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View Full Version : Clearing your gun - not cleaning


OKW Lover
07-17-2008, 06:32 AM
On this weeks podcast there was a discussion about the person who accidentally shot himself in the DTD parking lot. During that discussion, it was apparent that people don't understand the use of the terms "clearing" a gun and "cleaning" a gun. "Clearing" is the act of unloading the gun and visually verifying that there is no longer a live round in the chamber. "Cleaning" is when you actually take the gun apart and clean it out. The guest at DTD was not "cleaning" the gun, he was "clearing" it, probably so he could lock it up before going into DTD.

UrsulasShadow
07-17-2008, 06:38 AM
On this weeks podcast there was a discussion about the person who accidentally shot himself in the DTD parking lot. During that discussion, it was apparent that people don't understand the use of the terms "clearing" a gun and "cleaning" a gun. "Clearing" is the act of unloading the gun and visually verifying that there is no longer a live round in the chamber. "Cleaning" is when you actually take the gun apart and clean it out. The guest at DTD was not "cleaning" the gun, he was "clearing" it, probably so he could lock it up before going into DTD.

So, presumably, he had been driving around with it loaded. With his son in the car. Is that legal and responsible?

dpuck1998
07-17-2008, 07:04 AM
So, presumably, he had been driving around with it loaded. With his son in the car. Is that legal and responsible?

Its both if he is a permit holder.

wildeoscar
07-17-2008, 07:07 AM
So, presumably, he had been driving around with it loaded. With his son in the car. Is that legal and responsible?

yeah, would have to assume he was driving around with it loaded... here is where we will agree. He was not being responsible. Breathing should not be the litmus test for carrying a loaded gun in your car.

Mousecop
07-17-2008, 07:20 AM
I'm glad someone else posted about this. I am fairly new to the podcast, but I did catch this and wanted to note the difference. It casts a whole different image about someone taking their weapon apart and cleaning it in a car (with brushes, cleaning fluid and so forth) vs. someone verifying the weapon is unloaded.

Apropos of UrsulasShadow's comments, ALWAYS ASSUME A GUN IS LOADED. I've been around weapons since I was a small boy, shot competitively and own a few. The first lesson drummed into my head by my father (an Army Marksman) was "always assume a gun is loaded" (and the second was "don't point it at anything you don't intend to shoot"). Even though I store my weapons in a locked 500# safe at home, and they are unloaded when I put them in there, I ALWAYS clear the weapon as the first act when I pick it up. And as the last act before I put it away. That's the only safe, responsible way to handle something like a dangerous weapon, especially when its dangerous condition (i.e. a bullet in the barrel) is not readily apparent from looking at it.

Although it sounds like this guy was an idiot, I'm not willing to condemn him based on what little I know. The spectrum goes from obvious idiocy of carrying a weapon with 'one in the pipe' (that he needed to clear before storage) to picking it up from the repair shop after test firing and the idiot at the repair shop didn't unload it. I'm glad he thought to clear it, and to send his son away while he did, since his competence is in question. And he got what he deserved - a bullet in the leg. As far as I am concerned, he should lose all rights to carry a weapon, since he just demonstrated he can't handle it properly.

I'm only starting to recognize voices on the podcast, but I think it was Pete that pointed out that, although many people are skilled enough and respect the weapons enough to carry them, there are many lunatics that can't. What ultimately disturbs me is that this suggests legislating to the lowest common denominator - if one can't, then all can't. I don't believe that is fair (although it certainly solves the whole problem). Frankly, I'd like to see the kind of rigorous training for gun owners that we have for other personal items of destructive capability (i.e. automobiles), and some accountability for mishaps. This idiot in the parking lot should lose his permits, never again be allowed to get them, and have a mandatory jail sentence levied and have his weapon confiscated (unless there's a darn good reason why this happened - such as a car ran into his and he dropped the gun and it discharged). I bet with this sort of consequence, he'd think closely about whether he 'needs' to carry, or just 'wants' to. We'll never stop the bad guys from having and abusing guns, but people that are otherwise honest and sane should understand that this is a privilege to carry a weapon, and can be lost - just like a drivers license.

And, no, I am NOT a member of the NRA, because I believe they do more damage to the sport than good, and I can't support their whining. I may consider joining the National Shooting Sports Assn someday, but right now I am not a member of any lobbying group.

I'll climb down from the soapbox now. :lmao:

Mark

dpuck1998
07-17-2008, 07:26 AM
Great first post....welcome!

wildeoscar
07-17-2008, 07:34 AM
first of all :welcome: to mouse cop.

And to amend my comments from all previous posts, I agree with Pete on this more than disagree. With the minor exception that he was clearing the weapon, not cleaning it... this guy was only being semi responsible for sending the kid out of the car while he unloaded the weapon... because it should not have been loaded in the first place. He didn't get what he deserves by shooting himself, wouldn't wish that on any one, but I have to agree what ever permits this guy has should be pulled.

And the point that MouseCop makes is right on target for me, proper training and licensing is cool... no different than driving a car. A car is a very deadly weapon, and we let 16 year old punks drive if they prove some competence then take it away if they show incompetence... I have no problem with gun laws reflecting this because I have never shot myself by accident or on purpose.

And today I'll be in charge of giving home work, for folks to listen to some back episodes, any of the ones about me are fine!

dpuck1998
07-17-2008, 07:40 AM
Just in case someone thinks this is a training issue...

Even the best make mistakes, that could be deadly...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mhIJOVD8hwY

disneyholic family
07-17-2008, 07:42 AM
yes, always treat a gun as if it's loaded...
unfortunately this is one of the most common ways people get hurt/killed here by weapons....
the "stray" bullet....

Mousecop
07-17-2008, 08:00 AM
Great first post....welcome!

Thank you - I don't want to come off like a nut job, but what gets my hackles up is getting scraped into the 'lowest common denominator' box because it is a simplistic solution to a very complex challenge.

I introduced myself in more detail in the "Singles Roll Call" forum but, as this is only my 4th post, I can't yet add a link. I trust you folks can figure your way over there ...:thumbsup2

Mark

Palm.Tree
07-17-2008, 06:36 PM
I hate guns period. I understand why people have them but I just don't like them.

wildeoscar
07-17-2008, 07:28 PM
Thank you - I don't want to come off like a nut job, but what gets my hackles up is getting scraped into the 'lowest common denominator' box because it is a simplistic solution to a very complex challenge.

I introduced myself in more detail in the "Singles Roll Call" forum but, as this is only my 4th post, I can't yet add a link. I trust you folks can figure your way over there ...:thumbsup2

Mark

you're doing great so far, now you just need a t shirt, and obsessive compulsive personality, a stalker, and book the "lowest common denominator" podcast cruise and moejeeto drinking contest. We know you can catch up.