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View Full Version : Is there anyone NOT bothered by the price of gas?


BabyTigger99
05-23-2008, 12:29 PM
Honestly, it doesn't really bother me. I don't sit and dwell on it. I don't mumble and grumble about it. I don't speculate where it will be 6 months - 10 years from now. Anyone else?

canadianmom2three
05-23-2008, 12:35 PM
I figure that if I was genuinely worried about it, I could easily make efforts to drive less, use public transport more, share a ride, buy a smaller vehicle etc....but I don't, so therefore I have no right to complain. Gas prices are much higher in some other countries, and then in some other countries, people have a lot more to worry about than rather or not they can afford to buy gas, heck they don't even have cars, let alone enough food to feed their family. I consider myself pretty blessed, and have no grounds to complain.

Now before you all get the wrong idea, I am not a 'wealthy' person, we live paycheque to paycheque, and budget VERY carefully....but I just figure that I am better off than so many people, who am I to complain about the price of gas, it gets paid for, and if that means there is less left over at the end of the month to eat out, buy more things that we don't really need, well that's the way it is...

drivencrazy
05-23-2008, 12:35 PM
I can say that I don't really like it... but we need to get from point A to point B... so we pay it and keep going. I filled up the Explorer and it stopped at $75... do wish that they would change that so I can be sure to fill up all at once.

Still planning on a road trip this summer, will just have to put more $$$ aside for gas. What can one do!

Todd&Copper
05-23-2008, 12:35 PM
I am kind of surprised by it (at how fast it has gone up lately), but since DH & I don't drive a lot, I don't really care that much. We also drive pretty fuel-efficient cars (his gets about 40 mpg and mine almost 30) so I am not crapping bricks over it.

pumpkinfish
05-23-2008, 12:36 PM
Sorry, I do worry and speculate. Gas is a big chunk of my budget due to commuting...if price increases I need to take away from another area of the budget...I can only skim so much :eek:

AnninIowa
05-23-2008, 12:39 PM
We are fortunate in that we have the money to fill up the car, and since we work from home, we can carefully plan our routes and save gas. The people who I really feel for are the low wage earners who don't have access to public transporation (not every city has a good transit system) and HAVE to drive to work, pay day care, etc.

In England gas is over $8 a gallon! In America, we are used to having our needs AND wants; in other countries, they splurge much less on "fun" stuff than we do.

mrsklamc
05-23-2008, 12:52 PM
I am more worried about how the rising cost of gas will effect everything else we have to buy...Although gas is much more expensive in Europe, their communities tend to be organized so that they drive much less.

Debbie6221
05-23-2008, 12:58 PM
I can say that I don't really like it... but we need to get from point A to point B... so we pay it and keep going. I filled up the Explorer and it stopped at $75... do wish that they would change that so I can be sure to fill up all at once.

Still planning on a road trip this summer, will just have to put more $$$ aside for gas. What can one do!


ITA with you! This is how I feel. If I have to adjust and give up some things I will but I don't want to change plans because of it. It IS very irritating but I don't want to make my self sick about it either. Unfortunately, we have a Mini Van and an SUV! Also we live IN chicago which makes it even worse!

luv2laugh
05-23-2008, 01:00 PM
In England gas is over $8 a gallon! In America, we are used to having our needs AND wants; in other countries, they splurge much less on "fun" stuff than we do.

That's what I keep telling people! I actually WANT gas to rise a little. Don't get me wrong - my pocketbook HATES it! However, I was reading interviews with the heads of the major car companies and they all pretty much said the same thing; Until our gas prices rise and stay around $6 a gallon, they're not going to market the more fuel efficient cars from Europe in the U.S.

I hate how much it costs, but unless gas prices rise, people aren't going to change. I think that in the long run, the price hikes are going to help our country become more "green."

happygirl
05-23-2008, 01:11 PM
I really don't see how you can't be bothered by it. unless you have unlimited income:confused3 High gas prices affect everyone on everything

cancer_survivor_06
05-23-2008, 01:15 PM
It hasn't really bothered me for the most part especially since I am the odd ball having to buy a bigger vehicle. The only time that in bothered me and I was mostly annoyed is tuesday i bought gas for 3.62 wed it went up to 3.75 thur it was 3.90 that has been the most drastic price jump that we have seen.

heartsy77
05-23-2008, 01:15 PM
Honestly, it doesn't really bother me. I don't sit and dwell on it. I don't mumble and grumble about it. I don't speculate where it will be 6 months - 10 years from now. Anyone else?


I am with you! I have decided their is nothing I can do about so why worry?!! I feed 11 plus children a day in my home (daycare) I am spending so much on food and I refuse to sweat it!

lovepurple
05-23-2008, 01:17 PM
I bothers me a lot. It is the reason a lot of my family will not be able to come to my daughter's graduation this year.
I'm sure it is also the reason my grocery bill has become sky high.

Mickey1974
05-23-2008, 01:25 PM
I can honestly say that I don't worry about it. I need it in order to drive my car and it sucks that it costs me more to use it. But I don't dwell on it or obsess over it like some people I know.

mirmartinez
05-23-2008, 01:31 PM
High gas prices may benefit us in the long run.
There is only a limited supply of oil and this will encourage people to be more mindful of how much they use.
Also, China and India are industrial now and this will also limit what they can use.
Higher oil prices will slow their pace and/or have them considering alternative fuels early in the game.

Jenna45
05-23-2008, 01:39 PM
:rotfl:
I drive a Tahoe and I have to say it does not really bother me to much , I fill up at half a tank which is about 50.00 - 60.00 and then I feel like it is not really costing so much.. But, I also work from home, so the only commute I have is driving ds to school in the morning :thumbsup2


Honestly, it doesn't really bother me. I don't sit and dwell on it. I don't mumble and grumble about it. I don't speculate where it will be 6 months - 10 years from now. Anyone else?

Irin997
05-23-2008, 01:41 PM
I'm sure it is also the reason my grocery bill has become sky high.

People should be concerned for this very reason. Think about all of the products that need to be transported and how those prices have risen. High gas prices are one of the main reasons why prices of produce along with everything else have risen. The domino effect begins with gas prices and soon enough everything else is rising too.

And in fact, it downright p*sses me off. Think about the fact that just 6 months ago, gas prices were roughly $1 cheaper per gallon. So for my 15 gallon tank, that's an extra $15 per week. And that should be enough to p*ss anyone off cause that's $60 a month I didn't have to spend before.

momto2girls
05-23-2008, 01:41 PM
I don't worry about it. I won't be changing my habits or plans because of the gas prices. It isn't something that I think about at all except when I come to the boards. :confused3

This isn't to say that I don't feel badly for the people who have a long daily commute, etc., but it really isn't anything that bothers me personally.

ecuagoddess
05-23-2008, 01:42 PM
I have no problem with the gas and even food prices going up, just adjust the budget accordingly. I guess those on the mainland are feeling it more because it is a drastic jump, but gas and food is always so expensive here that a little more is not a big deal. I skip over most of the threads bemoaning/tracking/inciting outrage over how things have gone up.

wovenwonder
05-23-2008, 01:49 PM
It makes me ill thinking about it. It's not the gas that I care about. I really don't drive that much. I just know without a doubt that everything else is going to continue to go up in price as long as the fuel keeps going up. There will be no end in sight until the fuel levels off in price.

sandisuze
05-23-2008, 02:03 PM
It just annoys me for many reasons- but I don't panic over it.
I am more thoughtful about driving and watching my budget. No more just hopping in the car to take a drive. OOT driving to Super target and sams is done less often- like 2 times a month instead of 4 or 5... or 6 or 7... ;)

I feel bad for those who have a commute or are really being hit hard by rising EVERYTHING prices.
I guess this whole thing has made me more aware about my habits.

DVC Sadie
05-23-2008, 02:09 PM
I can honestly say that it does not effect us personally and for that I am grateful.

It does bother me that the average earners are having a real hard time paying the increase for both food and gas and still have enough to pay their fuel bills. (plus rent).

All anyone has to do is go to their local food bank/pantry and see the number of people who have jobs that are in need of extra food to feed heir families. The saddest part is that the food banks/pantries are EMPTY.

mrsbornkuntry
05-23-2008, 02:22 PM
I'm not panicking, not yet anyway, but I am keeping an eye on it. I am being more mindful of my driving habits, combining trips and staying home more. It isn't going to break us financially at this point, but it could certainly make things tight if we aren't careful.

DMickey28
05-23-2008, 02:23 PM
It bothers me but I don't dwell on it. I figure I was fine with it being at $3.25. I probably don't fill up even twice a month but if I did it would be an extra $36 a month. That isn't going to kill me. Even with DH's car and his commute, it's probably another extra $30 a month.

I have never been a grocery shopper that looks for sales or coupons before. Now that I am a SAHM and I have a lot more time on my hands I shop sales and coupons. Sure the groceries cost more but my bill has gone down because of this.

I figure we live a good life right now. Sure we have challenges sometimes and there are tight times but DH is on the upswing of his career. His income potential is only going up and each year he only makes more money, and will hopefully continue that way. Even if we don't get to live any more extravagant we can still live the way we do.

That is what I try to tell myself ... it's what I believe. However days that I spend too much time on the DIS I get worried and depressed and have to walk away.

Enchanted_Mama
05-23-2008, 02:27 PM
no, it doesn't really bother me, either. It doesn't really impact us, as my DH works out of the house and I work very close to home, so we just don't do a lot of driving to begin with. I do feel for those who are really being impacted due to long commutes and stuff, but don't really feel too bad for anyone who has chosen to drive a gas hog and is now complaining about the $$ of gas.

LoveBWVVBR
05-23-2008, 02:28 PM
I don't dwell on it from a driving standpoint since we don't drive that much, but I do worry about my parents' heating costs for this coming winter. They live in a cold weather state and own 2 houses there to boot:sad2: I just spoke with my father this afternoon about the possibility of draining the pipes and closing up the lake house for the winter (not heating it). He thinks that it will cost easily 4K to heat that house alone and it's not very big:sad2: They can afford it, but they shouldn't be spending that on what is soon to be a fixed retirement income, KWIM?

WaltD4Me
05-23-2008, 02:33 PM
I am more worried about how the rising cost of gas will effect everything else we have to buy...Although gas is much more expensive in Europe, their communities tend to be organized so that they drive much less.

I agree, I don't drive all that much, but I do worry about how it effects so many other things. The price of food, airfare, really the cost of most everything transported by truck...people cutting out extras, which effects workers at restaurants, hair salons/spas, ect....

I work for an answering service and I can tell alot less people are calling our home improvement companies, re-modelers, landscapers, house painting companies that we answer for. One house big painting company was booming last year, I bet they are only getting 1/2 the amount of calls this year. I attribute that to people putting off painting their house because of gas prices.

tonilea
05-23-2008, 02:35 PM
We just adjust our budget and go on, but DH and I were talking about this very thing. A year and a half ago, this would have been a disaster for us. We were living pay check to pay check and drowning in debt.

housemouse
05-23-2008, 02:37 PM
It does bother me that the average earners are having a real hard time paying the increase for both food and gas and still have enough to pay their fuel bills. (plus rent).

I don't like the cost increase, but I can absorb it right now. I drive 70 miles round trip to work. I do work in a hospital though so if it becomes really cost prohibitive to drive, I'll just try to lump all my work days in a row and hunker down there while I'm working.

But Sadies statement is what bothers me the most about it. If it continues rising at the current pace a lot of people simply won't be able to afford to work anymore. If it was taking everything I made to pay for daycare and gas to work, I'd drop out too. Then what happens to the economy?

luv2laugh
05-23-2008, 02:40 PM
But Sadies statement is what bothers me the most about it. If it continues rising at the current pace a lot of people simply won't be able to afford to work anymore. If it was taking everything I made to pay for daycare and gas to work, I'd drop out too. Then what happens to the economy?

I'm hoping that these fears will lead to new cities closer together modeled after the many of the cities in Europe. I think our country needs a major public transportation overhaul.

DisFlan
05-23-2008, 02:42 PM
I don't sit around gnawing my nails about it, but it IS a problem that's already starting to ripple through the whole economy. Travel, food, freight, manufacturing, tax bases, education, farming, heating/cooling our homes and offices, fewer charity donations...everything is affected by it. And jobs are next. When businesses have to pay huge fuel bills and/or more for inventory, they raise prices or they hire fewer people - or cut pay or lay people off. And then those folks have less to spend at other businesses...and on it goes. It's not just the cost at the pump to fill our SUVs, it goes much deeper than that.

So yes, I'd say it's worth at least a little bit of worry. It affects us all.

DisFlan

PatriciaH
05-23-2008, 03:06 PM
We picked Celebration to move to because we knew this gas crisis was coming. I am from NY city and grew up taking the subway and cabs. I hate to drive and did not get my license until I was 25 and moved to MA We have one car and DH drives about 10 minutes to work. I work from home. We can walk and bike all around town. Publix is 5 minutes across 192. Target and Sam's Club are 10 minutes or less up 192. So are a million restaurants We have several Wall-Marts close by. WDW is 5 minutes away. Universal and Sea World are less than 15 minutes away.

We have a farmers market come to town every Sunday. Right in town we have a gas station, Starbucks, library (small but we can order online), bookstore, many restaurants, golf/golf club, several pools, miles of trails, a hospital with a 50,000 sf gym, fire station, several schools, ballfields, basketball courts, tennis courts, vollyball courts, churches, community centers, specialty pet food store, dry cleaners, spas/hairdressers, tanning, doctors, pubs/bars, tea house, barber, clothing stores, jewelry stores, 2 ice cream parlors (Coldstone/Kilwins), Planet Smoothie, Celebration Hotel (nice bar/food), florist, AMC theater, Ace Hardware, etc.. I can walk or bike to all of this.

The places to eat are:
Joes Crab Shack
Mulligans (pub with entertainment)
Siena Flats
Chick fil a
Quiznos
Le China
Shirlocks (tea/wine/live music)
Town Tavern
Market Street Cafe
D'Antinois
Seito
Columbia
Front Street Pizza
Windmill Cafe
Plantation Room
Seasons Cafe (hospital)

A French bakery/coffee house is opening soon (in PJ's coffee place), so is a dance studio and a kids play place. A new restaurant is opening in the Mona Lisa condotel. There are plans for soccer fields, a few new churches, dog park. We lost our Movie Gallery, deli and a boutique not too long ago

I feel bad for people that are far from everything. It is hard. We have a Lynx bus that stops in town and then goes to the Transportation and Ticket Center at WDW. There is also a car service/shuttle here- so that is good for older folks although a bit pricey.

Celebration is not for everyone but there are a lot of things here you can get to on foot/bike/NEV (electric vehicle!)

Several banks (Sun Trust, Nations, Bank of America)
Chiropractor
OBGYN/fertility specialists (most types of doctors- since the hospital just opened a new building and another will be opening soon)
State Farm
Celebration Self Storage
Celebration Vet
Several dentists
Lock and Safe (key/locksmith)
Tax Planning/H and R Block
Personal Training (several)
Carpet One
Monogram Studio
Eye Care
Counseling
Naturally Yours (herbal remedies, vitamins, etc.)
Arcade/game/party/NEV and bike rental store
Celebration Players (community theater)

Tinkerbelle32
05-23-2008, 03:13 PM
Untill we stop depending on other counties for most our oil consumption things will not be better. I know I will get flamed for this, but we need to start drilling in our own country. I just found out that we have not opened a new oil refinery since early 1970!:confused3 Obviously, our consumption has changed in the last 30 plus years. I love the environment and the animals, etc. but we need to start drilling!

jenm2878
05-23-2008, 03:18 PM
I cringe some when I fill up my car, but it hasn't become a problem yet. However, I get irritated with all the fuel surcharges on everything and how the price of food is getting rediculous due to gas prices. We pay for our garbage service every three months and the fuel surcharge has gone up every three months for the last two years. It's maddening.

luvsJack
05-23-2008, 03:42 PM
Untill we stop depending on other counties for most our oil consumption things will not be better. I know I will get flamed for this, but we need to start drilling in our own country. I just found out that we have not opened a new oil refinery since early 1970!:confused3 Obviously, our consumption has changed in the last 30 plus years. I love the environment and the animals, etc. but we need to start drilling!

No flames here--you are totally correct! Not only do we need to drill in our own country but we need to USE the oil we drill. The wells that are drilled in the Gulf of Mexico by our drilling companies are mostly capped. Meaning that the oil is just sitting there not being used.

As far as me personally worrying about the price of gas-I don't worry that much about it for my own use. I live less than 10 minutes from my work. What everyone needs to be more concerned about is the cost of fuel for trucks. The big trucks are going to stop rolling when the drivers and/or trucking companies stop making money, smaller companies are already going under. Everything you wear, eat, and use (unless you made it or grew it yourself) has been on a truck. If the trucks stop rolling, the country stops moving forward.

Tissa
05-23-2008, 04:59 PM
I'm glad it doesn't bother or affect a lot of people, it's great that you do not have a commute or that an extra $20 a tank is no sweat out of your budget but,some of us though are really feeling the pinch. Thankfully I drive a Civic but I still drive over 100 miles a week for work and other things. I'm a single mom with two kids and the extra $ each week is cutting more and more into the budget. My income isn't going up but my grocery and gas bill sure is.

rdrjj5
05-23-2008, 05:09 PM
Gas for the car I can somewhat control by driving less and doing more errands at once. The price does bother me but not as much as my home heating oil prices. When we filled up the beging of April, the price was $3.37 per gallon. Today it is over $1 more at $4.40. Being from New England I cut back on usage this winter, turning down thermostat, washing dishes by hand, full loads of laundry so next winter I can't do anymore. This is where the price of oil is really going to get alot of people.

luv2laugh
05-23-2008, 05:16 PM
Untill we stop depending on other counties for most our oil consumption things will not be better. I know I will get flamed for this, but we need to start drilling in our own country. I just found out that we have not opened a new oil refinery since early 1970!:confused3 Obviously, our consumption has changed in the last 30 plus years. I love the environment and the animals, etc. but we need to start drilling!

Not flaming!! I definitely agree that we need to stop depending on foreign oil, but drilling here would ruin a lot of the environment. Plus, what happens in another 20 years when our supplies run low? Personally, I think that we need to work harder on finding alternative energy sources not just for our cars, but to heat our homes as well. Hopefully the high gas prices will start to help move the process towards a whole different way of life faster. If the whole country is suffering with the high costs, then the whole country is more likely to help find the solution.

CarolA
05-23-2008, 05:24 PM
I am lucky in that I have taken the subway to work since I moved to Atlanta several years ago to avoid the traffic. As a result, I don't use a lot of gas.

I also have seen gas prices in other parts of the world and always kind of assumed this was coming so I never bought the SUV LOL!

I do think about those who might not be as lucky and I have definitly noticed an impact on other things like groceries!

I don't understand the "get more oil, do more drilling" trend on here. There are problems with that. One there's no refining capacity to turn that into something you can use and two what about your kids and thier kids?

luvmy3
05-23-2008, 05:28 PM
I am lucky in that I have taken the subway to work since I moved to Atlanta several years ago to avoid the traffic. As a result, I don't use a lot of gas.

I also have seen gas prices in other parts of the world and always kind of assumed this was coming so I never bought the SUV LOL!

I do think about those who might not be as lucky and I have definitly noticed an impact on other things like groceries!

I don't understand the "get more oil, do more drilling" trend on here. There are problems with that. One there's no refining capacity to turn that into something you can use and two what about your kids and thier kids?

What about our kids and theirs? Do you think things are going to be better for them if we don't do anything?

MoniqueU
05-23-2008, 05:31 PM
I try not to think too much about the cost of gas other then watching it like a train wreck. My husband drives an hour and a half to work one way. They give him a car and he can get some gas on the company car but he chooses to drive his truck as it has XM radio in it.:eek:

We traded in our landcruiser back when it it was a bit over 3 bucks for a highlander. I didn't like the new car much but now when I look at all the huge SUV's I feel better.Before we were filling up 3 times a week with a bigger tank. We are now down to two times a week BUT we are not in football/cheer yet for the year. Once the games start we could be all over several counties. We only have water polo going right now. I strongly strongly believe in sports or some other activity for children so I feel that is something I can't cut out. However as much as I believe in that I may be forced to skip some games or worse pull my kids out if prices keep going up at the rate they are. I am hoping it only goes to 4.50 a gallon here in CA and then starts dropping. That is what I think will happen but I never thought it would go to 4 a gallon so what do I know?

IluvKingLouis
05-23-2008, 05:42 PM
That's what I keep telling people! I actually WANT gas to rise a little. Don't get me wrong - my pocketbook HATES it! However, I was reading interviews with the heads of the major car companies and they all pretty much said the same thing; Until our gas prices rise and stay around $6 a gallon, they're not going to market the more fuel efficient cars from Europe in the U.S.

I hate how much it costs, but unless gas prices rise, people aren't going to change. I think that in the long run, the price hikes are going to help our country become more "green."

You and I are on the same page. I just hate how it has impacted groceries and everything else.

I feel bad for families who moved to the suburbs to find affordable housing and have no choice but to commute. We're fortunate in that my DH telecomutes and I too work from home. But a lot of my neighbors are struggling...but then again, most of them are driving vehicles that get 11 mpg. We have a car that gets 44-46 mpg and we are never in a position where we *have* to drive.

It's the rippling effect that I hate, and I really feel for folks that have no other choice.

DVC Sadie
05-23-2008, 06:09 PM
I guess I am in the minority here but thats okay with me.

Even though the price of gas (or oil per barrel) does not effect us financially it definitely effects us emotionally. To see grown men who work and then cry, because they are embarrassed to be at the food pantry and then to see the volunteers cry because there is no food is absolutely devastating.

The price of oil will effect everyone, whether it's the higher cost of gas, food, heat, rent/mortgage or TAXES it will financially effect everyone, whether we want it to or not.



Off of my soap box now....

CarolA
05-23-2008, 06:11 PM
What about our kids and theirs? Do you think things are going to be better for them if we don't do anything?

Well I am pretty sure that if we use ALL the oil now then that's not going to help.

I am pretty sure that if we do damage to the earth then that's not going to help.

There are posters on this board saying "we could get enough oil from Alaska to last 20 years" (I don't think they have posted that on this thread yet) Then what? We need a long term outlook not a "I have to have more oil now who cares about the future outlook"

NancyIL
05-23-2008, 06:12 PM
It's not just what I pay at the gas pump that is bothersome. Diesel gasoline costs even more, and trucks use diesel. The price of goods that are shipped by truck keeps going up - from food that is transported across country to anything else that isn't produced in your neck of the woods.

Our income is high enough to absorb the increase in prices. Many others are not so fortunate.

HunnyPots
05-23-2008, 06:24 PM
I hate that gas prices are so high but I have to put it in the category of "things I can do nothing about so why worry". :confused3

karinbelle
05-23-2008, 06:47 PM
Not flaming!! I definitely agree that we need to stop depending on foreign oil, but drilling here would ruin a lot of the environment. Plus, what happens in another 20 years when our supplies run low? Personally, I think that we need to work harder on finding alternative energy sources not just for our cars, but to heat our homes as well. Hopefully the high gas prices will start to help move the process towards a whole different way of life faster. If the whole country is suffering with the high costs, then the whole country is more likely to help find the solution.

ITA! The answer is a push toward alternative energy and adjusting our habits - not harming our natural irreplaceable resources. Who wants to live in a world without our wild areas?

bdcp
05-23-2008, 06:52 PM
Gas prices are what they are. We are in no danger of using up all the oil. There are pockets of oil all over the US, Canada and beneath the oceans, but the fantatical wacko environmentalists dont' care about facts. We need to be able to access and process the oil that is within our reach. China is drilling off the coast of the US and will profit from the oil found there. The price of gas is not changing our lives. I would not have bought the SUV I have if the price of gasoline was going to change my life. I filled up today and spent $63. I used to spend $40+ regularly to fill it up. If $23/fill up was going to break me, I've got bigger problems than the price of gasoline. The majority of Americans will not go hungry or lack for anything because of the cost of gasoline, which is much, much cheaper here than in Europe, Canada and quite a few other places. Most people using the "buying gas or eating" argument are just being dramatic. Very, very few people have that problem.

Drilling here would not ruin the environment. There are a lot of ways to drill safely and they are being used everyday. More oil leaks from beneath the ocean naturally than has ever been leaked by accidents.

Stitch'sGlitch
05-23-2008, 06:53 PM
I am glad the weather is starting to warm up. It's time to park the car and bring out the bike. Now that I have been riding my bike, gas has not been as big of an issue. We will see once it gets cold again, but for now no worries.

pilgrimage
05-23-2008, 07:02 PM
The cost of fuel for school buses has local budgets soaring.
Our local community is thinking of raising property taxes
15% to help. I feel esp. for seniors on fixed incomes
with high fuel costs to drive and heat, high medicine costs
and grocery dollars being stretched.

kydisneyfans
05-23-2008, 07:07 PM
I manage a group of 20 people who use vehicles to make deliveries every day. My job has become that much more difficult as our decrease in sales and increase in costs have effected everyone, including 40% employee turnover in 1 month alone.

Hopefully the standard deduction for business mileage is raised for 2008, that will help a little.

lovepurple
05-23-2008, 07:09 PM
I have no problem with the gas and even food prices going up, just adjust the budget accordingly.

It is really hard to adjust the budget when, unlike the federal state and local government, I cannot increase someone's taxes to increase my income. Our property taxes are getting a huge increase next year because our local government needs more money. Wages are not keeping up with the inflation. My budget is super tight right now and I am budgeted to the penny for necessities. I think more people are in the same situation than people realize. My car gets great gas mileage and I don't commute, so it isn't the gas price that bothers me as much as it is the prices of other things affected by the gas prices.

DVCajun
05-23-2008, 07:14 PM
I wish I could afford to live and work in Celebration. It's my dream.

As far as gas prices are concerned, does anyone else remember the gas crisis in the 70's? Everyone was freaked out by the rising gas prices and the "gas shortage." That's when mini cars made their debut. Well, guess what. Gas didn't continue to rise in price and in fact went back to normal for the time. That's exactly what I think will happen this time.

I *do* think we should pursue alternative fuel technology, but I also think it's ridiculous to ignore the oil we have within our own borders. Yes, it's a nonrenewable resource, but since we're pursuing other energy sources, that shouldn't be a huge deal, right? :confused3

Maybe that's why I'm not an economist. :rotfl:

CowboyCO
05-23-2008, 07:33 PM
High gas prices may benefit us in the long run.
There is only a limited supply of oil and this will encourage people to be more mindful of how much they use.
Also, China and India are industrial now and this will also limit what they can use.
Higher oil prices will slow their pace and/or have them considering alternative fuels early in the game.

Not really feeling that it benefits anything. We use less, China and India use more and the price stays high.:sad2:

When it comes to alternative furels for cars that is actually useful in the American culture -- ie -- range, availability and the cost of the technology, there isn't anything on the horizon.

Hydrogen fuel cells has a higher carbon footprint to create hydrogen than burning gasoline and it takes more energy to create it than gasoline.

Ethanol causes food inflation due to farmers switching to grow corn, causing shortage of supply in other food grains. Dairy and meat products are higher priced due to incresed feed costs.

Hybrid doesn't pay for itself for 4-6 years and really isn't alternative, it's supplemental.

Electric may work in urban areas, but won't really work for the 'burbs or commuting due to short range. Plus batteries are expensive to replace like for hybrids.

I think the best hope is for CNG (natural gas), as that is plentiful and we have huge domestic reserves.

karinbelle
05-23-2008, 07:33 PM
Gas prices are what they are. We are in no danger of using up all the oil. There are pockets of oil all over the US, Canada and beneath the oceans, but the fantatical wacko environmentalists dont' care about facts. We need to be able to access and process the oil that is within our reach. China is drilling off the coast of the US and will profit from the oil found there. The price of gas is not changing our lives. I would not have bought the SUV I have if the price of gasoline was going to change my life. I filled up today and spent $63. I used to spend $40+ regularly to fill it up. If $23/fill up was going to break me, I've got bigger problems than the price of gasoline. The majority of Americans will not go hungry or lack for anything because of the cost of gasoline, which is much, much cheaper here than in Europe, Canada and quite a few other places. Most people using the "buying gas or eating" argument are just being dramatic. Very, very few people have that problem.

Drilling here would not ruin the environment. There are a lot of ways to drill safely and they are being used everyday. More oil leaks from beneath the ocean naturally than has ever been leaked by accidents.

:teacher: Just a little light reading for perspective.

http://www.nwf.org/nationalwildlife/article.cfm?issueID=52&articleID=599

http://www.sierraclub.com/gasprices/index.asp

http://alaska.fws.gov/nwr/arctic/

http://www.incidentnews.gov/science

runwad
05-23-2008, 08:19 PM
Gas prices are what they are. We are in no danger of using up all the oil. There are pockets of oil all over the US, Canada and beneath the oceans, but the fantatical wacko environmentalists dont' care about facts. We need to be able to access and process the oil that is within our reach. China is drilling off the coast of the US and will profit from the oil found there. The price of gas is not changing our lives. I would not have bought the SUV I have if the price of gasoline was going to change my life. I filled up today and spent $63. I used to spend $40+ regularly to fill it up. If $23/fill up was going to break me, I've got bigger problems than the price of gasoline. The majority of Americans will not go hungry or lack for anything because of the cost of gasoline, which is much, much cheaper here than in Europe, Canada and quite a few other places. Most people using the "buying gas or eating" argument are just being dramatic. Very, very few people have that problem.

Drilling here would not ruin the environment. There are a lot of ways to drill safely and they are being used everyday. More oil leaks from beneath the ocean naturally than has ever been leaked by accidents.

I was listening to talk radio yesterday and they were talking about "side drilling" I think thats the name of it? Where another country can go into international waters and do this side drilling process and get the oil that is under Alaska. Now wouldn't that be a kick:mad:

TDC Nala
05-23-2008, 08:21 PM
It doesn't affect me much personally. I fill up the car about every two months (my commute is entirely on public transport and is subsidized by my employer), and I do not need to provide for a family. As far as I can see, the expenses for one person are not greatly changed.

That will change when I get taxed to provide money for folks with families, I suppose.

TupperMom7
05-23-2008, 08:41 PM
Gas prices are what they are. We are in no danger of using up all the oil. There are pockets of oil all over the US, Canada and beneath the oceans, but the fantatical wacko environmentalists dont' care about facts. We need to be able to access and process the oil that is within our reach. China is drilling off the coast of the US and will profit from the oil found there. The price of gas is not changing our lives. I would not have bought the SUV I have if the price of gasoline was going to change my life. I filled up today and spent $63. I used to spend $40+ regularly to fill it up. If $23/fill up was going to break me, I've got bigger problems than the price of gasoline. The majority of Americans will not go hungry or lack for anything because of the cost of gasoline, which is much, much cheaper here than in Europe, Canada and quite a few other places. Most people using the "buying gas or eating" argument are just being dramatic. Very, very few people have that problem.

Drilling here would not ruin the environment. There are a lot of ways to drill safely and they are being used everyday. More oil leaks from beneath the ocean naturally than has ever been leaked by accidents.


It is true that the high price of gasoline alone will not make the majority of Americans go hungry or do without, but when you add it to the high cost of everything else we have to pay for, it is starting to hurt. Of course, we can charge gas, groceries, clothes, and just about everything else. We will just leave our credit card bills to our children in our wills instead of an inheritance.:scared1:

Don't people in Europe have socialized medicine and more options for mass transit? If so, then they are not spending a lot of money on doctors and they don't have to drive a car to get to work, etc. I also believe that they get part of their college education paid for. :rolleyes1

brooklynheights
05-23-2008, 08:42 PM
I am able to walk to work ,grocery store, to get my hair cut ,to the shopping mall strip , there are 10 places to eat within walking distance ,2 pharmicies a dry cleaners and my doctors office where I live we have an indoor pool, jacuzi ,sauna ,2 gyms a tennis court,a party room and if we have overnight guests there are 2 guest suites we can rent if they are open if not 2 hotels within walking distance so I don't drive I only need a car to go to the movies(we hope they will build one on the empty lot near by) or to the dentist (couldn't find one I liked in walking distance) but the price of gas still affects all of us in the prices we pay for everything I don't dwell on it but it still is a concern we all need to be aware of

momto2girls
05-23-2008, 08:46 PM
It is true that the high price of gasoline alone will not make the majority of Americans go hungry or do without, but when you add it to the high cost of everything else we have to pay for, it is starting to hurt. Of course, we can charge gas, groceries, clothes, and just about everything else. We will just leave our credit card bills to our children in our wills instead of an inheritance.:scared1:

Don't people in Europe have socialized medicine and more options for mass transit? If so, then they are not spending a lot of money on doctors and they don't have to drive a car to get to work, etc. I also believe that they get part of their college education paid for. :rolleyes1

Sure, but they pay super-high taxes for it. :scared1: No thank you. We already pay a ton in taxes. I'm not interested in signing up for any more.

luvsJack
05-23-2008, 08:54 PM
Gas prices are what they are. We are in no danger of using up all the oil. There are pockets of oil all over the US, Canada and beneath the oceans, but the fantatical wacko environmentalists dont' care about facts. We need to be able to access and process the oil that is within our reach. China is drilling off the coast of the US and will profit from the oil found there. The price of gas is not changing our lives. I would not have bought the SUV I have if the price of gasoline was going to change my life. I filled up today and spent $63. I used to spend $40+ regularly to fill it up. If $23/fill up was going to break me, I've got bigger problems than the price of gasoline. The majority of Americans will not go hungry or lack for anything because of the cost of gasoline, which is much, much cheaper here than in Europe, Canada and quite a few other places. Most people using the "buying gas or eating" argument are just being dramatic. Very, very few people have that problem.
Drilling here would not ruin the environment. There are a lot of ways to drill safely and they are being used everyday. More oil leaks from beneath the ocean naturally than has ever been leaked by accidents.

I agree with everything you say except the part bolded. For some Americans: yes it can be a choice between buying gas or buying food (or some other necessitity.) Many, many people in America live paycheck to paycheck. My weekly fill up has doubled in my mid-sized car. If my budget was as tight as many of the people I work with (and some months it is) it would take a lot of juggling to pay for that $60 fill up instead of the $25 it used to cost.
You are right about the drilling not ruining the environment. We are already drilling all over the gulf. We are not using the oil found, but we are drilling it. As far as Alaska, I don't understand why everyone assumes it will do so much damage there. It doesn't damage the environment here or in Texas where there is plenty of drilling going on on land.

Gymbomom
05-23-2008, 09:15 PM
Gas prices going up hurt all of us.....if people are having to spend money on gas instead of other things that hurts our economy all around. Jobs are cut, prices rise to keep the big business profitable.

Besides, there are people who are really struggling right now......I worry about the people in the US who can't pay these higher prices.....don't you?

CajunDixie
05-23-2008, 09:57 PM
I don't dwell on it from a driving standpoint since we don't drive that much, but I do worry about my parents' heating costs for this coming winter. They live in a cold weather state and own 2 houses there to boot:sad2: I just spoke with my father this afternoon about the possibility of draining the pipes and closing up the lake house for the winter (not heating it). He thinks that it will cost easily 4K to heat that house alone and it's not very big:sad2: They can afford it, but they shouldn't be spending that on what is soon to be a fixed retirement income, KWIM?

I'm sorry but I can't feel sorry for someone that has a 2nd house. BTW lake houses can easily be winterized.

Untill we stop depending on other counties for most our oil consumption things will not be better. I know I will get flamed for this, but we need to start drilling in our own country. I just found out that we have not opened a new oil refinery since early 1970!:confused3 Obviously, our consumption has changed in the last 30 plus years. I love the environment and the animals, etc. but we need to start drilling!

There is drilling going on but our lovely <insert sarcasm> government won't do anything with the oil. My neighbor is hoping gas prices go even higher because he's sitting on an oil field in Montana. He inherited through his family and is planning on visiting there this summer. A neighbor there struck a gusher but they need a refinery built up there.

Not flaming!! I definitely agree that we need to stop depending on foreign oil, but drilling here would ruin a lot of the environment. Plus, what happens in another 20 years when our supplies run low? Personally, I think that we need to work harder on finding alternative energy sources not just for our cars, but to heat our homes as well. Hopefully the high gas prices will start to help move the process towards a whole different way of life faster. If the whole country is suffering with the high costs, then the whole country is more likely to help find the solution.

We need to get the automakers to work harder on building quality vehicles that can use alternative fuels. IMHO we need to get our heads out of the sand and demand automakers make energy efficient vehicles common. I have no doubt it can be done, they just don't want it done. One step is using bio-fuels, yes diesel costs more but it makes us less dependent on foreign oil.

It is really hard to adjust the budget when, unlike the federal state and local government, I cannot increase someone's taxes to increase my income. Our property taxes are getting a huge increase next year because our local government needs more money. Wages are not keeping up with the inflation. My budget is super tight right now and I am budgeted to the penny for necessities. I think more people are in the same situation than people realize. My car gets great gas mileage and I don't commute, so it isn't the gas price that bothers me as much as it is the prices of other things affected by the gas prices.

Sorry but local government can't just snap their fingers and increase taxes. I'm at the local government level and we don't even have our 2008 budget approved yet! We start planning the 2009 budget in June and have no idea if we can leave the bottom line the same or not. And we have no way to even ask that taxes be increased!!! Fuel prices hurt us too! Ambulances and fire trucks use lots of fuel. FD training recently cost us over $50 in fuel. And no we can't not have training...it's required by the state. Ambulances could raise their prices on mileage but it would come down to people that don't have Medicare and Medicaid overpaying to make up for the ones that do have Medicare and Medicaid. Mileage costs aren't just for fuel either; you have to factor in routine maintenance, insurance, equipment, tires.....

Not really feeling that it benefits anything. We use less, China and India use more and the price stays high.:sad2:

When it comes to alternative furels for cars that is actually useful in the American culture -- ie -- range, availability and the cost of the technology, there isn't anything on the horizon.

Hydrogen fuel cells has a higher carbon footprint to create hydrogen than burning gasoline and it takes more energy to create it than gasoline.

Ethanol causes food inflation due to farmers switching to grow corn, causing shortage of supply in other food grains. Dairy and meat products are higher priced due to incresed feed costs.

Hybrid doesn't pay for itself for 4-6 years and really isn't alternative, it's supplemental.

Electric may work in urban areas, but won't really work for the 'burbs or commuting due to short range. Plus batteries are expensive to replace like for hybrids.

I think the best hope is for CNG (natural gas), as that is plentiful and we have huge domestic reserves.

Not on the horizon but Biodiesels are available here and now! But it's not always easy getting the big name fuel companies to buy the bio. But Korea has no problem with buying it. :confused3 Bio is a much cleaner fuel and actually makes diesel vehicles run better. An average person can even make their own bio. We have a local guy that makes his own from used fryer grease.

brockscandy
05-23-2008, 10:11 PM
I was listening to talk radio yesterday and they were talking about "side drilling" I think thats the name of it? Where another country can go into international waters and do this side drilling process and get the oil that is under Alaska. Now wouldn't that be a kick:mad:

Exactly!! China does not care about us OR the enviroment. In fact, they are working with Canada to buy all the energy they can instead of Canada selling it to us! This came directly from my legislator who went to China. They straight out told him they are buying everything they can. It will only weaken us. He also said they are not ashamed to tell us that. The problem is Washington doesn't want to hear this right now. They just want to point fingers at the oil companies and make it look as if they are really doing something. If we don't drill in oil rich areas, others will.:mad:

CajunDixie
05-23-2008, 10:12 PM
Gas prices are what they are. We are in no danger of using up all the oil. There are pockets of oil all over the US, Canada and beneath the oceans, but the fantatical wacko environmentalists dont' care about facts. We need to be able to access and process the oil that is within our reach. China is drilling off the coast of the US and will profit from the oil found there. The price of gas is not changing our lives. I would not have bought the SUV I have if the price of gasoline was going to change my life. I filled up today and spent $63. I used to spend $40+ regularly to fill it up. If $23/fill up was going to break me, I've got bigger problems than the price of gasoline. The majority of Americans will not go hungry or lack for anything because of the cost of gasoline, which is much, much cheaper here than in Europe, Canada and quite a few other places. Most people using the "buying gas or eating" argument are just being dramatic. Very, very few people have that problem.
Drilling here would not ruin the environment. There are a lot of ways to drill safely and they are being used everyday. More oil leaks from beneath the ocean naturally than has ever been leaked by accidents.

I have to disagree with the bolded statement also. Unless you work with low income people I don't think you should assume people are just being dramatic. It is a real concern with our low income residents. Not only are we getting people that need help with rent and utilities but we have more people that need help with food because they don't qualify for food stamps. We have people that can't afford their prescriptions. We have people that need gas money to get to their jobs. People use the local foodbank and foodstamps but that doesn't always get them things like soap, shampoo, toothepaste, TP, laundry soap, shaving cream, dishsoap, diapers....just that short list there could cost a person $20. That $20 is now going into their gas tanks. Personally I get some of that stuff free at CVS or match coupons to sales at Kroger/CVS/WalMart. But some of these people can't afford a newspaper subscription, dont have internet access to learn about places like couponmom and just plain doesn't have the starter money needed to get a program like CVS' ECB working for them. Some to tell you the truth do not have the intelligence to make it work for them. Sad but true.

Several factories have closed, are on temp. shut downs or have just layed off workers....unemployment only goes so far and only lasts so long.

Melissa
05-24-2008, 06:39 AM
It's not really harming me, we haven't changed anything we do. I don't worry about it for me, yet anyway. But I work in social service and it is really problem for a lot of my clients- They miss more appoinrments than ever and food prices are a problem for them, so I am aware of it, not worried personally.

LoveBWVVBR
05-24-2008, 07:01 AM
I'm sorry but I can't feel sorry for someone that has a 2nd house. BTW lake houses can easily be winterized.

It IS winterized. It was going to be their retirement house once they both managed to retire and sell the other house, but that won't be happening now. They are going to put it up for sale this summer, although I don't guess that there will be a single buyer who wants to take on heating that house this winter either:sad2:

BTW, I never said that I felt sorry for my parents. I said that I worried about their heating costs this winter as the result of owning 2 houses in a cold climate. Geez.

TifffanyD
05-24-2008, 07:03 AM
We need to get the automakers to work harder on building quality vehicles that can use alternative fuels. IMHO we need to get our heads out of the sand and demand automakers make energy efficient vehicles common. I have no doubt it can be done, they just don't want it done. One step is using bio-fuels, yes diesel costs more but it makes us less dependent on foreign oil.

That would be a great solution but then you have to get people to BUY them. There are a lot of fairly fuel efficient cars out there but they're not the majority of the vehicles on the road. You can make a BETTER suv but it's still not going to get the gas mileage of your standard compact that is available now. Just my $.02

yensidwiz
05-24-2008, 08:06 AM
1st I seriously doubt the the people MOST hurt by gas prices are even reading these boards, a trip to Disney is something they can only dream about. Sadly, there are ALOT of people significantly hurt by the price of gas. The other day I was putting gas in my car and a young woman at the next pump was crying because the increased price of gas has hurt her so bad she didn't have any money left for food, and she has a young child to feed. My husband had a similiar experience a few days before that. Personally, I am disgusted by the price of gas. Oil should not be allowed to be traded on the open market, that in and of itself would significantly decrease oil prices which in turn would lower gas prices. The enviromentalists had no choice but to get involved. It is a sad but true fact that big business will do whatever it takes to make more money with no regard for who or what they hurt or destroy in the process. Unfortunately, like most things in this country that has gone from one extreme to the other. As for gas prices needing to reach $6.00 a gallon before the auto makers will produce fuel efficient vehicles. That's just wrong. During the Arab oil embargo in the 70's, one of the actions taken in response to this energy problem in the United States was the enactment of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) in 1975 by the Congress. Among other steps taken by this Act, one was aimed at energy conservation in the transportation sector through the establishment of Federal Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards for new passenger cars and light trucks which federally mandated minimum fuel economy standards for new motor vehicles. At that time congress also enacted a 55 mph speed limit which is proven to increase gas milage. Why hasn't this been done yet? Because there is not a shortage of oil. The prices are where they are because of speculation. Once again the rich are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer at the expense of the whole economy. The bottom line here is pure out ant out greed.

MrsPete
05-24-2008, 08:08 AM
I can honestly say that it does not effect us personally and for that I am grateful.No, it affects ALL OF US. Even those of us who drive small cars and who aren't forced to drive long distances for work are still paying higher prices at the grocery store (and other places). And when the lowest-paid people in our country are squeezed even more, that's going to affect us all too.

I can say that the gas prices haven't hurt me nearly as much as they're hurting other people, but I don't think any of us are genuinely unaffected.

I do agree with the people who say that the best outcome of this situation could be a greater awareness of our habits (and an understand of the fact that we cannot continue in the way we've been living for the past few decades); however, this isn't JUST about gas -- that's the tip of the iceburg and the obvious thing of which everyone's aware . . . but we Americans also have to stop our rampant consumption of, well, everything: driving oversized vehicles, eating out multiple times a week, buying big gifts for small holidays, using shopping as a hobby.

The other side of this coin is that we're concerned about the economy -- if we genuinely embrace the "less is more" idea in America, if we cut back on our consumption . . . the economy will spiral downhill fast. It's inevitable.

happygirl
05-24-2008, 08:11 AM
1st I seriously doubt the the people MOST hurt by gas prices are even reading these boards, a trip to Disney is something they can only dream about. Sadly, there are ALOT of people significantly hurt by the price of gas. The other day I was putting gas in my car and a young woman at the next pump was crying because the increased price of gas has hurt her so bad she didn't have any money left for food, and she has a young child to feed. My husband had a similiar experience a few days before that. Personally, I am disgusted by the price of gas. Oil should not be allowed to be traded on the open market, that in and of itself would significantly decrease oil prices which in turn would lower gas prices. The enviromentalists had no choice but to get involved. It is a sad but true fact that big business will do whatever it takes to make more money with no regard for who or what they hurt or destroy in the process. Unfortunately, like most things in this country that has gone from one extreme to the other. As for gas prices needing to reach $6.00 agallon before the auto makers will produce fuel efficient. That's just wrong. During the Arab oil embargo in the 70's, one of the actions taken in response to this energy problem in the United States was the enactment of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA) in 1975 by the Congress. Among other steps taken by this Act, one was aimed at energy conservation in the transportation sector through the establishment of Federal Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards for new passenger cars and light trucks which federally mandated minimum fuel economy standards for new motor vehicles. At that time congress also enacted a 55 mph speed limit which is proven to increase gas milage. Why hasn't this been done yet? Because there is not a shortage of oil. The prices are where they are because of speculation. Once again the rich are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer at the expense of the whole economy. The bottom line here is pure out ant out greed.

Well first of all I'm worried about the price of gas, Yes I do read this board and I know that alot of people that are hurting by gas prices do read this board, you really are making alot of assumptions in this post,

luv2laugh
05-24-2008, 08:14 AM
I do agree with the people who say that the best outcome of this situation could be a greater awareness of our habits (and an understand of the fact that we cannot continue in the way we've been living for the past few decades); however, this isn't JUST about gas -- that's the tip of the iceburg and the obvious thing of which everyone's aware . . . but we Americans also have to stop our rampant consumption of, well, everything: driving oversized vehicles, eating out multiple times a week, buying big gifts for small holidays, using shopping as a hobby.

I think that if the high prices help the country realize this and make actual changes, then there is a silver lining. America's known as the "supersized" nation across the world. Heck, if everyone around me considered me to the be "supersized" one, I'd be pretty mad! :rotfl:

MrsPete
05-24-2008, 08:15 AM
That would be a great solution but then you have to get people to BUY them. There are a lot of fairly fuel efficient cars out there but they're not the majority of the vehicles on the road. You can make a BETTER suv but it's still not going to get the gas mileage of your standard compact that is available now. Just my $.02Two thoughts:

1. The cars are out there, but on every lot they're 1-2 choices among 10-12 larger vehicles. I bought a Honda Civic last year, and I love the mileage -- if I'd chosen the Honda Fit, I'd have even better mileage, but I thought it was a little too small for my family of four. (Though in all honesty, many, many European families larger than mine survive with cars the size of the Fit -- it's just a matter of expectation and habit.)

2. Many people are "caught" in situations that prevent them from buying a fuel-efficient car right now, even if they think it's a better choice. That is, people who've leased a big SUV and still have a year left on their lease. People who are upside down on thier loans so that they literally cannot afford to pay off the loan if they give up the car. I'd guess that these people will make more fuel-efficient choices when they choose their NEXT CAR, but they simply can't make that switch right now.

yensidwiz
05-24-2008, 08:17 AM
I believe we are all hurt by gas prices but we can budget around it. I meant the people MOST hurt as in the ones who can't afford food or internet access anymore. As in the poorest people in the country. No disrespect was intended.:love:

MrsPete
05-24-2008, 08:28 AM
I agree with everything you say except the part bolded. For some Americans: yes it can be a choice between buying gas or buying food (or some other necessitity.) Many, many people in America live paycheck to paycheck. In all honesty, most people have some "fat" in thier budgets, which can be trimmed. Most people, even those living paycheck to paycheck, could cut out cable TV, the cell phone, the 16-year old's personal car, sodas, trips to the tanning salon, beer -- in all honesty, we've all got something that we could cut out --and voila! There's the money for food. For example, a family could buy an awful lot of groceries for the cost of going to the movie theater once. We Americans spend lots of money on our luxuries; they've become habits, so we don't stop to think about them being luxuries. People who are genuinely facing the "gas or food" question are going to have to stop and figure out what else can go (because realistically, gas and food are both pretty high on the "needs" list). Also, we've gotten away from basic foods in America. Beans and rice are dirt-cheap, as are plenty of other healthy foods -- it's expensive cuts of meat and processed foods that cost so much! I can put a plain but decent meal on my table for $2-3; no, it won't be a family favorite, but my family of four will be fed.

And there's another ugly fact that goes hand-in-hand with this discussion: debt. Most Americans have taken on more debt than they can handle -- a house at the top of thier mortgage budget, a new car, some credit card debt -- and now that other prices have increased rapidly, what used to be manageable is now a real burden. Gas prices aren't a simple problem; they co-exist within our individual budgets and our economy.

Finally -- and somewhat unrelated to the paycheck to paycheck topic -- I don't see people making big changes yet. The student parking lot at my high school is still full every day. These kid COULD ride the bus for FREE, but they're still driving private cars. The stores and the mall are still full. The restaurants are still doing a booming business.

CarolA
05-24-2008, 08:35 AM
Exactly!! China does not care about us OR the enviroment. In fact, they are working with Canada to buy all the energy they can instead of Canada selling it to us! This came directly from my legislator who went to China. They straight out told him they are buying everything they can. It will only weaken us. He also said they are not ashamed to tell us that. The problem is Washington doesn't want to hear this right now. They just want to point fingers at the oil companies and make it look as if they are really doing something. If we don't drill in oil rich areas, others will.:mad:

Why should they be ashamed to tell us??:confused3 Were we ashamed when we were the number one consumer??? I don't thik so.

They aren 't doing this to "weaken" us, they are doing to because their economy is using it and demanding it. That's the way things work in the world. America doesn't go to the head of the line because "We are America" I mean it's great to live here, but that doesn't make us better. (Maybe luckier, but that depends)

There was an article on the front page of the Atlanta paper today about folks trying to sell thier SUVs. It was actually entertaining. They had people talking about the model of their SUV and the price they wanted. Then they had a table showing the decline in the Kelly Blue Book value of the SUV. EVERY one of the folks trying to sell was asking for MORE then the blue book value.

MrsPete
05-24-2008, 08:36 AM
Don't people in Europe have socialized medicine and more options for mass transit? If so, then they are not spending a lot of money on doctors and they don't have to drive a car to get to work, etc. I also believe that they get part of their college education paid for. :rolleyes1Yes, but it's hard to compare us to them. To get these services they also pay even more of their income in taxes than we do, and mass transit is more practical in cities -- we have much more "wide open space" here.

MrsPete
05-24-2008, 08:44 AM
I don't sit around gnawing my nails about it, but it IS a problem that's already starting to ripple through the whole economy. Travel, food, freight, manufacturing, tax bases, education, farming, heating/cooling our homes and offices, fewer charity donations...everything is affected by it. And jobs are next. When businesses have to pay huge fuel bills and/or more for inventory, they raise prices or they hire fewer people - or cut pay or lay people off. And then those folks have less to spend at other businesses...and on it goes. It's not just the cost at the pump to fill our SUVs, it goes much deeper than that.

So yes, I'd say it's worth at least a little bit of worry. It affects us all.

DisFlanI agree with these thoughts. We as a country are going to have to scale life back to something more like a 50s-60s mentality: Yes, kids can share bedrooms; most kids' clothing comes from friends or cousins' hand-me-downs; one car per family; eating out is a treat, not an everyday affair. If we adopted this attitude towards spending/living, the vast majority of Americans would have enough money for their needs, and they'd be able to save for thier wants.

CarolA
05-24-2008, 08:44 AM
Yes, but it's hard to compare us to them. To get these services they also pay even more of their income in taxes than we do, and mass transit is more practical in cities -- we have much more "wide open space" here.

There is a lot of "wide open space" in Europe too.

However, they also tend to buy and drive MUCH more fuel efficient cars. When I drive in Europe seeing an SUV is strange. Most of the cars look like the little compacts I rent when I am driving there. Even the big "luxury" cars that are made in Europe (Mercedes etc) aren't as common on the roads as you might imagine.

luv2laugh
05-24-2008, 08:54 AM
Finally -- and somewhat unrelated to the paycheck to paycheck topic -- I don't see people making big changes yet. The student parking lot at my high school is still full every day. These kid COULD ride the bus for FREE, but they're still driving private cars. The stores and the mall are still full. The restaurants are still doing a booming business.

If our high school students all decided to ride the buses, the district would be in BIG trouble! All of the buses are already filled with 2-3 students per seat and with all the budget cuts going on in the education industry I don't think they have the funds to upgrade. I have noticed in my area that more teens are carpooling to school with their friends (less for gas!).

I do agree with the lack of big changes being made though. I think that our country considers a lot more things as "needed" than "wanted". I-pods are "needed", new clothes are "needed", big vacations are "needed" (sorry Disney, but it's true!). Everyone needs to change their entire mindset. If it's too difficult (it's going to take some time) for this generation, Americans need to pass new values down to the younger generations.

Tinkerbelle32
05-24-2008, 08:58 AM
I find it sad that folks trying to sell their cars was "entertaining". Maybe these people were having hard times. You honestly think that ONLY SUV drivers want their cars sold over the blue book price. You, yourself wouldn't want the best amount of money that you could get for your car? I have a hard time believing that. And to think that the people who feel that drilling is a viable option only care about now, and that we don't care about our children's children is assinine! I thought these boards were for giving advice and opinions and not finger pointing and name calling.

CarolA
05-24-2008, 09:07 AM
I find it sad that folks trying to sell their cars was "entertaining". Maybe these people were having hard times. You honestly think that ONLY SUV drivers want their cars sold over the blue book price. You, yourself wouldn't want the best amount of money that you could get for your car? I have a hard time believing that. And to think that the people who feel that drilling is a viable option only care about now, and that we don't care about our children's children is assinine! I thought these boards were for giving advice and opinions and not finger pointing and name calling.

WOW!!! Using the word "assinine" and saying "these boards were for giving advice and opinion and not finger pointing and name calling in the same post" (What would you call this post??????? :rotfl2: ) Sounds like to me what you are really saying is only opinions that agree with yours should be posted and any that don't are "assinine". Sorry it doesn't work that way on a message board.

I think that these folks need to face facts. It's very rare that someone will pay MORE then the value of a car for it. Why should they expect that? I am sorry that reality is tough, but..... I also find it entertaining that everyone in America thought they NEEDED an SUV. WHY???? Apparently these same families who NEEDED an SUV have not discovered that they could live without them... hmmm...

I will be selling my car in a year or so. I don't think that I am expecting to get paid more then it's worthe.

Tinkerbelle32
05-24-2008, 09:14 AM
These boards are for giving advice and opinions! I have no problem with anyone sharing their views, ways of solving issues, etc. But, when you start making assumptions and generalizations about other peoples views and feelings that is crossing a line to me. You do not know me. Therefore, how can you possibly state how I feel about my children or their childrens children etc. Please, feel free to give your opinion, but at the same time allow me to make mine without all the additional negative comments!

Lizzybear
05-24-2008, 09:18 AM
From a UK perspective, it does bother me yes but realistically there is nothing I can do so since I choose to drive a car then I pay the costs. My dad is a small business owner (roofing supplies) and is feeling the increase too: They have several trucks which of course run on diesel. He hasn't increased the prices to account for it yet but it'll be a possibility if the price continues to rise. It's currently 1 ($2) a litre, diesel is around 1.20. I'm lucky in that I live in a city where the public transport is pretty good (public transport isn't consistent in the UK, if you live in a rural area it's usually not a viable option for your sole method of transport) so I don't need to use my car for every little journey. The point about SUVs is interesting though: Definitely true for continental Europe but i've actually seen an increase in them here in recent years, despite how much they cost to run. I suppose at the end of the day people enjoy the comfort and convenience of having their own vehicle so petrol would have to become truly unaffordable for them to give up their cars completely, even if the option of public transport is there.

CarolA
05-24-2008, 09:20 AM
These boards are for giving advice and opinions! I have no problem with anyone sharing their views, ways of solving issues, etc. But, when you start making assumptions and generalizations about other peoples views and feelings that is crossing a line to me. You do not know me. Therefore, how can you possibly state how I feel about my children or their childrens children etc. Please, feel free to give your opinion, but at the same time allow me to make mine without all the additional negative comments!

WAIT!!!

My intial post that you decided to ATTACK and call names was not in response to anything you posted. But you decided to that you were going to tell me how WRONG I was. And apparently at that point I am suppose to agree and allow you to trash me?:lmao:

I have a solution for you. You can put me on ignore.

fkj2
05-24-2008, 09:24 AM
This thread--and some of the responses--is interesting.

Newton postulated that for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. I believe we'll see that in this economy.

To believe that high gasoline prices aren't impacting us individually does not consider their impact on the country as a whole. There are people who are hungry. Maybe they're not really visible, yet. The elderly, who have their pride, won't want to have to admit they don't have enough money to eat as well as they should. And they're a segment of society that NEEDS to eat well; the immune system doesn't function as well as we age and requires adequate nutrition. Then consider the children and teenagers who need adequate calcium intake to build their bone levels of calcium. For those of us who "haven't felt the effects of higher gas prices yet," take a look at your children, grandchildren, nieces and nephews...are you still "not feeling it?"

For those who utilize mass transit, it's good that you have that availability. I'm sure it's something we'd all like to have access to. And hopefully, your transportation won't suffer when local governments have to make budget cuts.

I do think there is something to the theory of Peak Oil, but even if that proved not to be true, we have allowed OPEC to hold us hostage to oil for decades and we've done nothing to prepare ourselves. We had plenty of warning: that's on US. What's our response? We send Bush to Saudi Arabia, begging, hat in hand.

As for natural gas, the June contract just closed short of $12/btu...and we're just heading into hurricane season. For those not following, it doesn't seem like producers are injecting large amounts into storage for the coming winter...yet. Really, why should they? Last fall, NG was less than $5/btu and supply was ample. The country drew down the storage and now the price has more than doubled.

As to the idea that oil shouldn't be traded on the open market, why not? It's like any other good or service. If anyone has a skill, they sell it to the highest bidder, right? Food's sold on the open market, and it's a HUGE industry for the United States.

Some will undoubtedly fare better than others, but I don't know how anyone can see the strain on the faces of their fellow Americans who have to choose between fuel, housing, food, or prescriptions and "not feel it."

PatriciaH
05-24-2008, 09:26 AM
People are saying how much in taxes they pay in Europe to have health care and great transportation but I think we pay quite a lot here. Property taxes are crazy now. I am also shocked what some people on these boards pay for health insurance. We pay $800/month for my health insurance (DH's contract company pays for his.) I am 37, healthy and do not smoke. In France they also have help for new parents like a nanny that will come to the home to help with laundry, child care, etc. The daycares are great and cost about $2 a week. New parents get a lot of time off not to mention they have more vacation time in general 5-6 weeks or so.

happygirl
05-24-2008, 09:33 AM
I believe we are all hurt by gas prices but we can budget around it. I meant the people MOST hurt as in the ones who can't afford food or internet access anymore. As in the poorest people in the country. No disrespect was intended.:love: No Biggie Welcome to the board have fun:goodvibes :goodvibes

Tinkerbelle32
05-24-2008, 09:47 AM
CarolA- I never once said that your opinion was wrong, incorrect, etc. Nor, did I ever trash you. I said that the statement made was assinine. I didn't agree with your statement when you said that these people who think drilling, or getting oil from Alaska can't care about the future the environment etc. Since I was the poster suggesting the drilling I took this as a reference pointed towards me. Enough said.

luvsJack
05-24-2008, 10:15 AM
[QUOTE=MrsPete;25297307]In all honesty, most people have some "fat" in thier budgets, which can be trimmed.QUOTE]

I agree that there are many Americans who have way to much "fat" in their budgets and trully need to begin trimming. But, the ones who really will have to decide between food and gas don't have the fat to trim. The community college I work at has many single parents enrolled in our two year allied health programs. They have to do their clinicals (working at medical sites as part of their education) and can't always work during this time. They don't have cell phones (or even land lines), cable television or any other such "luxury". They have to drive to school and to their clinicals (which can be a 1-2 hour drive), we do not live in an area where public transportation is feasible. So, yes they may have to make the hard choice of paying for some necessity or buying gas for their car; at least until they graduate.

I also agree that Americans use way too much of most things. We tend to think we are entitled to "bigger and supposedly better". We buy large homes and larger vehicles and then complain at the cost of using them. We have to stop and see where we can cut back. Regardless of what we have all been made to believe, we really can do without a lot of what we have or make do with a smaller version. I don't wish to get into the "do you need an SUV the size of Montana" discussion, but I do know that it is costing my niece $160 a week to go to work in her SUV and it would cost her, at the most, $60 in my car (for the same commute). $400 a month more in gas--thats a chunk out of a paycheck! She works for 1 week a month just to pay for gas to get to work!

I don't think it an either/or situation on drilling more/alternative fuels/consume less. We need all of the above so that we can become self sufficient and stop depending on other countries.

DawnM
05-24-2008, 10:20 AM
Well, since it cost $7 to get to Costco and back yesterday, I do get bothered by it, but we do have the resources to pay.

I just am being much more careful about how much we drive and how far we drive and am making sure to cosolidate trips/errands as much as possible.

DH takes his 40mpg car to the nearest light rail stop and takes the train in to work. His work subsidizes that so it is very economical.

We are working hard to keep our gas cost per month the same as it was when we just drove as much as we wanted.....and we CAN do that with some extra planning.

Dawn

DawnM
05-24-2008, 10:22 AM
The biggest problem I see with this is that most people are so in over their heads right now with large houses they can no longer afford and they can't sell for anywhere near what they paid for it and they have no savings or reserve to pay the difference anyway.

Dawn

I agree with these thoughts. We as a country are going to have to scale life back to something more like a 50s-60s mentality: Yes, kids can share bedrooms; most kids' clothing comes from friends or cousins' hand-me-downs; one car per family; eating out is a treat, not an everyday affair. If we adopted this attitude towards spending/living, the vast majority of Americans would have enough money for their needs, and they'd be able to save for thier wants.

Maliki2
05-24-2008, 10:30 AM
Of course I'm bothered by it. Here in Vermont there is pretty much no public transportation or I would take it. My car gets 32MPG my wifes about 27 MPG. So we don't have huge gas guzzlers. The problem is we each commute 62 miles a day (roundtrip), and we can't commute in together due to 2 different shifts. The cost a month is about 2/3rds our mortgage. Add in the heating cost in the winter, and we pay more per month than our mortgage just between those two. That I find appaling!

GrowingUpDisney
05-24-2008, 10:41 AM
Honestly, it doesn't really bother me. I don't sit and dwell on it. I don't mumble and grumble about it. I don't speculate where it will be 6 months - 10 years from now. Anyone else?

I wouldn't say I let it "bother" me so much as it worries me for those who were already living on limited means and struggling to pay their bills as it was. For instance, my grandparents. They worked hard their whole lives - my grandfather did not even retire until he was over 70 years old. He is the type of man that believes if you CAN work - you should, so he did. Now, he is retired and his health is deteriorating (he is 76). Although he was extremely good with his money and was NEVER frivilous - living on retirement is not easy. They have to be very careful about where their money goes.

The price gauge in gas has affected EVERYTHING. Groceries are almost double what they were a year ago. I saw a gallon of Barbers milk yesterday for $6.09! :scared1: I almost fell out. We are fine for now - but if it goes much higher, it will be tough for us. When I bought groceries yesterday, I bought VERY limited things - just what we needed and almost NO name brand items and it was double what I normally spend.

We live in a garden home, drive reasonable cars (Camry and 01 Town and Country) and work very hard for our money....it is a shame that OPEC and the oil companies are rolling in the profits they are making while people like us (considered "middle class") are struggling. It is ridiculous....

My husband works for a company that test oil/gas wells. They DO NOT PROFIT FROM GAS or OIL - let me make that perfectly clear. They are hired by companies to see if the oil or gas wells are leaking into the soil or ground water. The man who is over him forcasts gas rising to over $5.00 a gallon here before summer is over. That is assinine. There is NO excuse for it...GREED, MONEY and POWER will be (and already is) America's downfall.

a1tinkfans
05-24-2008, 11:10 AM
Honestly, it doesn't really bother me. I don't sit and dwell on it. I don't mumble and grumble about it. I don't speculate where it will be 6 months - 10 years from now. Anyone else?

UGH, all I know is this morning it was 4.29 :headache: by me this morning and personally, I am CUTTING down on driving BIG TIME, IT IS CRAZY!!!

DVC Sadie
05-24-2008, 12:19 PM
No, it affects ALL OF US. Even those of us who drive small cars and who aren't forced to drive long distances for work are still paying higher prices at the grocery store (and other places). And when the lowest-paid people in our country are squeezed even more, that's going to affect us all too.

I can say that the gas prices haven't hurt me nearly as much as they're hurting other people, but I don't think any of us are genuinely unaffected.

I do agree with the people who say that the best outcome of this situation could be a greater awareness of our habits (and an understand of the fact that we cannot continue in the way we've been living for the past few decades); however, this isn't JUST about gas -- that's the tip of the iceburg and the obvious thing of which everyone's aware . . . but we Americans also have to stop our rampant consumption of, well, everything: driving oversized vehicles, eating out multiple times a week, buying big gifts for small holidays, using shopping as a hobby.

The other side of this coin is that we're concerned about the economy -- if we genuinely embrace the "less is more" idea in America, if we cut back on our consumption . . . the economy will spiral downhill fast. It's inevitable.

You must have missed the rest of my post or just chose to ignore it?:sad1:

I posted that it didn't just concern some of us but all of us. Please reread, then post.

Sincerely, Sadie

T. Lynn
05-24-2008, 12:24 PM
Not real worried about it but I do think it's insane. I live about 4-6 miles from work and for DH, they are considering a gas card along with his next payroll increase.

That would be great since he drives 30 minutes to work. He does a great job at work so they definately make the increases & perks well worth it. As of January they gave him 3 weeks paid vacation (he's salary so he actually gets 3 extra paychecks) and at that time, he was only there 7 months.

MrsPete
05-24-2008, 03:58 PM
The biggest problem I see with this is that most people are so in over their heads right now with large houses they can no longer afford and they can't sell for anywhere near what they paid for it and they have no savings or reserve to pay the difference anyway.

DawnYou're absolutley right -- perhaps these people could be categorized as "willing to make changes, but realistically unable to do so". I think many of us can see options in our lives that'd be good financially, but they aren't really viable given the circumstances in which we live. For example, I would be perfectly willing to walk or bike to work -- it's only a tad over a mile, which is perfectly do-able in good weather -- but the roads are very busy, I'd have to cross a major intersection, and we have no sidewalks, so even though it looks like something I could (and should) do, it just isn't safe. That's not quite the same as a person who wants to get rid of the gas guzzler but can't . . . but the theme is similar.

MrsPete
05-24-2008, 04:09 PM
People are saying how much in taxes they pay in Europe to have health care and great transportation but I think we pay quite a lot here. Property taxes are crazy now. I am also shocked what some people on these boards pay for health insurance. We pay $800/month for my health insurance (DH's contract company pays for his.) I am 37, healthy and do not smoke. In France they also have help for new parents like a nanny that will come to the home to help with laundry, child care, etc. The daycares are great and cost about $2 a week. New parents get a lot of time off not to mention they have more vacation time in general 5-6 weeks or so.I've always kept good records of our medical expenses, and in all the years we've been married we only "saved money" by having insurance in three years: the two years when our two children were born and the year our oldest had a really bad broken bone.

We made a calculated choice to scale back our health insurance two years ago, and we have not regretted it. DH pays, I think, $40 every two weeks for our family of four. I now pay cash when the kids have something like strep throat, but if we were really sick or if we were to be in an accident we'd be covered. It's been a good choice for our family. It's not a forever choice, of course -- as DH and I grow older, we'll need to go back to a higher level of coverage; also, it wouldn't have been good when our girls were young and needed all those well-visits, etc. But it's "just right" for this point in our lives. I should also add that we have two incomes and enough in savings to make this feasible. No one should make this type of choice without investigating it carefully.

As for France's baby-help, vacation time, etc, remember that it isn't free -- nothing's really free. They're paying for it through taxes.

MrsPete
05-24-2008, 04:15 PM
If our high school students all decided to ride the buses, the district would be in BIG trouble! All of the buses are already filled with 2-3 students per seat and with all the budget cuts going on in the education industry I don't think they have the funds to upgrade. I have noticed in my area that more teens are carpooling to school with their friends (less for gas!).You're absolutley right that more bus riders would put a dent in the school's budget -- especially since the school busses use diesel fuel, which is even more expensive than the gas we use in our cars! And by law (in my area anyway), they MUST provide transportation to all students.

However, I wasn't really thinking about the school's budget. I was looking at it from the point of view of individual families. People complain about prices, but things must not be too bad if they have the option to get their kids to school FOR FREE, but they continue to let them make the more expensive choice instead.

Looking at it from the school's point of view, I wonder how long it'll be before we have four 10-hour days instead of five 8-hour days. It'd cut transportation costs by 20%, which is a significant savings. It'd be horrible for the elementary children, of course; it wouldn't be too bad for high schoolers. I know we have strict laws on just how many hours each class must meet in order for the children to be given credit for passing -- I wonder if five days per week is actually mandated. I predict some sort of change within a couple years.

luv2laugh
05-24-2008, 04:16 PM
As for France's baby-help, vacation time, etc, remember that it isn't free -- nothing's really free. They're paying for it through taxes.

Yes, but people were commenting how high France's taxes are. I think that for everything they get for their high taxes, it's a great deal.

patsal
05-24-2008, 04:21 PM
I have to be bothered by it since my income is not going up to reflect the actual cost of living. I own a house that is below my means, carry no CC balances and coupon clip, but the commute to work is not something I can change--we have no public transportation option in the suburbs to the suburbs. I am now working extra hours home instructing students on suspension or too ill to come to school just to pay for the difference in gas and grocery prices--this takes time from my own children and family. This does affect us all and though I don't lose sleep over it I do have concerns that this is just the beginning--eventually even those who think they are all comfy and don't care will have to. We all have a threshhold for expenses, eventually at this rate it will hit everyone.

MrsPete
05-24-2008, 04:23 PM
I agree that there are many Americans who have way to much "fat" in their budgets and trully need to begin trimming. But, the ones who really will have to decide between food and gas don't have the fat to trim. The community college I work at has many single parents enrolled in our two year allied health programs. They have to do their clinicals (working at medical sites as part of their education) and can't always work during this time. They don't have cell phones (or even land lines), cable television or any other such "luxury". They have to drive to school and to their clinicals (which can be a 1-2 hour drive), we do not live in an area where public transportation is feasible. So, yes they may have to make the hard choice of paying for some necessity or buying gas for their car; at least until they graduate.After my dad abandoned us and moved out of state to avoid paying child support, I spent my middle/high school years in genuine poverty, and I live in an area where public transit doesn't exist, so I know that there are people out there who are really making the only choices available to them, yet it isn't enough -- but I'm sure that the people who can cut back on things other than food outnumber them significantly. Also, those people in the most dire circumstances qualify for social services-type help. These are sad stories, and I don't mean to imply otherwise -- but they do not represent the majority of Americans.

rcpae
05-24-2008, 04:58 PM
[QUOTE=I know we have strict laws on just how many hours each class must meet in order for the children to be given credit for passing -- I wonder if five days per week is actually mandated. I predict some sort of change within a couple years.[/QUOTE]

It is an interesting thought because schools would not only save on gas, but electricity and so on.

Not a bad thought for businesses also to go to 4 - 10 hr days. I know when my DH and I were first married I worked 4 - 10's and loved it.

I know I am close to quitting my meager part-time job ($7.15 hr) because even though I set my own hours, it really isn't worth my time anymore. I really took the job just to help pay for my girls sports. It is only about 5 miles each way from my house but it is becoming inconvenient and the couple of dollars I may bring home per hour just doesn't seem worth my time.

I think many of us will need to re-think our current lifestyles.

christa112
05-24-2008, 05:27 PM
Am I cutting down my driving because of gas prices? No. Does it bother me that no one in the government stepping in with the gas price gauging? YES!!! What I don't understand how lets say on Monday I get gas and it cost $3.50 and on Thursday I drive by the same gas station and it is now $3.60. How is that happening???

DVC Sadie
05-24-2008, 05:52 PM
You're absolutley right -- perhaps these people could be categorized as "willing to make changes, but realistically unable to do so". I think many of us can see options in our lives that'd be good financially, but they aren't really viable given the circumstances in which we live. For example, I would be perfectly willing to walk or bike to work -- it's only a tad over a mile, which is perfectly do-able in good weather -- but the roads are very busy, I'd have to cross a major intersection, and we have no sidewalks, so even though it looks like something I could (and should) do, it just isn't safe. That's not quite the same as a person who wants to get rid of the gas guzzler but can't . . . but the theme is similar.

If walking isn't do able maybe a scooter with helmet and leather that gets 100 miles per gallon would work. In other words, it is always easier to justify why not instead of yes I can.

LoveBWVVBR
05-24-2008, 07:07 PM
Looking at it from the school's point of view, I wonder how long it'll be before we have four 10-hour days instead of five 8-hour days. It'd cut transportation costs by 20%, which is a significant savings. It'd be horrible for the elementary children, of course; it wouldn't be too bad for high schoolers. I know we have strict laws on just how many hours each class must meet in order for the children to be given credit for passing -- I wonder if five days per week is actually mandated. I predict some sort of change within a couple years.

As good as this sounds, I don't think that it will ever happen. My mother's school system tried to do something where they had the entire month of Jan. off and then lost the 2 spring breaks to compensate. It would have lowered the oil bills by an insane amount, and this was BEFORE the recent run up. The union fought it like heck and the plan failed. I think that in school systems with strong unions (which would be a lot of school systems), 4 10 hour days won't fly any better than the taking Jan. off plan.

karinbelle
05-24-2008, 07:29 PM
As good as this sounds, I don't think that it will ever happen. My mother's school system tried to do something where they had the entire month of Jan. off and then lost the 2 spring breaks to compensate. It would have lowered the oil bills by an insane amount, and this was BEFORE the recent run up. The union fought it like heck and the plan failed. I think that in school systems with strong unions (which would be a lot of school systems), 4 10 hour days won't fly any better than the taking Jan. off plan.

Why not? If the students went a couple of extra hours a day for the 4 days - and teachers did NOT lose pay - then they should be for it.

I could only see an objection if teachers were required to work additional hours and still come in on the 5th day for the same or reduced pay.

LoveBWVVBR
05-24-2008, 07:36 PM
Why not? If the students went a couple of extra hours a day for the 4 days - and teachers did NOT lose pay - then they should be for it.

I could only see an objection if teachers were required to work additional hours and still come in on the 5th day for the same or reduced pay.

I think the unions would find a reason to fight it. They had no reason to fight teachers having the month of Jan. off to save on oil bills, but they did anyways. I think that they will fight to maintain the status quo even if it makes no sense. That's JMHO, but I really can't see 4 10 hour school days flying in most school districts.

Also, parents would be up in arms if they had to find and pay for childcare for an entire day each week for school-aged kids. They would fight it too. I just can't see it happening in most school systems. I **could** see private businesses opting for a 4/40 or 9/80 work schedule, though. Several companies in our area already do this as a company-wide policy (the 9/80 schedule). I could easily see private businesses opting for the 4/40 workweek if it was feasible for their line of business. I just can't see public schools doing so.

treboats
05-24-2008, 09:32 PM
The thing that makes me mad is the oil companies are posting RECORD profits. The government needs to step in and regulate the price of gas. Utility companies are regulated why can't the oil companies be too? I am not saying they shouldn't be profitable but the profits they are reporting are disgusting.

yensidwiz
05-24-2008, 09:57 PM
The thing that makes me mad is the oil companies are posting RECORD profits. The government needs to step in and regulate the price of gas. Utility companies are regulated why can't the oil companies be too? I am not saying they shouldn't be profitable but the profits they are reporting are disgusting.

I couldn't agree more!

yensidwiz
05-24-2008, 10:07 PM
No Biggie Welcome to the board have fun:goodvibes :goodvibes

Thanks:)

tonilea
05-24-2008, 10:19 PM
The thing that makes me mad is the oil companies are posting RECORD profits. The government needs to step in and regulate the price of gas. Utility companies are regulated why can't the oil companies be too? I am not saying they shouldn't be profitable but the profits they are reporting are disgusting.

What annoys the living daylights outta me, is the oil companies are making record profits AND enjoying special tax status.

MrsKreamer
05-24-2008, 11:15 PM
The thing that makes me mad is the oil companies are posting RECORD profits. The government needs to step in and regulate the price of gas. Utility companies are regulated why can't the oil companies be too? I am not saying they shouldn't be profitable but the profits they are reporting are disgusting.

The "record" profits are misleading. Their overall profit margin has stayed the same, at around 9-10%. Many companies actually make more than this. Disney makes around 12% and I know Walmart makes around that as well.

I wasn't around in the 70s but I thought the price caps was what caused the shortage back then?:confused3

MrsKreamer
05-24-2008, 11:22 PM
I am worried, but I worry about everything. What concerns me is Dh's job. Now he can afford gas to get to work. We have trimmed our budget and luckily it is in his contract that he get a 1-2% raise(it is 1-2% of top pay) every 3 months and the entire company gets a 60 cents raise this year and next until the contract runs out.

I worry about how high gas has to get until many of his coworkers can't afford to get to work. I worry about my MIL. She works at Walmart. They are trying to cut worker's hours. The last two pay periods she has had to get 76 hours instead of 80, and they want to do more in the upcoming weeks. She is supposed to my a cashier manager but last night they had her unloading a truck. Thankfully she lives close enough to work so gas isn't an issue for her yet, but what about her cut hours?

We recently potty trained our oldest son. We were hoping to see a savings of almost $75 in our monthly grocery bill, since we now only have to diaper one child. I still haven't seen the savings.

luvsJack
05-25-2008, 07:08 AM
As good as this sounds, I don't think that it will ever happen. My mother's school system tried to do something where they had the entire month of Jan. off and then lost the 2 spring breaks to compensate. It would have lowered the oil bills by an insane amount, and this was BEFORE the recent run up. The union fought it like heck and the plan failed. I think that in school systems with strong unions (which would be a lot of school systems), 4 10 hour days won't fly any better than the taking Jan. off plan.

Actually our school system is already talking about going to a 4 day week next year. It may be a little easier for our school because they are already down to 4 1/2 days (not sure how many days most schools go), so they would just lengthen the 4 full days a bit and knock out that other 1/2 day for the students.

Mrs Pete: Sounds like you know firsthand about the hardships so many are facing. I can certainly sympthaize with your Mother, I too had an ex that tried to avoid paying child support. And I do agree wholeheartedly with you that most people have a lot of fat to trim. Thats something I have been trying to do for my own family. I haven't had to cut anything out but am really looking at the services we pay for and where I can reduce them. I have also found myself going back to the way I cooked when my boys were young (during the before mentioned child support problems), which means reeeaaalllly streching some meals.

CarolA
05-25-2008, 07:28 AM
The "record" profits are misleading. Their overall profit margin has stayed the same, at around 9-10%. Many companies actually make more than this. Disney makes around 12% and I know Walmart makes around that as well.

I wasn't around in the 70s but I thought the price caps was what caused the shortage back then?:confused3

Don't let "facts" get in the way of whining on here:rotfl2: (Just kidding)

Acutally I think price caps will lead to shortages. Other countries with a stonger currency in the world market will buy at the going rate. So folks won't sell to us creating a shortage.

TupperMom7
05-27-2008, 10:01 AM
Don't let "facts" get in the way of whining on here:rotfl2: (Just kidding)

Acutally I think price caps will lead to shortages. Other countries with a stonger currency in the world market will buy at the going rate. So folks won't sell to us creating a shortage.


From what I understand, we don't need to buy from other countries for our oil if the Oil Companies would just refine oil that is pumped here.

TupperMom7
05-27-2008, 10:03 AM
The "record" profits are misleading. Their overall profit margin has stayed the same, at around 9-10%. Many companies actually make more than this. Disney makes around 12% and I know Walmart makes around that as well.

I wasn't around in the 70s but I thought the price caps was what caused the shortage back then?:confused3

Okay, so Disney makes a 12% profit, but that is for entertainment, not for a necessity. I know many on this board feel it is a necessity to go to WDW every year, sometimes more than once, but I could live without it. I cannot do without fuel for my car and home heating and would rather not be paying these high prices if I didn't need to.
How about a million man march to Washington to demand that they step in and do something? Anybody ready to step up to the task?

CarolA
05-27-2008, 10:17 AM
From what I understand, we don't need to buy from other countries for our oil if the Oil Companies would just refine oil that is pumped here.

Oil companies are NOT public entities. They will sell to the highest bidder. So they refine what is pumped here and sell it to whomever. And since our currency is weaker we aren't the "first choice".

Now, it sounds like what you really want is "nationalization" of the system. In other words oil pumped here is refined and sold at a price we like. In that case the goverment would have to take over. IMHO that's a receipe for disaster! For profit businesses aren't going to play by those rules and most oil companies (if not all) are multinationals owned by lots of people who aren't American and would want (and deserve) to be compensated for the losses you want them to incur. And of course our taxes would have to go up to support this since someone has to PAY for drilling etc and the oil companies now do that exploration etc in hopes of a profit. Now we would have to fund that, we would have to fund clean up etc. Gee thats great. Low gas prices higher taxes!!!!


I am not marching on Washington to get them to take over the oil industry. I have no problem supporting some type of voucher system for elderly and others who need help with heating thier homes. As for gas.. A lot would depend and I probably would support it only in RARE cases.

shelly3girls
05-27-2008, 10:18 AM
Why not? If the students went a couple of extra hours a day for the 4 days - and teachers did NOT lose pay - then they should be for it.

I could only see an objection if teachers were required to work additional hours and still come in on the 5th day for the same or reduced pay.

As a mother of a 7 and 9 year old, I do not possibly see how 4 longer days = 5 days. Kids already get burned out by the amount of work they do in one day. Their attention span is limited. Although I do not normally support the teacher's union, I would believe the teachers if they said it was not practical.

dawnball
05-27-2008, 11:04 AM
From what I understand, we don't need to buy from other countries for our oil if the Oil Companies would just refine oil that is pumped here.

Oil is a fungible commodity. There is no difference between a US barrel of light sweet vs an OPEC barrel of light sweet. Everyone is trying to buy the cheapest barrel of oil they can, or sell the most expensive. If we're buying foreign oil instead of US oil - it's because it's CHEAPER. If US oil is sold overseas instead of to the US - it's because there's more profit to be made. The reasons that there is more profit to be made that way are frequently political. If we used US oil exclusively, then oil company profits would drop, and US gasoline prices would rise.

One problem we are seeing is that there is less light sweet oil and more heavy sour on the world market. Heavy sour oil requires more complex refining, and most of the world's refineries can't handle heavy sour. As there's less light sweet and more heavy sour - heavy sour sells at more of a discount. The US has (compared to the rest of the world) high amounts of capacity to refined heavy sour. So we buy heavy sour on the cheap - and sell light sweet at a profit. That's where most of the current US oil profits come from. There just isn't any extra refining capacity, and building refineries (particularly those that can handle heavy sour) is expensive. It could be cost effective to convert more refineries to handle heavy sour - but only if the price divide stays high in the future, and in the short term gas prices would go up due to diminished output of refined fuel during the upgrade.

Oil companies (even with these record profits) are still making a lower percentage profit margin than banks or credit card companies. They're making a third less than the *average* profit margin on the S&P 500. They're also making more than a third less than my local regulated power company that can't set it's own rates.

Most US oil and gas company shares are owned by mutual funds, pensions and IRA accounts. That's individual (mostly middle class) people saving for their retirement.

Am I bothered by the price of gas? Yes and no. I think that the transition to higher fuel costs has to happen sometime, and that it will be horrendously painful for a lot of people whenever it happens. However - I also know that there are significantly more fuel efficient cars available in the world than those sold in the US. And I know that automakers are looking for a steady gasoline price above $6/gallon before they bring them to the US. I currently drive a car that's 9 years old (and was not purchased with fuel economy in mind), and would still rank in the top 10 most fuel efficient cars if it were sold today. That's a terrible thing, in my opinion.

CarolA
05-27-2008, 11:22 AM
Oil is a fungible commodity. There is no difference between a US barrel of light sweet vs an OPEC barrel of light sweet. Everyone is trying to buy the cheapest barrel of oil they can, or sell the most expensive. If we're buying foreign oil instead of US oil - it's because it's CHEAPER. If US oil is sold overseas instead of to the US - it's because there's more profit to be made. The reasons that there is more profit to be made that way are frequently political. If we used US oil exclusively, then oil company profits would drop, and US gasoline prices would rise.

One problem we are seeing is that there is less light sweet oil and more heavy sour on the world market. Heavy sour oil requires more complex refining, and most of the world's refineries can't handle heavy sour. As there's less light sweet and more heavy sour - heavy sour sells at more of a discount. The US has (compared to the rest of the world) high amounts of capacity to refined heavy sour. So we buy heavy sour on the cheap - and sell light sweet at a profit. That's where most of the current US oil profits come from. There just isn't any extra refining capacity, and building refineries (particularly those that can handle heavy sour) is expensive. It could be cost effective to convert more refineries to handle heavy sour - but only if the price divide stays high in the future, and in the short term gas prices would go up due to diminished output of refined fuel during the upgrade.

Oil companies (even with these record profits) are still making a lower percentage profit margin than banks or credit card companies. They're making a third less than the *average* profit margin on the S&P 500. They're also making more than a third less than my local regulated power company that can't set it's own rates.

Most US oil and gas company shares are owned by mutual funds, pensions and IRA accounts. That's individual (mostly middle class) people saving for their retirement.

Am I bothered by the price of gas? Yes and no. I think that the transition to higher fuel costs has to happen sometime, and that it will be horrendously painful for a lot of people whenever it happens. However - I also know that there are significantly more fuel efficient cars available in the world than those sold in the US. And I know that automakers are looking for a steady gasoline price above $6/gallon before they bring them to the US. I currently drive a car that's 9 years old (and was not purchased with fuel economy in mind), and would still rank in the top 10 most fuel efficient cars if it were sold today. That's a terrible thing, in my opinion.

Great post with some good info.

My car is 7 years old. It gets better gas milage that a LOT of things I see advertised out there. (Now part of that is due to the fact that I drive a manual transmission!)

MrsPete
05-27-2008, 11:50 AM
If walking isn't do able maybe a scooter with helmet and leather that gets 100 miles per gallon would work. In other words, it is always easier to justify why not instead of yes I can.Two reasons why a scooter wouldn't be a good choice for me:

1. I'm already using less than a gallon of gas/week to get to and from work; at that rate, it'd take me a long time to make up the initial cost of the scooter. I really couldn't use a scooter for most of my errands because I couldn't carry a family's worth of groceries, etc. I'd walk to and from work (as I said in my previous post, if it wasn't for a giant, dangerous intersection) because that wouldn't require any up-front money.
2. I have two daughters who also go to school with me. We can't share a scooter.

For a different person -- one with a longer commute -- a scooter would be an excellent option (even if that person kept a car for rainy/cold days). In fact, I saw one of my fellow teachers arriving at school on one just this morning. These things are probably a great choice. As good as this sounds, I don't think that it will ever happen. My mother's school system tried to do something where they had the entire month of Jan. off and then lost the 2 spring breaks to compensate. It would have lowered the oil bills by an insane amount, and this was BEFORE the recent run up. The union fought it like heck and the plan failed. I think that in school systems with strong unions (which would be a lot of school systems), 4 10 hour days won't fly any better than the taking Jan. off plan.I don't live in a union state, but I think everyone can see that something has to happen; the schools can't print money on their memographs -- they're taking it from your pocket and my pocket.

Teachers would benefit personally from a switch to 4 days/week; they, too, would only be driving their cars to and from school 4 days. As a mother of a 7 and 9 year old, I do not possibly see how 4 longer days = 5 days. Kids already get burned out by the amount of work they do in one day. Their attention span is limited. Although I do not normally support the teacher's union, I would believe the teachers if they said it was not practical.I agree that it would be very bad for the younger children; it shouldn't be a problem for middle and high school students though.(Now part of that is due to the fact that I drive a manual transmission!)An oddity: I bought a new car last year, and I was waivering between whether to get the automatic or the straight-drive. The automatic actually gets 2 mpg MORE than the same model manual-transmission; I was shocked because that didn't used to be true!

sandisuze
05-27-2008, 11:54 AM
one of the things that bothers me most is the pricing games that are played:
Example: Last Thursday gas went up anywhere from 4.00 to 4.20 a gallon and stayed high over the weekend and Memorial day
Today the SAME gas stations have lowered their prices to 3.87 to 3.97 a gallon.
Hurricane season starts in a few days. Can you imagine what it'll be if there's even a hint of a storm anywhere?:worried:

Working in non profit I see a lot going on and although some have not made wise decisions IE: Buying a house they can't afford, buying stuff to keep up with their neighbors etc.- i see others that all it will take is an illness or a cut in hours and they will be in bad shape. I see a lot who take advantage of the system so others can't get help.
(Ok I 'll stop being off topic now -Sorry)

patsal
05-27-2008, 03:58 PM
Why not? If the students went a couple of extra hours a day for the 4 days - and teachers did NOT lose pay - then they should be for it.

I could only see an objection if teachers were required to work additional hours and still come in on the 5th day for the same or reduced pay.

That would make for a 7.5 hour day for the kids at the very least--now let's look at what research tells us about children, adolescents and learning styles--pretty much the average student has the ability to process information in concentrated amounts for minutes equivalent to 2Xthier age--so a 12 year old should be able to sit and do sustained work in any subject area for 24 minutes before their brain needs a rest form it, a 16 year old 32 minutes, etc. Now that is average we have of course the other two ends of the spectrum so a bunch can work longer while another bunch can't process for that long. We can't group them by ability any more so adjusting the time to meet individual needs wouldn't work. Give them 3 day weekends and the retention rate goes down for those that do not reinforce skills at home. So now my emergent readers are not reading for three days a week rather than two, my slower learners are not getting the extra reinforcement, and my gifted kids are not being challenged. Personally, I'd love it if I only had to go in 4 days per week but from what I know about kids and learning styles I don't think it would be best for kids.

karinbelle
05-28-2008, 08:32 PM
That would make for a 7.5 hour day for the kids at the very least--now let's look at what research tells us about children, adolescents and learning styles--pretty much the average student has the ability to process information in concentrated amounts for minutes equivalent to 2Xthier age--so a 12 year old should be able to sit and do sustained work in any subject area for 24 minutes before their brain needs a rest form it, a 16 year old 32 minutes, etc. Now that is average we have of course the other two ends of the spectrum so a bunch can work longer while another bunch can't process for that long. We can't group them by ability any more so adjusting the time to meet individual needs wouldn't work. Give them 3 day weekends and the retention rate goes down for those that do not reinforce skills at home. So now my emergent readers are not reading for three days a week rather than two, my slower learners are not getting the extra reinforcement, and my gifted kids are not being challenged. Personally, I'd love it if I only had to go in 4 days per week but from what I know about kids and learning styles I don't think it would be best for kids.


I agree that early elementary may have a problem. There is an issue with not enough breaks in the school day as it is - recess is minimal and only one time per day. PE is only 1 week per month at my DS's school. Perhaps if the longer day were broken up with more active, social learning situations it could turn a negative into a positive for the younger kids. Emotional Intellgience is what they are sorely lacking in many cases and it's showing up in the higher grades.

Another thought - many kids are already in care situations where they are in structured programs from 6 am to 6 pm or later.

For the middle and high schoolers - it could mean more opportunities to work their jobs, interact with their parents, job shadow, etc.

MrsPete
05-28-2008, 09:30 PM
That would make for a 7.5 hour day for the kids at the very least--now let's look at what research tells us about children, adolescents and learning styles--pretty much the average student has the ability to process information in concentrated amounts for minutes equivalent to 2Xthier age--so a 12 year old should be able to sit and do sustained work in any subject area for 24 minutes before their brain needs a rest form it, a 16 year old 32 minutes, etc. Ah, but a rest or a break doesn't mean a lunch period or a 30-minute recess. Any high school teacher who teaches 90-minute block scheduling periods will tell you that it's necessary to break the class up into several small segments within that 90-minute block. So the class might spend the first 20 minutes on a grammar exercise when they walk into class . . . then they get up and physically move (which helps them all) to put their grammar books away . . . then the teacher lectures on the novel they're reading for 15 minutes . . . then they move into small groups to complete an activity that asks them to reflect upon the reading that they've finished . . . then they move back to their rows for a quiz at the end of class and closure. For high school students, those 2-3 minute transition times ARE their breaks within the class. They don't completely walk away from the subject, but they "switch gears". The research supports these short breaks/transitions as a healthy learning choice -- the students don't totally disengage from the subject as they would if, say, they went to lunch and then came back to the same class.

karinbelle
05-30-2008, 04:04 AM
Ah, but a rest or a break doesn't mean a lunch period or a 30-minute recess. Any high school teacher who teaches 90-minute block scheduling periods will tell you that it's necessary to break the class up into several small segments within that 90-minute block. So the class might spend the first 20 minutes on a grammar exercise when they walk into class . . . then they get up and physically move (which helps them all) to put their grammar books away . . . then the teacher lectures on the novel they're reading for 15 minutes . . . then they move into small groups to complete an activity that asks them to reflect upon the reading that they've finished . . . then they move back to their rows for a quiz at the end of class and closure. For high school students, those 2-3 minute transition times ARE their breaks within the class. They don't completely walk away from the subject, but they "switch gears". The research supports these short breaks/transitions as a healthy learning choice -- the students don't totally disengage from the subject as they would if, say, they went to lunch and then came back to the same class.

Exactly right Mrs. Pete. Many adults also need mini-breaks through the work day. So in these terms, a 7.5 hour day for a child would not be much different than a 6 hour day as long as good teaching practice was taking place (a break or transition every 20 minutes or so).

PBader
05-30-2008, 04:46 AM
I own 2 gas stations and have hated to see the spike in prices. It really has put a crimp in my business cash flow. Since the beginning of May my wholesale price has gone up 50c. I cringe now before I look at my fuel costs for the day. I look back at when gas retailed for about $1 a gallon and a load of gas cost me $8K, now that same load is $34K. My gas jobber debits my account the next day for a load of gas. There are many days now that I lose money on every gallon of gas I sell after I pay Visa/MC the credit card fees. At $4 a gallon they are making almost 13c for each gallon of gas that is sold.

Am I bothered by the price? Yes and no. I feel for the folks out there that the increase has really hurt, especially the truckers and people that drive a lot for their work. I have quite a few employees that work for me part time for a 2nd job, quite a few of them have asked for an additional day to help out with their budgets. I also don't get many of my full timers turn down overtime anymore.

With the exception of a few of our large cities, there is just not much infastructure that is in place for mass public transportation. If we had that available in more cities I am sure that it would be well used. To build that now--most cities just couldn't afford it. They are already scrambling trying to cut $ out of their budgets to pay for the increase in fuel. Louisville has jacked up the property values to try to increase revenues, both of my locations values increased this year one 27% and the other 125%. Some businesses around me got increases of over 300%. While my house went up 6%. All this at a time when it is being reported that property values are down.:confused3

Our personal purchases of gas, really haven't effected our budget yet. We do fill up now at half a tank instead of letting it get low---I think that makes it easier on the mind, because it is about what it used to cost to fill up. We also don't carry any debt except for our house so I think that plays a large part of it not really "crimping our style".

LadyTrampScamp&Angel
05-30-2008, 06:49 AM
Am I bothered by the price of gas? Yes, now I am. I was ok for a long time but now as it is approaching $4/gal here and I'm seeing the increase in groceries etc, I'm now bothered.

I'm a SAHM, my DH walks to his office and our kid's school is .7 miles from our house. Most of our driving is recreational but now it's to the point that I am combining errands into one trip, re-thinking some trips this summer and not happy with what it will cost to drive to Chicago in a few weeks for a wedding. Still, we are very fortunate. I really feel for the people who have long communtes to work etc.

I'm not really obsessing about future prices, more preparing. Gonna buy that plug in Prius as soon as it becomes available. Right now I'm driving my 1990 Miata that gets 30 mpg as much as possible.

CarolA
05-30-2008, 07:09 AM
Our personal purchases of gas, really haven't effected our budget yet. We do fill up now at half a tank instead of letting it get low---I think that makes it easier on the mind, because it is about what it used to cost to fill up. We also don't carry any debt except for our house so I think that plays a large part of it not really "crimping our style".

This is my SIL's method..:rotfl: She says it still costs the same to fill up her Tahoe.

My brother who pays the credit card bill sees it a little differently however!:lmao:

bluehen
05-31-2008, 10:37 PM
Yes, but people were commenting how high France's taxes are. I think that for everything they get for their high taxes, it's a great deal.


It's not how much you pay...but what you get for your money.

Right now I don't believe I am getting my money's worth in the good old
US of A.

MoniqueU
05-31-2008, 11:29 PM
I am getting even more concerned. Gas here is now ranging from 4.06 a gallon to 4.42 for regular. With some prices down where my husband works in San Diego at over 4.50. As the list of people I know that are unemployed rises I start to worry for them more and more since it doesn't seem like there is any hiring going on right now.
I have been reading this board more and more to find coupons and codes for things that I need.

C.Ann
05-31-2008, 11:36 PM
I had to come back to my DD's today for a medical emergency.. I had just above a quarter of a tank and put in $30 worth of gas - at $4.14 a gallon.. Because I do so little drivng, that isn't really a "worry" for me.. However, I do get annoyed that 65 cents of it is taxes alone and like clock work, if they know the weather is going to be good - or there is a holiday weekend coming up - they immediately jack the price up higher.. It is no coincidence - it's been a pattern for years now, but this year the prices are jumping at an average of 45 cents a month here - meaning that they raising the prices much more frequently..

So - what do I worry about? The rising cost of food (pretty much double from last year) and the rising cost of everything else that has to be transported in some way, shape, or form.. I can do without a lot of things, but there are other people out there who can not do without the basic necessities of life - and those are the choices that they are having to make now.. Many people live where there is no form of public transportation and no ability to car pool.. So - in order to be able to afford to drive to work, they are sacrificing in crucial areas: food; housing; utilities; healthcare; medications; etc.. And what pray tell are these same people going to do when winter arrives and the heating bills are even more dramatic than they were last year?

Around the lake, the boating activity is already next to nothing.. This in turn will put many business around the lake out of business - which of course will mean more people having to file for unemployment and/or resort to food stamps, welfare, Medicaid, etc..

Then there are the elderly people - whose incomes will never rise to any level that will be of any benefit to them.. Each year SS issues a "cost of living" increase - which is immediately wiped out by the raises in the Medicare costs that are deducted from their monthly checks.. Even if they have saved and planned well for their retirement - in addition to their SS benefits - with the cost of everything rising so dramatically - due to the impact that rising fuel costs has on everything across the board - eventually that money will dwindle away to nothing.. (And heaven forbid, they have to deal with an extended catastrophic illness, they'll be wiped out in no time..)

The housing market is atrocious.. People can't simply sell their homes and move elsewhere to make it easier to get to work and wherever else they need to go because houses just aren't selling (at least in my area) for a price that would even cover paying off their existing mortages.. I have a close friend who has been one of the areas top leading realtors for many, many years.. Historically, buy this time of the year he has sold at least 50 homes.. To date, he has sold six..

The rising cost of fuel - both for vehicles and heating - is having a dramatic impact on every aspect of peoples lives - whether they care to recognize it or not..

At this point I am not cncerned about myself - I'm in a stable situation and keep myself that way by not spending money in a frivilous manner because I don't know what is going to happen 2 months, 6 months, or 12 months down the road.. However, I am very worried about other people and really don't know how some of them are going to manage if something doesn't change soon..

I guess only time will tell..:(

Michelle67
05-31-2008, 11:53 PM
I don't obsess about the price of gas, but I certainly don't like it! Where I live the bus isn't much of an option (only runs every two hours, doesn't run past about 7 at night, doesn't run at all on the weekend, and only comes down my road if you call the day before to request a pickup) and neither is a moped with three kids to haul around. We have to drive over 10 miles just to get to the nearest "real" grocery store. I choose to live out here, though, and don't regret my choice at all. I'd rather pay for expensive gas to get to the grocery store than pay the much higher "price" of having my kids back in the city schools. :confused3 I still almost choked when I filled my tank yesterday at $4.19 for 87 octane, but I don't bother to complain. It does no good. I'm just getting really good at combining trips and making lists so I don't have to make repeat trips to the grocery store!

It is a much bigger deal for my parents, though, who are trying to make ends meet with their social security some supplemental income, and are having a very hard time! Because yes, it affects not only driving around, but eating, heating, etc.