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civileng68
02-01-2008, 12:25 PM
Okay, I'm naive, but I have a reason to be, I'm from Florida.

Im coming to DL this month and have one concern. What about earthquakes, are the buildings safe? I have this fear of being on a top floor of a building and it crumbling. Laugh, I know. I'm just saying, I'm not familiar with this and don't know anything of it and it honestly makes me a little fearful.

Can anyone tell me anything about this?

mindylovesmickey
02-01-2008, 12:32 PM
I'm more worried about a hurricane. ;) No, really, all hotels in earthquake areas have emergency evacuation plans, and all are inspected regularly to make sure they are up to code. I know most of the hotels down there, if they are older have been through at least one and they are still standing, so that should say something. Look at your emergency plans, know what to do if one happens, and then enjoy your trip and sleep easy!

PrincessKell
02-01-2008, 12:55 PM
Earthquakes...never know when they will hit. BUT most of the time if they do they are not too big you dont even feel them. Just few and FAR between are the big ones.

With that said. you can always ask when the last time it was checked. I am sure that has to be some where you could find out about the codes and when they passed or failed along with any updates they have done to make the buildings safer.

but like other poster said, check the emergency plan.

You will be ok, and have a great trip!

DoomBugger
02-01-2008, 01:00 PM
CA has the strictest building codes in the world. I wouldn't trip, the odds of you experiencing an earthquake is remote.

Earthquakes do happen everyday on Big Thunder Mountain Railroad!!

AmericanItGirl
02-01-2008, 01:47 PM
The only times I've seen a building crumble due to an earthquake were in movies and old film footage of the 1906 earthquake. If you are sensitive because you've never experienced an earthquake before and an earthquake does happen, you'll most likely be the only one around to make note of it because the CMs and locals are used to tiny ones that they make no difference. If one happens at night when you're sleeping, you'll probably sleep right through. It is a legitimate fear for anyone who has never experienced an earthquake before (I was afraid of being struck by lightening when I went to Florida), but there are always websites that keep track of earthquakes that you can look at before you come.

Quest4fun
02-01-2008, 01:56 PM
I've been in high rise buildings down there and while they sway something fierce you don't need to worry about them falling over. The building code in Southern California is incredibly strict and the structures are made to withstand large earthquakes. If you've never been in an earthquake you will likely not even notice it.

You have no need to worry.

actionvaughn
02-01-2008, 02:01 PM
Well, "the Big One" is supposed to hit anyday now, and is already overdue. Since the Northridge earthquake though, building codes have really been brought up, so you shouldn't have too much to worry about.

JenDisneylandlver
02-01-2008, 02:10 PM
I'm with the PP on being more afraid of hurricanes!! I grew up in CA, most of the earthquakes I've lived through were quite small. I was 12 when the Bay Area was hit with the Loma Prieta earthquake. That was a big one. But the only one I experienced that big.

So they are a risk obviously when going to CA. But they do have the building codes for it, and the odds of it happening just when your visiting? I'd be more worried if I lived there still. But I don't worry when we visit.

DH got a job offer not that long ago in Florida, I flat out told him NO way! Hurricanes scare me to death! LOL

Random Villains
02-01-2008, 02:13 PM
I live in Phoenix, but Ive been to Disneyland MANY times, not once has there even been a tremor, let alone an earthquake.

Plus its the MAGIC kingdom, theres no way Disneyland would be harmed by an earthquake.

AmericanItGirl
02-01-2008, 02:16 PM
Well, "the Big One" is supposed to hit anyday now, and is already overdue. Since the Northridge earthquake though, building codes have really been brought up, so you shouldn't have too much to worry about.

The next big one is supposed to hit within the next 20-30 years, so I wouldn't worry. Also, since DL has survived numerous earthquakes and the rides are constantly refurbished, I wouldn't be worried about having a huge earthquake hit while on a ride and having a piece of the ride come crashing down on you.

Casey's Mommie
02-01-2008, 02:17 PM
I've lived in CA (specifically the Bay Area) all of my life and I've only felt 2 earthquakes.

Sure, an earthquake could happen anytime but the ones that are big enough to actually feel are very rare.

I wish more people were scared of Earthquakes in CA. Then maybe Disneyland would be less crowded!!!

AmericanItGirl
02-01-2008, 02:27 PM
I've lived in CA (specifically the Bay Area) all of my life and I've only felt 2 earthquakes.

Sure, an earthquake could happen anytime but the ones that are big enough to actually feel are very rare.

I wish more people were scared of Earthquakes in CA. Then maybe Disneyland would be less crowded!!!

:lmao:

I guess the fact that California is the natural disaster capital of at least the US isn't as widely promoted as maybe it should be. :rolleyes:

alligator
02-01-2008, 03:03 PM
im just echoing stuff everyones already said but- building code in california is very strict, and there are sections of the code specifically dealing with earthquake regulations for safety. on the off chance that you do experience an earthquake while you are here, yll be safe!

Aurora1959
02-01-2008, 04:01 PM
I've lived in CA (specifically the Bay Area) all of my life and I've only felt 2 earthquakes.

Sure, an earthquake could happen anytime but the ones that are big enough to actually feel are very rare.

I wish more people were scared of Earthquakes in CA. Then maybe Disneyland would be less crowded!!!

:lmao:

I guess the fact that California is the natural disaster capital of at least the US isn't as widely promoted as maybe it should be. :rolleyes:


:rotfl2:
You both had me laughing really hard. I too live in CA, and think our new motto should be "An earthquake any minute, maybe you don't want to move here after all".

I like to point out to my family in Washington, that the little quake they had near Olympia a few years back was nothing compared to what we get around me. And they had damage because the mindset there is 'it's not CA we're immune'. I had an Aunt who would not visit us in CA because she was petrified that a quake would occur while she visited. And that quake was only a few miles from her house. Carma.

Alex2kMommy
02-01-2008, 04:34 PM
I like to point out to my family in Washington, that the little quake they had near Olympia a few years back was nothing compared to what we get around me. And they had damage because the mindset there is 'it's not CA we're immune'. I had an Aunt who would not visit us in CA because she was petrified that a quake would occur while she visited. And that quake was only a few miles from her house. Carma.
I presume by 'they' you mean your family, not the state of Washington or its residents. We do have building and road construction codes (as well as remediation codes) designed to build/refurbish to withstand strong quakes, as well as emergency preparedness plans and so forth. Seismic monitoring and activity is on the news all the time, I can't imagine anyone living here thinking we are immune to earthquakes. :confused3

We lived in the Bay Area when I was a kid, and I slept through all the earthquakes. Really, it was no big deal, small ones happen all the time and you don't even feel them, they're centered in the ocean or deep underground.

I've been through a couple of bigger ones here in the Seattle area since then (two in a swaying highrise :scared1: ) and all was well. It is mostly older buildings that get a lot of damage, so I think you'll be in good hands at DL on the off chance that one hits during your stay.

daffidyll
02-01-2008, 04:49 PM
I lived in the valley when we had the big Northridge quake......from what I experienced and saw I'd much rather be on the top floor and crumble rather than be on the bottom and get crumbled. Like the others have said, it's not likely you will experience anything like that one while you are there but if you do, not sure if it's now common knowledge or not, but the doorway is NOT the safest place to be (learned that the hard way)....tip the couch over or a mattress on top of you and hide under that (mind you, you only need to do that for a BIG quake, not a little one). If it makes you feel any safer or more prepared for the 'just in case of a big one', keep a pair of sturdy shoes and a flashlight by your bed, and learn all of the exit routes (not just the one closest to you because it may not be accessable). And try not to worry too much about them, you'll be having so much fun at DL you most likely wouldn't even notice any of the little ones.

Mrs. Bee
02-01-2008, 06:11 PM
I lived 10 minutes from Disneyland for a year and a half and never felt an earthquake. However when I was out visiting on a trip once, we were at Disneyland and my brother-in-law called and asked if we felt the small earthquake that had just happened. We didn't. And one other time there was apparently an earthquake nearby while I was sleeping. Didn't feel that one either.

prettyprincessbelle
02-01-2008, 06:26 PM
I lived in the valley when we had the big Northridge quake......from what I experienced and saw I'd much rather be on the top floor and crumble rather than be on the bottom and get crumbled.

I totally agree.

I was about 7 when that happened.. But I remember that like yesterday.. I was terrified! :scared1:

But to the OP, I wouldn't worry.. Just enjoy your trip!! :wizard:

bumbershoot
02-01-2008, 06:27 PM
I like to point out to my family in Washington, that the little quake they had near Olympia a few years back was nothing compared to what we get around me. And they had damage because the mindset there is 'it's not CA we're immune'. I had an Aunt who would not visit us in CA because she was petrified that a quake would occur while she visited. And that quake was only a few miles from her house. Carma.

Odd.

I presume by 'they' you mean your family, not the state of Washington or its residents. We do have building and road construction codes (as well as remediation codes) designed to build/refurbish to withstand strong quakes, as well as emergency preparedness plans and so forth. Seismic monitoring and activity is on the news all the time, I can't imagine anyone living here thinking we are immune to earthquakes. :confused3

I agree.

I grew up in San Jose, where I only remember feeling an earthquake once or twice; the once was as a freshman in high school, and it was during math class, and it was very dramatic.

But other than that, we really only knew there was an earthquake b/c we would wake up and the pictures on the walls would be tilted. :goodvibes

I've lived in WA since I was 17, with some time off for the South, and we are VERY aware of earthquakes, VERY aware of earthquake safety, and I don't know anyone who thinks that "we're not CA so we're immune". Especially with the big huge volcano sitting over there, that could be impacted horribly by a big enough quake. :scared1:


OK! OP. If there's a bigger earthquake while you are there, you WANT the building to sway. Swaying is good. Not swaying + earthquake = crumbling. Just like on a cruise ship in rough weather, you want there to be some "give" in the joints of the structure. (if only hubby had woken up when we left the Inside Passage and the ship started flexing and groaning to give me that explanation, instead of me hearing it when he told the couple from BC that in the morning...I had to calm myself down and Mr. I Spent Time on Oil Tankers, This Is Nothing snored away...lol)

prettyprincessbelle
02-01-2008, 06:33 PM
Just like on a cruise ship in rough weather, you want there to be some "give" in the joints of the structure. (if only hubby had woken up when we left the Inside Passage and the ship started flexing and groaning to give me that explanation, instead of me hearing it when he told the couple from BC that in the morning...I had to calm myself down and Mr. I Spent Time on Oil Tankers, This Is Nothing snored away...lol)

OMG, that is exactly my Dad. We took a cruise to Europe a couple summers ago, and the boat was just rocking sooo much and I was totally getting sea sick, but no, my Dad who is Mr. Fisherman and this is a piece of cake, was wondering why my Mom and I were turning green.. :sick:

fairycat
02-01-2008, 07:58 PM
I was born and raised in Southern California and have survived earthquakes big and small. You will be fine as others have said with building codes and things they way they are you don't have to worry.

Saying that I understand as a child we went to Hawaii and though it was my first plane trip, I was more scared of Lava and Volcanos. I had nightmares for weeks over this. I have been back to Hawaii twice since and hope to go again this year and laugh about it now.

But would never live in Tornado Alley (EEEKKKK), and I don't want to deal with Hurricanes. But the scariest things in all of Florida is the bugs and humidity. No one can warn you enough!!!

I think everywhere has a disaster. Just read the emergency plans at your hotel and then worry about finding the characters and getting through the lines! :)

CupidsKiss
02-01-2008, 08:08 PM
:scared: I grew up here in BC under the threat of earthquakes with earthquake drills "drilled" into our heads. For the most part though we either sleep through the real thing or spend that 30 seconds to minute questioning each other "did you feel that?":confused3

Hundred mile an hours winds (+) and rising tides scares the bejeebers out of this coastal gal.

That being said I will eat crow if the big one hits and all my uphill neighbors homes slide onto mine.

EltonJohn
02-01-2008, 09:12 PM
Good first step in asking these questions. Learning about something will lessen your fear of it. Here is a California FAQ (http://www.consrv.ca.gov/index/Earthquakes/Pages/qh_earthquakes.aspx) about earthquakes, and there are also links about earthquakes at the bottom of the page. I'm sure that CA has building codes, etc. and that they are ready (see the Office of Emergency Services (http://www.oes.ca.gov/Operational/OESHome.nsf/1?OpenForm)) if and when a major quake hits. California has learned a lot since the San Francisco quake back in 1906. I'm sure your trip (and mine in March) will go off without a hitch.

Of course I live on a large supervolcano and like California we have several minor earthquakes every day so I'm not at all worried about a CA quake :rotfl: ;) I will be in Disneyland come hell or high water!

Leofoenget
02-01-2008, 09:13 PM
Well, "the Big One" is supposed to hit anyday now, and is already overdue. Since the Northridge earthquake though, building codes have really been brought up, so you shouldn't have too much to worry about.


HEAD FOR THE HILLS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :scared1: :scared1: :scared1: :scared1:

fairycat
02-01-2008, 10:27 PM
I will be in Disneyland come hell or high water!

Actually this phrase seems more appropriate for Hurricane Season in Florida! :rotfl:

For DL wouldn't it be come Fires or Wiggley earth!

Aurora1959
02-01-2008, 11:26 PM
I presume by 'they' you mean your family, not the state of Washington or its residents. We do have building and road construction codes (as well as remediation codes) designed to build/refurbish to withstand strong quakes, as well as emergency preparedness plans and so forth. Seismic monitoring and activity is on the news all the time, I can't imagine anyone living here thinking we are immune to earthquakes. :confused3

We lived in the Bay Area when I was a kid, and I slept through all the earthquakes. Really, it was no big deal, small ones happen all the time and you don't even feel them, they're centered in the ocean or deep underground.

I've been through a couple of bigger ones here in the Seattle area since then (two in a swaying highrise :scared1: ) and all was well. It is mostly older buildings that get a lot of damage, so I think you'll be in good hands at DL on the off chance that one hits during your stay.

Yes sorry - i did mean that, sorry if you thought I meant it to be all of WA. however, I have ran into it several times by folks. Mostly ones who don't live near any real towns and also have the impression that what happens anywhere else doesn't affect them. But those folks are certainly not limited to one state.

civileng68
02-02-2008, 01:10 AM
Thanks everyone!

You've made me feel better. I know it sounds silly but, I just wouldn't want to be so far from home, by myself, away from my wife and son, and my mind was telling me that I'd be stranded in the middle of a natural disaster, never able to leave. :) My mind is a pretty powerful thing, both good and bad :dance3: .

Anyways, thanks again! I really look forward to going out there this month!!!

Regarding hurricanes, I guess it's all what you're used to. Now, I won't lie, I hate them. I used to stay through them, until Hurricane Charlie a few years back. After that, I said "never again" and now we evacuate at the risk of one. Fortunately, just like you guys with earthquakes, you learn to live with them and how to live with them. We've learned that 'Canes die in their "killer" level strength about 20 miles inland, so, where do you think we go? We go to Orlando to Disney during hurricanes and as proof, I dont think Orlando has EVER had a category 4 or higher hurricane and has only ever had 2 category 3's in history.

With that said, the building codes here are unreal now and nearly every new building in a coastal area of Florida is build of concrete block (including my home) built to withstand a category 3. My problem is, we lose power for 2 weeks and have no A/C during 95 degree days with 100% humidity. MISERABLE!

Anyways, Thanks!

jlima
02-02-2008, 04:09 AM
Okay, I'm naive, but I have a reason to be, I'm from Florida.

Im coming to DL this month and have one concern. What about earthquakes, are the buildings safe? I have this fear of being on a top floor of a building and it crumbling. Laugh, I know. I'm just saying, I'm not familiar with this and don't know anything of it and it honestly makes me a little fearful.

Can anyone tell me anything about this?If there is an earthquake, the building you may be in will shake like crazy. The walls will shake, the furniture will shake, you will shake. Get in a doorway or under a table if you're in a restaurant. You will be absolutely scared to pieces but the shaking will stop and it will be over when it's over. If you are anywhere near a parking lot be prepared for a lot of noise because every car alarm will go off. If you are in a store or shop, especially a grocery store, be prepared for stuff to fall off shelves and walls; or be prepared for unsecured furniture, light fixtures, etc. to fall. Be aware that even though a building may not appear damaged, gas, phone, cable and power may be interrupted by situations that are miles from where you are. You will have trouble getting phone lines because EVERYBODY will pick up a phone to get in touch with loved ones as soon as the shaking stops . . . but every earthquake guide says not to do this so the lines are available for emergency personnel. Remember to stay calm, even if people around you panic. My first earthquake was the Whittier earthquake in '87. I was still in college and lived in a sorority house that was originally constructed in 1906! I was asleep and woke up with everything shaking around me. It was terrifying.

bumbershoot
02-02-2008, 04:18 AM
Regarding hurricanes, I guess it's all what you're used to. Now, I won't lie, I hate them. I used to stay through them, until Hurricane Charlie a few years back. After that, I said "never again" and now we evacuate at the risk of one. Fortunately, just like you guys with earthquakes, you learn to live with them and how to live with them. We've learned that 'Canes die in their "killer" level strength about 20 miles inland, so, where do you think we go? We go to Orlando to Disney during hurricanes and as proof, I dont think Orlando has EVER had a category 4 or higher hurricane and has only ever had 2 category 3's in history.

With that said, the building codes here are unreal now and nearly every new building in a coastal area of Florida is build of concrete block (including my home) built to withstand a category 3. My problem is, we lose power for 2 weeks and have no A/C during 95 degree days with 100% humidity. MISERABLE!

Anyways, Thanks!


Yep, it's all about what you're used to.

FL codes are making my aunt nutty. She lives in a double-wide near Daytona Beach. It's all bought and paid for, so that's good. She's lived there since '79, so the thing has survived all this time. But it's not built to today's code, so she can't get insurance on it, so she can't sell it, so she can't get OUT of there, which she wants to do, because she was born and raised in Upstate NY then fell madly in love with Arizona and only moved to FL to take care of her mother, and now she's stuck b/c she can't sell the thing. Which, again, while not to current code, has withstood all the weather that has been thrown at it for all these years.

And even if she were willing to take that total loss and just leave, her daughter loves living in that area and my aunt isn't going to just leave her daughter and two grandchildren, and the only option my cousin will consider is up in eastern PA where her husband is from, which isn't a thought to make my aunt happy, either!

My poor auntie.

Katink
02-02-2008, 01:03 PM
Us SoCal natives tell people that we really DO have 4 seasons - earthquake, fire, flood and mudslides. :rotfl: Having said that, the chances of any of those happening on your trip are incredibly remote so enjoy yourself. As other posters have mentioned, most earthquakes are over before your brain registers them. I, too, am more afraid of hurricanes and tornados - yikes!

Katink