better off paying as you go. Doing our numbers, I came to the same conclusion.

Now, in our case, I put money in a "dental" account. When there isn't enough, I put it on a credit card, or try to spread the work out as much as possible.

I agree with you 100%. i don't recommend my patients get out of pocket private dental insurance. It never turns out to be what it is promised. Plus the money going out can be saved for the bigger work.

puffkin
09-03-2008, 11:45 AM
At DH's old job, we pretty much broke even with the dental insurance every year. The premiums cost was about what the regular 2x year cleanings would add up to if we paid out of pocket plus we had some coverage (can't remember the limits) if more work was needed.


DH's new job the premiums are about 3x what the yearly cleanings would cost us and was very limited in what it covered. We decided that the insurance just wasn't worth it.

My job has free dental insurance now that covers all cleanings and 50% of most work up to a cap of $1500/family a year. This is by far the best coverage we have had, and as long as something big doesn't happen, I am pleased that we at least get this coverage.

bookgirl
09-03-2008, 11:54 AM
I have been getting mine done at the local dental school. It's about half price but it is slow because even though the students are just short of being dentists they still have to be monitored and the professors have to check and sign off on every step.

Now I have dental (paid by my employer) but I am going to let the school finish off my current plan of care before I make the move to a dental office.

myprincessgirlisa
09-03-2008, 12:02 PM
I have been getting mine done at the local dental school. It's about half price but it is slow because even though the students are just short of being dentists they still have to be monitored and the professors have to check and sign off on every step.

Now I have dental (paid by my employer) but I am going to let the school finish off my current plan of care before I make the move to a dental office.

are you satisified with what they did?

do they do ANYTHING?? or is it limited??

is there a waiting list??

doxxie
09-03-2008, 12:08 PM
I agree that dental insurance isn't really worth it for what you get. And I've recently had a run in with a copay program where the dentist won't do a routine cleaning and wants to do extensive work because that's how they are going to get paid.

BUT - I have heard of one copay plan that might be worth checking into. Assurant Dental. It looks like they do operate in Illinois (I think that's where you're at). However, even with them they are only going to do pay for certain procedures and you do have to go to a dentist on their list (then you get into the issue of do you trust the dentist).

Good luck. That's a ton of money and it stinks to be in that position. I feel for you.

mlynn
09-03-2008, 12:24 PM
I have been getting mine done at the local dental school. It's about half price but it is slow because even though the students are just short of being dentists they still have to be monitored and the professors have to check and sign off on every step.

Now I have dental (paid by my employer) but I am going to let the school finish off my current plan of care before I make the move to a dental office.

I have used the dental school for tooth removal. He did a great job. I have dental insurance now but my daughter needed massive dental work last year adn I had to pay the 5200 up front and then they sent me back 2600 so even with dental insurance it still is alot of money.

DisneyCowgirl
09-03-2008, 01:36 PM
Have you checked to see if your medical plan covers dental related to accidents or illness? Mine does.

problemchild718
09-03-2008, 01:44 PM
How about the dental clinic at one of the large hospitals near you-they offer basic care-no fancy cosmetic stuff. If your income allows, get on a finacing plan(sort of like a credit account)
May be worth switching jobs to one with better insurance if it looks like a huge expense will be incurred.

myprincessgirlisa
09-03-2008, 01:45 PM
Have you checked to see if your medical plan covers dental related to accidents or illness? Mine does.

the accident happened awhile ago & at the time i used my medical for the ER & ER dentist follow up appts....it was a 3year nightmare!!!! i have a 1inch thick folder from bills, collections, complaint letters, records.
I doubt they would cover it now...my policy has changed since then.
It REALLY stinks cause in my teen years when i had dental thru my dad, i had perfect teeth..NOW i have nothing & all this work to be done from that DARN waverunner!!!!:mad:

bumbershoot
09-03-2008, 02:08 PM
I had a waverunner accidnet where i slammed my mouth on the handle bars & now i need extensive work done...ive already sunk $10k into them & they need more..

That stuff wouldn't be covered by our dental insurance anyway, since there's a cap on the cost.



We would have to pay $48 a month for dental insurance. On top of that, it has a yearly cap, $1500(?), and only covers 50% for major issues, such as caps, etc., and 80% on fillings.


I think we pay less on our premium, but the other stuff is right on.

It's nice to get the appts covered, but assuming a normal dental year, we're paying MORE to insurance than we would be paying to the dentists... (I called the dentists to find out what the cash costs would be to compare)


Check out your major medical coverage, if it was an accident. Our Anthem for instance states does provide coverage if an accident within certain criteria. We had a son who wrecked on a motorcycle and needed dental work done and Anthem covered it. Good luck.

the accident happened awhile ago & at the time i used my medical for the ER & ER dentist follow up appts....it was a 3year nightmare!!!! i have a 1inch thick folder from bills, collections, complaint letters, records.
I doubt they would cover it now...my policy has changed since then.
It REALLY stinks cause in my teen years when i had dental thru my dad, i had perfect teeth..NOW i have nothing & all this work to be done from that DARN waverunner!!!!:mad:


Try them anyway. They know where the problems started, and it was while you were covered. Since it was while you were covered, they should still be covering things from that time.

This wasn't a long time ago, but it was an insurance plan ago (hubby changed jobs and therefore plans in October, then a few months after that the company changed their plans) and DS had an ER visit the day after we switched to the employer's plan. We've had continued issues with the ambulance company (Rural/Metro in WA is awful about billing and following through on promises!!!) and even though we aren't with the insurance company anymore, they have been absolutely brilliant at continuing to help me, and in fact reviewing their coverage and finding an error they made, and sending another check to us just in August.

It's worth a try.


But still, normal dental insurance woudln't be covering the things you're having done anyway, so perhaps you can take heart in that.

rach2674
09-03-2008, 02:18 PM
I go to the community college here and didn't realize they actually had a clinic until later in the year. I went there and they were great. I think they do more than cleanings, but I only got the cleaning. It did take a great deal of time, but it was the most thorough cleaning I've ever had.

I would check into a place like that and not some off-beat "medical college". Some of those places scare me. But you should be ok with a state school, whether it's a big university or community college.

I know there are plans that give discounts and even that may be worth it to you. Good luck and I hope you find something.

Rachel

daughtersrus
09-03-2008, 02:20 PM
Im not comfortable with a dental school..UNLESS someone has been to THE one in my area & has rave reviews....(chicago suburbs)
ANY help, tips, advice would be appreciated!!

I went to a friend when he was at U of I dental school in Chicago (just off the Eisenhower) but that was back in the late 80's early 90's. The dental work was GREAT but everything took a long time because it had to be checked by the instructors. The hours are not great either.

My friend moved to Black River Falls, WI a few years ago so I had to find a new one. I just spent several hours at the dentist last night getting impression made for a bridge that he's making again (third time in the last 2 years). My old one was made at the dental school but needed to be replaced because I had a root canal on one of the teeth (long story). I still have a bridge right above this one that was also made at the dental school.


I thought that the school closed a few years ago but I must be wrong.

I do feel for you. Even though we have insurance, they only cover 1/2 of everything with a max of $1,000 per year. My bridge was $3,000 plus the root canal fee so I was left with close to $3,000 out of pocket. :scared1:

thomas998
09-03-2008, 02:39 PM
pre-existing conditions will not be covered... the only time you can get those things done is if you go to work for a company that offers a dental plan and then sometimes after a 1 year period you could be covered... so I don't think that is going to help you in the short term.

I would say you really have only two options... dental school.... or a trip to mexico... depending on just how extreme the work is going to need to be a trip to mexico might actually cost less than a dental school in the states....

The extreme option is to have everything removed and go to dentures.

PrincessKitty1
09-03-2008, 05:16 PM
I have a flexible spending account, but I'd already run out of money in April! I pay out of pocket for dental care.It's the pits.

I personally would not recommend a dental school. I used to go to the faculty practice at the state university dental school (no students working on my mouth, just faculty) and they did a lousy job. I think sometimes dentists right out of dental school get faculty jobs just to get some experience before they go into private practice. I have had several negative experiences with two different faculty members. In fact, I just had a crown made for a big filling that cracked because the faculty dentist had left cotton gauze under the original filling, causing the filling to crack. My current dentist said he'd "never seen anything like it." :sad1:

I hate to sound so negative about using a dental school, but I do think you are better off going with a dentist who really knows what she/he is doing.

kadesha
09-03-2008, 05:21 PM
I don't have dental insurance and I just don't go to the dentist unless I KNOW I have a problem. My job doesn't offer health insurance either, so I don't go to the doctor unless I just HAVE to either. It's difficult, I'm sorry that you are dealing with it. Good luck!

brandylouwho
09-03-2008, 05:45 PM
Hey, just got back from the dentist and am wondering how I will afford it even with my insurance! $3000 worth of work to be done, insurance should cover not quite $1000 of it! What a nice gift receive on my birthday. :sick:

Anywho, my brother is without dental insurance and needs dentures--so he took out a loan. Our dental office offers interest free financing for 12 months. Yeah it sucks, but better to take care of your teeth and pay for cleanings and the like than have to lose them and pay for having them extracted, dentures, etc.

Green Tea
09-04-2008, 04:37 AM
In the instance you mention, OP, our medical insurance would pick that tab up, not our dental insurance. Have you tried that?

Suzanna1973
09-04-2008, 05:23 AM
Anthem offers Dental insurance for around $12 monthly. You might want to check into that. My daughter has it and it covers her cleanings and pays most of her dental work if needed.

mamaminnie
09-04-2008, 06:14 AM
I'd also agree with the idea of a dental school. My sister is a dentist (that's one way to get free/reduced price dental care but it's a big investment!;) )and when I went to see her in school, the work was supervised by top dentists in their field.

Schools also often have financing or payment plans available.

addicted2dizney
09-04-2008, 06:53 AM
Dental school route is a great way to go however please know that it's only great if you have the time to invest in it. Most appointments are either a morning block of time. 9-12 or afternoon 2-5 (just approximate to give you an idea.. ) It may take two appointments just to get a cleaning and xrays. Each bit of treatment is departmentalized and has to be signed off and checked by that department. Believe me, while I was a student of University of Medicine and Dentistry, Newark, NJ I was SO grateful for the patients that took the time to come see me! I just want you to understand the time constraints. Then if it is an ongoing case it may be delayed with school breaks, etc.. If you have the time during the week day you can't beat it!

eeyorethegreat
09-04-2008, 07:02 AM
Dental insurance is a 6 of one haf a dozen of another . We do have it right now because we have a family of six but I agree it doesn;t cover as much as I think it should.

wall*e2008
09-04-2008, 07:39 AM
We have never had dental coverage. The premiums cost more than the yearly cleanings and not much else is covered. Orthodontic coverage is only a samll % of the entire bill.

Are you sure that your accident is not covered by your health insurance. Ours covers wisdom tooth extractions. That are the only teeth we have ever had pulled.

I loveStitchnippyjon
09-04-2008, 07:46 AM
Back when I was a stay-at-home Mom I had lots of work done at the Dental school. I only had to pay for materials used.
In fact, I got called to be a patient for one student's State board exam. I didn't have to pay one cent for a gold inlay, just had to spend the better part of a day in the chair! Twenty years later, that inlay is still perfect.

Piecey
09-04-2008, 09:08 AM
Wow, sorry to hear about your dental issues, that's a tough one.

We would have to pay $48 a month for dental insurance. On top of that, it has a yearly cap, $1500(?), and only covers 50% for major issues, such as caps, etc., and 80% on fillings.
It really didn't pay to get it, and on another message boards, about finances, most people post that dental insurance is only good if it's free from the company, otherwise you're better off paying as you go. Doing our numbers, I came to the same conclusion.

Now, in our case, I put money in a "dental" account. When there isn't enough, I put it on a credit card, or try to spread the work out as much as possible.
I have a back tooth that is going to need to be capped. Just talked to dentist and he can still fix it, but knowing it's only a matter of time, I have started putting more money aside to cover it. I will let it go as long as possible.

I feel badly for you. My DH's aunt spent about $15K on her teeth, and then ended up getting all of them pulled and getting false teeth. It was all out of pocket. They had the money, but still, it was a lot.


Eek. I haven't figured it out with my new job yet, but my previous one I only paid $16/month for DH and I both to have coverage.
In the long run, it was worth it. We were only covered for three months but it paid out over $2k for us. (DH got braces)

I'll have to crunch the numbers for this new policy, though...

Forevryoung
09-04-2008, 10:13 AM
If you are going to avoid the dental school, I have a tip- it sounds strange but around here (NY), it works.

There are dentists out there who do not accept any insurance. They are not participating providers on any plan. If your insurance company is willing to pay a portion of their bill, you are still responsible for the rest.

For any procedure, the dentist is absolutely sure that he will get the same fee from every patient. So the dentist ultimately can/does charge less. Not only that, but they are well aware of the cost of dental work and should provide multiple options that vary in cost. Ultimately you are the one making an informed decision.

They are out there- it's an interesting concept nowadays, not to participate in insurance, but honestly, if the dentist is good at what they do, it works in their favor.

addicted2dizney
09-04-2008, 10:24 AM
If you are going to avoid the dental school, I have a tip- it sounds strange but around here (NY), it works.

There are dentists out there who do not accept any insurance. They are not participating providers on any plan. If your insurance company is willing to pay a portion of their bill, you are still responsible for the rest.

For any procedure, the dentist is absolutely sure that he will get the same fee from every patient. So the dentist ultimately can/does charge less. Not only that, but they are well aware of the cost of dental work and should provide multiple options that vary in cost. Ultimately you are the one making an informed decision.

They are out there- it's an interesting concept nowadays, not to participate in insurance, but honestly, if the dentist is good at what they do, it works in their favor.

You are correct, most higher end dentists do not participate with plans. You should always be given options with your care to make the choice that best suits you. Just keep in mind that a dentist needs to charge everyone the SAME fee whether or not they participate in your insurance or not. If they don't that is fraud. for example.. if they say a crown costs.. $1K to you because you have insurance. (even if they don't participate) and they tell Joe Smith $750 because they don't have insurance that is illegal to do. All fees are the same for all patients. It's a sticky situation to get into if the insurance companies or state comes looking around questioning it. Not that it's the problem of the patient, how would the patient know what the other fees are? It's just not ethical or legal to charge that way. In my experiences with Dentists that don't adhere to any insurance plans it's more to charge "higher" than what the insurance company would yield, not to give the patients a break. Perhaps that is just where I live but most I have worked for don't like to be tied down to the fee schedule insurance companies impose upon them when they can use higher grade materials and charge a higher premium for their work.

thomas998
09-04-2008, 10:40 AM
I have a flexible spending account, but I'd already run out of money in April! I pay out of pocket for dental care.It's the pits.

I personally would not recommend a dental school. I used to go to the faculty practice at the state university dental school (no students working on my mouth, just faculty) and they did a lousy job. I think sometimes dentists right out of dental school get faculty jobs just to get some experience before they go into private practice. I have had several negative experiences with two different faculty members. In fact, I just had a crown made for a big filling that cracked because the faculty dentist had left cotton gauze under the original filling, causing the filling to crack. My current dentist said he'd "never seen anything like it." :sad1:

I hate to sound so negative about using a dental school, but I do think you are better off going with a dentist who really knows what she/he is doing.

I'm surprised your dentist never saw the gauze under the filling before. Putting medicated gauze in a tooth and then putting a filling on top is standard practice if its a very big filling... Doing this is supposed to put less stress on the tooth... of course this is also supposed to just be a temporary filling and it should then be changed to a final filling in 3 to 6 months... I'm guessing the person that did it on your tooth either forgot to tell you or just assumed that on your next visit they would finish the job. The fact that you weren't told of this is a mistake on someones part... and its also a mistake on your current dentists part that he didn't realize what he was seeing.

thomas998
09-04-2008, 10:45 AM
You are correct, most higher end dentists do not participate with plans. You should always be given options with your care to make the choice that best suits you. Just keep in mind that a dentist needs to charge everyone the SAME fee whether or not they participate in your insurance or not. If they don't that is fraud. for example.. if they say a crown costs.. $1K to you because you have insurance. (even if they don't participate) and they tell Joe Smith $750 because they don't have insurance that is illegal to do. All fees are the same for all patients. It's a sticky situation to get into if the insurance companies or state comes looking around questioning it. Not that it's the problem of the patient, how would the patient know what the other fees are? It's just not ethical or legal to charge that way. In my experiences with Dentists that don't adhere to any insurance plans it's more to charge "higher" than what the insurance company would yield, not to give the patients a break. Perhaps that is just where I live but most I have worked for don't like to be tied down to the fee schedule insurance companies impose upon them when they can use higher grade materials and charge a higher premium for their work.

Sorry to have to say this but your mistaken. It is not only legal it is very common throughout the medical profession to charge different prices for the same services based on whether you are insured or not and based on who your insurer is. Hospitals are probably the most blatant ones doing this, they rationalize it by saying that the insured person is more likely to pay so they don't charge as much for a room where the uninsured is less likely to pay so they charge them more for the added risk. There have been some attempts to change this and require uniform pricing by non-profits but thus far those laws don't exist.

addicted2dizney
09-04-2008, 11:09 AM
Sorry to have to say this but your mistaken. It is not only legal it is very common throughout the medical profession to charge different prices for the same services based on whether you are insured or not and based on who your insurer is. Hospitals are probably the most blatant ones doing this, they rationalize it by saying that the insured person is more likely to pay so they don't charge as much for a room where the uninsured is less likely to pay so they charge them more for the added risk. There have been some attempts to change this and require uniform pricing by non-profits but thus far those laws don't exist.

This may be the case with Hospitals and large institutions but not the case with small time practices. I have had years of experience with both types of practices and been to several insurance seminars and charging one fee for all is the way to keep yourself out of trouble. True whats good for the big boys is not always good for the little boys but there is no way you can rationalize it that way if you are being audited.

addicted2dizney
09-04-2008, 11:17 AM
I'm surprised your dentist never saw the gauze under the filling before. Putting medicated gauze in a tooth and then putting a filling on top is standard practice if its a very big filling... Doing this is supposed to put less stress on the tooth... of course this is also supposed to just be a temporary filling and it should then be changed to a final filling in 3 to 6 months... I'm guessing the person that did it on your tooth either forgot to tell you or just assumed that on your next visit they would finish the job. The fact that you weren't told of this is a mistake on someones part... and its also a mistake on your current dentists part that he didn't realize what he was seeing.

I have been working in the dental field for close to 25 years. Been through all different changes in the types of material used for fillings etc.. the ONLY time a small piece of cotton or guaze is placed under a filling is if it is medicated with a eugenol type medication and placed under a temporary filling material. ( a ZOE or other temp filling) these fillings are NOT a hard filling like an amalgam or composite type and would/should only last a few months until a more permanent restoration could be done. I have seen the use of dental sealers or varnishes used in larger fillings to protect or help protect the nerve chamber, These are just painted on a clean, dry tooth structure. Placing a piece of cotton under an amalgam will only help to produce instability in the filling material, ( like building a brick house on a mattress) probably causing instability in the filling causing to to break along with the large size of the filling which could break due to the size anyway.

pinkyinhere
09-04-2008, 11:20 AM
You can make appointment with dental school students. They are very cheap and there are times that they need you for the exam. You even get service done for free.

bumbershoot
09-04-2008, 11:53 AM
Sorry to have to say this but your mistaken. It is not only legal it is very common throughout the medical profession to charge different prices for the same services based on whether you are insured or not and based on who your insurer is. Hospitals are probably the most blatant ones doing this, they rationalize it by saying that the insured person is more likely to pay so they don't charge as much for a room where the uninsured is less likely to pay so they charge them more for the added risk. There have been some attempts to change this and require uniform pricing by non-profits but thus far those laws don't exist.

I think the difference is intent. While going into my chiropractic practice, it was made clear at the board exams that if you say "Joe, since you don't have insurance, I'll charge you $20 when my normal fee is $50" you're heading to trouble. But you CAN give a *discount* to *anyone* you want, it just can't have anything to do with insurance. So "Joe, b/c you're such a good patient and come in for regular visits (or whatever), I'd like to extend you a discount" is fine, b/c it had nothing to do with insurance.

PrincessKitty1
09-04-2008, 08:59 PM
I'm surprised your dentist never saw the gauze under the filling before. Putting medicated gauze in a tooth and then putting a filling on top is standard practice if its a very big filling... Doing this is supposed to put less stress on the tooth... of course this is also supposed to just be a temporary filling and it should then be changed to a final filling in 3 to 6 months... I'm guessing the person that did it on your tooth either forgot to tell you or just assumed that on your next visit they would finish the job. The fact that you weren't told of this is a mistake on someones part... and its also a mistake on your current dentists part that he didn't realize what he was seeing.

No, this was NOT a temporary filling. My current dentist did say it could be done for a temporary filling, but this was not supposed to be a temporary filling. If it WAS just a temporary filling, the faculty member at the dental school did not tell me this. :sad2: I had it for at least 3 years.

But really, my experience at the dental school was one mistake after another. Poor color match on veneers, not returning my calls re: the crown that turned into a root canal that turned into an extraction (if they had returned my calls, I could have saved a good portion of the cost of the crown). And my dentist could not even figure out how to fit a temporary crown.

The faculty practice seems to have a very large turnover; I had a new dentist every couple of years. But the last one I had was the one who drove me into the office of a dentist in private practice. :) Too bad, because I work literally in the same building where the faculty practice is located.

Anyway, my point is simply that I would not rely on a dental school to do the kind of extensive dental work the OP needs, based on my experience at our dental school.

stitchlovestink
09-04-2008, 09:44 PM
Wow, sorry to hear about your dental issues, that's a tough one.

We would have to pay $48 a month for dental insurance. On top of that, it has a yearly cap, $1500(?), and only covers 50% for major issues, such as caps, etc., and 80% on fillings.
It really didn't pay to get it, and on another message boards, about finances, most people post that dental insurance is only good if it's free from the company, otherwise you're better off paying as you go. Doing our numbers, I came to the same conclusion.

Now, in our case, I put money in a "dental" account. When there isn't enough, I put it on a credit card, or try to spread the work out as much as possible.
I have a back tooth that is going to need to be capped. Just talked to dentist and he can still fix it, but knowing it's only a matter of time, I have started putting more money aside to cover it. I will let it go as long as possible.

I feel badly for you. My DH's aunt spent about $15K on her teeth, and then ended up getting all of them pulled and getting false teeth. It was all out of pocket. They had the money, but still, it was a lot.

That's not always true. Our premium is only $8. and change per 2 wk pay. They cover cleanings and x-rays at 100% as well as pretty much everything else at 80% incl fillings, caps, crowns, bridges, root canals. Our policy allows $2500 towards braces as long as it is for a minor. We don't have any coverage for braces for adults. I do think our plan is an exceptionally good one, but I wouldn't make a blanket statement about all policies. JMHO. ;)

Brooknwdw
09-04-2008, 10:09 PM
I don't have time to read all the replies, so sorry if this has been suggested already.

There is a "credit card" called CARE CREDIT, that is specifically for dental, cosmetic, vet, and other related medical services. They have a no interest, fixed pay plan.

One year, I HAD to have some dental work done, no insurance, and it had to happen. It was over 4k worth of work (one bridge alone was over $2200)

I didn't want to charge it on a credit card and pay interest, it was an emergency, so I applied for this care credit card. It is issued by GE Money Bank. When you apply (I did it online) they ask you how much you think you need, I was just guessing and I said 5k. I was instantly approved, and they tell you what your payment will be. As long as you pay it off within that time frame (like 18 months I believe it was)..you pay NO interest.

It's not ideal, no one wants an extra payment- but when it comes to your teeth..sometimes needs MUST! It worked for me!
If you want to check it out, just go to the carecredit website and research it, it will let you search for local dentists in your area who accept care credit.

HTH! :goodvibes

eeyorethegreat
09-05-2008, 07:03 AM
What kind of isurance do you all have that you are paying only $8 to $12 for per month we pay well more than that and yes i do need to crunch the # again this year. Though DH just got a temp corwn and gets a permanent gold one next week oh joy so the insurance is paying for some (not all) of that. We have Delta he gets it from his school district and we pay the full premium (it is offered but the district doesn't pick up any of the tab).


















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Teresa Pitman
09-05-2008, 07:12 AM
I'm a single parent although my four children are now grown. What I did was take my kids to the dentist as needed - not regular check ups and cleaning, unfortunately, but if they thought they had a cavity or had pain. Even that was pretty expensive. Two needed braces but didn't get them. I myself haven't been to a dentist in about 20 years, and now my kids are big and don't have to pay for them so I could probably go, I'm embarrassed about how bad my teeth are so I won't.

Not ideal but it was the best I could do.

Teresa

addicted2dizney
09-05-2008, 07:19 AM
I'm a single parent although my four children are now grown. What I did was take my kids to the dentist as needed - not regular check ups and cleaning, unfortunately, but if they thought they had a cavity or had pain. Even that was pretty expensive. Two needed braces but didn't get them. I myself haven't been to a dentist in about 20 years, and now my kids are big and don't have to pay for them so I could probably go, I'm embarrassed about how bad my teeth are so I won't.

Not ideal but it was the best I could do.

Teresa


Don't be embarrassed, As a dental professional, we love it more than anything to help people like you. I understand its a vicious cycle and it's hard to make the step back because it's been so long, then time goes by and it's even longer. Ask your friends who they use and find someone who is sympathetic to your needs. You will be surprised how easy it will be! :goodvibes Please get your teeth checked, only in the last few years are the heath experts showing proof that your oral health is linked to your dental health. Bacteria in your mouth circulates through your body to your organs. Think of the heart medications that get placed under your tongue because it enters the blood stream the quickest that way. I don't mean to preach, I just care about people's mouths and having them be the best they can be! :lovestruc If you ever need any advice, feel free to PM me! :goodvibes