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View Full Version : So what's your background (country of origin, ancestors, etc...)???


Colson39
07-15-2008, 06:20 PM
Something in another thread set me off to thinking....

So what background do all of you come from?

Personally, I am mostly Irish with a fair share of Native American (Blackfoot and Sioux from both sides of my family). Probably a smattering of some other stuff, but that's the gist of it.

So how about you guys/gals?

LarryJ
07-15-2008, 06:26 PM
Something in another thread set me off to thinking....

So what background do all of you come from?

Personally, I am mostly Irish with a fair share of Native American (Blackfoot and Sioux from both sides of my family). Probably a smattering of some other stuff, but that's the gist of it.

So how about you guys/gals?

There are probably more, but I have documentation for Cherokee (I'm a registered and voting member of the Cherokee nation via the Trail of Tears relocation thru the Hestor Roll mainly), Prussian and English and possibly some French. Verbal family history also indicates some Irish, but I haven't confirmed that yet.

Larry

lucy_love
07-15-2008, 06:29 PM
Something in another thread set me off to thinking....

So what background do all of you come from?

Personally, I am mostly Irish with a fair share of Native American (Blackfoot and Sioux from both sides of my family). Probably a smattering of some other stuff, but that's the gist of it.

So how about you guys/gals?

I'm Irish and Polish.

That's interesting about your Native American ancestry. N.A. is a topic I tend to research, I am very fascinating by the culture and history. On my out west trip we went to Devils Tower which is a Sioux (and other tribes) spiritual place, we went in June which is the national month for the Sioux and the monument.

lucy_love
07-15-2008, 06:31 PM
There are probably more, but I have documentation for Cherokee (I'm a registered and voting member of the Cherokee nation via the Trail of Tears relocation thru the Hestor Roll mainly), Prussian and English and possibly some French. Verbal family history also indicates some Irish, but I haven't confirmed that yet.

Larry

That's awesome that you have Cherokee in you, I love researching Native American tribes (as I said to Chris). I actually just finished a paper on the Cherokee tribe in education and children's literature. I just love researching the topic, I wish I had Native American in me!

djblu883
07-15-2008, 06:31 PM
I'm mostly Irish. I took a trip to Ireland 5 years ago to look for roots...found my daughter's instead...her father was first in his family to be born in the states.(O'Dowd)

LarryJ
07-15-2008, 07:28 PM
That's awesome that you have Cherokee in you, I love researching Native American tribes (as I said to Chris). I actually just finished a paper on the Cherokee tribe in education and children's literature. I just love researching the topic, I wish I had Native American in me!

I was fortunate since both sides of my family are from the far NE corner of Ok. and many of my relatives applied for government benefits around 1908 and living in D.C. I was able to retrieve all of the documentation from the National Archives from the microfiche records. These benefit packages had to list all the siblings (with birth dates, etc.) along with the maternal/paternal parents including their Cherokee names if any along with ages, Birthdates, locations, etc. I have documentation where my Cherokee lineage started when a full blooded Cherokee boy was taken in by a white male and given that males last name and then raised. This individual was born around 1801. The root of my Cherokee ancestary is from Gilmer, Ga. I actually knew and met my great grandmother that was listed on the benefit application of her father. She died in the late 1950s and was in her 90's when she died.

A funny somewhat related story is when our oldest son was accepted to Carnage Mellon University he put on his application as a NA minority and was invited to attend their "Minority Weekend" and when he showed up he was th only fair skined individual in about the 2 or 3 hundred that attended. He loved it and made some great friends in those three days. Also, in addition to his NROTC scholarship he got a grant for being a N.A. that paid for his room and board which was around $5,000 per year or semister back in the 1996 to 2000 time frame.


Larry

Colson39
07-15-2008, 07:48 PM
I was fortunate since both sides of my family are from the far NE corner of Ok. and many of my relatives applied for government benefits around 1908 and living in D.C. I was able to retrieve all of the documentation from the National Archives from the microfiche records. These benefit packages had to list all the siblings (with birth dates, etc.) along with the maternal/paternal parents including their Cherokee names if any along with ages, Birthdates, locations, etc. I have documentation where my Cherokee lineage started when a full blooded Cherokee boy was taken in by a white male and given that males last name and then raised. This individual was born around 1801. The root of my Cherokee ancestary is from Gilmer, Ga. I actually knew and met my great grandmother that was listed on the benefit application of her father. She died in the late 1950s and was in her 90's when she died.

A funny somewhat related story is when our oldest son was accepted to Carnage Mellon University he put on his application as a NA minority and was invited to attend their "Minority Weekend" and when he showed up he was th only fair skined individual in about the 2 or 3 hundred that attended. He loved it and made some great friends in those three days. Also, in addition to his NROTC scholarship he got a grant for being a N.A. that paid for his room and board which was around $5,000 per year or semister back in the 1996 to 2000 time frame.


Larry

Very cool Larry, you've done a lot more researh into your background than I have. I just know the basics of it, Blackfoot and Sioux, both plains tribes. It's kind of funny that I have it on both sides of my family, because my mom is hillbilly West Virginian, and my dad is Massachusetts Irish...lol. Most of it I get from my moms side, my grandfather was very Native American looking, and my Aunt on my moms side has striking dark hair, dark skin, high cheekbones, the whole typical Native American features. My mom came out fair skinned and blonde, go figure...lol.

Colson39
07-15-2008, 07:49 PM
I'm Irish and Polish.

That's interesting about your Native American ancestry. N.A. is a topic I tend to research, I am very fascinating by the culture and history. On my out west trip we went to Devils Tower which is a Sioux (and other tribes) spiritual place, we went in June which is the national month for the Sioux and the monument.

We visited Devils Tower when we went out west when I was about 16. In fact, when I looked at your pictures of your trip out west, you guys are standing in front of a paining of Devils Tower with a bear climbing up it, my parents have that EXACT same painting that they got when we went on our trip, some 16-17 years ago...lol.

The story of Devils Tower is great, about the bear claws making the marks in the rock, I've always loved that story.

jrandtysmom
07-15-2008, 08:01 PM
Very cool Larry, you've done a lot more researh into your background than I have. I just know the basics of it, Blackfoot and Sioux, both plains tribes. It's kind of funny that I have it on both sides of my family, because my mom is hillbilly West Virginian, and my dad is Massachusetts Irish...lol. Most of it I get from my moms side, my grandfather was very Native American looking, and my Aunt on my moms side has striking dark hair, dark skin, high cheekbones, the whole typical Native American features. My mom came out fair skinned and blonde, go figure...lol.

Wow you called your mom a hillbilly or were you generalizing all people from WVA?

kc5grw
07-15-2008, 08:07 PM
I'm half Czech. The other half is a mix of Irish, Native American and who knows what else.

lucy_love
07-15-2008, 08:12 PM
I was fortunate since both sides of my family are from the far NE corner of Ok. and many of my relatives applied for government benefits around 1908 and living in D.C. I was able to retrieve all of the documentation from the National Archives from the microfiche records. These benefit packages had to list all the siblings (with birth dates, etc.) along with the maternal/paternal parents including their Cherokee names if any along with ages, Birthdates, locations, etc. I have documentation where my Cherokee lineage started when a full blooded Cherokee boy was taken in by a white male and given that males last name and then raised. This individual was born around 1801. The root of my Cherokee ancestary is from Gilmer, Ga. I actually knew and met my great grandmother that was listed on the benefit application of her father. She died in the late 1950s and was in her 90's when she died.

A funny somewhat related story is when our oldest son was accepted to Carnage Mellon University he put on his application as a NA minority and was invited to attend their "Minority Weekend" and when he showed up he was th only fair skined individual in about the 2 or 3 hundred that attended. He loved it and made some great friends in those three days. Also, in addition to his NROTC scholarship he got a grant for being a N.A. that paid for his room and board which was around $5,000 per year or semister back in the 1996 to 2000 time frame.


Larry

That's awesome Larry!

We visited Devils Tower when we went out west when I was about 16. In fact, when I looked at your pictures of your trip out west, you guys are standing in front of a paining of Devils Tower with a bear climbing up it, my parents have that EXACT same painting that they got when we went on our trip, some 16-17 years ago...lol.

The story of Devils Tower is great, about the bear claws making the marks in the rock, I've always loved that story.

I actually became really fascinated with the tower after my visit and I did research on it and did a presentation. I'm kinda a dork and like to research, obviously! That's really neat that your parents have the painting. When we were there, everyone working was of a tribe, which I thought was pretty cool!

Colson39
07-15-2008, 08:48 PM
Wow you called your mom a hillbilly or were you generalizing all people from WVA?

lol, yes I called my mom a hillbilly. One day maybe you can listen to her stories of her running barefoots through the hills of West Virginia, then you'll understand why I called her that. If you saw the pictures of my relatives in WVA, you would also understand...lol. I love that part of my family though, through and through. I love WVA, it's gorgeous there, to me one of the most beautiful states in the nation. It was also great seeing WVU doing great in college football now! Both my grandparents are alumni from there, so I follow that school from time to time. If you're from WV, trust me, you're good in my book!

Trust me, when we call her a hillbilly, it's a term of endearment, nothing negative meant by it ;)

Just like when my friends call me a redneck...lol

Colson39
07-15-2008, 08:57 PM
That's awesome Larry!



I actually became really fascinated with the tower after my visit and I did research on it and did a presentation. I'm kinda a dork and like to research, obviously! That's really neat that your parents have the painting. When we were there, everyone working was of a tribe, which I thought was pretty cool!

My parents go and work in Glacier National Park in Montana every summer (they are there right now) for 6 months, stay in their camper. They work with a lot of Blackfoot out there, I love going out there to visit. Unfortunately, seeing the reservation is very saddening, it is so desolate.

Just recently, my dad put up "prayer flags" for my grandfather who passed away about 15-20 years ago, this isn't a picture of the one's he put up, but it gives you a general idea. These are ALL OVER near the reservations out there, seeing them among the quaking Aspen is one of the most amazing sites I've seen.

http://static.flickr.com/30/89518342_f9c4adacbc.jpg

Kaler131
07-15-2008, 08:57 PM
My dad is 100% Irish and my mom is Irish, Greek, & German. Which makes me a lot of Irish and a smaller amount Greek & German. My DH is from England....his family is from England & Ireland.

K Killabrew
07-15-2008, 09:05 PM
Irish, Scottish and English. My mother's is 100% Irish. Father is half Scottish and English.

lucy_love
07-15-2008, 09:08 PM
My parents go and work in Glacier National Park in Montana every summer (they are there right now) for 6 months, stay in their camper. They work with a lot of Blackfoot out there, I love going out there to visit. Unfortunately, seeing the reservation is very saddening, it is so desolate.

Just recently, my dad put up "prayer flags" for my grandfather who passed away about 15-20 years ago, this isn't a picture of the one's he put up, but it gives you a general idea. These are ALL OVER near the reservations out there, seeing them among the quaking Aspen is one of the most amazing sites I've seen.

http://static.flickr.com/30/89518342_f9c4adacbc.jpg

That's awesome that your dad did that, I also saw them at Devil's Tower since June was the national month for that. I guess my mom decided not to post those pictures :confused3

We were told strictly not to go off of the path, touch trees, etc. I was FURIOUS at the climbers that were there because by law, Devils Tower has to let climbers climb year round but they HIGHLY SUGGEST (there are signs all over the place) not to climb in the month of June. I was SOOOOOO mad when 3 climbers were getting ready to climb. I was about to let them here it. They even have to ask the Native Americans for the release forms, talk about a slap in the face!!!! All they ask is not to climb in the month of June since it is a highly spiritual time.

I really want to visit a reservation.

Colson39
07-15-2008, 09:12 PM
That's awesome that your dad did that, I also saw them at Devil's Tower since June was the national month for that. I guess my mom decided not to post those pictures :confused3

We were told strictly not to go off of the path, touch trees, etc. I was FURIOUS at the climbers that were there because by law, Devils Tower has to let climbers climb year round but they HIGHLY SUGGEST (there are signs all over the place) not to climb in the month of June. I was SOOOOOO mad when 3 climbers were getting ready to climb. I was about to let them here it. They even have to ask the Native Americans for the release forms, talk about a slap in the face!!!! All they ask is not to climb in the month of June since it is a highly spiritual time.

I really want to visit a reservation.

I've probably been to 3 or 4 reservations in my life, and they all have pretty much made me realized that the Native Americans have it worse off than pretty much anyone in this country. Minus the one's that have the casinos ;)

That's why whenever I see someone complaining about an Indian casino going up, I just remind myself how much was taken away.

clkelley
07-15-2008, 10:27 PM
Well, I'm half German on my dad's side, and on my mother's there is a little bit of Cherokee and a few other things.

I have the distinction of having Field Marshall Rommell "The Desert Fox" as a great, great, uncle.

But actually what I love telling people is that my grandfather came to Huntsville as a member of the German team that worked with Dr. Werner Von Braun on the Space Program.

Unfortunately, I don't speak any German as my grandparents didn't speak it around my dad (it was not a good idea to use German in the US in the 40s).

Shannone1
07-15-2008, 10:37 PM
I am a complete "mutt". Irish, Austrailian, Dutch, English. Mix that in with Chad's German, Irish, Swedish and Austrian and our kids could be the United Nations !!

PolynesianPixie
07-15-2008, 11:00 PM
I'm descended from the original Dutch Colony that is now Manhatten. I guess I'm about as American as you get without being native American because my Dad has traced all our ancestry back to at least sometime in the 1700's. I'm also very German with a smidge of Irish and a fair amount of Scottish.
My kids get the Cherokee from daddy, plus more German. They are blonde....with really good tans!

momoffive
07-16-2008, 01:14 AM
Well, I'm half German on my dad's side, and on my mother's there is a little bit of Cherokee and a few other things.

I have the distinction of having Field Marshall Rommell "The Desert Fox" as a great, great, uncle.

But actually what I love telling people is that my grandfather came to Huntsville as a member of the German team that worked with Dr. Werner Von Braun on the Space Program.

Unfortunately, I don't speak any German as my grandparents didn't speak it around my dad (it was not a good idea to use German in the US in the 40s).

My paternal Grandfather came to the US at 16 in 1917. He gave up speaking German as soon as he could get by on the little English he knew. My Dad said he only yelled at them in German. His saying was,It was hard for me to be an American, now I speak English. My Dad knows very little. My other Grandparents are all Irish with the exception of a great, great grandmother who was from Spain. My DH is a mutt. German, French, English, Slovak, and Irish.
Loretta

Born 2 Fish
07-16-2008, 06:43 AM
My family started from the Springers that once ruled Sweden.
I was born in Ohio, raised in Ohio and Florida now married and happy in Tennessee.
And I have always considered myself to be of the upmost royal hillbilly/redneck who's origin came from that beautiful, blonde headed country.:lmao:

Rhonda
07-16-2008, 06:52 AM
German and Norwegian. (Typical Minnesotan, LOL)

big kahuna1
07-16-2008, 07:47 AM
I'm Italian. My family came from Sicily. My real name is Vincenza Giuseppe Vittorio Rizzotto Buscetta Corleone. They call me Vinny for short and you can see why. My favorite Italian restaurant is the Olive Garden and my favorite pizzacomes from Pizza Hut.:scared1:

Born 2 Fish
07-16-2008, 08:36 AM
I'm Italian. My family came from Sicily. My real name is Vincenza Giuseppe Vittorio Rizzotto Buscetta Corleone. They call me Vinny for short and you can see why. My favorite Italian restaurant is the Olive Garden and my favorite pizzacomes from Pizza Hut.:scared1:


Vinny,,yup, I can see that.
The only reason your favorite pizza ia Pizza Hut is cause you haven't had one of my homemade pizzas.:woohoo:

BigDaddyRog
07-16-2008, 08:48 AM
Steve is short for Vincenza in Wopland!! ;)
Im Spanish(not Mexican, not that theirs anything wrong with being Mexican), French and Irish.....I think the genes went the predominantly Irish route. My wifes all Dego, so my kids are muts.

AlyLynn
07-16-2008, 08:50 AM
I'm German, Irish, Welsh...DH is 100% Ukrainian.:goodvibes

big kahuna1
07-16-2008, 09:33 AM
You talkin' to me! :thumbsup2

RNmomnFL
07-16-2008, 09:42 AM
Me mostly german with a bit of polish (born and raised in OH, transplant to FL now...still secretly root for the Buckeyes and Browns). DH has WV ties but being a USF Bulls fan (our oldest is there) we don't wish the 'neers well. :)

2goofycampers
07-16-2008, 10:16 AM
Mom was all French. Dad is German, Dutch and English.

ftwildernessguy
07-16-2008, 10:42 AM
Well, I guess I'm 100% Native American since I was born in the United States.

My ancestry is German. They weren't famous or anything, just dirt farmers. I come from a line of warriors from the Civil War on up. I have many interesting anecdotes about the GreatGreat Grandfather in the Civil war and his brother, but long stories.

I grew up adjacent to the Seneca Nation Indian Reservation in WNY, and have done many humanitarian missions to Indian Reservations in the West. Interestingly enough, all of the Indians I met called themselves Indians or American Indians. I've only heard them referred to as Native Americans by the government and people who don't live on the reservation. I never saw a prosperous reservation, even those with casinos. The casinos I saw were managed by a Japanese organization, and outside of a few of the people from the reservation having jobs, the people saw very little of the wealth produced. I saw a lot of government officials showing up to open health clinics, after which they pat themselves on the back and go home, leaving the actual problems behind. Our government has created a tremendous problem with no real way out. Health issues like alcoholism and diabetes are rampant there, along with oral health issues and heart disease, and the government's answer is to build beautiful clinics and feed supplies to them, but not give them the means to staff them. I was at one reservation in Montana where the government funded a community college. The courses taught - Native American Studies. I talked with a number of the residents and the big complaint was - they couldn't get a job with a major in this. They wanted math and science, but the Bureaucrats thought this is what they needed. Those who travelled off the reservation for an education usually returned without one - they were unable to make the transition into the American society due to their isolation.

Just my observation.

tellnotails
07-16-2008, 11:10 AM
Well, I guess I'm 100% Native American since I was born in the United States.

My ancestry is German. They weren't famous or anything, just dirt farmers. I come from a line of warriors from the Civil War on up. I have many interesting anecdotes about the GreatGreat Grandfather in the Civil war and his brother, but long stories.

I grew up adjacent to the Seneca Nation Indian Reservation in WNY, and have done many humanitarian missions to Indian Reservations in the West. Interestingly enough, all of the Indians I met called themselves Indians or American Indians. I've only heard them referred to as Native Americans by the government and people who don't live on the reservation. I never saw a prosperous reservation, even those with casinos. The casinos I saw were managed by a Japanese organization, and outside of a few of the people from the reservation having jobs, the people saw very little of the wealth produced. I saw a lot of government officials showing up to open health clinics, after which they pat themselves on the back and go home, leaving the actual problems behind. Our government has created a tremendous problem with no real way out. Health issues like alcoholism and diabetes are rampant there, along with oral health issues and heart disease, and the government's answer is to build beautiful clinics and feed supplies to them, but not give them the means to staff them. I was at one reservation in Montana where the government funded a community college. The courses taught - Native American Studies. I talked with a number of the residents and the big complaint was - they couldn't get a job with a major in this. They wanted math and science, but the Bureaucrats thought this is what they needed. Those who travelled off the reservation for an education usually returned without one - they were unable to make the transition into the American society due to their isolation.

Just my observation.

good post......

100+ years later and we still are trying to eradicate them.....:sad2:

Colson39
07-16-2008, 11:13 AM
Well, I guess I'm 100% Native American since I was born in the United States.

My ancestry is German. They weren't famous or anything, just dirt farmers. I come from a line of warriors from the Civil War on up. I have many interesting anecdotes about the GreatGreat Grandfather in the Civil war and his brother, but long stories.

I grew up adjacent to the Seneca Nation Indian Reservation in WNY, and have done many humanitarian missions to Indian Reservations in the West. Interestingly enough, all of the Indians I met called themselves Indians or American Indians. I've only heard them referred to as Native Americans by the government and people who don't live on the reservation. I never saw a prosperous reservation, even those with casinos. The casinos I saw were managed by a Japanese organization, and outside of a few of the people from the reservation having jobs, the people saw very little of the wealth produced. I saw a lot of government officials showing up to open health clinics, after which they pat themselves on the back and go home, leaving the actual problems behind. Our government has created a tremendous problem with no real way out. Health issues like alcoholism and diabetes are rampant there, along with oral health issues and heart disease, and the government's answer is to build beautiful clinics and feed supplies to them, but not give them the means to staff them. I was at one reservation in Montana where the government funded a community college. The courses taught - Native American Studies. I talked with a number of the residents and the big complaint was - they couldn't get a job with a major in this. They wanted math and science, but the Bureaucrats thought this is what they needed. Those who travelled off the reservation for an education usually returned without one - they were unable to make the transition into the American society due to their isolation.

Just my observation.

You should come down here and see the reservation Casinos in South Florida. Every tribe member on the reservation that has a Casino (mainly the Seminoles) gets at least $100,000 a year from the tribe as a payoff from the casino. I understand most tribes aren't that way, but down here in South Florida, they have made out quite well. Then again, these aren't your normal small Indian casinos, the Hard Rock Casino down here is HUUUUGGGEEEE. Plus they just got Blackjack and Baccarat. I'm telling you, in 10 years, Florida is going to become Little Vegas, the Casinos they have here are great. It will never be Vegas, but it will overtake second place for sure.

That being said, when I was growing up, way before the casinos, the reservation was dirt poor. I used to do dances on the reservation, I was a hoop dancer, and I always thought that it was one of the poorest areas around, it was sad.

Rhonda
07-16-2008, 11:38 AM
Ok.........what's a hoop dancer?? :cool1: :banana:

Colson39
07-16-2008, 11:40 AM
http://www.aboriginalkin.com/pics/2006_Mosaic/026littletent.jpg

Here is a video....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZ6QQWo4cw4&feature=related

Us3
07-16-2008, 11:43 AM
Irish and Cherokee only...both sides.

Us3
07-16-2008, 11:46 AM
Chris...now that would be some good entertainment for a FW GG! ;) j/k :p

Colson39
07-16-2008, 11:48 AM
Except now probably all the kids would want to play with the hoops....lol

ftwildernessguy
07-16-2008, 11:53 AM
I was invited to go to a sweat lodge one night. I don't know, sitting around half naked with a bunch of other guys in a dark, hot hut didn't sound too exciting to me. They did have food, though, and brought me some the next day. It was elk and buffalo and really good.

Colson39
07-16-2008, 12:34 PM
Yea, all they are really are saunas, and since I'm not that into saunas, I'm not that into sweat lodges. I definitely agree that sitting around half naked with a bunch of other guys in the dark isn't my cup of tea.

All7OfUs
07-16-2008, 01:59 PM
I'm French, Belgian, Scotch, and English. 1/4 each. DH is Polish, Dutch, and German, so I guess that makes our poor kids a little of everything European. Potpourri, for sure!! Honestly, though, our kids are culturally Kazakh than anything now. They speak it fluently, and sometimes act more Central Asian than American!!

lucy_love
07-16-2008, 04:38 PM
Well, I guess I'm 100% Native American since I was born in the United States.

My ancestry is German. They weren't famous or anything, just dirt farmers. I come from a line of warriors from the Civil War on up. I have many interesting anecdotes about the GreatGreat Grandfather in the Civil war and his brother, but long stories.

I grew up adjacent to the Seneca Nation Indian Reservation in WNY, and have done many humanitarian missions to Indian Reservations in the West. Interestingly enough, all of the Indians I met called themselves Indians or American Indians. I've only heard them referred to as Native Americans by the government and people who don't live on the reservation. I never saw a prosperous reservation, even those with casinos. The casinos I saw were managed by a Japanese organization, and outside of a few of the people from the reservation having jobs, the people saw very little of the wealth produced. I saw a lot of government officials showing up to open health clinics, after which they pat themselves on the back and go home, leaving the actual problems behind. Our government has created a tremendous problem with no real way out. Health issues like alcoholism and diabetes are rampant there, along with oral health issues and heart disease, and the government's answer is to build beautiful clinics and feed supplies to them, but not give them the means to staff them. I was at one reservation in Montana where the government funded a community college. The courses taught - Native American Studies. I talked with a number of the residents and the big complaint was - they couldn't get a job with a major in this. They wanted math and science, but the Bureaucrats thought this is what they needed. Those who travelled off the reservation for an education usually returned without one - they were unable to make the transition into the American society due to their isolation.

Just my observation.

When I was researching for my paper, I asked several Native Americans what they prefer to be called. Several of them said indigenous; we are taught to say in the education system Native American. Interesting! I loved reading what you wrote.

Colson39
07-16-2008, 10:26 PM
I think most prefer just to be called what they are. Seminole, Cherokee, Blackfoot, Sioux, Arapaho, Apache, what have you. Whenever I've visited the reservations, we just say that.

Normally if someone asks me in person what I am, I say Irish, Blackfoot, and Sioux. To which I normally get "What the heck is Blackfoot and Sioux???"...lol.

Rhonda
07-17-2008, 07:32 AM
I think most prefer just to be called what they are. Seminole, Cherokee, Blackfoot, Sioux, Arapaho, Apache, what have you. Whenever I've visited the reservations, we just say that.

Normally if someone asks me in person what I am, I say Irish, Blackfoot, and Sioux. To which I normally get "What the heck is Blackfoot and Sioux???"...lol.

My DH is part "Sioux". His grandmother lived on a reservation. He's always been taught that the term "Sioux" is actually a demeaning name -- and they prefer to be known as Dakota (or Lakotah, depending on the tribe and where it's located).

ftwildernessguy
07-17-2008, 08:53 AM
My DH is part "Sioux". His grandmother lived on a reservation. He's always been taught that the term "Sioux" is actually a demeaning name -- and they prefer to be known as Dakota (or Lakotah, depending on the tribe and where it's located).

This is the problem with the US today - we've lost that melting pot mentality and are into our individual identity too much. Now we are such a mixture of backgrounds that it seems people are picking and choosing their ethnic identity for whatever will benefit them the most. I have some patients who are Vietnamese but lived their entire life in France. When asked about their origin, they say they are French. I am all for maintaining individual heritage; customs and traditions are an important part of family heritage and who we are, but I am american first - hence my offense at the term Native American. Anyone born in the US is a native american. I've spent a lot of time in foreign countries and learned a lot about their cultures and always had a great relationship with the native peoples. One thing they all have is a strong sense of pride in their country, however, regardless of their background, and they identify first with their homeland. We have lost this in the US, and seem too fragmented socially now.

Shannone1
07-17-2008, 09:35 AM
This is the problem with the US today - we've lost that melting pot mentality and are into our individual identity too much. Now we are such a mixture of backgrounds that it seems people are picking and choosing their ethnic identity for whatever will benefit them the most. I have some patients who are Vietnamese but lived their entire life in France. When asked about their origin, they say they are French. I am all for maintaining individual heritage; customs and traditions are an important part of family heritage and who we are, but I am american first - hence my offense at the term Native American. Anyone born in the US is a native american. I've spent a lot of time in foreign countries and learned a lot about their cultures and always had a great relationship with the native peoples. One thing they all have is a strong sense of pride in their country, however, regardless of their background, and they identify first with their homeland. We have lost this in the US, and seem too fragmented socially now.

I understand what you are saying. I feel like we are ALL Americans who live here and sometimes people get too hung up on labels. :thumbsup2

Colson39
07-17-2008, 09:55 AM
My DH is part "Sioux". His grandmother lived on a reservation. He's always been taught that the term "Sioux" is actually a demeaning name -- and they prefer to be known as Dakota (or Lakotah, depending on the tribe and where it's located).

You are correct on that :) I don't know much about the Sioux or Dakota side of my family, I'm much more Blackfoot. I grew up knowing I was Blackfoot, I only found out about the Sioux side from my grandmother when I was like 17.

loveDmouse
07-17-2008, 09:59 AM
I am proud to be an American! :) :thumbsup2 I would like to go back and look at our lines. I know we have Irish in us.

We4mickey
07-17-2008, 11:57 AM
I am german. One set of grandparents came over on a ship when they were 18, the other was born here from german immigrants. I'm easy, but DH is a mutt. English, french, german, irish and serbian are all on his side. Thus we have a DS who is dark haired and olive skinned and one that is a redhead and fair skinned. Go figure!